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Ireland_ Galway Fall 2010

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					Ireland, Galway
FALL 2010 PROGRAM HANDBOOK

The Galway, Ireland program is offered by International Academic Programs (IAP) at the
University of Wisconsin-Madison in conjunction with the National University of Ireland (NUI),
Galway. This IAP Program Handbook supplements handbooks or materials you receive from
NUI Galway as well as the IAP Study Abroad Handbook and provides you with the most up-to-
date information and advice available at the time of printing. Changes may occur before your
departure or while you are abroad.

Questions about your program abroad (housing options, facilities abroad, etc.) as well as
questions relating to your relationship with your host university or academics (e.g. course credit
and equivalents, registration deadlines, etc.) should be directed to IAP at UW-Madison.

This program handbook contains the following information:

CONTACT INFORMATION ...................................................................................................... 3
 On-site Program Information ...................................................................................................... 3
 UW-Madison Information ........................................................................................................... 3
 Emergency Contact Information ................................................................................................. 3
PREPARATION BEFORE LEAVING ....................................................................................... 4
  Immigration Documents .............................................................................................................. 4
  Handling Money Abroad ............................................................................................................. 5
  Packing ........................................................................................................................................ 6
  Electronics ................................................................................................................................... 6
TRAVEL AND ARRIVAL ........................................................................................................... 6
THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM ................................................................................................... 7
 National University of Ireland, Galway ...................................................................................... 7
 International Affairs Office ......................................................................................................... 7
 Orientation ................................................................................................................................... 8
 Course Information...................................................................................................................... 8
 Credits ......................................................................................................................................... 9
 Pass/Fail/Drop/Audit ................................................................................................................. 10
 Grades and Grade Conversions ................................................................................................. 10
LIVING ABROAD ...................................................................................................................... 11
  Ireland........................................................................................................................................ 11
  Galway....................................................................................................................................... 11
  Housing ..................................................................................................................................... 12
     Student Residences ................................................................................................................ 12
     Private Sector Houses and Apartments ................................................................................. 17
     Temporary Accommodation .................................................................................................. 18
  Student Life ............................................................................................................................... 18
  Transportation ........................................................................................................................... 19
  Safety ......................................................................................................................................... 19
  Health ........................................................................................................................................ 20
  Communication ......................................................................................................................... 20

February 2010                                                 1
STUDENT TESTIMONIALS .................................................................................................... 22
  Galway....................................................................................................................................... 22
  Banking and Finances ............................................................................................................... 22
  Packing ...................................................................................................................................... 22
  The Academic Program ............................................................................................................. 22
  Housing ..................................................................................................................................... 23
  Student Life ............................................................................................................................... 23
  Safety ......................................................................................................................................... 24
  Travel......................................................................................................................................... 24




February 2010                                                 2
Contact Information
ON-SITE PROGRAM INFORMATION
Your primary contacts will be:

Louise Kelly                                          International Office
International Student Officer                         National University of Ireland, Galway
+353 (0)91 493581                                     7 Distillery Road
louise.kelly@nuigalway.ie                             Galway
                                                      Ireland
Maria Brady                                           +353 (0)91 495277
International Admissions                              +353 (0)91 495551 fax
+353 (0)91 492105                                     international@nuigalway.ie
maria.brady@nuigalway.ie                              www.nuigalway.ie/international/


UW-MADISON INFORMATION
International Academic Programs
University of Wisconsin-Madison
250 Bascom Hall, 500 Lincoln Drive
Madison, WI 53706
(608) 265 6329
(608) 262 6998 fax
www.studyabroad.wisc.edu

Erin Polnaszek
IAP Study Abroad Advisor
(608) 262 1446
eepolnaszek@bascom.wisc.edu

EMERGENCY CONTACT INFORMATION
In case of an emergency, call the main IAP number (608) 265 6329 between 8:00 a.m. and 4:30
p.m. Monday to Friday; after-hours or on weekends call the IAP staff on call at (608) 516 9440.


EMBASSY REGISTRATION
All program participants who are U.S. citizens must register at the U.S. Embassy before departure
as this will help in case of a lost passport or other mishap. You can register on-line at
https://travelregistration.state.gov. If you are not a U.S. citizen, register at your home country’s
embassy or consulate.




February 2010                            3
United States Embassy
42 Elgin Road
Ballsbridge
Dublin 4
Ireland
+353 1 668 8777
+353 1 668 9946 fax
http://dublin.usembassy.gov



Program Dates
First Semester (Fall 2010)
Orientation                                            September 1, 2010
Teaching begins                                        September
Teaching ends                                          November
Examinations begin                                     December
Examinations end                                       December

The fall dates will be updated soon. For reference, you can refer to the 2009 calendar dates found
here: http://www.nuigalway.ie/academic_dates/academic_term_dates.html



Preparation Before Leaving
IMMIGRATION DOCUMENTS
Passport: A passport is needed to travel to Ireland and to register with Irish immigration
authorities. Apply immediately for a passport if you do not already have one. Passport
information and application forms can be found on the U.S. State Department website
http://travel.state.gov/passport/. If you already have your passport, make sure it will be valid for
at least 6 months beyond the length of your stay abroad.

Visa: U.S. citizens do not need a visa to enter Ireland. Non-U.S. citizens should consult with the
Irish consulate for visa requirements.

Registration: Visiting students residing in Ireland for a period longer than 3 months must register
with the Immigration Office within one month of arrival. The International Office will arrange an
appointment for UW-Madison students to register with the immigration authorities at the
beginning of the semester. The International Office will also advise on the residence permit
application process at the NUI Galway orientation. Students will need the following items in
order to receive a registration certificate:

    1. Valid passport
    2. Student Identity Card
    3. Evidence of financial support




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                   Letter from Parent/Guardian or Self stating that you are in good financial
                    standing and how you/parents/guardian are planning to pay for your out of pocket
                    costs (i.e.: housing/meals/book).
                   Award letter if you receive financial aid and/or scholarships
                   Original bank statement
                   IAP will also provide a letter to you explaining that you are on an official study
                    abroad program, dates of the program, and which fees you have already paid for
                    the program.
    4. €150 immigration registration fee (payable by credit card)

For additional information on immigration requirements, visit
www.nuigalway.ie/international/beforearrive/immigration_requirements.html.


HANDLING MONEY ABROAD
The official currency of Ireland is the Euro (EUR), with 1 Euro equaling 100 cents. As of
2/22/10, the exchange rate was $1 USD to 0.74 Euro. You should bring some money with you in
cash to cover expenses such as train, bus, and taxi fares, overnight accommodation and meals. It
is advisable to have about €250 in cash and about €250 in traveler’s checks which are readily
cashable.

Banks: Many students open a bank account shortly after arrival. Banks near campus are:

Bank of Ireland
National University of Ireland, Galway
Code No. 904018 Intl.
+353 (0)91 524555
+353 (0)91 527671 fax

Allied Irish Bank
Distillery Road
Newcastle, Galway
Code No. 937436
+353 (0)91 524466
+353 (0)91 524095 fax

Ulster Bank
Newcastle Road, Galway
Code No. 985753
+353 (0)91 529013
+353 (0)91 529015 fax

To open a bank account you need to have a:
     Valid passport
     NUI Galway student identity card
     Letter from NUI Galway confirming your home address and Galway address. This letter
       can be acquired from the International Office once you have registered as an NUI Galway
       student.



February 2010                               5
If you wish to open an account in one of these banks prior to arrival, your own bank may be able
to facilitate this. It can take up to two weeks for the international transfer of money through the
banking system. You should therefore allow for delays of this duration when deciding how much
currency to bring with you in order to meet your initial expenses in the first few weeks after
arrival.

Most banks in Galway provide Bureau de Change and Traveler’s Check facilities. There are also
bureaux de Change at Dublin Airport and Shannon Airport. Banks are open from 10:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m., Monday to Friday, and until 5:00 p.m. on Thursday.

ATM/Debit cards: You can also access your checking account using an ATM card; generally
you will find that cards of the CIRRUS and PLUS system are the most widely accepted. When
you use your ATM card, you immediately receive your funds in local currency; the exchange rate
you get is in general better than what you would get when exchanging travelers’ checks. Check
with your bank or credit union before departure to ensure that you can use your ATM card
overseas and to verify the fee you will be charged for such transactions.

Credit cards: Visa, American Express, and Master Card are accepted at many locations and
cardholders are able to draw cash on their card accounts per their card company's policies.

PACKING
Packing light is a good idea as most items you will need will be available for purchase in Ireland.
Some packing suggestions:

     warm coat                                            good walking shoes or boots
     waterproof shoes                                     sheets and a blanket or duvet cover
     long pants, jeans                                    towels
     raincoat and umbrella                                books
     long sleeve shirts                                   bike lock
     sweaters                                             pictures from home for room
     skirts                                               small gifts


ELECTRONICS
Ireland runs on 220V (volts), 50Hz (cycles) AC and uses the British Standard 1363 three-pin
plug. If you plan on bringing any appliances from the United States, keep in mind that they will
require adapters/converters which you should purchase before departure. It may be more
convenient and less expensive to purchase appliances in Ireland rather than purchasing the
necessary converter/adapters in the United States.



Travel and Arrival
You are responsible for making your own flight arrangements to Galway. The major airports in
Ireland are at Shannon (SNN) www.shannonairport.com (on the west coast, approximately 55
miles from Galway) and Dublin (DUB) www.dublinairport.com (on the east coast, approximately
135 miles from Galway). Galway (GWY) has a smaller airport www.galwayairport.com
(approximately 5 miles from the city). There are no trans-Atlantic flights to Galway.

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Arrival in Shannon: There is a regular bus service from Shannon Airport to Galway. The
journey takes approximately one and one half hours and costs approximately 15 Euro. Bus
timetables can be found at www.buseireann.ie. Upon your arrival at Galway (Galway Station)
there are taxis which can take you to your final destination.

Arrival in Dublin: Direct bus service is available from Dublin airport to Galway and takes
approximately four hours (see www.citylink.ie or www.buseireann.ie for timetables and
purchasing tickets). There is also regular bus service from the Dublin Central bus station
(Busáras) to Galway. Buses leave Dublin Airport approximately every 20 minutes for Busáras.
Many of these buses continue to Heuston Railway Station, from which trains for Galway depart.
You may also travel via taxi from the airport to the centre of the city but the bus is much cheaper
and just as quick. There is a frequent train service from Dublin (Heuston Station) to Galway. The
journey takes approximately three hours.



The Academic Program
NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF IRELAND, GALWAY
The university was founded in 1845 as Queen’s College, Galway. It was one of three Queen’s
Colleges founded under the Queen’s College (Ireland) Act, 1845, the others in Belfast and Cork.
The College opened for students in 1849. In 1997, it was reconstituted as a university, under the
name of Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh/National University of Ireland, Galway.

Since the 1960s, the university has experienced significant and continuous growth, both in its
buildings, facilities and physical resources and also in the number of students and staff. Its
student body now numbers 13,000 (more than 11,000 fulltime), with academically strong
programs of teaching and research throughout its seven faculties:

               Arts
               Celtic Studies
               Commerce
               Engineering
               Law
               Medicine and Health Studies
               Science

The campus is located on the banks of the River Corrib, close to the center of Galway. The
original mid-nineteenth century university buildings are a Tudor architectural style. The old
stone quadrangle, at the heart of the university, is flanked by new buildings, reflecting the steady
growth, in quality and numbers, of the university.

National University of Ireland (NUI), Galway www.nuigalway.ie


INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS OFFICE
The NUI Galway International Affairs Office coordinates academic, administrative, and student
service arrangements for all visiting students. These arrangements include admissions, course


February 2010                             7
registration, academic advising, transcripts, accommodations, orientation, health counseling, and
information on extracurricular activities.

NUI Galway International Office www.nuigalway.ie/international/


ORIENTATION
In September and January of each year, orientation programs are organized by the International
Student Officer to provide practical information for new students on living in Galway and to
introduce the students to academic and administrative staff of the university and to student
services personnel. The sessions include information on procedures which must be completed by
incoming visiting students, services and facilities of the university as well as other general
information. Registration procedures will also be explained and representatives from the various
faculties will be present to offer advice.

The program is designed to help students settle into university life and the new environment as
quickly and easily as possible. Included in the program is a guided tour of campus and Galway
city. A reception at the conclusion of the program, hosted by the president of the university, gives
new students the opportunity to meet university staff and fellow students in an informal
atmosphere. UW-Madison students are required to participate in the orientation program.

NUI Galway Information Handbook for Visiting North American Students
www.nuigalway.ie/ushandbook/


COURSE INFORMATION
Courses: The majority of NUI’s B.A. programs are only three years in duration due to a more
rigorous high school education system than that of the United States. Most of the Faculties
number their courses according to this system. Course levels are clarified as:

        100 = First Year Program, introductory level course
        200 = Second-Year Program, intermediate/lower level advanced course
        300 = Third-Year Program, upper level advanced course

You will be classified at the university as a “Visiting Student.” Admission as a Visiting Student is
granted in faculty (department) and subject areas. Within these areas, and in accordance with
their own preferences, students may select courses subject only to class and examination
timetable limitations.

A wide range of courses are available but some restrictions do apply to course choice as follows:

       First year courses in all Faculties and a small number of other courses are offered on a
        year-long basis. They must be taken over the entire academic year and must be taken in
        their entirety. Arising from this, a student who will be attending for one semester only
        cannot select, either in the first or the second semester, a course which is offered on a
        year-long basis.
       In all Faculties prerequisites must be met.
       Not all Psychology courses are available to Visiting Students.
       In the subject Sociological and Political Studies admission to final year seminar courses
        will be limited.

February 2010                            8
       In the subject English students may only select one seminar course per semester and
        admission to seminar courses is limited.
       In the subject History there are restrictions on the selection of seminar courses.
       In Second Year Science, a quota system applies to all subjects. Therefore, class sizes are
        limited and places in subjects may not be available to visiting students. Permission for
        entry into any subject in Second Year Science must first be obtained from the Head of
        Department of the relevant subject. Applicants should therefore indicate clearly on their
        application forms any Science Courses they may wish to take.

When selecting courses students should have regard to their academic and vocational objectives,
and in order to make the selection that will best suit their requirements, they may need to with
Faculty and Departmental staff. They will be referred to the appropriate Faculty Officers for
assistance in these consultations.

The final list of course offerings is not normally available until the July prior to the academic
year. In practice, there is little change in the courses offered from one year to the next. Courses
available for visiting students are available online at
www.nuigalway.ie/arts/overseas_students.html.

Registration: Although visiting students will list a tentative course schedule on their applications
to NUI Galway, course registration is not finalized until after the semester begins. Like Irish
students, visiting students to NUI Galway “shop around” for courses the first two weeks of the
semester. The International Office recommends that students attend 7 to 8 classes in order to
identify their course schedule for the semester.

Approximately two weeks into the semester, students will have a day reserved for them to submit
course registrations to faculties. Registration procedures will vary according to individual
faculties. Registration for popular classes in the Arts, specifically English, Political Science, and
Sociology, may require an early arrival when registering in-person. Students must supply one
passport-type photograph at registration, with their name and registration number on the back.

Visiting students are assumed to have serious academic objectives in coming to the university and
are expected to satisfy all prescribed attendance and course exercises. Once the deadline for
dropping or adding courses has passed, no further course changes are possible.

Students are encouraged throughout the semester to check their registration statement and to
notify Maria Brady in the admissions office if there are any errors. All courses posted on the NUI
transcript must be posted on the UW transcript even if it is a registration error.

Equivalents and Course Equivalent Request Form (CERF): Each course you take abroad
must be assigned a UW-Madison “equivalent” course in order for your grades and credits to be
recorded on your UW-Madison transcript. In order to establish UW-Madison course equivalents
for your study abroad courses, you will submit a Course Equivalent Request Form (CERF).
Detailed information on the UW course equivalent process is available in the IAP Study Abroad
Handbook.

CREDITS
Conversions: NUI Galway uses the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) credit system. The
detailed credit conversion scale is as follows:


February 2010                             9
                         NUI Galway ECTS Credits          UW-Madison
                       2.5                               2
                       3                                 2
                       4                                 2
                       5 or 5,5                          3
                       6 or 6,5                          3
                       7 or 7,5                          4
                       8                                 4
                       9                                 5
                       10                                5
                       12                                6
                       12,5                              7
                       15                                8

Limits and Load: A full-time credit load is 30 ECTS credits per semester. UW-Madison students
must enroll in at least 25 ECTS credits a semester and are recommended to take 30 ECTS credits
each semester.


PASS/FAIL/DROP/AUDIT
Please refer to the IAP Study Abroad Handbook for academic policies.


GRADES AND GRADE CONVERSIONS
Visiting Students undergo the same assessment as full degree students. Assessment is usually by
end-of-semester examination or essay(s). In addition, departmental assessments may take place
during the semester. However, the final end-of-semester assessment is that on which the final
grade, or greater part thereof, for the course is based.

NUI Galway Grading Scale:

                    First Class Honours                   70% and above
                    Second-Class Honours, Grade 1         60-69%
                    Second-Class Honours, Grade 2         50-59%
                    Third-Class Honours                   45-49%
                    Pass                                  40-44%

UW-Madison Conversion:

                             NUI Galway          UW-Madison
                             66%+                A
                             63-65%              AB
                             61-62%              AB
                             58-60%              B
                             55-57%              BC
                             52-54 %             BC
                             48-51%              C
                             45-47%              C
                             40-44 %             D

February 2010                           10
                              0-39 %               F



Living Abroad
IRELAND
Ireland is an island of five million people located in the Northwest of Europe and is a member of
the European Union. Long renowned for its culture, it has a strong tradition of developmental and
educational links with other nations.

Almost 40% of the Irish population is under the age of twenty five. Ireland has an excellent
educational infrastructure and a high rate of participation in third-level education. Its highly-
skilled workforce makes Ireland an attractive location for international corporations and
industrialists. Irish graduates have distinguished themselves as leaders of economic, social and
cultural development in Ireland and throughout the world. NUI Galway is a leading institution in
the Irish tertiary education sector.

Ireland is one of six Celtic nations with its distinctive Irish (Gaelic) culture and language.
Although Irish is its first official language, English is now the most common language in daily
use. However, Irish is still the first language of Gaeltacht (Gaelic speaking) communities which
are located mainly on the west coast of Ireland.

Irish Times www.ireland.com
Irish Tourism www.ireland.travel.ie


GALWAY
Galway, with a population of 65,000, is the third largest city in the Republic of Ireland and one of
Europe's fastest growing urban centers. It is a vibrant, cosmopolitan city, with a thriving cultural
and commercial community. Settled by the Kings of Connacht and Norman traders in the Twelfth
Century, Galway grew steadily in the middle ages. In 1484, the English monarch, King Richard
III granted the city its charter.

Traces of Galway's rich medieval past can still be seen today in the city. The most impressive is
Lynch's Castle in Shop Street, now in daily use as a bank. At St. Nicholas Collegiate Church,
according to tradition, Christopher Columbus prayed before setting out on his voyage of
discovery to the 'New World'. The Spanish Arch - so named because of Galway's maritime trade
with Spain - is located close to the Claddagh - a traditional nineteenth century fishing village on
the banks of the River Corrib.

Because of its dynamic and pioneering role in theatre, arts and culture, Galway has earned the
title 'Cultural Capital of Ireland'. The world renowned Druid Theatre Company, the Macnas Street
Theatre Company and An Taibhdhearc, the National Irish Language theatre, are all located in the
city centre. The close proximity of the Connemara 'Gaeltacht', the country's largest Irish speaking
community and location of the Irish-language television service, Teilifís na Gaeilge, gives a
distinctive 'Gaelic' dimension to the cultural life of Galway.



February 2010                            11
HOUSING
You are responsible for finding your own housing in Galway. Although there is no university-
owned housing, NUI, Galway does have an Accommodation Service Office
www.nuigalway.ie/accommodation/ which provides local housing information for students.

The Accommodation Service helps students find accommodation and provides advice on
accommodation issues, e.g. letting agreements, tenant rights and obligations, and help in the event
of a dispute. Fact sheets on a wide variety of accommodation issues are available from the
service.

Agnes O'Farrell
Accommodation Officer
+353 (0)91 492760
+353 (0)91 494505 fax
agnes.ofarrell@nuigalway.ie

Teresa Kelly
Assistant to Accommodation Officer
+353 (0)91 492364
+353 (0)91 494505 fax
kellyt@nuigalway.ie

Angela Walsh
Assistant to Accommodation Officer
+353 (0)91 492364
+353 (0)91 494505 fax
angela.walsh@nuigalway.ie

The Accommodation Service recommends that visiting students book accommodations early in
advance (many residences begin accepting applications in early spring for the following academic
year). The following accommodation options are available to students:

       University approved residential accommodation complexes
       Private sector houses and apartments
       Hostels
       Lodgings

When securing housing, visiting students should be prepared to complete and submit appropriate
accommodation applications and pay full rent and deposit in advance via a wire transfer from
their home bank. Students are strongly encouraged to get all information in writing in advance
and to be clear on rental terms (e.g. start/end dates, rental payments, deposits, disclosure of
charges, etc.), as both written and verbal leases are considered legally binding in Ireland. Should
a student encounter any problems with a landlord, they may consult with the Accommodation
Service for assistance.

Student Residences
Donegan Court
Overlooking a Corrib River waterway near the city center, Donegan Court is a recently-built
complex with close proximity to the university (10 minutes) and downtown Galway. Apartment-
style units look out into a central, “European”-style courtyard, while a small number of units have

February 2010                            12
entrances that open directly out onto the street. Units are fully-furnished with complete living
and kitchen appointments and a common laundry room. According to its manager, Donegan
prefers to rent on a per-unit basis for the entire year, rather than place individual students, though
some students have been able to make arrangements for individual accommodations.

+353 (0)91 2258505
+353 (0)86 1083644 mobile
+353 (0)91 564682 fax
jfitzgerald@leob.ie
www.donegancourt.com

Corrib Village
Located just up the river on the banks of the Corrib, Corrib Village is one of the closest student
residences to campus (10 minute walk to campus along a riverside path) and is built on
university-owned land. The complex is made up of a number of detached 3-story buildings that
house a total of 761 students, most of whom are first-year students, as well as a housing office
and convenience store with staff on-site during business hours. Each building, accessible through
a security keycard, features 176 self-catering three and four bedroom units. Units commonly
include student rooms, a hallway, kitchen area, common room, and suite bathroom. Rooms are
available in single or double occupancy, with either twin or full-size beds, some of which have
attached bathrooms (en suite). Kitchen areas include a compact refrigerator, electric cooktop and
oven, and dishwasher. The common area has a sofa and chairs, as well as a small television.

Corrib Village
Newcastle Road, Galway
+353 (0)91 527112
+353 (0)91 523661 fax
info@corribstudents.com
www.corribstudents.com

Dúnáras Apartments
A 25 minute walk from campus, Dunaras Apartments is a large complex of two and three
bedroom self-catering apartments that provide accommodation for 409 students (many of whom
are international students). Units commonly feature a single room and double room, with
modern, clean facilities, including a common room, television, furniture, and kitchen with
refrigerator, freezer, and stove. The majority of units face an inner car park and entrance is
accessible either through the main Dunaras entrance or secured gates; there are a number of units
that have public entrances that face out onto the main road below. A housing office is on-site, and
Dunaras states that a security guard is present at night. Students have access to an on-site laundry
room.

Dunaras Residential Accommodation
Bishop O’Donnell Road
Galway
+353 (0)91 589588
+353 (0)91 581222 fax
info@dunaras.ie
www.dunaras.ie

Amhra House
Twenty-eight fully furnished apartments make up the four-year old Amra House which provides

February 2010                             13
housing for 86 students. Apartments are located on the second floor of a secured entry building
near the city center (approximately 15 minutes from campus). Each apartment houses
approximately three students (small double and single rooms), and features a fully-furnished
common room with television, couch, and chairs, and kitchen area with a compact refrigerator,
electric cooktop and oven, and clothes washer. Rooms are rented on a year-only basis to students.
There is no representative on-site.

Amhra House
Bothar na mBan
Prospect Hill
Galway
+353 (0)91 768455
+353 (0)86 8511199 mobile
+353 (0)91 768456 fax
amhra@galwayrent.com
www.galwayrent.com/amhra/

Lisdonagh
Located next to Dunaras Apartments, Lisdonagh is located 25 minutes from campus on a busy
road that leads down to shops and the city center. A five-year old complex, Lisdonagh houses 71
students with each unit containing two bedroom apartments that share a common secured-entry.
Units and facilities are similar in size and quality to Amra House. There is no representative on-
site.

Lisdonagh
Cuan Glas,
Bishop O’Donnell Road
Galway
+353 (0)91 768455
+353 (0)86 8511199 mobile
+353 (0)91 768456 fax
lisdonagh@galwayrent.com
www.galwayrent.com/lisdonagh/

Gort na Coiribe
Adjacent to Cuirt na Coiribe, Gort na Coiribe is a large complex of apartment- and townhome-
style student accommodations located 15 minutes from NUI Galway. Five years old, Gort na
Coiribe consists of 144 self-catering apartments and houses 657 students, with 3 to 6 students to
each apartment/house. Units feature single and double rooms, with modern fully-furnished
kitchen and common room areas. There is an office and laundry room on site.

Gort na Coiribe
Headford Road
Galway
+353 (0)91 746400
+353 (0)91 746555 fax
info@gortnacoiribe.ie
www.gortnacoiribe.com

The Student Village/Menlo Park Apartments


February 2010                            14
Menlo Apartments is a two-story complex housing 139 students and is located 20 minutes from
campus, close to both Cuirt and Gort na Coiribe. Five years old, Menlo Park consists of 35 two
and three bedroom apartments with 3 to 5 students to each apartment, all of which look out onto a
central courtyard. Each unit has either a single and double room (twin beds), or a single and two
doubles (twin beds and full and twin beds). Units also have laundry in the apartment, large
refrigerator, and full cooking appliances. Secured access and closed circuit cameras provide
security, and an on-site business office is located in the complex, with an affiliated hotel and
conference center next door. Students may apply at any time for housing.

Terryland,
Headford Road
Galway
+353 (91) 768663
+353 (91) 768664 fax
menloapts@iol.ie
www.menlopartkhotel.com/apartments/

Cuirt na Coiribe
Located a 15 minute walk from campus, Cuirt na Coiribe is a large complex of self-catering
apartment-style units in a multiple-story dormitory block layout and houses 380 students. The
complex is three years old, and features a reception office, mini-mart, business office, and
laundrette. Each block has secured access via an electronic key fob. Individual units feature fully
furnished rooms, common rooms, and kitchens with stainless steel appliances.

Cuirt na Coiribe
Headford Road
Galway
+353 (0)91 700700
+353 (0)91 700790 fax
info@cuirtnacoiribe.com
www.cuirtnacoiribe.com

Atlantis Apartments
Atlantis is made up of several multi-story blocks, each with its own secure entry, and consists of
19 self-catering apartments. Each apartment unit houses 3 to 4 students, and is fully-furnished,
with a large refrigerator, freezer, and dishwasher in a kitchen that opens out into a common living
room, with laundry in-unit. The complex is located within walking distance of supermarkets and
shops and is a 15 minute walk to campus.

According to its representative, Atlantis only rents for the academic year, but may occasionally
have semester openings as a result of cancellation. In those cases, the management draws from a
wait list it maintains (prospective students pay a fee in order to be placed on the wait list).

Atlantis Apartments
74-80 Old Seamus Quirke Road
Galway
+353 (0)91 539673
+353 (0)87 6677998 mobile
+353 (0)91 537903 fax
info@atlantisapartmentsgalway.com
www.atlantisapartmentsgalway.com

February 2010                            15
Centrepoint Apartments
Located in a busy office and business park, Centrepoint is a recently built, modern apartment
complex featuring 40 self-catering apartments roughly a 30 to 40 minute walk from campus.
Units are two, three, and four bedroom apartments, consisting of furnished single and double
rooms, kitchen, and dining area. The complex is situated on the top floor of a multi-story building
with businesses and shops on the ground floor. According to the Centerpoint manager,
applications for Fall housing are accepted after December.

Centrepoint Apartments
+353 (0)91 381000
sowens@winterspm.com
www.centrepointgalway.com

Ros Geal University Residence
Ros Geal is a women’s-only student residence that provides bed and board to approximately 30
female students in a historic house directly across from NUI Galway. Both semester and year-
long students live in either single, double, or triple rooms in a sorority-house style layout. Meals
are provided in a community dining room, and a computer lab and chapel are located in the
house.

Originally founded by parents of students, Ros Geal is currently run by Opus Dei, Catholic
church-based organization. The house is non-denominational, but embraces Christian principles
such as community service, volunteerism (e.g. working with orphanage), and sponsors travel and
trips (e.g. Italy in Summer 2006). In addition to these values, students are expected to abide by
house rules, which include a 12 midnight curfew on most nights.

Ros Geal
19 University Road
Galway
+353 (0)91 524524
rosgeal@eircom.net
www.rosgeal.net

Gort Ard
Gort Ard is a men’s only residence located in Salthill, approximately a 30 minute walk from
campus. Undergraduate and graduate students live in single rooms for either the semester or
academic year. Both semester and year-long students live in single rooms and meals are provided
in a community dining room, A wide variety of activities are organized during the year that
complement life at university. Gort Ard is managed by Opus Dei, a Catholic church-based
organization. The house is non-denominational and accommodation and activities are open to
people of all backgrounds.

Gort Ard University Residence
Rockbarton North
Salthill, Galway
+353 (0)91 523 846
+353 (0)91 529 401
info@gortard.com
www.gortard.com


February 2010                             16
Private Sector Houses and Apartments
This Accommodation consists of flats, houses and apartments run by the private rented sector. As
it can vary from house to house, students are advised to see this accommodation for themselves
before making a booking to ensure they will be happy with their choice. Each tenant should be
prepared to pay:

       One month’s rental.
       €300-400 deposit against damages not due to wear and tear
       At least €90 towards heating oil each semester
       Each tenant is required to sign a lease
       Tenants should never sign leases on behalf of their co-tenants
       Always remember that a signed lease is legally binding. If a tenant breaks her/his lease,
        the initial deposit against damages is automatically forfeited

Charges, such as electricity, refuse and television must be paid separately as the bills arrive.
Students should always be careful about signing leases and keeping contracts--even verbal
contracts can also be binding. Students are urged read carefully the Guidelines for Renting
Accommodation at
www.nuigalway.ie/student_services/accommodation_office/Guidelines_for_Renting.html.

Self Catering Accommodation Off Campus
Where the student shares with the owner and has limited access to the kitchen. Note that in self-
catering accommodation, a student may only have visitors at the discretion of the householder.
Also note that you must come to an arrangement with the householder vis-a-vis cooking
arrangements. Duvets are normally supplied but you must purchase your own sheets and duvet
covers. These can be purchased at a reasonable rate in Galway at local department stores.
Shared Houses/Flats/Apartments
Houses/Flats/Apartments are normally rented for the full academic year (September to June
approximately). In rented houses/flats/apartments, rent must always be paid during Christmas and
Easter vacations. Occasionally, houses/apartments are rented for one semester but only if a back-
up group for Semester II is guaranteed. It should be borne in mind that the demand for rented
houses/apartments far exceeds the supply. Please check our website for details of private rented
accommodation.
Bedsits (sometimes known as Studios)
One room in which a student sleeps, cooks, etc. We discourage students from living in bedsits, as
they are seldom custom-built and sometimes represent poor value for money. Experience also
shows that students opting for this type of accommodation may experience loneliness.

One room in which a student sleeps, cooks, etc. We discourage students from living in bedsits, as
they are seldom custom built and are sometimes damp and represent poor value for money.
Experience also shows that students opting for this type of accommodation quite often experience
loneliness.

Please always remember that if you leave before the end of your tenancy agreement, whether
written or verbal, you may be liable for the rent to the end date. Always ask for a rent book.

To access accommodation from the private sector visit www.findahome.ie.



February 2010                             17
The Galway Advertiser www.galwayadvertiser.ie, the local newspaper, issues a list of
accommodation each Wednesday at 2 p.m. Their Office is located on 41/42 Eyre Square, Galway.
It costs 2 Euro (approximately).

Past participants have also found accommodation listings at www.daft.ie.

Temporary Accommodation
City Centre Budget Accommodation
Kinlay House (Reservation necessary)
Merchants Road
Eyre Square Galway
+353 (0)91 565244
+353 (0)91 565245 fax
info@kinlaygalway.ie
www.kinlayhouse.ie

Sleepzone
Bóthar na mBan
Prospect Hill
Galway
+353 (0)91 566999
Info@sleepzone.ie
www.sleepzone.ie

Bed and Breakfasts
Ms. Darry Ryan
'The Ivies'
1 Montpelier Terrace
Sea Road
Galway
+353 (0)91 583257
info@theivies.com
www.the-ivies.com

Ms. Betty Hassell,
41 Maunsells' Park
Taylors Hill
Galway
+353 (0)91 523307
info@iverniabb.com
www.iverniabb.com/


STUDENT LIFE
There is no better way to integrate into the social, sporting and cultural life of the University than
through membership of one of the University's clubs or societies. It is a most effective way of
meeting Irish students. There are more than fifty societies and thirty athletic clubs on campus
which cater for a wide variety of interests. The Societies' contact person is Mr. Matt Doran,
Student Services, ext. 2235. Mr. Doran's office is based in the Student Centre (first floor). The

February 2010                             18
Societies' notice-boards are situated in the Hub (Student Common Room) - check these for
venues and meeting times.

The University's indoor and outdoor Sports and Recreation Centers offer tennis and squash
courts, Olympic handball courts, gymnasium, badminton, volleyball and basketball courts, table
tennis, boxing, karate and aerobics. Playing fields are available for other sports e.g. hockey, rugby
and football, while provision is also made for horse-riding and golf.

The University's prime location on the banks of the River Corrib provides students with excellent
opportunities to take part in all water sports, from rowing to kayaking to canoeing. Wind-surfing,
sailing and a swimming pool are available nearby in Salthill, while the mountains and hills of
Connemara are easily accessible for those interested in mountaineering, hill-walking and
orienteering.

The University also houses one of the main musical venues in the west of Ireland - the Aula
Maxima recital room hosts a varied program of internationally renowned classical, traditional and
contemporary Irish musicians throughout the year.

Every student of the University is also a member of the Students' Union, which promotes and
protects the interests of its members. The Union runs a stationery shop, bar and snack bar service.
Entertainment is organized on a regular basis by the Union and is open to all students.

Students are also encouraged to consider volunteering during their time in Galway. Established
in 2003, ALIVE (A Learning Initiative and the Volunteering Experience) offers volunteer
opportunities as part of the Community Knowledge Initiative project. The goal of this project is
to enable NUI Galway to become a role model in promoting the development of civic and
leadership skills in students. Over 700 students have been recognized to date for their
volunteering commitment within a variety of pathways including community and non-
governmental organizations, through participation within societies and clubs, and mentoring first
year students through the Student Connect Program to mention a few. Further information on
student volunteering is available at www.nuigalwaycki.ie.


TRANSPORTATION
Information on travel within Ireland, and abroad, can be obtained from the student travel
company USIT which is located at 16, Mary St. in Galway city centre (telephone +353-91-
565177). The International Student Identity Card (ISIC) is available at USIT and offers
concessions on Bus Eireann (the National bus company) bus routes. To obtain an ISIC card, it is
necessary to have your University I.D. card and one photograph. Concessions on rail travel are
available with an Irish Rail Student Card which can be purchased at the Galway train station. The
application form for the Irish Rail Card can also be downloaded from the web at www.irishrail.ie.
The completed form should be taken to the Students' Union Office in NUI, Galway.


SAFETY
Galway is generally regarded as a safe city. However, normal precautions regarding personal
safety both on and off campus should be taken. If leaving campus after dark, avoid poorly lit
areas or areas that are not frequented by the public. A Campus Watch Service operates in the
University and its objective is to make NUI Galway a safer place in which to study, live and


February 2010                             19
work. If you notice anything suspicious, contact Security staff at extension 2198/direct line +353
(0)91 492198.

Fire, Police, Ambulance and Coastal Rescue, Mountain and Cave Rescue: Dial 112 and ask the
operator for the emergency service you require. There is no charge for this service.

The police in Ireland are called Gardaí - full details of national and local Garda stations are in the
green pages at the front of the telephone directory. In Galway, the main Garda station is located at
Mill Street, +353 (0)91 563161.


HEALTH
A Student Health Service is provided on campus, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday to Friday,
which is free and completely confidential. It is staffed by two doctors, two nurses, a
physiotherapist and a sports injuries therapist, who are there to meet the needs of all students with
any medical problem. Referral to other agencies and specialist services is available as required.
Please note that the Student Health Service does not cover the cost of prescribed medicine,
hospitalization, optical or dental treatment. Students are therefore advised to have a thorough
medical check-up before leaving home.

Students from countries other than EU countries are required to pay full charges for in-patient and
out-patient services in a public hospital and all charges for doctors' services, drugs and medicines.
Students from non-EU countries are accordingly advised to hold a comprehensive Health
Insurance Policy to meet any costs accruing from health care treatment.

Health Service
+353 (0)91 492604

In serious non-medical emergencies contact Louise Kelly, International Student Officer, at +353
(0)86 857 6152.

A Student Counseling Service is also available at No. 5 Distillery Road. The student counselors
provide a professional and strictly confidential counseling service for all students experiencing
problems while pursuing their studies. Please note that there is no emergency service for
counseling, so any messages left will not be responded to until the office re-opens the following
morning or after the weekend.

Counseling Service
+353 (0)91 492484

Students with disabilities—for example, learning difficulties, visual impairment, hearing
impairment, or mobility problems—are advised to contact the University Disability Officer,
Elizabeth Walsh at +353 (0)91 493541 or elizabeth.walsh@nuigalway.ie at the time of
application for any information or assistance they may need.


COMMUNICATION
Telephone: When making calls, keep in mind time zone differences
www.timeanddate.com/worldclock. To make an international call to the United States, dial the
access code for the country from which you are calling plus the United States country code

February 2010                             20
(always “1”) followed by the appropriate U.S. area code and local number. To call
internationally from the United States, dial “011”, the country code, city access code (if
necessary) and the phone number . Country and city codes can be found online
(www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/dialing.html). Some of above steps can vary if you are using
a calling card.

There are public telephones in many outdoor locations all over Ireland as well as in telecentres,
public buildings, including rail and bus stations, shops, pubs, restaurants and hotels. Local trunk
and international calls can be dialed direct from these phones. Telephone cards can be purchased
in telecentres and in post offices and retail outlets displaying the CallCard sign. Some former
students recommend having a U.S. calling card (AT&T, Sprint, etc.) to be able to obtain cheaper
rates than are available through direct dialing. Pre-paid calling cards are also available at
“tobacco-and-magazine” shops and may offer the least expensive rates.

There are many cheap options for international calling cards on sale in newsagents in Ireland. An
increasingly popular option for students is to buy a “Ready to Go” mobile phone (cell phone).
These are reasonably cheap to buy and you can control your usage as they work on a “phone
card” basis, so you pay as you talk.

Mail: There are many post offices in Galway. Stamps, air-letter forms, postal orders etc. can be
purchased in them. There is a post office adjacent to the University campus on Newcastle Road.
The General Post Office, on Eglinton Street, is normally open from 9.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m.
Smaller post offices may close for lunch.

Email: Computer Services provides the University’s Information and Communications
Technology (ICT) infrastructure, ICT support services to students and academic staff, and
strategic co-ordination of University Information Services provision. Computer Services provides
desktop provision and support services to approximately 2,000 academic staff members.

In addition, PC Suites across the campus provide free of charge Internet and email facilities to
registered students. Printing is charged on a per-page basis. At registration students receive a
registration statement that contains their username (student ID number) and password required to
login to computers on the campus network. The registration statement also contains the student’s
email address, which will end with @nuigalway.ie.

Support Services are available to all staff and students. Computer Services operates a User
Support Centre (USC) from 9:15 am to 5:00 pm, Monday to Friday in Room 118, Computer
Services, Arts and Science Building (Ground Floor). The USC is a one-stop-shop where users can
bring their computing queries and problems. Contact the USC via e-mail at
user_support@nuigalway.ie, telephone (ext. 3325) or in person. Operator emergency cover is
available at ext. 3325 on Saturday and Sunday from 9:15 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. and 2:15 p.m. to 5:00
p.m.

A “wi-fi” computing service is available for students and staff with suitably equipped laptops.
Please view the Computer Services website at www.nuigalway.ie/cs/wireless/ to find out about
the wireless service and technical requirements for connecting to it.

Further information on Computer Services is available at www.nuigalway.ie/cs.




February 2010                            21
Student Testimonials
The quotes below are comments from past participants; they reflect various students' experiences
and are included to provide different perspectives. IAP does not endorse any specific view
expressed in this section.


GALWAY
Galway is absolutely wonderful! Looking back on it, I am very happy to have stayed on the west
coast of Ireland vs the East coast; it is beautiful, rugged, and much more of what is though of as
'true Irish Ireland'.

One thing to realize is that it rains quite a lot in Galway. I would guess that each semester has an
equal share of Irish winter, which is quite different than Wisconsin. It is cold and rainy, and when
it's not raining, it's probably cloudy. If you won't be able to stand not seeing the sun for
sometimes a week at a time, then Ireland (Galway especially, since the West coast gets the most
rain) might not be for them. But! All this rain is what makes Ireland so green! This country has
the most beautiful scenery I've ever been privileged enough to travel through and love. Ireland is
absolutely gorgeous.


BANKING AND FINANCES
Everything seemed more expensive to me, but I had to buy a lot of stuff since I was living in an
apartment so I needed sheets and a quilt etc.

I just used my ATM card. I had to pay a fee to my bank as well as to the machines I used while
over there, so I took out a lot of money each time. I


PACKING
Everyone always says to pack as light as you can, but the value of the dollar (as we all know) has
not been so great lately, and so not only is everything pricey in Ireland, the exchange rate is bad.
Bring lots of sweaters and warm clothing. Invest in a pair of waterproof shoes as well as a
waterproof coat, both are essential. The Irish don’t really bother with umbrellas because it gets
pretty windy.

Don’t overdo it on the packing. Chances are you’ll buy a ton of stuff while you’re over there, and
you will need a way to get it back. Overweight luggage fees are very high.


THE ACADEMIC PROGRAM
I loved the vast array of subjects I was able to choose from.

As for academics, 6 classes were manageable; NUI is one of the best schools in Ireland, but in my
opinion, was not quite comparable to Madison.


February 2010                             22
Waiting in long lines for several hours to gain admission to some courses was a pain. Many NUI-
G students commonly stay up all night, it is said, in order to secure places at the front of the line.
Quite a few students reported that they were unable to enroll in at least one or two courses
because of the long lines. Course-availability information from some departments was said to be
not very reliable.


HOUSING
I was also lucky enough to find a residence that had a variety of different national and cultural
backgrounds. I was able to actually visit with many Irish people, learn their culture and history,
and attempt to speak Irish.

It is my opinion that most Irish students live in Cuirt na Coiribe. Me and [another UW student]
both stayed there, and knew only Irish people there. We each had four Irish roomates….I had the
time of my life but it was mostly because of the roommates I was with. They took me under their
care and as a result felt very comfortable and assimilated….I felt like I lived there, was not just a
stranger visiting and trying to go to school.

Finding housing for the semester is a bit harder than finding it for the entire year, but it is
manageable. Having to contact and set up housing while still in the US was very hard to do, and I
think that people interested in the program should know of this challenge, which I think is fairly
unique to the Galway program.


STUDENT LIFE
Galway is very similar to Madison in that it is a college town; the students have a very strong
presence in the city, which is also similar in size to Madison. Due to this, the social life in Ireland
is quite strong and a high priority for the residents there (whom are greatly students). The pubs
and clubs there are a blast, however, they sure do drink a lot, and it can sometimes be
overwhelming and definitely something to get used to. And I thought Madison drank a lot!!

To meet people, get involved! NUI loves having international students in their clubs and
organizations, and they'll make sure to tell you all about them once you get there.

[S]eminars seem to be where visiting students have the best chances of being with mostly Irish
students. My English seminar was with six Irish girls and I got a lot of perspective on how their
college perspective.

I would say that Ireland, with it's English speaking people, is maybe a bit more similar to the US
than the rest of Europe. So in that sense, I didn't have too much culture shock. Just give it time, it
takes time to readjust to being home again.


TRAVELING
Traveling around Ireland is simple. They have a very good bus system. Also, if you want to
leave Ireland, getting to the Dublin airport or the one in Limerick isn’t hard. Buses go to both. A
train also goes to the Dublin airport.

There are day trip options all around Galway. When you first get to Galway, be touristy! Go the
information booths and check out the best sites.

February 2010                              23
SAFETY
In general I think future students should know Galway is extremely friendly and actually I found
so safe compared to Madison. As a girl, I felt more secure going out and walking alone then I do
here.


TRAVEL
Ireland for me was the stepping stone into further travel into Europe and RyanAir is a great
resource for any study-abroad student interested in European travel.

If you plan on travelling a lot for long/short periods of time, I highly recommend a backpacking
backpack. They are very useful, especially if you plan on doing a lot of travelling by train.

The cheap airlines provide a really easy way to take advantage of seeing parts of Europe while
you're in Ireland. Aer Lingus is also a cheap way to get to Ireland and back home again for a
reasonable price.




February 2010                            24

				
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