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Psychology and Neuroscience
Professor Cooper, Chair; Associate Professor Bonner, Director of Graduate Studies; Professors Asher, Cabeza, Caspi,
Cooper, Costanzo, Hariri, Hoyle, Leary, Meck, Moffitt, Putallaz, Roth, Rubin, Schmajuk, Sikkema, Strauman, Thompson,
C. Williams, Whitfield, Wood; Associate Professors Bennett, Brannon, Day, Groh, Huettel, LaBar, Mazuka, Shah;
Assistant Professors Bilbo, Egner, Feng, Harris, Joh, Linnenbrink-Garcia, Marsh, Mitroff, Wilbourn, Yin; Research
Professor L. Wallach; Associate Research Professor Rabiner; Assistant Research Professor Richman; Lecturer Batson;
Senior Lecturer Fellows Grimes, Murphy; Medical School Faculty: Blumenthal, Bonner, Curry (Director of Clinical
Training), Keefe, Robins, Surwit, R. Williams; Professors Emeriti Coie, Eckerman, C. Erickson, R. Erickson, Hall,
Kremen, Lockhead, M. Wallach; Faculty with Secondary Appointments: Professors Angold, Bettman, Brodie, Chartrand,
Compton, J. Costello, Dodge, Edwards, Fairbanks, Fitzgerald, Fitzsimons, Flanagan, Fuemmeler, Gassman-Pines, George,
Gibson-Davis, Gold, Gustafson, W. C. Hall, Hardy, Holditch-Davis, Larrick, Levin, Linville, Logue, Lynch, Madden,
March, Nicolelis, Nowicki, Palmer, Payne, Platt, Purves, Rosenthal, Ruse, Schiffman, Serra, Sheppard, Sherwood, Siegler,
Smith-Lovin, Spenner, Stocking, Swartzwelder, Vidmar, Wells, Weinfurt, Welsh-Bohmer, Whidby, Zucker; Adjunct
Professors Barbarin, Cox, McLoyd, Ornstein, Reznick,Vernon-Feagans; Adjunct Associate Professors Curran, Gariepy,
Hopfinger, Hussong, Kurtz-Costes, and Taylor
    Graduate training leading to a PhD in Psychology and Neuroscience is offered through a unique program that
merges Social Sciences and Natural Sciences in the study of brain, behavior, and cognition in humans and animals.
Program tracks are offered in Clinical Psychology, Cognition/Cognitive Neuroscience, Developmental Psychology,
Social Psychology, and Systems and Integrative Neuroscience.
Psychology Courses (PSY)
201S. The Psychology of Mindfulness Meditation: Theory, Research, and Practice. Mindfulness meditation in
relation to psychological and phycial health. Traditional Buddhist teachings and contemporary Western perspectives
on mindfulness. Survey of empirical research, including controlled trials and studies of basic mechanisms and
processes through self-report, psychophysiological, and neuroimaging methods. Use of mindfulness practices in
behavioral and other psychotherapies. Includes experiential learning through meditation practices in class and for
homework assignments, as well as lecture and discussion. Readings mostly original journal articles and book
chapters. Prerequisites: PSY 100R, 101RE, or 102RE desirable. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate
students. Instructor: Robins. 3 units.
202S. Autobiographical Memory (C). A review and critical analysis of the literature, theory, and empirical study
of autobiographical memory within cognitive psychology. Emphasis on the reasoning, research designs, and
methods used in examining autobiographical memory. Consent of the instructor required. Instructor: Rubin. 3 units.
203S. Genetics and Environment in Abnormal Behavior. Introduces students to an emerging topic in behavioral
science: the interaction between genes and environments. Evaluates research showing that genes influence
susceptibility to the environmental causes of abnormal behavior, and research showing that genes' connections to
behaviors depend on environmental experiences. Readings are primary journal articles. Topics include the design
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and analysis of genetic research into mental disorders, and ethical issues stemming from genetic research into human
behavior. Prior coursework in statistics/research methods, genetics, and/or abnormal psychology is desirable.
Consent of instructor required. Instructors: Caspi and Moffitt. 3 units.
204S. Exploring the Prefrontal Cortex (B). Review and critical analysis of current and historical perspectives on
functional neuroanatomy of the prefrontal cortex. Discussion is informed by anatomical, neuropsychological,
neurological, neuroimaging, animal models, and computational approaches. Open to juniors and seniors majoring in
Psychology or Neuroscience, and to graduate students. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Egner. 3 units. C-L:
Neuroscience 204S
205S. Children's Peer Relations (D). Examination of the empirical literature with emphasis on the functions that
peers serve for children, the developmental course of these relationships, the clinical ramifications and possible
explanations for inadequate peer relations (including an examination of the family's role), and interventions used to
improve children's relationships with their peers. Regular opportunities to analyze, critique, and synthesize primary
research literature. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Asher or Putallaz. 3 units.
206S. Pediatric Psychology (D, P). The conceptual and methodological bases for the field. Emphasis on the
reasoning, research designs, and methods implemented at the interface of behavioral and biomedical issues
concerning health care for children. Case material illustrating how developmental, biological, and psychosocial
processes act together in child health and illness. Focus on adjustment and coping with illness and treatments related
to cystic fibrosis, sickle cell disease, cancer, diabetes, and seizure disorders. Consent of instructor required.
Instructor: Bonner. 3 units.
208S. Seminar in Emotion (D, P). Theories of emotion, covering biological, developmental, social, ethological,
and cultural perspectives. Topics include facial and vocal expression of emotion, individual differences in emotion
development, the role of emotion in social relationships, emotion and psychopathology, and emotion and physical
health. Prerequisite: Psychology 99 or 108 and consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
209S. Disturbances in Eating and Body Experience Across the Lifespan. Study of atypical and typical
development of conscious somatic sensation, i.e. how individuals sense and understand body signals and how
extremes of sensitivity may form part of the core phenomenology of disorders such as anorexia nervosa, pediatric
obesity, and autism spectrum disorders Study of detailed narratives of patients have served as a springboard for
novel hypotheses about human function. Readings alternate between primary journal articles to patient memoirs and
narratives. Students interview patients struggling with eating disorders, children who binge eat, and children with
high functioning autism, among other clinical conditions. Juniors, Seniors and Graduate students. Instructor: Zucker.
3 units.
210AS. Multidisciplinary Approaches to Contemporary Children's Issues. 2 units. C-L: see Children in
Contemporary Society 210SA; also C-L: Public Policy Studies 210S
211S. Biology of Nervous System Diseases. 3 units. C-L: see Biology 241S; also C-L: Neuroscience 242S
214S. Motives, Goals, and Social Behavior (S,P). Covers a variety of topics involving the motivations underlying
a variety of social behaviors (such as interpersonal relationships, stereotyping, and achievement) and the social and
psychological processes involved when people try to regulate their own motives, thoughts, emotions, and behavior.
Reading and discussion of literature on current theory and research on motivation, goal-directed behavior, and self-
regulation. Instructor: Shah. 3 units.
215S. Developmental Behavior Genetics (D). Review estimates of the contribution of genetic and environmental
variance to developmental concepts across the life span. Basic understanding of the statistical approach to
behavioral genetics. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Whitfield. 3 units.
216S. Gender, Pain, and Coping (P). Examination of recent research on gender differences manifested in severity
of pain, in healthcare seeking behaviors for painful conditions, and in responses to pain management interventions
such as medications or self-help efforts. Exploration of gender-related factors, psychological, social, spiritual,
cultural, and biological, which influence responses to persistent pain. Writing intensive seminar requiring student
critiques of recent journal articles focused on sex and gender differences in the pain experience, as well as a review
paper analyzing recent research in this area. Instructor: Keefe. 3 units.
218S. Personality, Stress, and Disease (P). The interaction between person and social environment as a contributor
to development of physical disease. Both epidemiological and laboratory-based research considered. Prerequisite:
Psychology 109A for undergraduates and consent of instructor. Instructor: R. B. Williams. 3 units.
222S. Global Mental Health. 3 units. C-L: see Global Health Certificate 223S; also C-L: Cultural Anthropology
222S
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223S. Learning and Cognition: A Neural Network Approach (B, C). Several connectionist theories of human
and animal learning and cognition. Neural network theories of classical conditioning; the concepts of models of the
environment, prediction of future events, reliable and salient predictors, redundancy reduction, competition for
limited capacity short-term memory, mismatch between predicted and observed events, stimulus configuration,
inference generation, modulation of attention by novelty, and timing. Neural networks of operant conditioning; the
concepts of goal-seeking mechanisms, response-selection mechanisms, and cognitive mapping. How neural network
models permit simultaneous development of psychological theories and models of the brain. Instructor: Schmajuk. 3
units.
226S. Cognitive Neuroscience of Memory (C). Research on the neural correlates of memory in humans.
Neuropsychological studies with brain-damaged patients and functional neuroimaging studies with healthy
individuals. Cognitive neuroscience models of memory, including episodic memory, working memory, semantic
memory, priming, and procedural memory. Prerequisite: Psychology 101(RE), formerly 91, or Psychology 102(RE),
formerly 92, and consent of instructor. Instructor: Cabeza. 3 units. C-L: Neuroscience 216S
227S. Behavioral Physiology: Basic Systems (P). Organ systems review of physiology, emphasizing the role of the
central nervous system and behavior in physiological function. Emphasis on the research designs, methods, and
reasoning by which the physiology of behavior is understood. Prerequisite: Psychology 101(RE)-formerly 91 or
159S for undergraduates and consent of instructor. Instructor: Surwit. 3 units.
229S. Psychosocial Determinants of Health. Provides an in-depth understanding of psychosocial determinants of
health. Emphasis on the ways psychological factors interact with social, cultural, economic, and environmental
contexts of health. Topics include impact of social integration, socioeconomic position, discrimination, health
behaviors, and affective states on health outcomes. Students will gain competency through lectures, discussions,
written work, and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Psychology 99 or 116, Research Methods. Open to Juniors,
Seniors and Graduate students. Instructor: Richman. 3 units.
230S. Stereotypes and Stigma (P). Experimental research in stereotyping and stigma; readings from psychology,
public health, and sociological perspectives on issues related to ethnicity, gender, and social class. Consent of
instructor required. Prerequisites: Psychology 99 and 104(RE)-formerly 116. Instructor: Richman. 3 units.
238S. Everyday Cognition (C). Selected cognitive processes (e.g., encoding, retrieval, representation, information
load) and how they work in everyday settings. Cognition in classrooms, courtrooms, hospitals, grocery stores, jobs,
athletics, and dance. Special focus on medical cognition, courtroom cognition, and memory for movement. For each
setting, successful vs. mediocre performance, task analysis, errors, experiments, applications. Presentations by the
instructor, students, and specialists from the everyday world (e.g., pharmacists, judges, choreographers). Instructor
consent required. Instructor: Day. 3 units.
240S. Biological Pathways to Psychopathology (A(P),B,C). Introduces students to emerging methodologies for
understanding the biological pathways of psychopathology. Evaluates research showing that the integration of
psychology, neuroimaging, pharmacology and genetics can illuminate specific biological pathways that help shape
risk for and emergence of psychopathology. Readings are primary journal articles. Topics include the design and
analysis of multimodal research (fMRI, PET, pharmacology, molecular genetics) examining the biological
underpinnings of behavioral traits relevant to psychopathology. Prior coursework in biological psychology, i.e., PSY
101RE (formerly PSY 91) or its equivalent is recommended. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Hariri. 3 units.
C-L: Neuroscience 243S
241S. Affective Neuroscience (B, C). A critical examination of current theory and experimental research related to
neurobiology of emotional information processing and emotion-cognition interactions. Topics range from animal
studies to clinical disorders, including neurogenomics, social cognition, functional brain imaging, emotional
learning and memory, neuroethics, and individual differences. Basic background in neuroanatomy and cognitive
neuroscience expected. Consent of instructor required. Prerequisites: Psychology 135 or Psychology 112. Instructor:
LaBar. 3 units. C-L: Neuroscience 211S
242S. Nonverbal Cognition. Exploration of Nonverbal cognition in animals and human infants. Focus on nonverbal
counting and the relationship between the representation of number, time, and space. Topics include animal
cognition, developmental psychology, neuropsychology, and brain imaging to sketch a complete picture of how the
mind represents number in the absence of linguistic counting. Upper level undergraduates may enroll with consent
of the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Brannon. 3 units.
249S. Anthropology and Psychology (C, P). 3 units. C-L: see Cultural Anthropology 249S
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250S. Hormones, Brain, and Cognition (B, C). Current research on how hormones modify and modulate cognitive
processes across the lifespan. Consent of instructor required. One course. Instructor: C. Williams. 3 units. C-L:
Neuroscience 250S
258S. Social Behavior and Personality (P). Broad examination of current theory and research on the interpersonal,
personological, and social cognitive influences on social interaction/behavior. Emphasis on: nature of social
influence, function/construction of the self, relationship formation/maintenance, aggression, altruism, personality-
based mediators and moderators of social behavior, and application of social psychological theory/research to real-
world issues. Methodologies discussed = experimental, quasi-experimental, narrative, observational, and
correlational models. Prerequisite: Psychology 99 or 104(RE)-formerly 116 and 185B and Statistics 101,
Psychology 117 or equivalent and consent of instructor for undergraduates. Instructor: Costanzo or Hoyle. 3 units.
262S. Minority Mental Health: Issues in Theory, Treatment, and Research (P). Survey and discussion of
theoretical, research, and clinical issues in minority mental health with special emphasis on African-Americans.
Prerequisite: Psychology 100(RE)-formerly 119A for undergraduates and consent of instructor. Instructor: Staff. 3
units. C-L: African and African American Studies 262S
265. The Biological Basis of Music. 3 units. C-L: see Neurobiology 259; also C-L: Philosophy 259, Music 259
267S. Language, Brain, and Human Behavior. 3 units. C-L: see Linguistics 202S; also C-L: English 204S
268. Brain and Language (B, C). 3 units. C-L: see Linguistics 268; also C-L: Neuroscience 268
270PS. Selected Problems: Self and Social Behavior. Overview of psychological theory and research involving
the role of self-attention in human thought, emotion, motivation, and behavior; open only to seniors and graduate
students. Instructor: Leary. 3 units.
270S. Special Topics in Psychology. Topics vary by semester and section from the different areas of Psychology:
Biological, Cognitive, Developmental or Personality/Social. Consent of instructor and/or specific prerequisites may
be required for specific offerings. Open to Undergraduate as well as Graduate/Professional students. Instructor:
Staff. 3 units.
272S. Obesity and Eating Disorders (B, P). A review of obesity and of the major clinical eating disorders
(including binge eating disorder, bulimia nervosa and anorexia nervosa) and their pathophysiology, and their
treatments. Prerequisite: Introductory Biology. Instructor: Surwit. 3 units.
290. Special Topics in Psychology. Advanced topics vary by semester and section from the areas of Psychology:
Abnormal/Health, Biological, Cognitive, Developmental or Social. Consent of instructor and/or specific
prerequisites may be required for specific offerings. Open to Undergraduate and Graduate/Professional students.
Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
For Graduate Students Only
305. Adult Psychopathology. Examination of current diagnostic and theoretical approaches to adult
psychopathology and personality disorders and the implications of diagnostic and theoretical systems for assessment
and treatment. Instructor: Strauman. 3 units.
306. Interventions in Behavioral Medicine and Health Psychology. Review critical elements of randomized
clinical trials in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. Discuss basic issues of study design including
identification of target population, selection of outcome measures, blinding, use of control groups, randomization,
power analyses, and data analytic approaches. Examine a variety of behavioral interventions including stress
management, diet, exercise, pain management, and coping skills training. Key clinical trials in four health areas-
cardiovascular disease, cancer, metabolic disorders, and pain will be reviewed. Students will be expected to prepare
an oral presentation on a research topic of their choice, and submit a written research proposal at the end of the
semester. Prerequisites: Psychological Assessment; Psychotherapy. Consent of instructor required. Instructor:
Blumenthal. 3 units.
307. Models of Intervention and Prevention. Review of empirically-supported treatments for adult disorders.
Therapeutic relationship issues and communication style; strategies commonly used across disorders in empirically-
supported treatment and prevention programs; their application to specific disorders; development of theoretically
integrative treatments. Course balances discussion of theory and research findings with practical and ethical issues
in treatment delivery, illustrated by case transcripts and videotapes. Instructor: Robins. 3 units.
310. Diversity and Mental Health: Issues in Theory, Treatment and Research. Discussions of theoretical,
research, and clinical issues in multicultural psychology. Increase multicultural awareness and skills to conduct
research and clinical practice. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
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312. Development of Achievement Motivation. Analysis of the development of achievement motivation from
multiple theoretical perspectives; consideration of contextual influences on achievement motivation, with a specific
emphasis on home and school factors; discussion of empirical evidence regarding the role of achievement
motivation in engagement and learning in school. Implications for educational practices and policies will be
discussed. Instructor: Linnenbrink-Garcia. 3 units.
313. Motivation Science in Social Psychology. This graduate level course will explore the reemerging focus in
social psychology on motivation and its role in determining the nature and consequences of self and social-
regulation. Specifically, this seminar will focus on research and theorizing on the differing motivations underlying
social behavior (such as the motivations characterizing stereotyping and prejudice a well as achievement behavior
and interpersonal relationships). Students will be expected to read research articles and chapters from the leading
social psychology outlets to actively discuss the merits and limitations of these research traditions. Students will also
be expected to actively participate in weekly discussions and to present a grant proposal for a research study inspired
by the weekly reading assignments and classroom discussion. Because this is an advanced graduate seminar,
registration requires instructor approval. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
315. Seminar in Consumer Behavior. 3 units. C-L: see Business Administration 562
316. Behavioral Decision Theory. 3 units. C-L: see Business Administration 525; also C-L: Statistical Science 231
317. Political Psychology (A). 3 units. C-L: see Political Science 320
318. Research Design. Methodology principles of research design in psychology. Experimental, quasi-experimental
and correlational research. Permission of instructor required. Instructor: Cooper. 3 units.
320. Applied Multivariate Statistics. Applications of multivariate statistics in psychology and related disciplines.
Topics include: MANOVA, factor analysis, principal components analysis, cluster analysis, multidimensional
scaling, multiple logistic regression, and various approaches to longitudinal data analysis. Covers issues in applied
data analysis such as a priori and post-hoc power analyses, transformation of data, and graphical/written/oral
presentation of results. Data analyzed using the SAS statistical software package, as well as other specialty
programs. Mandatory weekly lab sessions. Prerequisite: Psychology 273 and 274 or equivalent. Consent of
instructor required. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
321. Social Development. Analysis of children's social development from multiple theoretical perspectives
including biological, social cognitive, social learning, and ecological perspectives. Includes socialization in the
contexts of families, peers, schools, and neighborhoods and the role of media. Implications for
prevention/intervention programs and social policy are discussed. Permission of the instructor required. Instructor:
Asher. 3 units.
322. Advanced Cognitive Development. Advanced level introduction to critical issues in the study of cognitive
development from birth to adolescence. Emphasis on both theoretical accounts of cognitive development and recent
research that informs these explanations. Permission only. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
327. Theories of Developmental Psychology. Examine worldviews and assumptions that underlie theories in
developmental psychology; discuss the philosophical and historical foundations for key ideas and theories in the
study and understanding of human development, take on the perspectives of key historical figures in developmental
psychology; understand how change and development have been conceptualized over the history of the field; debate
ongoing controversies in the field such as nature-nurture, continuity-discontinuity, universal-culturally specific
development; explore the link among theoretical perspectives, research methodologies and data interpretation.
Permission of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
329S. Foundations of Cognitive Development. Introduction to main theories and concepts of cognitive
development as it is studied from psychological and neuroscience perspectives. Instructors: Brannon or Needham. 3
units.
330S. Foundations of Cognitive Psychology. Current concepts and controversies in the way people and other
animals perceive, think, and remember. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
332. Developmental Psychopathology. This course examines major emotional and behavioral disorders of
childhood/adolescence from a developmental perspective. Issues addressed include risk and protective factors, long-
term outcomes, and prevention/ intervention. Instructor: Rabiner. 3 units.
333. Cognition and Teaching. An examination of key phenomena and concepts in cognitive psychology (especially
in areas of perception, attention, memory, comprehension, mental representation, and problem solving) and their
implications for the teaching-learning process at the college level. Instructor: Day. 3 units.
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335. Personality Assessment. A course for clinical graduate students on assessment of persons through a variety of
methods, including personological, clinical and semi-structured interviews, analysis of narrative material, and
psychological tests. Introduction to self-report, observer-report, and projective methods. Consent of insructor.
Instructor: Curry. 3 units.
339. Ethical Issues in Research and Clinical Practice. Topics including ethical issues in teaching, research, and
clinical practice. Instructor: Blumenthal. 3 units.
343. Clinical Practicum. Intensive experience and supervision in clinical intervention processes. Student training in
psychotherapy strategies and techniques and in clinical consultation skills is conducted in clinical settings. 0 to 6
units. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.
344. Clinical Practicum. Intensive experience and supervision in clinical intervention processes. Student training in
psychotherapy strategies and techniques and in clinical consultation skills is conducted in clinical settings. 0 to 6
units. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.
345. Teaching Practicum. Experience based on teaching assistantship for fall semester. Instructor: Bonner. 3 units.
346. Teaching Practicum. Experience based on teaching assistantship for spring semester. Instructor: Bonner. 3
units.
348. Child/Adolescent Psychotherapy. Introduction to psychodynamic and cognitive-behavioral approaches to
clinical problems of children and adolescents, with an emphasis on empirically-supported interventions. Instructor:
Curry. 3 units.
349. Practicum in Psychological Research. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
350. Practicum in Psychological Research. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
352. Child Assessment. Interview methods; intelligence and achievement testing; personality and developmental
batteries; peer, teacher, and parental instruments; and observational techniques. Instructor: Fitzgerald and Whidby. 3
units.
354. Clinical Assessment. This course enables students to master a key professional skill of the clinical
psychologist that is used in internship, clinical practice, and academic research. Theory topics include psychometric
measurement, the science of test construction, the politics and history of mental testing, and the misuses of mental
testing. Students learn to evaluate and critique tests. Students learn to administer, score and interpret eh WPPSI,
WISC, WAIS, and selected tests of academic achievement and neuropsychological brain functions. Students learn to
write a formal report of assessment findings, to give oral consultations to patients, parents and referring physicians,
to understand the legal aspects of assessment practice, and to appropriately apply test for diagnosis and treatment
planning. Instructor: Moffitt. 3 units.
355. Research Practicum. Students will be involved in a research apprenticeship to a faculty member for hands-on
experience with research efforts. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
356. Research Practicum. Students will be involved in a research apprenticeship to a faculty member for hands-on
experience with research efforts. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
357S. Cognitive Neuroscience Colloquia. Graduate students (2nd year and higher) and other research trainees (e.g.
postdocs) in cognitive neurosciences will each take a turn at presenting a research topic (e.g. a research update, a
practice talk, an experimental proposal, presentation of a scientific article) in a forum aimed at helping junior
researchers develop and hone their presentation skills. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Woldroff and staff.
1 unit.
359S. Principles in Cognitive Neuroscience I. Introduction to the cognitive neuroscience of emotion, social
cognition, executive function, development, and consciousness. Topics also include cognitive disorders, and
computer modeling. Highlights current theories, methodological advances, and controversies. Students evaluate and
synthesize findings across a variety of research techniques. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Cabeza,
Labar, Purves, or Woldorff. 3 units. C-L: Neurobiology 349S, Philosophy 359S
360S. Principles in Cognitive Neuroscience II. Introduction to the cognitive neuroscience of emotion, social
cognition, executive function, development, and consciousness. Topics also include cognitive disorders, and
computer modeling. Highlights current theories, methodological advances, and controversies. Students evaluate and
synthesize findings across a variety of research techniques. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Cabeza,
Labar, Purves, or Woldorff. 3 units. C-L: Neurobiology 350S, Philosophy 360S
362. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging. 3 units. C-L: see Neurobiology 381
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363S. Psychology and Neuroscience First Year Seminar I. Analysis and discussion of current models and
research in psychology and neuroscience. Focus is on theories and research in brain-behavior relations, particularly
those relevant for perception, memory, and attention in humans and animals. Instructor: Staff. 1.5 units.
364S. Psychology and Neuroscience First Year Seminar II. Analysis and discussion of current models and
research in psychology and neuroscience. Focus is on theories and research in brain-behavior relations, particularly
those relevant for perception, memory, and attention in humans and animals. Instructor: Staff. 1.5 units.
366. Applied Analysis of Variance. Application of analysis of variance typical in psychology and related
disciplines. Introduction to the general linear model. Foundations of experimental design, probability, inference.
Topics include: one factor ANOVA, factorial ANOVA with two- and three-way interactions, trend analysis, within-
subjects designs, analysis of covariance, effect size and power estimation. Equips students to apply, interpret, and
report results of ANOVA. Training in the use of SAS statistical computing system. Mandatory weekly lab sessions.
Assumes undergraduate statistics course; understanding of basic statistical concepts. Consent of instructor required.
Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
367. Applied Correlation and Regression Analysis. Applications of correlation and regression analysis typical in
psychology and related disciplines. Correlation topics include: computing, testing, and comparing zero-order,
partial, and semi-partial correlation coefficients. Regression topics include: logic of model comparison, hierarchical
analysis, effect and dummy coding, interaction effects, curvilinear effects, diagnostics, and power estimation. Equips
students to apply, interpret, and report results of correlation and multiple regression analyses. Training in the use of
the SAS statistical computing system. Mandatory weekly lab sessions. Assumes prior graduate training in general
linear model. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
368. Applied Structural Equation Modeling. Applications of structural equation modeling typical in psychology
and related disciplines. Topics include: notation, path diagrams, specification and identification, estimation,
modification, power estimation, measurement models, multivariate regression models, panel models, growth
models. Emphasis on model comparisons, limits on causal inference. Equips students to apply, interpret, and reports
results of structural equation modeling analyses. Training in the use of relevant software. Mandatory weekly lab
sessions. Prerequisite: Psychology 274 or equivalent. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
369. Research Synthesis and Meta-Analysis (G). 3 units. C-L: see Education 369
370. Applied Multilevel Modeling. Applications of multilevel modeling typical in psychology and related
disciplines. Estimation and interpretation of models for multilevel data structures, including data generated by
clustered and longitudinal designs. Examination of conceptual, substantive, and methodological issues in analyzing
multilevel data. Focus on appropriately conceptualizing, modeling, and reporting research on multilevel data.
Training in the use of relevant statistical software. Mandatory weekly lab sessions. Assumes prior graduate training
in applications of analysis of variance and multiple regression. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. 3
units.
371. Social Cognition. 3 units. C-L: see Business Administration 566
380S. Foundations of Behavioral and Computational Neuroscience. Survey and in depth discussion of the
methods, theory, and current research in the field of behavioral and computational neuroscience. Emphasis on
animal models and neurobiological underpinnings of learning, memory, and cognition. Covers the latest
developments in research on neuroanatomical, cellular and molecular substrates of behavior with emphasis on the
influence of development, environment, and experience across the lifespan. Instructor: Buhusi, Williams, Staff. 3
units.
381. Data Methods in Cognitive Psychology. Introduction to the analysis of behavioral data from cognitive
research with a focus on the separation of accuracy and response strategy. Particular emphasis on Signal Detection
Theory and other basic statistical decision models. Application of Matlab to both basic Monte Carlo simulation and
cognitive experiment generation. Simple estimation of the parameters of decision models using iterative search
algorithms and the use of bootstrap techniques to estimate the variability of parameter estimates. Investigation of the
basic relationship between decision models and statistical tests typically used behavioral data analysis such as
Student's t-test. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
391. Special Topics in Psychology. This seminar is designed to provide students with an opportunity to engage in
an advanced and intensive examination of the research literature on a special topic in psychology. Specific topics
will vary by semester. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
392. Special Topics in Psychology. This seminar is designed to provide students with an opportunity to engage in
an advanced and intensive examination of the research literature on a special topic in psychology. Specific topics
will vary by semester. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.
            Graduate School Bulletin –2011-2012 COURSES SECTION -- THIS WILL BE YOUR ONLY PROOF Page 8 of 8



395. Special Topics in Psychology. Special topics in psychology. Consent of instructor required. Variable credit.
Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.
396. Graded Research. 1 to 3 units. Instructor: Staff. Variable credit.
399. Special Readings in Psychology. Consent of instructor required. Instructor: Staff. 3 units.

				
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posted:7/4/2011
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