Docstoc

DRAMA _D018_

Document Sample
DRAMA _D018_ Powered By Docstoc
					CHURCHLANDS SENIOR HIGH
       SCHOOL




    YEAR 10 TO 11

 SUBJECT SELECTION
   BOOKLET 2009


                      1
                             MAKING CHOICES - The Next Step




INTRODUCTION

Young people today face new social and economic challenges in a complex and changing world. The
pattern of work roles they will experience over their lifetimes will be very diverse. It may include
periods of both full-time and part-time employment, unemployment, self-employment and unpaid work
including recurrent education and training. Their capacity to participate fully and effectively in a broad
range of work roles will be directly affected by their capacity to make and implement career decisions
at successive stages in their lives.

You will soon need to make a decision about your immediate future. This is an important decision and
may be difficult to make. You will have help to make your decision but it is up to you to actively seek
out the advice and information you need to make a sound choice. It is wise to plan for several
alternatives in case you change your mind or miss out on your first choice.

This booklet contains information to help you decide which directions to take after Year 10. Details are
provided on various post school alternatives, in addition to Year 11 and Year 12 courses and the West
Australian Certificate of Education.

Read this booklet carefully before making your decision about next year. Consider the range of options
presented and discuss possible choices with your parents and other people who are available to help
you – Senior School Coordinator, Deputy Principals, Teachers and representatives from TAFE and the
UNIVERSITIES.

It is essential that if you are returning to undertake upper school studies you select a program that
provides you with:
        reasonable likelihood of success
        clearly defined opportunities to enter employment, training or higher education (University,
          TAFE etc) in your preferred career field.

Further information and assistance with the course selection process is readily available from teaching,
counselling, and administrative staff within the school.

If you and/or your parents wish to discuss future career or educational plans with the Senior School
Coordinator you should make an appointment as soon as possible.

Very soon you will be asked to indicate your PROPOSED STUDIES FOR 2009. If you intend returning
to Churchlands S.H.S. next year you will also need to make an appointment to discuss subject
selections for next year with a counsellor. The dates of the subject selection sessions are: Wednesday
 th                           th              th
6 August and Thursday 7 and Friday 8 August 2008. A letter will be sent home to parents with
the details of the arrangements and when to make appointments. DO NOT MAKE APPOINTMENTS
YET.




                                                                                                         2
   WHEN MAKING YOUR CHOICES



                         BE REALISTIC

Do not think that:

        Your study habits will miraculously change over the holidays.

You have always hated Society and Environment but next year you are going
                           to love Geography.

     You can ignore your past results in subjects you intend to continue
                              with next year.

      You will be able to manage and like a subject that someone else
                            has chosen for you

          You will like a subject because your best friend is doing it.

         You should choose a subject because you think a particular
                        teacher will be teaching it.

      You should choose a subject because you have heard it is easy.

       You don’t have to bother to think now because you can always
                          change your mind later.

         You hate chemistry but because it is a pre-requisite for your
                    chosen career everything will be ok.

       You can ignore entry requirements and kid yourself that you will
                           cross that bridge later.




                                                                            3
      CAREER INFORMATION & HOW TO OBTAIN IT

Your choice of possible careers is perhaps one of the most important decisions you will make in your
lifetime. Students who plan ahead and think what jobs will best suit their interests, abilities and
personality will be more contented with their choice. You should actively seek information about
careers and job availability.

Below is a list of people and places where you can obtain information:

1.    SENIOR SCHOOL COORDINATOR
      The Senior School Coordinator is available to discuss any issues relating to Year 11 and 12
      studies including Tertiary Studies, TAFE/Apprenticeship/Employment Studies or Vocational
      Education and Training (V.E.T). Programmes and general careers information offered through
      Churchlands S.H.S.

2.    SCHOOL LIBRARY
      The library has material (literature, videos and information) on a wide range of careers and
      courses of study in the Careers Section of the library.

3.    INTERNET ACCESS
      Careers information can be obtained through the Churchlands S.H.S. Website
      www.churchlands.edu.au (click on CURRICULUM or STUDENT SERVICES then Post
      Compulsory/VET and screen down to LINKS.


4.    CAREER INFORMATION CENTRE
      This modern careers library provides a lot of up-to-date information about employment and
      career opportunities, in addition to further study opportunities at T.A.F.E./University. They
      welcome visits by students, and can assist with interest/aptitude assessments.
                 nd
      Location: 2 Floor, City Central Building, 166 Murray Street. PERTH. WA 6000
      (Phone 9464 1305)
      Hours: 8.30 a.m. – 5.00 p.m. (Monday - Friday)

5.    W.A. TRAINING/INFORMATION CENTRE
      Provides vocational information on education and training particularly with reference to T.A.F.E.
      studies. Counselling and advice is also available.
                 nd
      Location: 2 Floor, City Central Building, 166 Murray Street. PERTH. WA 6000
      (Phone 9421 1344)
      Hours 8.30am to 5.00 pm (weekdays)

6.    CENTRELINK OFFICES – Refer White or Yellow Pages.

7.    TECHNICAL & FURTHER EDUCATION (T.A.F.E.)
      T.A.F.E. offers a variety of short and long term courses in skills training. For information see the
      Careers Coordinator at C.S.H.S. or contact the nearest Metropolitan T.A.F.E. College.

      CENTRAL TAFE                                       CHALLENGER TAFE
      Telephone: 1300 300 822                            Telephone: (08) 9239 8189
      Fax:       (08) 9427 1999                          Website: www.challengertafe.wa.edu.au
      Website: www.central.wa.edu.au

      SWAN TAFE                                          WEST COAST TAFE
      Telephone: (08) 9267 7500                          Telephone: 1300 134 881
      Fax:       (08) 9267 7516                          Fax:       (08) 9233 1066
      Website: www.swantafe.wa.edu.au                    Website: www.westcoast.wa.edu.au




                                                                                                         4
8.    PROSPECTIVE STUDENT OFFICERS ATTACHED TO UNIVERSITIES
      Are available to discuss courses with high school students, and may be contacted at the various
      tertiary institutions.

      i)     CURTIN UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY www.curtin.edu.au
             Prospective Student Services. Telephone: 9266 2662
      ii)    MURDOCH UNIVERSITY www.murdoch.edu.au
             The Prospective Students Centre. Telephone: 1300 687 3624
      iii)   UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA www.admissions.uwa.edu.au
             The Prospective Students Office. Telephone: 6488 2477
      iv)    EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY www.ecu.edu.au
             Student Recruitment. Telephone: 134 328
      v)     NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY www.nd.edu.au
             Prospective Students Office. Telephone: 9433 0533
      vi)    Tertiary Institutions Services Centre www.tisc.edu.au


9.    JOB GUIDE FOR W.A. 2008
      This is a useful and informative book. These have been distributed to all Year 10 students
      during Term 2. This guide is also available from the internet on www.jobguide.dest.gov.au

10.   FURTHER INFORMATION on Education/Training Programs may be obtained from:

       Agricultural High Schools         - Education Department Phone: 9264 5318
       Private Business &                - Yellow Pages/West Australian classifieds
        Training Colleges
       Senior Campuses               - Cyril Jackson Senior Campus Phone: 9279 5122
                                      - Tuart College Phone: 9444 9377
                                     - Canning College Phone: 9458 9644
                                     - North Lake Senior Campus Phone: 9337 4888
       Vocational Program Coordinators at Government Secondary Schools




                           FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
Since July 1998, financial assistance for young people has been simplified with the introduction of a
YOUTH ALLOWANCE. The Allowance is designed to provide a single income support payment for
Young Australians, whether they are in education, training, unemployed or sick.

The Youth Allowance replaces Austudy, Newstart Allowance, Youth Training Allowance, Sickness
Allowance, and additional Family payment for 16-18 year olds.

Youth Allowance, as with Austudy is subject to a means test (entitlements will depend upon parental
income).

ABSTUDY, which provides financial assistance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders studying
approved courses has not changed.

Further information on both Youth Allowance and Abstudy may be obtained from your local Centrelink
Youth Services Centre.

Additional financial assistance for needy students in Years 11/12 may be available, subject to means
testing.

Further details and application forms are available through the School Registrar.




                                                                                                    5
                                     CERTIFICATION

Students entering Year 11/12 in 2009-2010 will be working towards two documents, both of which are
issued by the Curriculum Council of Western Australia.

They are:

1.    STATEMENT OF RESULTS

A statement of results is issued to all students who complete at least one course unit or
endorsed program.

The statement of results records:

• grades achieved in course units
• achievement of VET units of competency and VET qualifications
• achievement of endorsed programs
• examination result, school result and WACE score for each course
• completion of WACE requirements
• achievement of English language competence
• coverage of overarching learning outcomes (under review, decision expected March 2008)
• 20 hours of community service
• achievement of awards.


2. WESTERN AUSTRALIAN CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION (WACE)

WACE requirements for 2010 — 2015
To be eligible for the award of the Western Australian Certificate of Education, students in their final year
of compulsory schooling and who are enrolled in a pair of stage 2 or 3 units, or unless exempt, sit for
and make a genuine attempt at the examination for that course.

To qualify for a Western Australian Certificate of Education (WACE), a student must:
• Complete at least 20 course units
o At least ten units must be from Council courses (including at least three two-unit combinations).
o Up to 10 unit equivalents can be from endorsed programs.

o Completion of a full-year D or E code subject (or equivalent) will equate to two course units.

• Achieve an average of a C grade or better
o Across at least 10 course units from at least five courses (at least three two-unit combinations must
be included), or

o Across at least eight course units from at least four courses if endorsed programs equivalent to eight
units are included, or

o Across at least six course units from at least three courses if endorsed programs equivalent to 10
units are included.

o An accredited full-year Curriculum Council subject equates to a two-unit course combination.

o A credit system will be used to equate a level and band for a course unit studied during 2005-2007 to
a grade.
                                                                                                           6
o Achievement of a VET course unit equates to a C grade.

• Meet the standard for English language competence
o Complete at least four units from an English course or completion of two full-year English subjects
(formerly accredited). Full-time students* are required to complete, in each year of their senior
secondary schooling, two units of an English course.

o Meet the English language competence standard, as defined by work samples**, or

o Achieve a grade of C or better in any E code full-year English subject (formerly accredited), or

o An average of Level 4 or better across two units studied in Year 12 in the English course (achieved
2006 or 2007), or

o An average of C grade or better across two units studied in Year 12 (achieved in 2007) in English as
an Additional Language/Dialect or Literature, or

o Pass the Curriculum Council English language competence test.

• Include all 13 overarching learning outcomes in their overall program of study***

• Complete 20 hours of community service

• Sit for WACE examinations, unless exempt

* If students are part-time they must study two units of an English course in their final year of study.

** Teachers will use the students’ assessments during the year as evidence of attainment of the language
competence standard. Work sample exemplars and descriptors will be provided to assist teachers to make
these judgements. The emphasis will be on the key functional skills of reading and writing. The standard is
related to the standard required to achieve a C grade or better in stage 1 English.

*** The policy is under review. Schools will be notified in March 2008 of the outcome of this review.




                                                                                                              7
                    TECHNICAL & FURTHER EDUCATION (TAFE)
                                        www.tafe.wa.edu.au
TAFE is Western Australia‘s largest sector of vocational education and training. It offers a broad range
of courses ranging from para-professional to trades. Students can select from approximately 800
courses.

TAFE currently has 18 different areas of study:

1.    Arts, Entertainment, Sport and Recreation
2.    Automotive
3.    Banking, Finance, Insurance and Property Services
4.    Building and Construction
5.    Business and Management
6.    Clothing, Textiles, Footwear and Furnishing
7.    Community Services, Health and Education
8.    Computing and Information Technology
9.    Electrical, Electronic, Refrigeration and Airconditioning
10.   Engineering and Mining
11.   Food Processing
12.   Hospitality, Travel and Tourism
13.   Languages
14.   Primary Industry
15.   Sales and Personal Services
16.   Science, Technology and Process Manufacturing
17.   Sport and Recreation
18.   Transport and Logistics

There are four levels of awards granted by TAFE and students may enter these with varying levels of
schooling.


                                          Diploma

       YEAR 12                                                                 2/3 Years
                                          Advanced Diploma


                                          Certificate (Levels lll/lV)          1/2 Years

       YEAR 11
                                          Certificate (Levels I/II)            1 Year

       YEAR 10
                                          Pre-Apprenticeship                   1 Year


In recent years, TAFE has become more of a post Year 12 option. Although Year 10‘s and Year 11‘s
may gain entry into pre-apprenticeship and certain lower level certificate courses, preference is given
to Year 12 students.

Many TAFE courses articulate with University courses. Students can gain entry into many
University courses in the same subject area upon successful completion of either an Advanced
Diploma or Diploma course and be given advanced standing (i.e. the University course will be
shortened. On most occasions the student enters second year. )

TAFE has become a very popular choice for Year 12 leavers with increasing numbers enrolling in
recent years.

There is also a Second Semester intake into T.A.F.E. at the start of Term 3 and applications have to
be into T.A.F.E. Admissions by the end of May. Check with T.A.F.E. for details.



                                                                                                       8
                         TAFE ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS

Technical and Further Education (TAFE) in recent years have dramatically changed their admission
requirements. Entry into many of the TAFE courses is very competitive.

TAFE have published the minimum entry requirements and selection criteria for each TAFE course.
Selection criteria are applied where there are more applicants who satisfy the minimum entry
requirements for a particular course than the quota of positions available. A credit points system is
used to rank applicants in order of merit.
* Please refer to T.A.F.E. Handbook 2009 for detailed information-available free from Senior School
Coordinator.

How do I address the selection criteria?

If the course you are applying for asks you to address the selection criteria you will need to submit more
documents.

You can score points for:

Qualification pathway (maximum score = 29)
This includes any qualification completed/not completed, as listed in the qualification pathway of the
selection criteria.

Work Experience/Employment (maximum score = 29)
This includes any employment or workplace experience that you have had as listed below under the
work experience and employment sector. Note: you must provide copies of either a reference, pay slip
or group certificate/summary. CVs and phone references are not accepted.

Education/Skills Development (maximum score = 42)
This includes secondary education (current or past), or a portfolio demonstrating skill development. The
portfolio may contain qualifications or tests that you completed in the past. For more information on how
the points are calculated for this section and evidence required check the Evidence Guide or call
TAFEWA Admissions on 9224 6560.



                            PRE-APPRENTICESHIP COURSES


A pre-apprenticeship course is a one-year full-time course of instruction (usually from February to
November) at a TAFE campus in a specific trade (eg plumbing, cooking etc.), or a small group or
‗family‘ of trades (eg electrical fitting and installing/mechanics). During the year, pre-apprentices are
given instruction and/or experience in a range of practical activities associated with the chosen trade
and also complete about one third of the Certificate of Trade Studies for the trade (i.e. the theoretical
component of the apprenticeship).

On successful completion of the course, pre-apprentices still need to find an employer willing to employ
them as an apprentice. They are eligible for a shortened three-year term of apprenticeship in selected
trades as a result of already having studied for a year. This is now the most common pathway to
obtaining an apprenticeship.

Education Levels Required
The minimum educational level required is the completion of Year 10 with an average level of C Grade
in four Learning Areas including English and Mathematics, or equivalent. However, entry to many
courses is competitive. Higher grading in Year 10 units and/or successful completion of relevant Year
11 or 12 courses is usually an advantage.

                                                                                                         9
Applying for Pre-apprenticeship Courses
Information is made available through the Senior School Coordinator or from individual TAFE
campuses. These are normally available in August/September and must be completed and submitted
to TAFE Admissions by the end of Term III.

There are often more applicants than places in courses and interviews are often conducted.
Applicants are informed if they have been successful by the end of January.

There is a provision on the application form to select four trades (in order of preference) and also to
indicate the TAFE campus preferred. First choice of course and TAFE campus is usually, but not
always, possible for successful applicants.




                       APPRENTICESHIPS & TRAINEESHIPS


The Government has reformed the apprenticeship and traineeship system to encourage employers to
offer more jobs to young people. Young people will find more flexible arrangements for combining
work with vocational training and an increased number of apprenticeship opportunities.
Apprenticeships will become available in more industries and occupations, particularly in new
industries and where new technologies are emerging.

New Apprenticeships encompass existing apprenticeships and traineeships to provide young people
with training options which:
 Involve paid job opportunities combined with a mix of on and/or off-the-job training
 Lead to a nationally recognised and portable qualification which is valued in the labour market
 Link to higher qualifications to provide career opportunities
 Will make apprenticeships and traineeships available on a part-time basis in certain schools
 Provide jobs and career opportunities in a wider range of industries.

Apprenticeships and traineeships are available in over 300 occupations and their availability varies
from State to State. In addition to the traditional apprenticeship trades, opportunities are to be found in
the fields of:

   Administration
   Arts and the media
   Banking, insurance and financial services
   Building including bricklaying, cabinet making, carpentry and joinery, glass cutting and glazing,
    masonry, painting, plastering, plumbing and gas fitting, roof tiling, sprinkler fitting.
   Child care
   Communications and information technology
   Community services and health
   Electrical including electrical fitter, electrical mechanic, electrical trades person
   Food including flower and vegetable seed propagation, gardening, green keeping, nursery work,
    fruit tree cultivation
   Hairdressing
   Horticultural including flower and vegetable seed propagation, gardening, green keeping, nursery
    work, fruit tree cultivation
   Manufacturing operations
   Metal including blacksmithing, boiler making, fitting and turning, machining, moulding, sheet metal
    working, tool making, welding.
   Printing book binder, compositor, graphic reproduction, letterpress machinist, printing machining.
   Sales
   Tourism and hospitality
   Transport, warehousing and furniture removals
   Vehicle including automotive electrics, fitting, body builder, coach painting, motor mechanic, panel
    beater

                                                                                                         10
Assistance in relation to Apprenticeship & Traineeship opportunities may be obtained from:

      WA Training Information Centre
        nd
       2 Floor, City Central Building,
       166 Murray Street
       PERTH 6000
       Phone: 9421 1344

      Your local TAFE Information Centre

      The Senior School Coordinator at school.

      Your local Centrelink Office through Employment National (formerly the CES).


GROUP TRAINING SCHEMES

Hospitality Group Training WA                    West Perth           Phone:   9481 1602
Motor Industry Training Association (M.I.T.A.)   Balcatta             Phone:   9240 8044
Group Training - Perth (Furniture Trades)        East Perth           Phone:   9221 5133
Plumbing & Painting Training Co                  Maylands             Phone:   9370 1796
Electrical/Electronic Group Training Scheme      Malaga               Phone:   9248 9077
W.A. Group Training (Building Trades)            Perth                Phone:   9225 4300
Group Training Association of WA                 Naval Base           Phone:   9411 0777
 (Metals/Engineering)
HIA Training Foundation                          Osborne Park         Phone: 9244 3222
(Building Trades)




                                                                                             11
         CONVERTING AVERAGE MARKS TO A TER

   A minimum of 4 subjects must be used for your average
   You must achieve the minimum requirement in English or Literature-English but it doesn‘t have
    to count in your average
   TISC select your average from your best 4 subjects for a TER calculation

                                 TISC Website: www.tisc.edu.au

AVERAGE (Of best 4/5 or 6 Subjects)                   Tertiary Entrance Ranking (TER)
             29.80                                                    30
             33.82                                                    40
             39.41                                                    50
             42.78                                                    55
             45.90                                                    60
             49.05                                65– Minimum Course entry ECU/Murdoch
             52.63                                                    70
             53.35                                                    71
             53.98                                                    72
             54.63                                                    73
             55.27                                                    74
             56.00                                            75 – Minimum Course entry to
                                                                   Curtin
                56.76                                                 76
                57.45                                                 77
                58.08                                                 78
                58.80                                                 79
                59.49                                                 80
                60.18                                          81 – Minimum Course entry to
                                                                    UWA
                60.82                                                 82
                61.53                                                 83
                62.29                                                 84
                63.10                                                 85
                63.84                                                 86
                64.78                                                 87
                65.76                                                 88
                66.53                                                 89
                67.49                                                 90
                68.47                                                 91
                69.57                                                 92
                70.78                                                 93
                72.06                                                 94
                73.45                                                 95
                74.96                                                 96
                77.04                                                 97
                79.43                                                 98
                81.18                                                 98.5
                83.61                                                 99
                87.00                                                 99.5
                88.90                                                 99.7
                92.24                                                 99.9
                94.14                                                 99.95



                                                                                              12
.
                      Curriculum Council Exhibitions and Awards
                     * The information for Exhibitions and Awards for students completing Year 12 in
                       2010 is not yet available from the Curriculum Council so we have included the
                       details for 2008 as most of the information will remain unchanged for 2010.


Policy and guidelines
Exhibitions and awards are granted by the Curriculum Council to senior secondary students studying the
Council subjects/courses in 2008. The awards recognise individual excellence at the senior secondary
level of schooling. Both general educational excellence and subject/course-specific excellence are
recognised.
General criteria for eligibility for exhibitions and awards
To achieve a Beazley Medal: TEE, a Beazley Medal: VET, a general exhibition, a general exhibition
(ATSI),
a general exhibition (ESL/ESD), a subject/course exhibition, a certificate of distinction and a certificate of
excellence, a student must:
• be an Australian citizen or a permanent resident of Australia
• be enrolled as a full-time student in a registered secondary school
• not have previously completed the subject/course external assessment used in determining the award
• have satisfied the requirements for a WACE at the time of the determination of the awards.
Special general awards, special subject/course awards and special certificates of distinction may be
awarded to students who do not meet the general eligibility criteria.
Beazley medals
Beazley Medal: TEE
The Beazley Medal: TEE is awarded for excellence in tertiary entrance rank subjects or courses. It is
awarded to the highest ranked eligible student, using the general exhibition criteria.
Beazley Medal: VET
The Beazley Medal: VET is awarded for excellence in studies that include workplace learning and VET.
It is awarded to the eligible student who has demonstrated the best results in a vocational program.
Eligibility criteria
Students eligible for this award will have:
• at least five school assessments from:
o E-code full-year (or equivalent) Curriculum Council subjects of which
��two must be E-code wholly school assessed subjects (other than a SWL subject), and
��at least one grade from an E-code structured workplace learning subject studied during Year 12
or complete at least two units of Workplace Learning (endorsed program).
o Courses in which at least two units have been completed in Year 12, and/or
o VET studies in a stand alone mode, from which the number of E-code full-year subject equivalents
will be calculated at the rate of half of one subject per 55 hours for a maximum of two subjects.
• completed at least 110 hours of VET in a particular industry area (either completed in an integrated or
stand alone mode).
School assessment award score
Students will be short listed according to the school assessment award score. A student‘s school
assessment award score will be calculated from achievement in E-code subjects and/or courses studied
in Year 12, and upon exhibitions and awards obtained in the year of the calculation or in the previous
year.
The calculation of this score will:
• be based on the school-assessed grade for E-code subjects, and the school assessment for courses
units studied in Year 12, and
• take account of the two assessment scales from the two types of assessments (E-code subjects and
courses studied in Year 12).
The accuracy of the database is paramount for the calculation of the school assessment award score.
Late or inaccurate submission of students‘ results from schools will disadvantage students.
Selection criteria
The exhibitions and awards committee will determine the award winner from the shortlist according to
the following criteria (listed in priority order):
                                                                                                          13
• AQF level of the nationally recognised VET qualification
SECTION 10: EXHIBITIONS AND AWARDS
Revised WACE Manual 2008 57
• coherence of the WACE program
• number of other Curriculum Council awards.
General exhibitions
Forty awards, known as general exhibitions, are awarded to the eligible students who obtain the highest
Curriculum Council award score based on the average of five TEE subjects/WACE courses scaled
marks, calculated to two decimal places. The subjects and/or courses (at least two units in each course)
must have been studied and completed during the last two years of senior secondary schooling. Where
candidates have accumulated scaled marks over two years, the following rules apply in calculating the
Curriculum Council‘s award score:
• most scaled marks must have been obtained in the final year of senior secondary schooling.
• where a student has repeated a subject and/or course, the first scaled mark obtained is used. Scaled
marks in repeated subjects and/or courses will count only once.
The following subject/course combinations will not be permitted in determining the Curriculum Council
award score. In cases of such combinations, only the higher of the two scaled marks will count.
Biology and Human Biology
Chemistry and Physical Science
Chinese: Advanced and Chinese: Second Language
Discrete Mathematics and Applicable Mathematics
Discrete Mathematics and Calculus
Earth & Environmental Sciences and Geology
English (WACE course) and English Literature
English as an Additional Language/Dialect and English as a Second Language
English and English as an Additional Language/Dialect
English (E-code) and English Literature
English Literature and English as an Additional Language/Dialect
Indonesian: Advanced and Indonesian: Second Language
Japanese: Advanced and Japanese: Second Language
Malay: Advanced and Indonesian: Advanced
Malay: Advanced and Indonesian: Second Language
Physics and Physical Science
Additional general exhibitions
General exhibition (ATSI)
One award known as general exhibition (ATSI) may be awarded to the top eligible Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander student based on the average of five TEE subjects/courses scaled marks, calculated to
two decimal places. The subjects and/or courses (at least two units in each course) must have been
studied and completed during the last two years of senior secondary schooling.
The subject and/or course combinations not permitted in calculating of the Curriculum Council award
score are listed in the general exhibition criteria. Rules regarding the inclusion of scaled marks in
repeated subjects and/or courses are listed in the general exhibition criteria.
To be eligible for this award, the student must fit the Australian Bureau of Statistics definition of an
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.
In the event that this student wins a general exhibition, he or she will also receive the general exhibition
(ASTI).
General exhibition (ESL/ESD)
One award known as general exhibition (ESL/ESD) may be awarded to the top eligible student with an
ESL/ESD background based on the average of five TEE subjects/courses scaled marks, calculated to
two decimal places. The subjects and/or courses (at least two units in each course) must have been
studied and completed in the year of the award.
The subject and/or course combinations not permitted in calculation of the Curriculum Council award
score are listed in the general exhibition criteria. Rules regarding the inclusion of scaled marks in
repeated subjects and/or courses are listed in the general exhibition criteria.
SECTION 10: EXHIBITIONS AND AWARDS
58 Revised WACE Manual 2008
To be eligible for this award, the student must meet the ESL/ESD background criteria used for studying
English as an Additional Language/Dialect course.
In the event that this student wins a general exhibition, he or she will also receive the general exhibition
(ESL/ESD).

                                                                                                          14
Subject/course exhibitions
Category one (TEE subjects/courses)
A subject exhibition may be awarded to the eligible student obtaining the highest raw examination mark
in the TEE for each subject, provided that at least 100 students sat the examination. To be eligible for a
category one subject exhibition, the student must have achieved a grade of A in that subject in the year
of the award being granted.
A course exhibition may be awarded to the eligible student obtaining the highest external assessment
score for each WACE course, provided that at least 100 students sat the examination. To be eligible for
a category one course exhibition the student must have completed at least two course units in the year
of the award being granted. No course exhibition will be available for students who have not sat the
examination in that course.
Background candidates sitting a LOTE subject which includes background and non-background
candidates are not eligible for a subject exhibition in the respective subject.
Category two (wholly school assessed subjects and non-examination candidates)
A subject exhibition may be awarded to the eligible student who is the top student in each subject for the
award of the certificate of distinction for wholly school assessed subjects.
A course exhibition may be awarded to the eligible student who is the top student in each course for the
award of the certificate of distinction for non-examination candidates.
Certificates of distinction
Category one (TEE subjects/WACE courses)
Certificates of distinction are awarded to eligible students who are in the top 0.5 per cent of candidates
sitting the examination or the top two candidates (whichever is the greater) in a TEE subject where there
are at least 100 students sitting the examination. The determination is based on the combined mark
(being an equally weighted combination of the standardised moderated school assessment and the
standardised examination mark).
For courses, certificates of distinction are awarded to eligible students who are in the top 0.5 per cent of
candidates sitting the external assessment or the top two candidates (whichever is the greater) where
there are at least 100 candidates sitting the examination. The determination is based on the combined
score (being an equally weighted combination of the statistically adjusted school assessment and the
external assessment).
In the case of LOTE subjects which have background candidates, certificates of distinction will be
granted to the top 0.5 per cent of eligible candidates or to the two top non-background candidates
(whichever is greater). Background candidates sitting a LOTE subject, which includes both background
and non background candidates, are not eligible for a certificate of distinction in the respective subject.
Category two (wholly school assessed subjects/courses)
Certificates of distinction may be awarded to eligible students who are in the top 0.5 per cent of students
in E code (Year 12) wholly school-assessed subjects with a mean enrolment of 100 or more in October
of the previous two years.
If a wholly school-assessed subject has an enrolment of more than 100 students as at the end of
processing enrolments (mid-July), then certificates of distinction and a subject exhibition are to be
available for awarding in this subject and schools will be informed accordingly.
The wholly school-assessed subjects to be granted subject exhibitions, special subject awards,
certificates of distinction and special certificates of distinction for 2008 will be compiled in October 2007.
SECTION 10: EXHIBITIONS AND AWARDS
Revised WACE Manual 2008 59
An award may be awarded to eligible students who are in the top 0.5 percent of students in their final
year of senior secondary schooling (Year 12) in a WACE course. There must be at least 100 Year 12
students enrolled in two units in the course for an award to be made in that course.
To be eligible for a certificate of distinction, a student must not have sat the examination and must have
completed at least two units for that course during their final year of senior secondary schooling (Year
12).
Students who are not in their final year of senior secondary schooling and are enrolled in the subjects
are eligible to be nominated for the wholly school-assessed subject awards. Should a student not in the
final year of senior secondary schooling be nominated for an award, he or she would be granted either a
special subject/course award or a special certificate of distinction.
Selection is by a panel appointed by the Curriculum Council. Panel members will be nominated by the
school sectors and approved by the Curriculum Council. The selection process involves two stages:
• School nomination – completion of a nomination form from the Principal highlighting the subject
achievement for a student likely to be in the top 0.5 per cent studying the subject/course.
• Interview or similar – short-listed students may be invited to demonstrate their understanding of, and
achievements in, the subject through an interview, performance and/or submission of a portfolio of work,
as determined by the selection panel.
                                                                                                           15
Schools will be required to assist the student to attend the interview at the Council and will be
responsible for meeting associated costs. Country nominees will be invited to attend an interview in
person or through a video conference/teleconference as appropriate.
Details of the process for determining recipients of these certificates of distinction will be available on
the Curriculum Council website www.curriculum.wa.edu.au from the beginning of Term 2, 2008.
Special general award
A special general award is presented to students not eligible for the award of a general exhibition
because they have not satisfied the general criteria for eligibility but who have otherwise achieved the
requirements for the award of a general exhibition and whose Council award score is not below the
lowest score for a general exhibition.
Special subject/course awards
A special subject/course award may be presented to a student not eligible for a subject/course exhibition
because they have not satisfied the general criteria for eligibility but who have otherwise achieved the
requirements for a subject/course exhibition. Only one award will be available in a particular subject.
Background candidates sitting a LOTE subject which includes both background and non-background
candidates are not eligible for a special subject award in the respective subject.
Special certificate of distinction
A special certificate of distinction is awarded to students not eligible for the award of a certificate of
distinction because they have not satisfied the general criteria for eligibility but who have otherwise
achieved the requirements for the award of a certificate of distinction. It will be awarded only to
candidates within the top 0.5 per cent of candidates sitting the examination or students in the top 0.5 per
cent of students enrolled in the subject for wholly school-assessed subjects.
Background candidates sitting a LOTE subject which includes both background and non-background
candidates are not eligible for a special certificate of distinction in the respective subject.
Certificates of excellence
A certificate of excellence is to be awarded to each eligible student who, in their last three consecutive
years of senior secondary school enrolment, obtain:
• at least 10 A grades in year-long subjects or course equivalents; or
• nine A grades in year-long subjects, if they have two course unit equivalent from endorsed programs
(including VET units of competence); or
SECTION 10: EXHIBITIONS AND AWARDS
60 Revised WACE Manual 2008
• eight A grades in year-long subjects, if they have four course unit equivalent from endorsed programs
(including VET units of competence);
• (only the students enrolled in a school-based traineeship) at least six A grades in year-long subjects, if
they have eight or more course unit equivalent from endorsed programs (including VET units of
competence), and have been engaged in a school-based traineeship and have achieved a minimum of
a Certificate II.
Completion of two course units is equivalent to a year-long Curriculum Council subject. Repeated
course units can be used in the determination of this award.
A subject cannot be used more than once in the determination of this award and two A grades in
semester length Curriculum Council subjects may be deemed equivalent to one A grade in a year-long
Curriculum Council subject.
At the time of the determination of this award, the student must have satisfied the requirements for the
WACE.
General
Award approval
The final decision on the granting of each award is made by the Curriculum Council exhibitions and
awards committee. For subject/course exhibitions (category one), the chief examiner or nominee is
required to make the recommendation.
Certificates and medals
The winner of the Beazley Medal: TEE and the Beazley Medal: VET receives a medallion and cheque
for $2000. In the event of a tie for either award, each student in the tie is to be granted a medallion and
$2000.
• Winners of general exhibitions and special general awards receive a medallion, a certificate and a
prize.
• Winners of a subject/course exhibitions and special subject/course awards receive a medallion,
certificate and a prize.

                                                                                                              16
• All other award winners receive a certificate.
• All certificates are suitable for photocopying.
Awards by nomination
The selection criteria and other promotional material for the certificates of distinction (non-exam) and
certificates of distinction (WSA) to be posted on the web and sent to schools during Term 1.
Full-time student
A full-time student is one who is enrolled in at least four full-year or equivalent subjects/courses in a
registered school.
Outstanding achievement
Where the number of candidates who sat a TEE subject/WACE course examination was below 100, the
exhibition and awards committee may decide to award a subject/course exhibition or certificates of
distinction if the achievement is of an exceptionally high standard.
Sickness/misadventure claims
A derived examination mark resulting from a sickness/misadventure claim can be included in the
determination of a Beazley Medal: TEE, a general exhibition, a general exhibition (ATSI), a general
exhibition (ESL/ESD), a certificate of distinction, a special general award or a special certificate of
distinction.
Release of information
The name and school of award winners is published unless the award winner prefers otherwise. In such
cases, only the name of the school will be published.
Sponsorship
The aim is that educational and business bodies will provide sponsorship for the exhibitions and awards,
and that the prizes and presentation ceremony will be self-supporting through sponsorship.
The Curriculum Council secretariat will seek sponsorship for the exhibitions and awards. Sponsorship
packages will be available for different levels of sponsorship.
Awards ceremony
A presentation ceremony is held in February. The ceremony is inclusive of all Curriculum Council
exhibitions and awards.


.




                                                                                                      17
SUBJECTS OFFERED IN YEAR 11
           2009




                              18
                                                                          TAFE/APPRENTICESHIP/
                    TERTIARY STREAM
                                                                          EMPLOYMENT STREAM
CODE                                                  CODE
2A/2B          Accounting and Finance                 1A/1B       Applied Information Technology
2A/2B          Ancient History                        D944        Aspects of Tourism
2A/2B          Applied Information Technology         1A/1B       Business Management & Enterprise
2A/2B          Biological Sciences                    1A/1B       Career and Enterprise
2A/2B          Chemistry                              1A/1B       Children, Family & the Community-Caring
2A/2B          Chinese-Background Speakers                        for Others
2A/2B          Chinese-Second Language                1A/1B       Children, Family & the Community-Living
2A/2B          Computer Science                                   Independently
2A/2B          Dance                                  1A/1B       Dance
2A/2B          Drama                                  1A/1B       Design-Photography
2A/2B          Earth and Environmental Science        1A/1B       Design-Technical Graphics
2A/2B          Economics                              1A/1B       Drama
2A/2B          English                                1C/1D       English
2A/2B          Literature-(English)                   1C/1D       Food Science & Technology-Hospitality
2A/2B          English     as    an  Additional       1A/1B       Integrated Science
               Language/Dialect                       1B/1C       Materials design and Technology (Metals)
2A/2B          French                                 1C/1D       Materials Design and Technology (Textiles)
2A/2B          Geography                              1B/1C       Materials Design and Technology (Wood)
2A/2B          Human Biological Science               1B/1CMAT    Mathematics-Course 5 (Pathway 2 or 3-Year 10)
2A/2B          Japanese-Second Language               1C/1D       Media Production and Analysis
2A/2B          Media Production and Analysis          1A/1B       Music
2A/2B          Modern History                         1A/1B       Physical Education Studies
2A/2B          Music-(Western Art Music)              1A/1B       Politics and Law
2A/2B          Physics                                1A/1B       Visual Arts
2A/2B          Politics and Law
2A/2B          Visual Arts
                                                      WL          Workplace Learning (Endorsed Programme)
2A/2BMAT       Mathematics -Course 4
                (B Grade Pathway 2-Year 10)
2A/2BMAT       Mathematics -Course 3
                (A Grade Pathway 2-Year 10)
3A/3BMAT       Mathematics-Course 2
               (C Grade Pathway 1-Year 10)
3A/3BMAT       Mathematics-Course 1 (Double
3A/3BMAS       Maths) (B Grade Pathway 1-Year 10)
(Specialist)




         NOTE CAREFULLY
          All accredited subjects contribute to Secondary Graduation
          Students with CLEAR University intentions should take at least 4, Tertiary Stream subjects
           according to their INTERESTS and ABILITY.
          Students cannot select the combination of Literature-(English) and English; Human Biological
           Science and Biological Science.
          All students are to select six subjects from the list.



                                   ACCOUNTING & FINANCE 2A/2B


         SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
         A good level of performance in English and a satisfactory grade in Pathway 2 Mathematics.
                                                                                                          19
Pathway 1 Maths – Grade C – Exam: 50% or Pathway 2 Maths – Grade B – Exam: 65%.

ACCOUNTING & FINANCE
2AACF
Explore the world of accounting from sourcing finance at commencement of business to
recording/processing financial information when the enterprise is up and running. Learn about various
forms of business structure, essential principles for keeping the enterprise operational, accounting for
GST, controlling liquidity/profitability and complying with government requirements. Investigate the
ethical, social and environmental aspects of business operations. Apply your knowledge of financial
institutions and systems to create and safeguard the wealth generated by business.

ACCOUNTING & FINANCE
2BACF
Discover accrual accounting and electronic banking systems used worldwide. Prepare and analyse
financial documents such as business budgets, profit reports and balance sheets. Experience how to
electronically process your financial data to save time and money. Learn about the accounting and
finance professions and investigate the financial and ethical issues they encounter.

ASSESSMENT
Internal assessment throughout the course is based on the following:
               Semester Examinations          50%
               Continuous Assessment          10%
               - In Class Assignments
               Topic Tests                    40%

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Management
Accounting
Bookkeeping
Clerical
Course exemptions at tertiary level-T.A.F.E. and University




                                 ANCIENT HISTORY 2A/2B


PRE-REQUISITES
High level of essay writing and analytical skills.
Yr 10 Society and Environment – Grade B; Exam Score: Minimum 65%.

RATIONALE
The Ancient History course allows students to gain insights into their own society and its values
through the proper study of societies and culture of the more distant past. These societies are both
monocultural and multicultural in nature: vary in size from small city states to vast empires; and in
significant cases are the ancient foundations of modern political, legal, cultural and religious
institutions. It helps students to understand why societies and peoples hold certain values, and why
values and belief systems vary from one group to another.

UNIT OUTLINE

Unit 2AHIA
The focus for this unit is historical trends and/or movements. Students understand that throughout
history there have been events, ideas, beliefs and values that have contributed to underlying historical
trends and/or movements. They understand that some of these trends and/or movements have lasted
thousands of years, whilst others have had a fleeting impact on society, and that these trends and/or
movements have met with varying degrees of support and opposition, sometimes causing conflict. They
are able to note cause, impact and consequence, action and reaction, and trends of continuity and
                                                                                                       20
change.

Unit 2BHIA
 The focus for this unit is confrontation and resolution. Students learn that there are internal and
external forces that result in confrontation and resolution within societies and these have consequences
for continuity and change. They assess how the structures of power and authority were used, how
different groups and individuals responded and whether there was potential for greater confrontation
and more effective resolution.

COURSE OUTLINE

Outcome 1: Ancient historical investigation, communication and participation
Students apply the skills of historical inquiry and methodology to investigate the past and communicate
their findings using the discourse of history.
Outcome 2: Understanding the past
Students understand the past, linking the chronology of people, events, ideas and distinctive features of
society into an historical narrative.
Outcome 3: Continuity and change in the Ancient World
Students understand the nature of forces, the interaction between forces and their significance for
continuity and change in an historical context.
Outcome 4: Interpretations and perspectives of the Ancient World
Students understand that interpretations and perspectives of people and events may change
over time.

UNIT DESCRIPTION

         Emergence of the Greek City States in the Archaic Period. Includes colonisation, tyrants and
          constitutional reform. Individuals like Solon, Lycurgus.
         The Persian Wars. Covers the period 511-479 B.C. The Rise of Persia and the threat to the
          Greek states, the Ionian Revolt, Marathon and Xerxes invasion.

ASSESSMENT
School-managed assessment will provide evidence of achievement of all of the outcomes. Students
must be given at least two opportunities to demonstrate achievement of each outcome. The final
level/percentage will be determined by course work completed throughout the year and one major
school based examination for each unit of study.



                               APPLIED INFORMATION
                                 TECHNOLOGY 2A/2B


PRE-REQUISITES
High level of performance in English
Yr 10 English – Grade B; Exam: 65%.

RATIONALE
We live in a world saturated with information technology, yet so many of us grasp only bits and pieces of
the knowledge and skills necessary to make the technology really work for us. In this course, students
use a range of computer hardware and software to create, manipulate and communicate information.
The result is a set of skills to equip the student for the 21st Century and something equally important -
appreciation of the impact of information technology on society in general.
Students acquire and develop understandings, experience and skills related to the creation,
manipulation, storage, retrieval and communication of information using a range of computer software
and hardware. They apply this to technology challenges associated with human need in their lives, the
community and workplaces. They learn to work in a climate of rapid change associated with information
technology and appreciate its impact on individuals and social systems.


                                                                                                     21
2A/2B UNIT OUTCOMES
Outcome 1 Technology Process
Students apply a technology process when creating or modifying products using information
communication technologies.
Outcome 2 Understanding Information and Communication Technologies
Students understand the nature and use of computer hardware and software to achieve information
solutions.
Outcome 3 Quality of Information Solutions

Students explore alternatives and use skills, techniques, processes, standards and conventions to
achieve information solutions.

Outcome 4 Information and Communication Technologies in Society
Students understand how cultural beliefs, values, abilities and ethical positions are interconnected in the
development and use of information and communication technologies.
ASSESSMENT
School managed assessment will focus on providing evidence of achievement that is not readily gained
through external process. For example, evidence of achievement of the Technology Process and
Enterprise outcome and some conceptual understandings that are demonstrated iteratively, over time in
a range of learning contexts and may involve students negotiating, working collaboratively and in teams
to complete practical work.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Today people use computers to work, communicate and have fun. If you want to be a nurse,
multimedia designer, lawyer, vet, journalist, travel consultant, police, chef or have a career in any other
area anywhere in the world then you need to be able to use computers properly, efficiently and
creatively. For example, the Internet is used for e-commerce, getting up-to-date information, email and
chat as well as edutainment. This course will give you the edge when you apply for jobs and help in
your further studies as well as give you an outlet for creativity. You will learn to use a variety of software
packages and a range of computer hardware to create interesting solutions for important problems.
Enrol in this course to develop your internationally employable skills, access the information you need
for successful modern living and develop your personal potential in the digital zone.



                            BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 2A/2B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
     Year 10 Pathway 1 Science (Grade B and Exam 50%), or
     Year 10 Pathway 2 Science (Grade A and Exam 65%).

RATIONALE
Biology is a body of knowledge about living organisms and their interrelationships with each other and
with the physical world. Through Biology we investigate and answer questions about the living world. It is
closely connected with decisions individuals will be making about the future of the biosphere. Biology
influences diverse aspects of our understanding of the world from sub-microscopic entities such as
genes and DNA to global theories such as evolution and the greenhouse effect. Biological knowledge is
continually refined in the light of new evidence. Research in biology impacts on diverse industries such
as: biotechnology, forestry, fishing, agriculture, mining, and eco-tourism.

COURSE CONTENT

The course covers the following content areas;

     Ecosystems: biodiversity and sustainability
     The functioning organism
     Continuity of species
                                                                                                          22
     Working as a biologist

ASSESSMENT
The types of assessment listed below are consistent with the teaching and learning strategies
considered to be the most supportive of student achievement of the outcomes in the Biological Sciences
course:

       Examinations
       Tests
       Extended response
       Investigation
       Practical skills
       Fieldwork and environmental investigations

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Most tertiary institutions offer science courses with major studies in biology. Successful completion of
the Biology Course of Study would be an advantage to students wishing to pursue these courses.
Many career opportunities exist in the Biological area. Industry, Research and Government organisations
all require the services of qualified Biologists.



                                    CHEMISTRY 2A/2B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
     Year 10 Pathway 1 Science (Grade B and Exam 65%).

RATIONALE
Chemistry, the study of matter and its interactions, is an indispensable human activity that has
contributed essential knowledge and understanding of the world around us. Chemical knowledge has
enabled us to understand matter and devise processes for activities such as: cooking and preserving
food; purifying air and water; recycling plastics; anaesthetising patients; creating and building computers;
and communicating with others around the world about chemistry. It has also allowed people to design
and produce materials for purposes that include: transport and fuels; cosmetic and beauty products;
building products; medical treatments and pharmaceuticals; and cleaning agents. The significant
achievements of chemistry stretch across every facet of our lives. However, some may come at a price
if they are not used with the greatest of care. Chemical monitoring tells us that some materials, that may
pose a threat to ourselves and other life forms, have entered the environment. Ongoing developments
and improved understanding of chemistry can also be used to solve these problems.


COURSE CONTENT

The course covers the following content areas;
        macroscopic properties of matter
        atomic structure and bonding
        chemical reactions
        acids and bases in aqueous solutions
        oxidation and reduction
        organic chemistry
        applied chemistry.

ASSESSMENT
The types of assessment listed below are consistent with the teaching and learning strategies
considered to be the most supportive of student achievement of the outcomes in the Chemistry course.

     Examinations
     Tests
     Practical assessment
                                                                                                        23
     Investigations
     Assignments and classwork

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
A sound knowledge of chemistry is essential to further studies in most science related areas including:

      Agriculture                      Environmental Health            Life Sciences
      Biology                          Metallurgy                      Mineral Exploration
      Chemistry                        Geophysics                      Mining Engineering
      Dentistry                        Food Science                    Molecular Genetics
      Engineering                      Human Biology                   Biochemistry
      Medicine                         Process Control                 Environment Science
      Pharmacy                         Materials Science               Biotechnology
      Geology                          Chemical Physics                Veterinary Studies




                         CHINESE: SECOND LANGUAGE
                                    2A/2B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
CSL stage 1– Grade B; Exam Score: Minimum 50%.

RATIONALE
Chinese is one of the world‘s most significant language families and Chinese languages are spoken by
almost all citizens of the People‘s Republic of China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macao, and by substantial
numbers of people in Singapore and Malaysia, as well as by the global Chinese community. It has a
continuous written tradition lasting some four thousand years, and the role of Chinese culture in Asia
has been as significant as that of classical culture in Europe. The Chinese language referred to in the
course is Modern Standard Chinese, also known as Mandarin, with Putonghua as its spoken form and
simplified character text as its written form.

ELIGIBILITY
This course is only available to students who are deemed to be non-background candidates by the
Curriculum Council. Students wishing to enrol in this course will be required to make written application
to the Curriculum Council to determine their eligibility.

2A/2B UNIT OUTLINE
Outcome 1: Listening and responding
Students listen and respond to a range of texts.
Outcome 2: Spoken interaction
Students communicate in Chinese through spoken interaction.
Outcome 3: Viewing, reading and responding
Students view, read and respond to a range of texts.
Outcome 4: Writing
Students write a variety of texts in Chinese.

Unit 2ACSL
The focus for this unit is 中国特色 (the Chinese way). It is for students who have sound basic skills in
Chinese and are ready for to explore and compare their own culture and identity with that of their peers
in Chinese-speaking communities and also explore different Chinese-speaking cultures through the
medium of Chinese. They explore popular or traditional culture, the culture of everyday life, notions of
national or regional identity, or other forms of culture specific to Chinese-speaking communities.

Unit 2BCSL
The focus for this unit is我们去旅行吧! (travel—let’s go). It is aimed at students who are ready to
develop their skills to a higher level. They interact with Chinese speakers in either Australia or other

                                                                                                      24
Chinese-speaking communities at a deeper level, and begin to view their own culture from the
perspective of a Chinese speaker. This unit also focuses on ways in which learning Chinese may be of
benefit to students in relation to future work.

ASSESSMENT
Refer to the new WACE Manual for policy and principles for both school-based assessment and
examinations.
.
POST SCHOOL OPPORTUNITIES
The study of Chinese provides students with knowledge, understanding and skills
that form a valuable foundation for a range of courses at university and other tertiary
institutions.
In addition, the study of Chinese assists students to prepare for employment and full
and active participation as citizens.



                              CHINESE: BACKGROUND
                                   SPEAKERS 2A/B

The Chinese Background Speakers Syllabus is designed for students with a cultural and linguistic
background in Chinese.

RATIONALE
The study of Chinese contributes to the overall education of students, particularly in
the areas of communication, cross-cultural understanding, literacy, cognitive
development and general knowledge.
The study develops an understanding of how attitudes and values are shaped within
both Chinese-speaking and Australian communities.

Objectives Outcomes

Objective 1 — exchange information, opinions and ideas in Chinese. Spoken exchanges in Chinese,
Written exchanges in Chinese

Objective 2 — express ideas through the production of original texts in Chinese. Writing in Chinese

Objective 3 — analyse, evaluate and respond to a range of texts that are in Chinese. Listening &

responding, Reading & Responding
Objective 4 — understand aspects of the language and culture of Chinese-speaking communities.

Learning contexts: Teachers may determine a variety of learning contexts (examples shown below),
ensuring coverage of the four required themes of The Individual & the Community, Overseas Chinese,
Youth Culture, Global Issue

The Individual & the Community, enables students to examine the relationship between individuals and
groups. This theme will explore changing attitudes towards family and gender groups.

Youth culture, examines the role of young people in society, and takes into account social and
educational perspectives.
Chinese communities overseas, enables students to examine the Chinese culture as it is experienced in
non-Chinese cultural settings.
Global issues, looks at aspects of the changing world, such as economic growth, the environment and
the global community.

ASSESSMENT
Refer to the new WACE Manual for policy and principles for both school-based assessment and
examinations.

                                                                                                      25
POST SCHOOL OPPORTUNITIES
The study of Chinese provides students with knowledge, understanding and skills
that form a valuable foundation for a range of courses at university and other tertiary
institutions.
In addition, the study of Chinese assists students to prepare for employment and full
and active participation as citizens.



                             COMPUTER SCIENCE 2A/2B

PRE-REQUISITES
Pathway 1 Mathematics C Grade; Exam Score: Minimum 50%
Pathway 2 Mathematics B Grade; Exam Score: Minimum 65%

RATIONALE
Information based, information and communication technologies are integral to the twenty first century
global village and economy. Everyone is influenced by computers in some way and whilst all will use
computer systems as a means to an end, it is vital to develop an interest in the intricate workings of
computer systems so that future generations have the knowledge, understanding and skills to create
and maintain computer systems. This Computer Science course of study aims to take students beyond
the use of computers at an application level and into the realm of creating software, building and
networking computer-based systems.
Computer science is a wide-ranging discipline that can lead to many different professional and non-
professional careers. This course will cover a variety of topics to appeal to diverse range of students
interested in academic or vocational pathways. This course aims to stimulate students‘ awareness of
the nature and scope of computer science and thus enable them to recognize the opportunities within
this field for their own potential growth, as well as the possibility of contributing to the development of our
future technological society.
1A/1B UNIT OUTCOMES
Outcome 1 Technology Process
Students apply a technology process to create or modify computer-based systems appropriate to
meeting technology challenges.
Outcome 2 Computer Systems
Students understand the design, operation and interrelationships of a range of computer-based
systems.
Outcome 3 Computer Skills
Students apply cognitive, organisational, operational and manipulative skills appropriate to using,
developing and adapting computer-based systems.
Outcome 4 Computers in Society
Students understand the interrelationships between development and use of computer-based systems
and the individual, society and environment.

ASSESSMENT
School-managed assessment will provide evidence of achievement of all of the outcomes, with an
emphasis on skills that may not be measured readily through an external process: for example,
evidence of achievement in outcomes related to the development and presentation of ideas, research
and development of a variety of information systems.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
This Course of Study is designed for students wishing to become an Information Technology
professional. This is suitable for anybody wishing to commence further studies at TAFE or University.



                                         DANCE 2A/2B




                                                                                                           26
PRE-REQUISITES
B Grade in Year 10 dance.
Yr 10 English – Grade B; Exam: 65%.

RATIONALE
Dance is dynamic and powerful. It embodies our ideas, thoughts, emotions and values and provides a
unique opportunity to develop physically, creatively, aesthetically, emotionally and intellectually. The
Dance course develops and presents ideas through a variety of genres, styles and forms, as it provides
a unique way in which to express our cultural view and understanding of the world. They gain an
understanding of the physical competencies specific to dance, including experiential anatomy
(movement specific alignment), strength, flexibility, coordination and rhythmic understanding, while
learning to use the body as a medium for artistic expression. Students reflect on, respond to, and
evaluate how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. In performing dance,
technical, design and expressive skills are incorporated and developed. Through participation in the
Dance course, students develop transferable skills essential to their future. These include
communication skills, collaborative teamwork skills, negotiation and conflict resolution skills, problem
solving skills, as well as the ability to organise, analyse and evaluate. Participation may lead to
opportunities for future study in dance or related arts fields.

The course content is divided into three content areas:
 choreography
 performance
 contextual knowledge.

2A/2B;
Outcome 1 Dance ideas
Outcome 2 Dance as an arts practice
Outcome 3: Responses to dance
Outcome 4: Dance in society

Unit 2ADAN
The focus for this unit is popular culture. There are many aspects of popular culture which could be
used to provide students with interesting and relevant concepts for dance. The exploration of dance in
popular culture leads to a wider understanding of the functions and contexts of dance in our society.
Through practical lessons, students use safe dance practices and improved physical competencies to
acquire genre-specific technique. Performance qualities and etiquette are improved through increased
opportunities for performance of popular styles.

Unit 2BDAN
The focus for this unit is Australian dance. Students use their knowledge and understanding of dance
language to reflect the development of their ideas and concepts and examine how the language of
movement in Australia is unique. They manipulate the elements of dance and choreographic processes
to produce new dance works which reflect an understanding of Australian culture. An understanding of
the diverse range of functions and contexts of dance in Australia allows them to make relevant
comparisons between their own dance and that of others.

ASSESSMENT
The three types of assessment
Performance/production
Response
Investigation


Weighting
Stage 2
                     Type of assessment




                                                                                                    27
                      Performance/production
                      Extended performance/production project in which students explore ideas, rehearse, perform and/or
                      produce dance works.
                      (This may be one production task that is divided into parts with significant events for defining/collecting
                      evidence that enables outcomes to be assessed, or it may be any number of smaller tasks).
                      Using choreographic devises and improvisation to create original dance works, interpreting
                      choreographic intent, rehearsing, designing lighting, costumes, set, and graphics for programs, posters
      40–60%          and promotion.
                      Demonstrating the development of confidence and competence in the use of dance skills, techniques
                      and processes and technologies in a range of performance contexts.
                      Other types of evidence may include observation checklists or evaluation tools (self, peer), videos of
                      students.
                      Best suited to the collection of evidence of student achievement of Outcomes 1 and 2 and includes
                      using a journal to show evidence of exploration and the development of ideas, reflection on learning
                      processes and critical evaluation and modification of ideas; reflection on and evaluation of performance
                      and production processes.
                      Response

                      Students apply their knowledge and skills in analysing and responding to their own
                      dance and that of others.
      20–30%          Response to, analysis and evaluation of their own and others‘ or professional dance
                      works.
                      Types of evidence may include: journal entries, observation checklists, evaluation tools (self, peer),
                      critical reviews and essays.
                      Best suited to the collection of evidence of student achievement of Outcomes 1, 3 and 4.
                      Investigation
                      Research work in which students plan, conduct and communicate an investigation in the form of case
                      studies. The findings may be communicated in any appropriate form e.g. written, oral or graphical, or
                      various combinations of these.
      20–30%          The focus of case studies may include dance works of companies, choreographers, dancers, themes or
                      issues. Each should be explored in relation to a range of contextual factors and explore a range of
                      primary and secondary sources.
                      Types of evidence may include essays, performance, journal entries, observation checklists,
                      PowerPoint, video, audio.
                      Best suited to the collection of evidence of student achievement of Outcomes 2, 3 and 4.


CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Participation may lead to opportunities for future study in dance or related field.



                                            DRAMA 2A/2B

PRE-REQUISITES
High level of performance in English
Yr 10 English – Grade B; Exam: 65%
An interest in performances and performing.

RATIONALE
Drama 2A focuses on dramatic action. In contexts related to dramatic action, students have the
opportunity to research, workshop, interpret, perform and produce texts from forms and styles related to
representational and/or realistic drama. Students will explore different techniques of characterisation,
consider audience/performance relationships and analyse drama technologies developed to represent
realistic sets, characters and situations in a variety of performance spaces.
Drama 2B focuses on challenge and identity. In contexts related to challenge and identity, students
have the opportunity to research, workshop, interpret and perform presentational and/or non-realistic
drama texts. They undertake production roles and collaborate to work safely and present their drama in
a well-organised manner. Students consider how drama shapes cultural and personal identity, how it is
shaped by its historical and cultural context and how it can provide a commentary or critique that may
challenge conventional thinking.



                                                                                                                               28
2A/2B UNIT OUTLINE
Outcome 1 Drama ideas
     Students create, interpret, explore, develop and present drama ideas.
Outcome 2 Drama skills and processes
     Students use drama skills, techniques, processes, conventions and technologies.
Outcome 3 Drama responses
     Students respond to, reflect on and evaluate drama.
Outcome 4 Drama in society
     Students understand the role of drama in society.

ASSESSMENT
School managed assessment will provide evidence of achievement of all of the outcomes, with an
emphasis on skills that may not be measured readily through an external process: for example,
evidence of achievement in outcomes related to the development and presentation of ideas, research
and drama production. Students must be given at least two opportunities to demonstrate achievement of
each outcome. It is expected that students will maintain a drama portfolio including a reflective journal
as a record of their drama processes. These may be in written and/or multi-media format.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The Drama Course of study is inclusive of general and vocational education catering for a full range of
achievements in years 11 and 12. This will include students who intend studying Drama, Arts
Management, Theatre Design and Theatre Studies at tertiary level; students who intend studying or
seeking employment in vocational areas such as acting, directing, design of sets, costumes, lighting or
sound and theatre management; and students who will continue to enjoy drama and apply the
knowledge, skills and understandings they have learned to other aspects of their lives. The Drama
course of study will also be useful for students intending to work in careers that require empathy and a
high level of interpersonal skills.



                           EARTH AND ENVIRONMENTAL
                                  SCIENCE 2A/2B



PRE-REQUISITES
     Year 10 Pathway 1 Science (Grade B and Exam 50%), or
     Year 10 Pathway 2 Science (Grade A and Exam 65%).

RATIONALE
Earth is unique in the solar system. Its liquid water and oxygenated atmosphere support a great
diversity of life in a wide range of environments. Technological advances continue to provide us with
the opportunity to view and learn more about these environments. Viewing Earth from space means
we can appreciate that our planet is a global system made up of major reservoirs, namely the solid
Earth, water, atmosphere and biosphere. Matter is constantly cycled within and between these
reservoirs in a dynamic system characterised by continual change. The Earth and Environmental
Science course of study takes a multidisciplinary approach by drawing on a wide variety of science
disciplines to understand how these cyclic processes work and to demonstrate the relevance of Earth
Science knowledge in daily life.
COURSE CONTENT
The course covers the following content areas:

       Physical earth
       Living earth
       Earth‘s resources
       Earth science in daily life




                                                                                                        29
ASSESSMENT
The types of assessment listed below are consistent with the teaching and learning strategies
considered to be the most supportive of student achievement of the outcomes in the Earth and
Environmental Science course.

        Exams
        Tests
        Extended tasks
        Investigation

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The mining industry is of enormous economic importance to WA and there are a variety of careers that
relate to mining and its associated industries




                                     ECONOMICS 2A/2B


PREREQUISITES
Competent at essay writing and analytical skills
Year 10 Society & Environment – B Grade & Exam Score of at least 65%

UNIT DESCRIPTION
    1. The focus of this unit is Business Economics. It explores the key role of businesses in the
       process of production and spending. It also explores the strategies that businesses use to
       promote their products and manage internal and external constraints, including government
       regulation and policy.
    2. The second focus is Markets. It explores the key role that markets play in determining the
       wellbeing of individuals and society, as well as the limitations of markets. The emphasis is on
       understanding the workings of the real world markets that are relevant to the student.
    3. To provide students with an adequate understanding of Contemporary Economic Issues with
       emphasis on:
     Role of business
     Strategies employed by businesses
     Role of Markets in maximising economic welfare of society
     Governments role in the economy
     Government Economic Goals

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES
   A)      Syllabus Content                                         Weighting %
           Economic Framework                                            40
           Firms & Production                                     18.5
           Market Forms                                                  18.5
           Environmental Economics                                       23

    B)      Types of Assessment
            Class test                                                    30
            Examinations                                                  30

   C)       Others (Research, Statistical Ex     , Investigation) 40

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Accountant, Barrister/Solicitor, Economist, Economics Teacher, Financial Planner, Finance Reporter,
Investment Planner, Public Relations Consultant, Stockbroker, Marketing/Advertising, Banking,
Company Secretary, Futures Broker, Foreign Exchange Dealer.




                                                                                                         30
                                               ENGLISH
                                                2A/2B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
High level of performance in English
Yr 10 English – Grade B; Exam Score: Minimum 65%.

COURSE OF STUDY OUTCOMES
The New English Course is designed to facilitate the achievement of four courses of study outcomes.
Outcomes are statements of what students should know, understand, value and be able to do as a
result of their learning. The outcomes are:
     Listening and speaking
     Viewing
     Reading
     Writing
Each of the outcomes is described as a learning progression across eight broad levels and these are
used to determine the specific learning program.

COURSE CONTENT
In the English course of study students learn about the English language: how it works and how to use it
effectively. Language plays a central role in human life: it provides a vehicle for communication, a tool
for thinking, a means of creativity and a source of pleasure. Through language humans shape
understandings of themselves and their world. An understanding of language and the ability to use it
effectively empowers students. It gives them access to knowledge, enables them to play an active part
in society and contributes to their personal growth. Each course of study unit has a broad area of focus
and examples of learning contexts are suggested. Teachers will choose learning contexts that are
relevant to their students‘ interests and needs.

ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed throughout the year on a wide range of activities, both written and oral. There
will also be two major examinations for the year with one being held each semester.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The necessity of English competence for success in a career cannot be understated. All tertiary
institutions and most jobs require the ability to communicate fluently and competently, whether it is in
written or spoke forms.



                            LITERATURE – (ENGLISH) 2A/2B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
High level of performance in English and a keen interest in literature.
Yr 10 English – Grade A – Exam: 70%.

COURSE OUTCOMES
As well as reading a range of highly regarded fiction texts, Year 11 Literature introduces students to
contemporary theoretical approaches to literature. Central to this is the understanding that literary
meaning is made through relationships between the writer, texts, reader and context. Close knowledge
of the literary texts and literary concepts is essential in this subject, and students will be given a range of
prose, poetry and drama texts to read, analyse and enjoy. As the course progresses, students will also
be expected to use a variety of secondary, non-fiction texts that will enrich their understanding of the
fiction text they are studying.


                                                                                                           31
The Literature course is designed to facilitate the achievement of two outcomes. Outcomes are
statements of what students should understand and be able to do as a result of the syllabus content
taught. Students should be able to demonstrate creative, logical and analytical thinking in the Reading
outcome. They should be able to communicate and account for their responses to literary texts in the
Producing outcome.

COURSE CONTENT
The course content is divided into three content areas:
    language and generic conventions
    contextual understandings
    producing texts

The course explores the ways writers can employ and adapt language to specific purposes and how
generic conventions are used to produce texts. Contextual understandings refer to the personal, social,
cultural and historical spaces in which texts are produced and read. The production of texts involves an
understanding of the processes and strategies involved in the reading and production of texts.

ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed throughout the year on a wide range of activities, both written and oral. Each
semester will be concluded with an exam. Students should realise that the majority of their marks will
come from the class work and assessments. They cannot compensate for a ‗low mark‘ by doing
particularly well in the exam as it represents a relatively small percentage of the overall mark.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The necessity of English competence for success in a career cannot be understated. All tertiary
institutions and most jobs require the ability to communicate fluently and competently, whether it is in
written or spoke forms. However, specific career paths for students completing Upper School Literature
involve any occupations that have language analysis as a major component including journalism,
teaching, publishing, marketing, management, public relations or library studies.



                             ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL
                                LANGUAGE/DIALECT
                                      2A/2B

The English as a Second Language/Dialect Course of Study is focused on student achievement of four
outcomes related to listening, speaking, reading and viewing, and writing in Standard Australian English.
These outcomes are a synthesis of Curriculum Framework outcomes from the English and LOTE
learning areas: Understanding Language, Attitudes, Values And Beliefs, Conventions, Processes and
Strategies, Listening, Speaking, Viewing, Reading, Writing, Listening and Responding and Speaking,
Viewing, Reading and Responding, Writing, Cultural Understandings, The System of the Target
Language, Language Learning Strategies.


ELD 2A          Examples of learning contexts within the broad focus of Life styles: leisure,
                entertainment, music, health, work, fashion; self-image.

ELD 2B          Examples of learning contexts within the broad focus of Making choices: health,
                accommodation, transport, work, further education, the natural environment;
                global issues.


Eligibility Criteria
English as a Second Language will be available normally only to a student:
     whose first language is not English; and
     for whom English has not been the major language of communication and/or instruction for a
         total period of more than
         seven years prior to the commencement of the year in which the course is taken.


                                                                                                     32
  Circumstances for Exemption
  It is possible that exemption from the above criteria will be granted to a student:
         who was born outside Australia and had little or no formal education prior to arriving in Australia;
           or
         who was born outside Australia and has had a disrupted formal education; or
         who is of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent, or from Cocos Island or Christmas Island,
           for whom standard Australian English has been the medium of instruction, but for whom
           standard Australian English is a second language/dialect, and whose exposure to standard
           Australian English is limited to the school context because of geographical isolation.



                                         FRENCH 2A/2B


  PRE-REQUISITES
  Year 10 French B Grade or equivalent

  RATIONALE
  French is one of the priority languages to be taught in Australian schools. The French course is
  designed to equip students with the skills to function within an increasingly global society, a culturally
  and linguistically diverse local community and to provide the foundation for life-long language learning.
  An ability to communicate in French provides opportunities for students to learn about the rich and
  diverse culture, traditions and belief systems throughout the world, and to participate in exchanges. It
  also enhances career opportunities, and enjoyment and appreciation of French culture through travel,
  film, literature, music, fashion and design, cuisine, art and sport.

  2A/2B UNIT OUTLINE
  Outcome 1        Listening and responding
  Students listen and respond to a range of texts.

  Outcome 2       Spoken interaction
  Students communicate in French through spoken interaction.
  Outcome 3       Viewing, reading and responding
Students view, read and respond to a range of texts.
  Outcome 4       Writing
  Students write a variety of texts in French.
  COURSE UNITS:
  Each unit covers the nationally required themes of The Individual, the French-speaking Communities
  and The Changing World
  Unit 2AFRE
  The focus for this unit is
      my well-being, my free time
      French sports, arts, entertainment and cuisine
      the Olympic Games, international organisations and their work

  Unit 2BFRE
  The focus for this unit is
       my travel plans and tales, my country
       on exchange, celebrations
       exploring the French-speaking world on the net, tourism and hospitality
  ASSESSMENT
  School-managed assessment will provide evidence of achievement of all of the outcomes. Students will
  be given at least two opportunities to demonstrate achievement of each outcome. The final
  level/percentage will be determined by course work completed throughout the year and one major
  school based examination for each unit of study and assessed according to the Grade descriptors.
  CAREER POSSIBILITIES
  Careers enhanced by the study of French include banking and international finance, commerce,
  diplomacy, government, law, tourism and hospitality, winemaking, fashion and cosmetics, media,
  science and technology, translating and interpreting.
                                                                                                           33
                                     GEOGRAPHY 2A/2B



ELIGIBILITY OF COURSE
Students who have demonstrated a keen interest in their year 10 geography studies and who have
achieved at least a B grade and 65% in the examination in Society and Environment.

RATIONALE
Geography is a field of inquiry that brings together the human and physical dimensions of the world in
the study of people, places and environments. This includes the study of interrelationships between
natural and human environments and the spatial patterns that result from and account for these
processes over time.

The rapidly changing nature of our world and the complexity of interrelationships between people and
places demand solutions that reflect public decision making and the need to balance the competing
demands, views and values of the various stakeholders. In the curse, a wide range of issues are
explored such as energy-efficient planning, natural disasters, water management, biodiversity, urban
living, and changing agricultural practices. These issues and their implications are examined at local,
regional and international levels with a view to making sense of the present and evaluating future
solutions. In assessing solutions that take into account economic, social and environmental
considerations, students develop an understanding of how a balanced, sustainable future can be
achieved.

Students develop a range of skills that help them to understand the physical world, interpret the past,
scrutinise the present and explore sustainable strategies for the future care of places. They are able to
understand recent and future developments, such as urban planning, climate change, environments at
risk, sustainable development practices and the unequal distribution of resources throughout the world.

These understandings and skills are transferable and applicable to the world of work and everyday life
and offer a framework for a systematic understanding of our environment and society, both now and in
the future. The understandings, skills, knowledge and values developed in the course will ensure
students are well placed to enrol in post-school studies at tertiary levels and employment in the
workforce. They are significant to careers associated with tourism, town planning, primary industries
such as mining, land evaluation, environmental planning, teaching, overseas aid programs, foreign
affairs, trade and the spatial science industries.


COURSE
Unit 2A GEO
The focus of this unit is the geography of natural hazards and impact minimisation. The increasing
incidence of hazards, together with their impact on standards of living, has prompted the active search
for proposed solutions. An understanding of how these hazards are perceived and managed at a local,
regional and global level is developed in a range of ways. First, an understanding of hazards is
developed. Secondly, the spatial distribution of hazards, the cause and impact and increased risks due
to urbanisation and poor management are explored. Finally, students investigate strategies to minimise
the risks associated with hazards.

Unit 2B GEO
The focus of this unit is the geography of sustainable resource use. Natural resources provide the basis
for economic growth in Australia. There is an unprecedented global demand for these resources. Future
provision will require application of sustainable management practices to resource development and the
surrounding environment. Regional perspective supported with local area case studies are used to
investigate spatial patterns that emerge between resource developments, local communities and market
destinations. There is a need to evaluate management practices that can sustain these resources into
the future. Approaches to sustainable management can vary significantly between countries in terms of
social, economic and environmental factors. Students will compare these spatial patterns and practices
in resource use in Australia to those in a less developed country.


                                                                                                          34
ASSESSMENT
There are between 4 to 6 assessment tasks per unit studied.
Types of assessment
Geographical inquiry: is a process where students plan and conduct investigations, process and
translate information and communicate findings.
Fieldwork/Practical: students actively engage in collecting primary data and interpretation of data from
a number of sources. These can include field observations, maps, photographs, tables, graphs and
statistics.
Short and extended responses: students answer questions that demonstrate ability to understand the
key concepts in the geography course. These are usually completed in class.
Examination: a major assessment held at the completion of a unit.



                         HUMAN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE
                                    2A/2B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
     Year 10 Pathway 1 Science (Grade C and Exam 50%), or
     Year 10 Pathway 2 Science (Grade A and Exam 65%).

RATIONALE
How does the human body function? Why does it work this way? How do we reproduce? Why are we
different from one another, and why are we similar to our relatives? What effect will my choices have on
my health? What are the risks/benefits of medical interventions? These are some of the questions that
many young people ask and they are the sorts of questions that human biology tries to answer.

COURSE CONTENT
The course covers the following content areas;
    Human form and function
    Human diversity and change
    The practice of human biology

ASSESSMENT
The types of assessment listed below are consistent with the teaching and learning strategies
considered to be the most supportive of student achievement of the outcomes in the Human Biological
Science course.
     Examinations
     Tests
     Response (extended)
     Investigation

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The study of Human Biology would be an advantage for students interested in Nursing, Physiotherapy,
Physical Education teaching and a variety of other tertiary areas of study.



                                   JAPANESE (SECOND
                                    LANGUAGE) 2A/2B


PRE-REQUISITES
Successful completion of year 9 & 10 Japanese: Grade A or B

RATIONALE
Japanese has been identified as one of the priority languages from the Asia-Pacific region to be taught

                                                                                                      35
  in Australian schools in recognition of the close economic and cultural ties between the two countries.
  Through the study of Japanese, students can gain access to the rich cultural tradition of Japan and an
  understanding of different attitudes and values within the wider Australian community and beyond.

  In the Japanese: Second Language course, students develop the necessary understandings and values
  to communicate effectively with Japanese speakers in both social and workplace contexts in Australia,
  in Japan and elsewhere. They develop a stronger sense of their personal identity and greater respect for
  people of Japanese-speaking communities.

  COURSE CONTENT
  The course content enables students to maximise their achievement of both the overarching learning
  outcomes from the Curriculum Framework and the Japanese: Second Language course outcomes.
  2A/2B UNIT OUTLINE
  Outcome 1        Listening and responding
  Students listen and respond to a range of texts.

  Outcome 2       Spoken interaction
  Students communicate in Japanese through spoken interaction.
  Outcome 3       Viewing, reading and responding
Students view, read and respond to a range of texts.
  Outcome 4       Writing
  Students write a variety of texts in Japanese.
  These content areas should not be considered in isolation but rather holistically, as content areas that
  complement one another, that are interrelated and interdependent.

  COURSE UNITS
  The Japanese: Second Language course is subject to eligibility criteria and is designed for students who
  do not have a Japanese background; that is, students who have learnt the majority of the Japanese they
  know in an Australian school or similar environment. These students, typically, have studied Japanese
  during their compulsory school years.
  Each unit covers the nationally required themes of The Individual, the Japanese-speaking Communities
  and The Changing World
  Unit 2AJSL
  The focus for this unit is ホームステイしよう!(home-stay). Students make arrangements to have an
  overseas student visit their home or visit a Japanese family. This unit explores aspects such as typical
  rules and routines of home and school life, celebrations and gift giving.
  Unit 2BJSL
                                             くに
  The focus for this unit is ようこそ、私の国 へ! (welcome to my country). Students explore situations
  and events associated with welcoming visitors to Australia. They compare and contrast their own
  lifestyles with other cultures specifically in the areas of food etiquette, maintaining a healthy lifestyle and
  leisure activities.

  ASSESSMENT
  School-based assessments will be based on the course outcomes, including Oral Communication,
  Response (Listening), Response (Viewing and reading) and Written communication. Students will be
  given at least two opportunities to demonstrate achievement within each assessment type, in addition to
  two school based examinations, one each semester. Students will be provided with information relating
  to the school-based assessments including the weighting for each type.

  CAREER POSSIBILITIES
  Students studying the Japanese language will benefit from rapidly increasing range of career
  opportunities particularly in the Commerce, Teaching, Tourism, Diplomatic and Law fields as the
  demand for people with language skills and cultural awareness grows.




                                                                                                             36
                                            MATHEMATICS PATHWAYS

                                               Year 11 and Year 12

Course             Pre-requisites               Old Courses (Up to 2008)          New Courses (2009 and Beyond)
         Minimum          Min Exam Result         11                 12               11                 12
         Grade
  1          Year 10             70%         Introductory        Calculus/         COURSE 1         COURSE 1
            Pathway 1                          Calculus/         Applicable      3A MAT 3B MAT    3C MAT 3D MAT
            Grade B                          Geometry &         Mathematics      3A MAS 3B MAS    3C MAS 3D MAS
                                             Trigonometry
  2         Year 10            60%           Introductory        Applicable        COURSE 2         COURSE 2
           Pathway 1                           Calculus         Mathematics      3A MAT 3B MAT    3A MAT 3B MAT
            Grade C

  3         Year 10            75%           Foundations of      Discrete          COURSE 3         COURSE 3
           Pathway 2                          Mathematics       Mathematics      2C MAT 2D MAT    3A MAT 3B MAT
            Grade A

  4         Year 10            65%           Foundations of      Discrete          COURSE 4         COURSE 4
           Pathway 2                          Mathematics       Mathematics      2A MAT 2B MAT    2C MAT 2D MAT
            Grade B

  5         Year 10            60%           Mathematics in     Modelling with     COURSE 5         COURSE 5
           Pathway 3                            Practice        Mathematics      1B MAT 1C MAT    1D MAT 1E MAT
           Grade C




                                                                                                                  37
                                MATHEMATICS-COURSE 4
                                     2A/2B MAT


PRE-REQUISITES
Minimum Requirement.
Year 10 Mathematics Pathway 2 - B Grade Examination Score – 65%

2A MAT
UNIT CONTENT
1.        Number and algebra
This section uses the four arithmetic operations and rule of order in the context of integers, decimals,
fractions, percentages, ratios, powers, square roots and cube roots. Linear relationships are studied
algebraically and graphically. Equations and inequalities are solved especially in relation to Pythagoras’
theorem and proportion. The concepts of profit, loss, discount, commission and proportion are covered
in the finance section.
2.       Space and measurement
Pythagoras’ theorem is used to calculate sides of triangles and direct proportion is used to make
estimations. Geometric language and conventions are used to describe symmetry and perform
translations, reflections and rotations.
3.      Chance and data
This section involves the collection and organisation of data, its representation and interpretation. The
concepts covered include taking samples, frequency tables, dot frequency plots, histograms, grouped
and ungrouped data, relative frequency, spread, tables, circle graphs, mean, median, mode and range.
ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment.

Response (65%-75%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.

Investigation (25%-35%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems.

2BMAT
UNIT CONTENT
.
1.      Number and algebra
This section involves the study and application of exponential relationships and the algebraic and
graphical solution of equations, mainly linear and simple exponentials. Number patterns will be
described and investigated and recursive definitions of number patterns will be introduced.

2.      Space and measurement
Surface area and volume formulae will be solved directly and inversely for prisms, pyramids and
spheres. Coordinate geometry is used in two dimensions for distances and lines. Right triangle
trigonometry is used to calculate sides and angles. Network diagrams are drawn and interpreted

                                                                                                       38
including the concepts of traversability and shortest path.

3.       Chance and data
Students will simulate everyday chance events, calculate and interpret probabilities and collect and
analyse bivariate and time-series data. They will read information from graphs, make predictions
involving interpolation and extrapolation and observe trends.

ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment:

Response (65%-75%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.

Investigation (25%-35%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems.



                                MATHEMATICS-COURSE 3


PRE-REQUISITES
Minimum Requirement.
Year 10 Mathematics Pathway 2 - A Grade Examination Score – 75%

2A MAT
UNIT CONTENT
1.        Number and algebra
This section uses the four arithmetic operations and rule of order in the context of integers, decimals,
fractions, percentages, ratios, powers, square roots and cube roots. Linear relationships are studied
algebraically and graphically. Equations and inequalities are solved especially in relation to Pythagoras’
theorem and proportion. The concepts of profit, loss, discount, commission and proportion are covered
in the finance section.
2.       Space and measurement
Pythagoras’ theorem is used to calculate sides of triangles and direct proportion is used to make
estimations. Geometric language and conventions are used to describe symmetry and perform
translations, reflections and rotations.
3.      Chance and data
This section involves the collection and organisation of data, its representation and interpretation. The
concepts covered include taking samples, frequency tables, dot frequency plots, histograms, grouped
and ungrouped data, relative frequency, spread, tables, circle graphs, mean, median, mode and range.
ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment.
Response (65%-75%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.

                                                                                                       39
Investigation (25%-35%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems.

2BMAT
UNIT CONTENT
.

1.      Number and algebra
This section involves the study and application of exponential relationships and the algebraic and
graphical solution of equations, mainly linear and simple exponentials. Number patterns will be
described and investigated and recursive definitions of number patterns will be introduced.

2.      Space and measurement
Surface area and volume formulae will be solved directly and inversely for prisms, pyramids and
spheres. Coordinate geometry is used in two dimensions for distances and lines. Right triangle
trigonometry is used to calculate sides and angles. Network diagrams are drawn and interpreted
including the concepts of traversability and shortest path.

3.       Chance and data
Students will simulate everyday chance events, calculate and interpret probabilities and collect and
analyse bivariate and time-series data. They will read information from graphs, make predictions
involving interpolation and extrapolation and observe trends.

ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment:
Response (65%-75%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.
Investigation (25%-35%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems.



                                MATHEMATICS-COURSE 2


PRE-REQUISITES
Minimum Requirement.
Year 10 Mathematics Pathway 1 - C Grade Examination Score – 60%

3A MAT
UNIT CONTENT
1.      Number and algebra
        Estimation and calculation
        Functions and graphs
        Equations and
        Inequalities
        Patterns, Finance
                                                                                                       40
2.        Space and Measurement
          Rate
          Measurement
3.        Chance and data
          Quantify chance
          Interpret chance
          Collect and organise data
          Represent data
          Interpret data

ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment:

Response (75%-85%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.
Investigation (15%-25%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems

3B MAT
UNIT CONTENT

     1.      Number and algebra
             Functions and graphs
             Equations and inequalities
             Differential Calculus
             Patterns

     2.      Space and measurement
             Measurement
             Networks

     3.     Chance and data
            Represent data
            Interpret data

ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment:

Response (75%-85%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.

Investigation (15%-25%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems.
                                                                                                       41
                                MATHEMATICS-COURSE 1

PRE-REQUISITES
Minimum Requirement.
Year 10 Mathematics Pathway 1 - B Grade Examination Score – 70%

3A MAT
UNIT CONTENT
1. Vectors
This section is an introduction to vector terminology,
 representation and methods based on coordinate geometry and trigonometry.
2. Trigonometry
Using trigonometry to find distances and angles (in degrees and radians) in geometric figures in two and
three dimensions is the focus of this section.
3. Exponentials and logarithms
This section reviews, consolidates and extends the concepts of exponential and logarithmic functions,
their graphs, the index and logarithmic laws and their application to solving simple equations as
preparation for the calculus of exponential and logarithmic functions in unit 3BMAS.
4. Functions
The study of calculus begins with the basic concepts of functions which are explored in detail. The
approach is informal and intuitive and the underlying ideas are illustrated wherever possible by graphs and
sketches to provide understanding without overwhelming with technical detail.
5. Mathematical reasoning
Mathematical reasoning is an explicit focus throughout the MAS units. Here, we examine conjectures
from number patterns and establish laws and properties needed elsewhere in this unit.
6. Polar coordinates
Polar coordinates are a means of specifying position in the plane by magnitude and direction

ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment:

Response (75%-85%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.

Investigation (15%-25%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems

3B MAT
UNIT CONTENT
1. Vectors
This section extends vector methods to include vector representations of lines and the dot product.
2. Trigonometry
A thorough understanding of the trigonometric functions is an important foundation for the successful
study of mathematics at higher levels. In this unit special emphasis is given to periodicity, amplitude and
phase, which are illustrated by graphs wherever possible.
3. Exponentials and logarithms
In this section, limit concepts are introduced via an important limit associated with the number e. This is
followed by the study of the natural exponential and logarithm functions and differentiation of these
functions.
                                                                                                       42
4. Functions
An intuitive approach using the zoom facility of calculators, numerical experimentation as well as
algebraic manipulation is still appropriate in this section.
5 Mathematical reasoning
6. Complex numbers
Complex numbers have applications in many branches of science and engineering. The study of complex
numbers enriches and unifies studies in algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus.

ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment:

Response (75%-85%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.

Investigation (15%-25%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems.




                                MEDIA PRODUCTION AND
                                      ANALYSIS
                                        2A/2B


PRE-REQUISITES
High level of performance in English
Yr 10 English – Grade B; Exam: 65%.

COURSE COMMENTS
This course is an accredited list 1 subject for Tertiary entrance scoring. It will give an excellent
background to students who wish to continue their studies in tertiary institutions in the areas of Media
Studies, Mass Communication and Communications Studies and Cultural Studies.

COURSE CONTENT
Students will undertake two semesterized units over the year. The focus of the first semester unit is
popular culture (MPA2A). This involves identifying what is meant by ‗popular‘ culture and considering
the types of media, ideas and audiences around which popular culture evolves. Students view, listen to
and analyse a range of popular media, develop their own ideas, learn production skills and apply their
understandings and skills in creating their own productions. Learning contexts may include: reality
television, television drama and video games.
The focus of the second semester unit is press and broadcasting (MPA2B). Leaning contexts may
include: Journalism (radio, television and photographic), news, and popular documentary.

ASSESSMENT
Assessment in this course comes from three assessment types; investigation and research work,
responses to student and professional media productions and student practical productions. The
examination at the end of each unit forms part of the ‗responses‘ type of assessment.



                                                                                                           43
CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Media Production and Analysis is a very useful stepping stone into university and TAFE courses It also
gives an excellent background to students who wish to continue their studies in tertiary institutions in the
areas of Media Studies, Mass Communication and Communications Studies and Cultural Studies.
Students who wish to work in Media related fields such as television, journalism, broadcasting,
advertising and marketing will find this course most useful. However, Media Production and Analysis is
also an important course for developing general life-skills for all students as it helps us to analyse and
deal with the impact of the Mass Media in our lives.



                                 MODERN HISTORY 2A/2B

PRE-REQUISITES
B Grade in Society and Environment and 65% or better in the Year 10 S&E exam
Level 5 or better in the ICP or TCC outcomes

RATIONALE
History is the study and practice of making meaning of the past with a view to understanding the
present. It engages us with the ideas, beliefs and values that shape and influence our lives. A study of
Modern History enables students to become critical thinkers. The skills and knowledge gained from this
course inform judgements and actions in a rapidly changing world. The Modern History course promotes
skills of research, hypothesis testing and analysis of information as students engage with investigations.
Students benefit from acquiring the literacy skills of the discipline of history such as critical thinking,
research, analysis and effective written expression. These skills equip them for a world changed and
linked by information and communication technology and prepare them for lifelong learning
The course is divided into two units. Each unit is studied for a whole semester.

Unit 2A
The focus for this unit is societies and change. Students learn about the evolving nature of societies
and the various forces for continuity and change that exist.
Students learn that some values, beliefs and traditions are linked to the identity of a society and that in
any period of change there are those individuals and institutions that support and oppose change and
that this results in different interpretations of events.
Students will learn to develop propositions/ hypotheses with supporting arguments, use appropriate
strategies for selecting, recording and organising information, recognize that there are different points of
view regarding historical events and that evidence sometimes conflicts , and also to communicate
findings in a literate and coherent manner.

The area of study for this unit will be: The USA between the wars, 1919 to 1941.
This will involve exploring issues such as
How the USA was affected by World One
The roaring twenties and the impact of technology, mass media, prohibition, the rise of organized crime
and racism on US culture
How the Great Depression of the 1930‘s changed the USA
The impact of the early years of WW2 on the USA.

Unit 2B
The focus for this unit is historical trends and movements. Students will be shown that throughout
history there have been events, ideas, beliefs and values that have contributed to underlying historical
trends and movements. That these trends have been met with varying degrees of support and
opposition that have sometimes caused conflict. Students will be shown links between events, their
impact, consequence, action and reaction as well as trends of continuity and change.
Students will learn how to justify their choice of sources, draw inferences based on key elements and
communicate findings in ways that show consideration of differing perspectives and justify a particular
viewpoint.

The area of study for this unit will be : Nazism in Germany 1918–1945
This will involve exploring issues such as:
The effect of Germany‘s defeat in WW1 on the nation.
The impact of the Great Depression on Germany
                                                                                                        44
Why Hitler rose to power and the appeal of Nazism
Hitler‘s racial ideas and policies
The influence of Nazism on the lives of the people
How Hitler and the Nazis changed Germany.
The impact of WW2 on Germany and Nazism

ASSESSMENTS
These will be made up of:
Research Investigations, document studies, knowledge tests, essays and exams
Career Possibilities
The study of history can lead to careers in Journalism, Law, Librarianship, Teaching, Research Officer,
Public Service, Diplomatic Service, the Armed Services, Media and Creative Arts, Politics , Police.




                           MUSIC (WESTERN ARTS MUSIC)
                                     2A/2B

SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
Students should have completed Music Scholarship or Music Option OR a satisfactory audition with the Music
Department.
Year 10 Music – Grade B.

COURSE OBJECTIVES
This course aims to:
     provide a variety of experiences which will enable students to develop their own musical abilities
      of performance, aural awareness and compositional skills, and to observe and evaluate major
      contributions of other musicians in the context of the place in history.
     develop aural skills which should be seen as an integral part of all musical activities
     provide opportunities for singing as a means of developing and reinforcing students‘ feeling for
      metre, pulse, accent, phrase, melody, harmony and balance.
     provide opportunities to perform, listen and compose, by which students will be encouraged to
      explore, manipulate, experiment, risk, test, and modify musical ideas
     accommodate a variety of abilities and provide for the personal satisfaction of all students.

COURSE CONTENT
The course is divided into four sections:
1. Perception:
   The development of aural skills in relation to aural analysis, discrepancies and rhythm and melodic
   dictation.
2. Composition:
   Writing melodies to a given opening, word setting, harmonization, accompaniment writing and
   orchestration.
3. Literature of Music:
   The aural recognition of musical examples and the study of the development of music from the
   period 1650 to approximately 1900.
4. Performance:
   This is the continuation and development of skills and techniques on their chosen instrument.

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURE
Course Work                     60%
     Perception                 20%
     Composition                13%
     Literature                 17%
     Performance                50%

Examinations                    40%
     Written paper              50%
     Performance                50%


                                                                                                       45
CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Further studies in careers such as:
      Music Teacher - both class and instrumental
      Music Editor
      Music Publisher
      Music Arranger
      Professional Musician



                                        PHYSICS 2A/2B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
     Year 10 Pathway 1 Science (Grade B and Exam 65%).

RATIONALE
Physics is an experimental discipline involving the study of the properties of, and interrelationships
between energy and matter. Physics helps us to construct models and explain physical phenomena.
These, in turn, allow us to develop a deeper understanding of the world around us.
Like other sciences, physics is evolving. Learning Physics requires observation, investigation, data
collection and data evaluation in order to construct and modify models of physical phenomena. This
course mirrors scientific processes by encouraging students to refine and reconstruct the models of
physical phenomena they already hold in ways that help them to build robust understandings of
important concepts. This course also encourages the communication of those understandings to others.

COURSE CONTENT
The course covers the following content areas;
 working in physics
 motion and forces
 nuclear physics
 heating and cooling
 electrical fundamentals

ASSESSMENT
The types of assessment listed below are consistent with the teaching and learning strategies
considered to be the most supportive of student achievement of the outcomes in the Physics course.

       Examinations
       Tests
       Experiments
       Investigations

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Further studies in careers including:

             Chemistry                           Geology
             Computer Technology                 Geophysics
             Engineering                         Mining & Mineral Technology
             Metallurgy                          Radiography
             Medicine                            Dentistry
             Biophysics                          Veterinary Studies
             Process Control                     Biotechnology
             Mineral Exploration                 Mining Engineers
             Physiotherapy                       Surveying
             Electronics




                                                                                                   46
                                POLITICS AND LAW 2A/2B


PREREQUISITES
High level of performance in SOSE
Yr 10 SOSE – Grade B. Exam Score: Minimum 65%

RATIONALE
Politics and Law is a critical study of the processes of decision- making concerning society‘s collective
future .The study of politics examines the structures and processes through which individuals and
groups with different interests, beliefs and goals, deliberate and negotiate in order to make choices,
respond to changing circumstances and enact laws.

The study of Politics and Law contributes to students‘ intellectual, social and ethical development. The
course aims to support all students in developing a sense of identity, and a sense of political, legal,
cultural and social awareness.

The course also challenges students to critically examine the effectiveness of political and legal systems
using criteria such as openness, responsiveness and accountability of those systems .At the same time,
the skills and values developed in the Politics and Law course aim to allow students to become
informed, active and effective participants in the political and legal decisions that affect their lives and
the future of their communities at the school, local, state, national and international levels.

2A/2B UNIT OUTLINE
UNIT 2A
Thefocus for this unit is political and legal systems. Students critically examine the principles,
structures and processes of political and legal systems.

UNIT 2B
The focus for this unit is representation and justice .Students critically examine and assess political
and legal systems in relation to representative democracy and justice.

Outcome 1: Political and legal inquiry
Students use inquiry skills to communicate an understanding of the principles, structures, institutions,
processes and practices of political and legal systems.

Outcome 2: Political and legal systems
Students understand the operation of, and the relationship between political and legal systems.

Outcome 3: Stability and change in political and legal systems
Students understand the nature of stability and change in political and legal systems.

Outcome 4: Citizenship in the political and legal systems
Students understand the skills and practices of citizenship.

ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed throughout the year on a range of activities which include short answers,
source analysis and essays .There will also be two major examinations for the year with one being held
each semester.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Politics and law can be a valuable background to careers such as law, political advocacy, public
administration, teaching, journalism, government.




                                                                                                           47
                                      VISUAL ARTS 2A/2B



SUGGESTED PREREQUISITES
For students who completed visual arts courses in Year 9 and/or Year 10 and are interested in applying
to enter a university qualification. There are aspects of this course requiring competent levels of literacy.

COURSE CONTENT
Unit 2A: The focus for this unit is differences. It covers different forms of visual art from past and present
contexts and provides students with a range of sources of inspiration and stimulus for developing ideas
and producing original artworks. They explore different materials, media and techniques when exploring
and expressing their ideas.

Unit 2B: The focus for this unit is identities. In this unit students explore concepts or issues related to
personal, social, cultural or gender identity. They investigate themes of personal interest and a range of
observational, conceptual and/or imaginative starting points for visual exploration. They become aware
that art may give form to ideas and issues that concern the wider community and develop understandings
of how the visual arts may be both socially affirming and challenging.

ASSESSMENT
Students will be required to complete a variety of activities in both art making and art interpretation. They
will be producing artworks, responding to their own work as well as the work of others and complete an
in depth investigation of a selected artist and their work. Results from an examination at the end of each
semester will be part of the final assessment.

FURTHER EDUCATION AND CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The development of a body of work and resolved artworks will be suitable to lead to a TER in Year 12.
There is an examination component to this course, leading to an external exam in Year 12. Many
university qualifications lead to a variety of art-related career paths such as arts management and
administration; fine arts or contemporary arts in a variety of studio areas, graphic design, industrial
design, fashion design and photography or digital media.




                                                                                                          48
     TAFE/

APPRENTICESHIP/

 EMPLOYMENT

    STREAM




                  49
                                APPLIED INFORMATION
                                  TECHNOLOGY 1A/1B

PRE-REQUISITES
Students are provided with opportunities to apply computer technology to the development of products
that satisfy human communication and information needs. The features of a range of advanced
computer applications are introduced with the focus being on using computer technology to solve
problems. Whilst the focus is on the use of computer technology, both the processes and the products
are emphasised. Students develop generic computer skills and concepts by using a variety of computer
technologies.

RATIONALE
We live in a world saturated with information technology, yet so many of us grasp only bits and pieces of
the knowledge and skills necessary to make the technology really work for us. In this course, students
use a range of computer hardware and software to create, manipulate and communicate information.
The result is a set of skills to equip the student for the 21st Century and something equally important -
appreciation of the impact of information technology on society in general.

Students acquire and develop understandings, experience and skills related to the creation,
manipulation, storage, retrieval and communication of information using a range of computer software
and hardware. They apply this to technology challenges associated with human need in their lives, the
community and workplaces. They learn to work in a climate of rapid change associated with information
technology and appreciate its impact on individuals and social systems.
1A/1B UNIT OUTCOMES
Outcome 1 Technology Process
Students apply a technology process when creating or modifying products using information
communication technologies.
Outcome 2 Understanding Information and Communication Technologies
Students understand the nature and use of computer hardware and software to achieve information
solutions.

Outcome 3 Quality of Information Solutions

Students explore alternatives and use skills, techniques, processes, standards and conventions to
achieve information solutions.

Outcome 4 Information and Communication Technologies in Society
Students understand how cultural beliefs, values, abilities and ethical positions are interconnected in the
development and use of information and communication technologies.
ASSESSMENT
School managed assessment will focus on providing evidence of achievement that is not readily gained
through external process. For example, evidence of achievement of the Technology Process and
Enterprise outcome and some conceptual understandings that are demonstrated iteratively, over time in
a range of learning contexts and may involve students negotiating, working collaboratively and in teams
to complete practical work.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Today people use computers to work, communicate and have fun. If you want to be a nurse,
multimedia designer, lawyer, vet, journalist, travel consultant, police, chef or have a career in any other
area anywhere in the world then you need to be able to use computers properly, efficiently and
creatively. For example, the Internet is used for e-commerce, getting up-to-date information, email and
chat as well as edutainment. This course will give you the edge when you apply for jobs and help in
your further studies as well as give you an outlet for creativity. You will learn to use a variety of software
packages and a range of computer hardware to create interesting solutions for important problems.
Enrol in this course to develop your internationally employable skills, access the information you need
for successful modern living and develop your personal potential in the digital zone.
                                                                                                          50
                           ASPECTS OF TOURISM D943/944


PRE-REQUISITES
There are no Pre-Requisites.     It would be preferable that students have an interest in the
Tourism/Hospitality industry and Australia in general (the year 11 course focuses on tourism in
Australia).

COURSE OBJECTIVES
To help students to develop an understanding in a range of tourist activities, services and facilities-in the
local community, Western Australia and Australia in general.

COURSE CONTENT
   Australia‘s major tourist destinations
   Impact of tourism on Australia including economy, environment and culture
   Eco-tourism
   Impact on and contribution of Australia‘s Indigenous people to tourism
   Tourism in Western Australia
   Cultural awareness and impact on tourism
   Tour guiding
   Low cost holidays

ASSESSMENT
Assessment will be broken up into two semesters. In each semester there will be three major
assessment tasks. There is no exam. This course is outcomes based. Assessments are in a variety of
forms eg. poster promoting an Australian state, excursion reports, planning low budget holidays, oral
reports, mapping. Research is an important component of each section in the course.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
Tourism is Australia‘s largest export earning industry. In Western Australia more than 27,000 people are
employed in the industry and it is expected that in the next decade an extra 200,000 jobs will be created.
Students successfully completing this course will be given background that will give help towards
completing a Diploma of Tourism at TAFE and also employment in one of the many facets of the tourism
industry.




                          BUSINESS MANAGEMENT AND
                                ENTERPRISE 1A/1B



SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
High level of performance in English
Yr 10 English – Grade C; Exam Score: Minimum 60%.

COURSE OF STUDY OUTCOMES
The Business Management and Enterprise course is designed to facilitate the achievement of four
outcomes. These outcomes are based on the Technology and Enterprise learning area outcomes in the
Curriculum Framework. Outcomes are statements of what students should know, understand, value
and be able to do as a result of the syllabus content taught. The four outcomes in the Business
Management and Enterprise course are:
    1. Understanding business.
    2. Business in society.
    3. Innovation and enterprise.
    4. Business operations.

                                                                                                         51
COURSE CONTENT
The Business Management and Enterprise course gives students the opportunity to understand how
vital business is and how it impacts on every aspect of our lives. This course focuses on the
development of practical skills required for the establishment, day to day running and continued viability
of a business. Exposure to a wide range of business activities, management strategies and an insight
into the potential of entrepreneurship empowers students and helps them to appreciate the significance
of their role as both participants and consumers in the business world.

ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed throughout the year on a wide range of activities including investigations,
productions and response types of assessment. All work will be assessed in class and there are no
formal examinations for this course.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
This course provides students with the opportunity to understand the world of business. They will be
well equipped with the practical skills to be successful in working in a business environment and
understand what is required to set up and run their own business. This course is especially useful for
students who are considering apprenticeships and, once qualified in their trade, would like to work for
themselves. It also provides an overview into the workings of business for students who are interested
in studying commerce or business at TAFE or university.



                            CAREER AND ENTERPRISE
                                    1A/1B


PRE-REQUISITES
There are no pre-requisites for this course however an interest in investigating careers and being
enterprising and innovative would be an advantage.

RATIONALE
Careers can no longer be considered in isolation in a constantly changing world of work. Careers are
now considered to be about work, learning and life. Learning about career development has replaced
traditional career education. The Career and Enterprise course is about career development learning. It
is an holistic approach; recognizing that individuals need to be proactive, enterprising career managers
who engage in lifelong learning. Career development learning will be enhanced by access to
workplaces, work experiences and workplace learning programs.

The Career and Enterprise course aims to provide all students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to
enable them to be enterprising and proactive managers of their own career development in a constantly
changing digital and global world of work.

The course content encompasses theoretical and practical aspects of career development and
enterprise. Topics include:
Career Management
Self-understanding and Management
Career Building
Lifelong Learning
Corporate Citizenship
Workplace Operations
Efficiency, Productivity and Sustainability
Rights and Responsibilities
Environmental Influences and Trends
Organisation of workplaces
Globalisation
Constant Change

The Career and Enterprise course aims to prepare all students for a future where they will need to

                                                                                                      52
identify possibilities and create opportunities within the work environment. The course aims to empower
students to make business sound decisions in regards to career development. Career development
learning for the modern world recognises that careers are about life, work and learning. It is a lifelong
process, whereby individuals need to take an active role in career development. It also recognises that
information communication technologies have facilitated globalisation and linking of economies and
workplaces around the world. They will be well equipped to be proactive participants in the dynamic
world of work, behaving responsibly and demonstrating integrity in work activities.

1A/1B UNIT OUTLNE
Outcome 1       Career and enterprise concepts
Students understand factors underpinning career development.
Outcome 2       Career and enterprise investigations
Students investigate career development opportunities.
Outcome 3       Career development in a changing world
Students understand how aspects of the changing world impact on career development opportunities.
Outcome 4       Being enterprising
Students use career competencies to manage career development opportunities.

ASSESSMENT
School managed assessment will focus on providing evidence of achievement that is not readily gained
through external processes. All outcomes will be assessed using a variety of assessment types
including investigations, practical tasks and case studies.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The Career and Enterprise course is essential for those students looking to step into the world of work,
be it part or full time in the near future. It is of particular interest to those students participating in the
Structured Workplace Learning program.




                                 CHILDREN, FAMILY & THE
                                 COMMUNITY-CARING FOR
                                      OTHERS 1A/1B


PRE-REQUISITES
There is no pre requisite for these courses but a general interest in children is beneficial.

The focus of these units is on the development and care of infants and children 0-5 years old.

COURSE CONTENT
       Maternal health
       Neonatal care
       Healthy lifestyles
       Conception
       Birth
       Milestones: development from 0-5 years.
       Role expectations of family members
       Potential issues eg…teenage pregnancy
       Growth and development
       Lifestyle behaviours
       Child safety
       Immunisation
       Family types
       Resources and support material

ASSESSMENT
Assessment will be based on evidence of levels of achievement of the course of study outcomes.
                                                                                                           53
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
CFCC provides valuable background for students considering a career in areas that deal with children.
Careers include: childcare administrator, pre-school teacher, day care assistant, nanny, nursing and
family day care. It also serves as an introduction to further studies in occupations such as social work,
teaching, nursing, medicine, physiotherapy, speech pathology, occupational and dental therapy.




                                CHILDREN, FAMILY & THE
                                   COMMUNITY-LIVING
                                 INDEPENDENTLY 1A/1B


PRE-REQUISITES
There is no pre requisite for these courses.

The focus of these units is on individuals living independently either by choice or through unplanned
circumstances. CFCL is a valuable course in that it teaches young people important life skills.

COURSE CONTENT
       Nutrition
       Life challenges and opportunities
       Independence and support available
       Community supporting individuals
       Me and my family
       Family life
       Cultural diversity
       Range of skills for independent living eg…food preparation and craft.

ASSESSMENT
Assessment will be based on evidence of levels of achievement of the course of study outcomes.

This course provides valuable background for students wishing to enter such fields as teaching, the
hospitality industry, the textile and fashion industries and the establishment of small businesses.



                                       DANCE 1A/1B


PRE-REQUISITES
C Grade in dance outcomes in yr 10 and a keen interest in Dance.

RATIONALE
Dance is dynamic and powerful. It embodies our ideas, thoughts, emotions and values and provides a
unique opportunity to develop physically, creatively, aesthetically, emotionally and intellectually. The
Dance course develops and presents ideas through a variety of genres, styles and forms, as it provides
a unique way in which to express our cultural view and understanding of the world. They gain an
understanding of the physical competencies specific to dance, including experiential anatomy
(movement specific alignment), strength, flexibility, coordination and rhythmic understanding, while
learning to use the body as a medium for artistic expression. Students reflect on, respond to, and
evaluate how dance styles and forms are historically derived and culturally valued. In performing dance,
technical, design and expressive skills are incorporated and developed. Through participation in the
Dance course, students develop transferable skills essential to their future. These include
communication skills, collaborative teamwork skills, negotiation and conflict resolution skills, problem
solving skills, as well as the ability to organise, analyse and evaluate. Participation may lead to
opportunities for future study in dance or related arts fields.
                                                                                                        54
The course content is divided into three content areas:
 choreography
 performance
 contextual knowledge.

1A/1B;
Outcome 1 Dance ideas
Outcome 2 Dance as an arts practice
Outcome 3: Responses to dance
Outcome 4: Dance in society

Unit 1ADAN
The focus for this unit is exploring the components of dance. Through practical lessons, students
acquire genre-specific technique, improve their physical competencies and learn safe dance practices.
The elements of dance and processes of choreography are explored and students solve structured
choreographic tasks to produce dance works for performance. They have first hand experience of
dance-making which actively engages them in exploration, improvisation, research, reflection and
response.

Unit 1BDAN
The focus for this unit is dance as entertainment. Students explore the entertainment potential of
dance and choreography. This further develops them as competent performers, as they identify and
explore technologies and design concepts which enhance the entertainment value of the dance and
place it in its social, historical, political and economic context.
ASSESSMENT
The three types of assessment
Performance/production
Response
Investigation


Weighting
Stage 1
                         Type of assessment

                         Performance/production
                         Extended performance/production project in which students explore ideas, rehearse, perform and/or
                         produce dance works.
                         (This may be one production task that is divided into parts with significant events for defining/collecting
                         evidence that enables outcomes to be assessed, or it may be any number of smaller tasks).
                         Using choreographic devises and improvisation to create original dance works, interpreting
                         choreographic intent, rehearsing, designing lighting, costumes, set, and graphics for programs, posters
      50–70%             and promotion.
                         Demonstrating the development of confidence and competence in the use of dance skills, techniques
                         and processes and technologies in a range of performance contexts.
                         Other types of evidence may include observation checklists or evaluation tools (self, peer), videos of
                         students.
                         Best suited to the collection of evidence of student achievement of Outcomes 1 and 2 and includes
                         using a journal to show evidence of exploration and the development of ideas, reflection on learning
                         processes and critical evaluation and modification of ideas; reflection on and evaluation of performance
                         and production processes.
                         Response

                         Students apply their knowledge and skills in analysing and responding to their own
                         dance and that of others.
      15–25%             Response to, analysis and evaluation of their own and others‘ or professional dance
                         works.
                         Types of evidence may include: journal entries, observation checklists, evaluation tools (self, peer),
                         critical reviews and essays.
                         Best suited to the collection of evidence of student achievement of Outcomes 1, 3 and 4.
                         Investigation
      15–25%             Research work in which students plan, conduct and communicate an investigation in the form of case
                         studies. The findings may be communicated in any appropriate form e.g. written, oral or graphical, or


                                                                                                                                  55
                      various combinations of these.
                      The focus of case studies may include dance works of companies, choreographers, dancers, themes or
                      issues. Each should be explored in relation to a range of contextual factors and explore a range of
                      primary and secondary sources.
                      Types of evidence may include essays, performance, journal entries, observation checklists,
                      PowerPoint, video, audio.
                      Best suited to the collection of evidence of student achievement of Outcomes 2, 3 and 4.



CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Participation may lead to opportunities for future study in dance or related arts fields.



                                               Design 1A / 1B
                                        PHOTOGRAPHY

PRE-REQUISITE
Lower school photography would be an advantage.

RATIONALE
The focus for this unit is design basics in the photography context. Students understand that
design/photography is a discipline area with its own history, tradition and tools and techniques. Students
are introduced to design elements and principles and design processes and practice. They are
introduced to basic drawing skills and a range of techniques to demonstrate their control over the
elements of design in the context of photography. Students are introduced to basic production skills and
processes, materials and technologies in black and white and digital photography.

Excursions to photographic exhibitions and participation in outings to community events could provide
background to some of the practical activities during the course. Students will also be encouraged to
use cameras to explore their own interests or concerns and communicate their personal perspectives
through their images.

ASSESSMENT
School based assessment:
Students will produce three types of assessable work, Investigation 15 – 25%, Response 15 – 25% and
Production 50 – 70%, to demonstrate their achievements in the following outcomes:

-   Design understanding
-   Design process
-   Application of design
-   Design in society

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
For most students the Photography course will provide a possible future leisure time activity that is
interesting and challenging. Others will use their photographic skills in studies at tertiary institutions
while, for some photography will pave the way to further studies which will prepare them as
photographers in industry or graphic arts fields. The association of photography with art journalism and
other general media areas is also well known.



                          DESIGN-TECHNICAL GRAPHICS
                                     1A/1B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
Some lower school Computer Aided Drawing & Design (CAD) would be an advantage, although this is
not essential.


                                                                                                                    56
COURSE CONTENT
Technical graphics uses conventions of technical drawing and computer aided design to create designs
that deal with mainly three dimensional subjects, usually of an industrial nature.
Each unit is designed with a particular focus and is divided into three content area
      Design principals and process
      Communication principals and visual literacies.
      Production / CAD knowledge and skills.
The course is designed to extend the students in their technical drawing skills and to apply their skills to
engineering drawings using 3D and Architectural C.A.D. programmes. These C.A.D. packages are used
as an aid to drawing and designing as used extensively in industry today.

TOPICS INCLUDE
         recognising and interpreting technical drawings
         use of freehand sketching as an aid
         looking at and commenting on existing designs
         applying skills and knowledge of CAD in producing technical drawings to solve a practical
          design problem.

OUTCOMES
* design understanding, design process, application of designs and design in society.

ASSESSMENT

Like other general vocational subjects, assessment is via outcomes and tasks. Generally stage 1 units
have 30% for investigation and design evaluation comments & 70% for your skill in producing your CAD
designs / drawings.


CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Students completing this course will find it valuable as a foundation for:

1.       Tertiary studies in Engineering, Architecture etc.
2.       An essential subject for students who intend to pursue a career in Drafting (engineering,
         architectural, design etc) Surveying, Cartography.
3.       Pre-apprenticeship courses or apprenticeships in such trades as carpentry, cabinet making, sheet
         metal work, fitting and turning, building trades, electrical etc.



                                        DRAMA 1A/1B


PRE-REQUISITES
An interest in performances and performing.

RATIONALE
Drama 1A focuses on exploring drama. Students will be introduced to fundamental drama skills,
techniques, forms, conventions and technologies. Through small-scale drama performance projects
students will extend their understanding and application of voice and movement skills and techniques
and the actor‘s interaction in and with the performance space using technologies such as sets, lighting
and sound.
Drama 1B focuses on drama events. Students will extend their skills in improvisation and relate these
to playwriting structures through a focus on characterisation, use of dialogue and creating drama
narratives with dramatic tension. They further develop their voice and movement skills and techniques
appropriate to the drama event, the audience and the performance space. Students will participate in a
public performance for an audience other than their class members either through devising new work or
staging a scripted drama.




                                                                                                        57
1A/1B UNIT OUTLINE
Outcome 1 Drama ideas
     Students create, interpret, explore, develop and present drama ideas.
Outcome 2 Drama skills and processes
     Students use drama skills, techniques, processes, conventions and technologies.
Outcome 3 Drama responses
     Students respond to, reflect on and evaluate drama.
Outcome 4 Drama in society
     Students understand the role of drama in society.

ASSESSMENT
School managed assessment will provide evidence of achievement of all of the outcomes, with an
emphasis on skills that may not be measured readily through an external process: for example,
evidence of achievement in outcomes related to the development and presentation of ideas, research
and drama production. Students must be given at least two opportunities to demonstrate achievement of
each outcome. It is expected that students will maintain a drama portfolio including a reflective journal
as a record of their drama processes. These may be in written and/or multi-media format.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The Drama Course of study is inclusive of general and vocational education catering for a full range of
achievements in years 11 and 12. This will include students who intend studying Drama, Arts
Management, Theatre Design and Theatre Studies at tertiary level; Students who intend studying or
seeking employment in vocational areas such as acting, directing, design of sets, costumes, lighting or
sound and theatre management; and students who will continue to enjoy drama as a leisure activity and
apply the knowledge, skills and understandings they have learned to other aspects of their lives. The
Drama course of study will also be useful for students intending to work in careers that require empathy
and a high level of interpersonal skills.



                                             ENGLISH
                                              1C/1D


PRE-REQUISITES
Successful completion of Year 10 English, achieving at least a ―C‖ grade or Level 4.

COURSE OF STUDY OUTCOMES
The New English Course is designed to facilitate the achievement of four courses of study outcomes.
Outcomes are statements of what students should know, understand, value and be able to do as a
result of their learning. The outcomes are:
     Listening and speaking
     Viewing
     Reading
     Writing
Each of the outcomes is described as a learning progression across eight broad levels and these are
used to determine the specific learning program.

COURSE CONTENT
In the English course of study students learn about the English language: how it works and how to use it
effectively. Language plays a central role in human life: it provides a vehicle for communication, a tool
for thinking, a means of creativity and a source of pleasure. Through language humans shape
understandings of themselves and their world. An understanding of language and the ability to use it
effectively empowers students. It gives them access to knowledge, enables them to play an active part
in society and contributes to their personal growth. Each course of study unit has a broad area of focus
and examples of learning contexts are suggested. Teachers will choose learning contexts that are
relevant to their students‘ interests and needs.

ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed throughout the year on a wide range of activities, both written and oral.
                                                                                                      58
CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Year 11 English is a sound preparation for students considering a future that does not necessitate
tertiary education. Students completing this course have the option of continuing on to the Year 12
course, enrolling in TAFE or embarking upon a career in the workforce.



                                   FOOD SCIENCE &
                               TECHNOLOGY-HOSPITALITY
                                       1C/1D


PRE-REQUISITES
An interest in food preparation and the food industry.

COURSE OUTLINE
The focus of these units is on food and the individual as well as
food for the community. Students will learn about food through practical food preparation skills and
expand their interests in relation to themselves and their future as well as community groups. Food
Science and Technology is a valuable course in that it teaches students important life skills.

COURSE CONTENT
This course covers the following areas:
                         Evaluation of nutrient content of various foods and needs of the individual
                         Investigate the impact of nutrition on health related issues eg.obesity
                         Food habits and traditions
                         Safe work practices in the hospitality industry
                         Safe food handling
                         Producing food for selves and family
                         Developing skills for small scale food production
                         Adapting recipes to suit design briefs
                         Developing industry standard food preparation skills
                         Investigate and evaluate food trends

This course also gives the students an opportunity to complete some units of competency which will go
towards a Certificate 11 in Hospitality.

ASSESSMENT
Assessment will be based on evidence of levels of achievement of the course of study outcomes.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
A very rewarding course that would benefit anyone wishing to follow a career in the Hospitality and
Tourism industry. Hospitality is the biggest employer in Australia Many university and TAFE students
work in this industry whilst studying or embark on a full time career in this industry. By achieving units of
competency students will have improved job prospects, extra recognition for T.A.F.E entry and
completion of units of competency upon acceptance at T.A.F.E.



                           INTEGRATED SCIENCE 1A/1B

PRE-REQUISITES
Satisfactory performance in Year 10 Science.

RATIONALE
The Integrated Science course encourages students to be questioning, reflective and critical thinkers
about scientific issues. The course is based on an integrated view of scientific knowledge that draws on

                                                                                                          59
the traditional disciplines of science and new scientific technology to enable students to investigate
issues that are interesting and relevant in a modern world. This course provides opportunities for
students to consider contemporary scientific developments and to appreciate different perspectives and
world views. This process enables them to make informed judgements and decisions about questions
that directly affect their lives and the lives of others.
COURSE CONTENT
The focus for learning is the practice of science, the knowledge of content from the biological, physical
and environmental/earth science disciplines and an understanding of the impact of science on the world
in which students live. Three content areas are covered which are interconnected

       The impact of science e.g., scientific knowledge, concepts, evidence
       The practice of science e.g., investigations, practical skills, data analysis, presentation skills
       Conceptual understandings e. g., biological, physical, environmental/earth sciences

It is expected that students will experience a range of contexts, for example;

Flight, cosmetics,science of toys, food and nutrition, health and disease, local waterways, permaculture,
rockets, consumer science, electricity, brewing and baking, sports science, land care, aquaculture, first
aid, technology (materials), robotics, viticulture and wine making, horticulture, biotechnology,
biodiversity, sustainability, forestry, space science, mining and industry, driver education, forensic
science, reproduction and genetics, community water supply and treatment, marine science.

ASSESSMENT
The types of assessment listed below are consistent with the teaching and learning strategies
considered to be the most supportive of student achievement of the outcomes in the Integrated Science
course

       Tests
       Explanations
       Investigations
       Practical tasks

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Integrated Science enhances students‘ life skills and improves their opportunity of finding employment.
It‘s a desired subject in a number of TAFE pathways.



                               MATERIALS DESIGN &
                             TECHNOLOGY-METALS 1B/1C


PREREQUISITES
There are no formal prerequisites, although students are expected to have a keen interest in
manufacturing with metal, developing and using machining and welding techniques and incorporating
technical aspects such as CAD in their projects.

RATIONALE
The materials course at the 1B/1C stage aims to expose students to industry techniques and skills and
provides a solid foundation for further work or study in the metals area. Students experience a range of
methods of cutting, machining, joining and finishing metal based projects to an industry standard.
Projects may also combine metal and other materials such as Carbon Fibre, Stainless Steel and
Fibreglass in order to provide a broader range of materials experience in a metals context.

CONTENT
Students work initially on the skills necessary to produce quality outcomes. Then aspects of design and
planning are included so that students may develop the necessary pre-production processes to optimise
success in their practical workshop tasks. Projects include machining and fabricating long board skate
trucks, vinyl cutting graphic designs, mig and arc welding of small furniture items and the machining and
manufacture of simple heat transfer engines.
                                                                                                             60
ASSESSMENT
The following assessment overview and outcomes are mandated by the Curriculum Council of Western
Australia.

Schemes of assessment are addressed in the following areas:

       Design:                  Fundamentals & Techniques of design
       Production:              Skills
       Response:                Materials Classification

Tasks are assessed on the following outcomes;

Outcome 1:      Applying a technology process
                Students apply a technology process to create or modify products

Outcome 2:      Understanding the use of materials
                Students understand how the nature of materials influences design

Outcome 3:      Using Technology Skills
                Students create products safely and efficiently

Outcome 4:      Understand materials in Society and the Environment
                Students relate a connection between materials, people and the environment.

This course provides a sound grounding for the design and manufacture of a metal product. The skills
obtained will be an advantage for the Certificate I Engineering Course (VET) offered in year 12.



                             MATERIALS DESIGN &
                           TECHNOLOGY-TEXTILES 1C/1D


PRE-REQUISITES
No pre-requisites but flair and enthusiasm.

COURSE OUTLINE
Thinking of a career in the Fashion Industry?

Technology Process and technology skills – design, create small articles and clothing using fabrics of
your choice.
Understanding the use of materials, society and the environment – both natural and synthetic fabrics,
their properties and uses

Unit 1c MDTT
Focus is production fundamentals, principles and practices of design. Students learn to communicate
aspects of the design process, while making their articles – household articles, casual clothing and
accessories.

Unit 1d MDTT
Focus of this unit is design fundamentals, designing for self. Students are introduced to a range of
technology skills, generate ideas and realise their ideas through their design projects. Projects will
include personal clothing, fashion clothing, fashion accessories – beaded jewellery, belts, scarves, hats.

TYPES OF ASSESSMENT
Design Portfolio, Production, Response and Reasoning.

Note – there will be ongoing costs of fabrics and haberdashery for practical work

                                                                                                         61
                              MATERIALS DESIGN &
                             TECHNOLOGY-WOOD 1B/1C



PREREQUISITES
There are no formal prerequisites, although students are expected to have a keen interest in woodcraft
and timber furniture making. Students are also expected to be motivated and thorough in the design and
planning of their workshop tasks.

RATIONALE
The materials course at the 1B/1C stage aims to expose students to industry techniques and skills and
provides a solid foundation for further work or study in the timber manufacturing industry. Students
experience a range of workshop equipment both general and specialised in order to accurately cut,
shape, join and finish timber furniture projects to an industry standard.
While the course is essentially practical, it provides opportunities for students to develop skills in
conceptual design, problem solving, environmental considerations and social awareness.

CONTENT
Students work initially on the skills necessary to produce quality outcomes. Then aspects of design and
planning are included so that students may develop the necessary pre-production processes to optimise
success in their practical workshop tasks. Projects include contemporary hall tables, turned hardwood
pepper grinders, folding outdoor furniture and entertainment cabinets.

ASSESSMENT
The following assessment overview and outcomes are mandated by the Curriculum Council of Western
Australia.
Schemes of assessment are addressed in the following areas:

       Design:                 Fundamentals & Techniques of design
       Production:             Skills
       Response:               Materials Classification

Tasks are assessed on the following outcomes;
Outcome 1:     Applying a technology process
               Students apply a technology process to create or modify products

Outcome 2:      Understanding the use of materials
                Students understand how the nature of materials influences design

Outcome 3:      Using Technology Skills
                Students create products safely and efficiently

Outcome 4:      Understand materials in Society and the Environment
                Students relate a connection between materials, people and the environment.

This course provides a sound grounding for the design and manufacture of timber furniture. The skills
obtained will be an advantage for the Certificate I in Furniture (VET) offered in year 12.




                                                                                                    62
                              MATHEMATICS – COURSE 5
                                    1B/1C MAT


PRE-REQUISITES
A student should have acquired a C Grade in Year 10 Mathematics.

1B MAT
UNIT CONTENT

1.       Number and algebra
In this unit, students use whole numbers, decimals, fractions and percentages for practical purposes.
They apply mathematics for personal budgeting, banking and shopping including simple interest, unit
cost and discount.
2.       Space and measurement
Students use 12 and 24 hour time and estimate, measure and order the length and mass of objects
using a variety of instruments. They estimate and measure perimeters and areas of shapes and
measure and classify angles.
They translate, reflect and rotate shapes in design and identify and draw tessellations using
transformations.
3.       Chance and data
Students use repeated measurement to collect data relevant to them and record and organise the data.
They display data in one and two way frequency tables, pictographs, Venn diagrams and bar graphs
and interpret the displays. Mean, median, mode and range are calculated and used to describe and
compare data sets. They calculate using mental strategies, written methods and calculators.

ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment.

Response (40%-50%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.

Investigation (50%-60%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems.

1C MAT
UNIT CONTENT
1.      Number and algebra
In this section, students use rule of order, decimals, fractions, percentages and ratios for practical
purposes. They apply mathematics to financial matters in the workplace such as pay scales,
commissions, salaries, and taxation. They plot points in the first quadrant, read and interpret travel
graphs, write and use algebraic rules for number patterns.

2.      Space and measurement
They measure volume and other attributes of objects, and derive and use formulas for area of squares
rectangles, triangles and parallelograms and volume of prisms. They read and draw maps with whole
number scales, describe and draw shapes in three dimensions including front, side and top views.

                                                                                                       63
3.      Chance and data
Students describe and quantify likelihood for chance events using fractions, and design and test simple
probability devices. They collect and record time-series data relevant to them, display data in tables and
graphs such as line graphs and interpret the displays. They calculate using mental strategies, written
methods and calculators.


ASSESSMENT
There will be two types of assessment.

Response (40%-50%)
Students apply their understanding and skills in mathematics to analyse, interpret and respond to questions
and situations. This assessment type provides for the assessment of knowledge, conceptual
understandings and the use of algorithms.
Written assessments, which may be done under timed conditions, require students to demonstrate use of
terminology, knowledge of factual information, understanding of concepts, use of algorithms and problem-
solving skills.
Evidence-gathering tools will include tests and examinations.

Investigation (50%-60%)
Students plan, research, conduct and communicate the findings of an investigation. They may investigate
problems to identify the underlying mathematics, or select, adapt and apply models and procedures to
solve problems.



                                MEDIA PRODUCTION AND
                                   ANALYSIS 1C/1D


PRE-REQUISITES
There are no pre-requisites for Media Studies

COURSE COMMENTS
Media Production and Analysis is a very useful stepping stone into vocational courses offered at TAFE.
Students who wish to work in Media related fields such as television, journalism, broadcasting,
advertising and marketing will also find this course most useful. However, Media Production and
Analysis is also an important course for developing general life-skills for all students as it helps us to
analyse and deal with the impact of the Mass Media in our lives.

COURSE CONTENT
Students will undertake two semesterized units over the year. The focus of the first semester unit is
entertainment (MPA1A). This involves identifying how stories are constructed in the media. Learning
contexts may include: advertising and image.
The focus of the second semester unit is infotainment (MPA1B). This involves identifying how non-
fiction media texts appear to be real but are constructed in such a way that they attract and entertain
audiences. Leaning contexts may include: lifestyle programmes and magazines.

ASSESSMENT
Assessment in this course comes from three assessment types; investigation and research work,
responses to student and professional media productions and student practical productions. There will
be no exam at the end of either unit. Assessment weightings favour practical production tasks.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Media Production and Analysis is a very useful subject for students wishing to undertake one of the
many media-related courses offered at TAFE. Students who wish to work in Media related fields such as
television, journalism, broadcasting, advertising and marketing could also find this course most useful
PRE-REQUISITES
There are no pre-requisites for Media Studies

                                                                                                          64
COURSE COMMENTS
Media Production and Analysis is a very useful stepping stone into vocational courses offered at TAFE.
Students who wish to work in Media related fields such as television, journalism, broadcasting,
advertising and marketing will also find this course most useful. However, Media Production and
Analysis is also an important course for developing general life-skills for all students as it helps us to
analyse and deal with the impact of the Mass Media in our lives.

COURSE CONTENT
Students will undertake two semesterized units over the year. The focus of the first semester unit is
entertainment (MPA1A). This involves identifying how stories are constructed in the media. Learning
contexts may include: advertising and image.
The focus of the second semester unit is infotainment (MPA1B). This involves identifying how non-
fiction media texts appear to be real but are constructed in such a way that they attract and entertain
audiences. Leaning contexts may include: lifestyle programmes and magazines.

ASSESSMENT
Assessment in this course comes from three assessment types; investigation and research work,
responses to student and professional media productions and student practical productions. There will
be no exam at the end of either unit. Assessment weightings favour practical production tasks.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Media Production and Analysis is a very useful subject for students wishing to undertake one of the
many media-related courses offered at TAFE. Students who wish to work in Media related fields such as
television, journalism, broadcasting, advertising and marketing could also find this course most useful




                                           MUSIC 1A/1B

SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
Students should have some experience on a musical instrument and a comprehensive background in
music reading and theory. A demonstrated willingness to participate in various musical activities and
styles is also desirable.

COURSE CONTENT
Four units of study are to be completed. The activities involved in each unit of study are listening,
creating, presenting, sharing, reflecting, analysing and appreciating music. Units of study will be
selected from the following list:
                                                                              th
Media Music                                         Western Art Music in 20 Century
Jazz                                                Music and Dance
Rock Music                                          Music Theatre
Folk Music                                          Music and Religion
Romanticism in Music                                Music Technology
Medieval Music                                      Australian Music
Music in the Renaissance                            Music for Solo Instrument and/or Solo Voice
Baroque Music                                       Music in the Classical Era
Music of non-Western Culture                        Music for Small/Large Vocal/Instrument Ensembles
(especially Australian Aboriginal Music)

Each term/unit consists of three major tasks;
   1. Research, analysis and Appreciation
   2. Composition and Performance
   3. Solo Vocal or Solo Instrumental Performance

Students are also expected to participate in Senior Choir and in an appropriate instrumental ensemble
(concert band or orchestra)

ASSESSMENT
This course will be assessed using a student outcome assessment basis. All three tasks contribute to
the overall grade of this course.
                                                                                                          65
                          PHYSICAL EDUCATION STUDIES
                                     1A/1B


PRE-REQUISITES
Interest in physical education and sport. Minimum of a C grade in Year 10 Physical Education. Must be
able to swim 400m in less than 10 minutes.

RATIONALE
Physical activity is significant in many people‘s lives and makes a definitive difference in student‘s health
and well being. It is a source of enjoyment and personal challenge and brings together people from
diverse cultures, communities and countries. People participate in physical activity for both its intrinsic
and extrinsic value, and because it can give meaning to their own and others‘ lives. Physical Education
Studies assists students to make choices that benefit their health now and in the future.

1A/1B UNIT OUTLINE
The focus for Unit 1A and 1B is personal participation and peer participation in sport and understanding
components of fitness and training in order to design personal fitness profiles. Practical components will
be based on sports from the following – bodyboarding, golf, volleyball, beach volleyball, basketball or
touch rugby. Selection will be dependant on teacher and resource availability.

Students will complete both practical and theoretical work in the following outcomes:
Outcome 1 Skills for physical activity
Students apply decision-making, movement, strategic and tactical skills to enhance personal
participation in physical activity.

Outcome 2 Self-management and Interpersonal Skills for Physical Activity

Students apply self-management and interpersonal skills to enhance participation in physical activity.

Outcome 3 Knowledge and understanding of movement and conditioning concepts for physical activity

Students understand movement and conditioning concepts that inform the enhancement of participation
in physical activity.

Outcome 4 Knowledge and understanding of sport psychology concepts for physical activity

Students understand mental skills, motor learning, coaching and tactical concepts that inform the
enhancement of participation in physical activity.

ASSESSMENT
School-managed assessment will provide evidence of achievement of all of the outcomes. Students will
complete a variety of tasks which will allow achievement in all four outcomes. Students will be credited
with a grade for Unit 1A and Unit 1B at the end of the year.

Weighting
Stage 1
             Type of assessment

             Performance/response
             The assessment of students engaged
             in an activity, on-the-spot evaluation of
             performance and student reflective
             response about their performance.
 50–70%
             Two tasks of this type are required.
             Performance      and    reflection  on
             performance in physical activity forms
             and settings, in the role of performer,
             coach and/or official.

                                                                                                         66
            Best suited to the collection of evidence
            of student achievement of Outcomes 1
            and 2.




            Investigation
            Research work in which students plan,
            conduct and communicate an
            investigation.
            Investigation of own and others‘ current
            participation in physical activity,
            participation potential, physical activity
 15–25%     issues and social contexts. The
            findings may be communicated in any
            appropriate form (e.g. written, oral,
            graphical,     video,      or     various
            combinations of these).
            Best suited to the collection of evidence
            of student achievement of Outcomes 3
            and 4.
            Response
            Students apply their knowledge and skills
            when analysing and responding to a
            series of stimuli or prompts.
            Response to, analysis and evaluation
 15–25%     of own or others‘ (peer or professional)
            participation in physical activity.
            Student responses may be oral, written
            or multimedia.
            Best suited to the collection of evidence
            of student achievement of Outcomes 3
            and 4.


CAREER POSSIBILITIES
Although Physical Education Studies is not a pre-requisite for some tertiary studies, it would be an
advantage for students interested in Nursing, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Education
teaching and any Recreational or Sports management courses.



                                    POLITICS & LAW 1A/1B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
No pre-requisites.
An interest in law and how it influences the functioning and operation of our society would be an
advantage.

COURSE CONTENT
A major objective of the subject is to produce informed citizens with knowledge of their basic legal
rights, obligations and duties, who understand how the legal system works. It investigates the need for
law in our society and the ways in which laws are made.
Topics studied include the functions of law, Parliament and the Courts as lawmakers, criminal and civil
law and young people and the law.

ASSESSMENT
The assessment framework is based on six generally defined common assessment tasks set by the
Curriculum Council. They include oral, written and group work, the development of a legal resource kit
and an in-class test. There is no exam.

                                                                                                      67
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
As law affects everyone and regulates society all students would benefit from studying it. Successful
completion of the course will provide valuable points for TAFE entry. It could also provide background
for journalism and any area that requires knowledge of the legal system. It is useful studied in
conjunction with Political & Legal Studies.



                                     VISUAL ARTS 1A/1B


SUGGESTED PRE-REQUISITES
There are no pre-requisites for this course. Completing this course at Year 11 would not exclude the
student from later selecting a university-bound course.

COURSE CONTENT
Unit 1A: The focus for this unit is experiences. Students develop artworks primarily concerned with
experiences of the self and observations of the immediate environment. They discover ways to compile
and record their experiences through a range of art activities and projects that promote a fundamental
understanding of art language and appreciation of the visual arts in their everyday life.

Unit 1B: The focus for this unit is explorations. In developing subject matter for artworks, students
explore ways to express personal beliefs, opinions and feelings. They explore a variety of media and
materials in a range of art forms when generating and extending ideas.

ASSESSMENT
Students will be required to complete a variety of activities in both art making and art interpretation.
There will be no examination component for assessing this course. Aspects of the course will lead to the
achievement of competencies within the Certificate II of Contemporary Art.

CAREER POSSIBILITIES
The development of a body of work and resolved artworks will be suitable to lead to meeting the entry
requirements for TAFE courses. This could lead to a career in graphic design, fashion design, industrial
design, jewellery, painting, ceramics, sculpture and arts management among many other arts-related
careers.



                                 WORKPLACE LEARNING
                                 (Endorsed Programme)

As of 2009 Workplace Learning will be a Curriculum Council Endorsed Program at Churchlands SHS.
This means that it is not a subject that gains a grade but gains valuable points (two unit equivalents)
towards secondary graduation. It also can be used to make a student more competitive for TAFE
entrance.

Workplace learning: employability skills

In this mode of Workplace Learning, students undertake training in a real workplace (minimum of 110 hours
over a four week period split into two, two week blocks) during which they are expected to demonstrate
achievement of at least 20 skills from the Curriculum Council's employability skills list. This workplace learning
takes place during the exam periods when non tertiary bound students will not be sitting examinations.

During the work placement students must meet workplace hours and complete a logbook as well as
achieving employability skills. The logbook contains:

       A task schedule that provides a record of tasks completed in the workplace

       An attendance record

                                                                                                         68

				
DOCUMENT INFO