OLD NEWS ARCHIVES 2008 AND 2007 by shuifanglj

VIEWS: 25 PAGES: 26

									OLD NEWS ARCHIVES 2008 AND 2007

                                     2008
  HARMONY MUSEUM PRESENTS ANNUAL GERMAN STYLE CHRISTMAS MARKET (11/15 &
                               16/2008)

      ALAN & DOROTHY BALDINGER ESTATE FUNDRAISER AUCTION (09/13/2008)

        IMPORTANT BUSINESS MEETING FOR HARMONY MEMBERS (09/09/2008

  FAMILY'S 1800 JOURNEY ACROSS STATE DISCUSSED AT HARMONY MUSEUM (09/09/2008)

              DINE AS IN GERMANY AT HARMONY MUSEUM: (08/16/2008)

  HARMONY MUSEUM'S 4TH ANNUAL "REGION-MADE" ANTIQUE GUN SHOW (8/09/2008)

    HISTORIC HARMONY SPONSORS ALLEGHENY BRASS BAND CONCERT (7/03/2008)

        ANNUAL HARMONY MUSEUM HERB & GARDEN FAIR JUNE 14 (06/14/2008)

  KNOECHEL RETURNS TO HARMONY MUSEUM - POPULAR QUILT IN A DAY PROGRAM
                              (5/27/2008)

JAMES M. ADOVASIO - CO-AUTHOR OF THE BOOK THE INVISIBLE SEX TO SPEAK (5/03/2008)

    HARMONIEFEST DINNER INCLUDES 19TH CENTURY CLOTHING SHOW (2/16/2008)




                                     2007
              HARMONY NEW YEAR'S EVE ON GERMAN TIME (12/31/2007)

  ELEGANT DINNER & CANDLELIGHT TOURS OPEN HOLIDAYS AT HARMONY MUSEUM
                               (12/9/2007)

   HARMONY MUSEUM SCHEDULES WASHINGTON 1753 COMMEMORATION (12/1/2007)

          HARMONY MUSEUM SUMMER HISTORY CAMP DATES SET (7/23/07)

        THE HARMONY MUSEUM'S 3RD ANNUAL HERB & GARDEN FAIR (6/9/07)

         QUILT IN A DAY PROGRAM RETURNS TO HARMONY MUSEUM (5/29/07)

            SEE GEORGE WASHINGTON AT HARMONY MUSEUM (5/8/2007)

      CELEBRATE NEW SEASON WITH HARMONY MUSEUM SPRING FEAST (4/14/07)
                RENOVATION COMPLETED AT HARMONY MUSEUM (03/27/07)

                      FLOOD PLAIN DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGED.
                 WASHINGTON'S TRUE APPEARANCE DECIPHERED. (02/10/07)

          HISTORIC HARMONY'S 41st ANNUAL HARMONIEFEST PROGRAM (02/10/07)

HARMONY MUSEUM PRESENTS ANNUAL GERMAN STYLE CHRISTMAS
MARKET

HARMONY, Pa. -- Historic Harmony's WeihnachtMarkt (Christmas Market) during the Nov.
15-16 weekend promises a memorable holiday experience with unique shopping as well as
entertainment and foods, all reflecting the historic community's German heritage. Self-guided
museum tours are part of the event, with rooms decorated in early 19th century tradition.

The festive atmosphere of the market grounds is much like that of WeihnachtMarkts so popular
throughout Germany, with many individual shops, a large entertainment tent, and food and
refreshment stations. There's more shopping in the adjacent Stewart Hall, Butler County's two
wineries will offer tastings and sales in the museum building's 199-year-old wine cellar, weavers
will occupy a nearby log house museum annex and craft activities for children will be offered in
another. The museum's Christmas market also launches the holiday season for its own gift shop
as well as Harmony's other specialty shops.
Outstanding artisans from throughout the region, many demonstrating their crafts, offer quality
goods as diverse as silver jewelry, tin ware, iron goods, treen (wood ware), folk Santas, hand-
carved Santas, folk art, paintings and drawings, dolls, jewelry, pottery, Shaker wood boxes,
cuckoo clocks, beeswax candles and ornaments, marbleized paper, birdhouses, quilts, woven
goods, stained glass, art glass, furniture, ornaments, greeting cards, soaps, Christmas cookies and
gingerbread. In addition, Little Germany of Berks County, Pa., a longtime WeihnachtMarkt
participant, offers a large selection of authentic German items including toys, ornaments and
lights, nutcrackers, smokers (carved wood figures in which incense is burned), steins, recorded
music, cook books, foods and chocolates.

Children will encounter Father Christmas in the market village and can take part in craft
activities at the Ziegler log house. The entire family will be entertained by German songs and
dances of Pittsburgh's Teutonia Mannerchor and performances of dulcimer players, fiddlers and
other musicians. A horse-drawn wagon is a fun ride through the heart of the historic district, and
visitors are invited to join in singing Christmas carols when an outdoor Christmas tree is lighted
early Saturday evening. A home made gingerbread house will be given away through a raffle.

Harmony Museum exhibits interpret the area's extraordinary history, which began with a
Delaware Indian village visited by a young George Washington in 1753 and includes Harmony's
1804 founding by German Separatists, fine hunting rifles made by Charles Flowers from about
1850 through the 1890s, oil and gas booms, and physicians who have served the area during the
past 200 years. Walking tours of Western Pennsylvania's first National Historic Landmark
District are an opportunity to learn even more about 250 years of local history and landmark
sites.
Traditional German foods and refreshments will be available, including soup, bratwurst and
sauerbraten sandwiches, potato pancakes, German potato salad, home baked pie, the museum’s
signature Harmony Society ginger cookies, home made root beer and mulled cider.

The market will be presented 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday.
Admission is $6 for adults, $5 for seniors, $3 for students and free for children younger than six.
A special rate for large groups is available by advance arrangement. Admission includes all-day
access to the market, museum, entertainment and wagon rides. The Landmark District walking
tour, at 3 p.m. both days, is an additional $5 per person but free for youngsters 16 and under. All
proceeds benefit nonprofit Historic Harmony and its eight Harmony Museum properties.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles
north of Pittsburgh’s Point and 30 miles south of I-80. Its recorded history began with Murdering
Town, an Indian village visited by Virginia Maj. George Washington during his 1753 mission
demanding the French leave the region, thus sparking the French & Indian War. Pacifist German
Lutheran Separatists, fleeing European militarism and a state church they considered corrupt,
settled Harmony in 1804 and organized as the communal Harmony Society. The Harmonists left
for Indiana Territory in 1814. Resettlement was led by Mennonites from eastern Pennsylvania,
also pacifists, whose congregation faded away at the beginning of the 20th century, although
many of their descendants remain in the area.

####
10/16/2008
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator
724-452-7341 or hmuseum@zoominternet.net


Back to Top

ALAN & DOROTHY BALDINGER ESTATE FUNDRAISER AUCTION

The Alan & Dorothy Baldinger Estate Antiques Auction will be held as a fundraiser at the
Harmony Museum Barn, Mercer St., Harmony, Pa 16037 on Saturday, September 13, 2008 at
10:00 a.m. Preview day of sale at 9:00 a.m. Website has photos, www.jsdillauctions.com .

This will be an exciting auction of furnishings and objects from the Alan & Dorothy Baldinger
Estate, as well as other sources. The auction also affords the HH the opportunity to accept
donations of quality antiques and collectibles from members and friends, and to dispose of
several unused and unneeded items from HH's "attic" -- NOT, of course, museum collection
artifacts. Call Kathy Leuk at the office, 724-452-7341, to donate items to the sale.

J.S. Dill Auctions is donating its services for this benefit. See its web site for photos of some of
the sale items, www.jsdillauctions.com . All proceeds benefit the Harmony Museum - auction
being conducted as the result of the Baldinger Families' donation of quality heirlooms to the
Museum. The Baldingers were an old-line banking family most locally-noted for their store ...
Baldinger's Foods From All Nations, located on Route 19 South of Zelienople.
Note: a 10% Buyer's premium applies to all purchases. VISA/Mastercard and Discover will be
accepted. Checks require two forms of ID. Auction conducted at the Harmony Museum Barn
with off-street parking available. Removal encouraged on the day of sale. Auction services
donated by Jack S. Dill, J.S. Dill Auctions, Inc. For more information, please call 724-452-5082.

Back to Top

IMPORTANT BUSINESS MEETING FOR HARMONY MEMBERS AND FRIENDS

Members and friends are urged to be at Stewart Hall at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 9, for an
historical presentation and important business meeting. Approval will be sought to sell the
Bishop Boyer House, and a slate of officer and director candidates will be presented.

The departure of Boyer House tenants in early August presented HH with three options:
rehabilitation ($20,000-$25,000) as a rental; restoration ($40,000-$50,000) as museum annex;
protection with preservation easement and sale, generating funds to assure maintenance and
restoration of of HH's other properties. The board determined the third option to be the best
solution for HH, working with Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation to preserve the
Boyer House with an easement while eliminating the many financial and other liabilities it
represents for HH. This also supports the late Lillian Frankenstein's preservation objective in
donating the house to HH in 2003, unfortunately without an endowment for maintenance and
restoration.

Pursuant to HH's bylaws, the board recommends members approve the sale with an easement to
be held in perpetuity by Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation (PHLF). In addition, the
board recommends members assure similar protection for HH's other properties by assigning a
preservation easement on each to PHLF. Full details will be presented at Sept. 9 meeting.

In addition, the nominating committee will present candidates for HH officers, (president, vice
president, recording secretary and treasurer) and the two other director terms that expire at year's
end.

The public is also welcome for Violet Covert's "Reflections" program, in which she interprets
Sally Hastings' journal about her pioneer family's journey in 1800 from Lancaster to Washington
County. Covert's novel, "Reflections from a Grass Widow", was self published in April and can
be purchased at the program. The novel is based on the Hastings family's experience, but Covert
also included the complete text of Hasting's original journal, "A Tour to the West 1800", its first
reprinting in more than 200 years. Hastings, who died in 1812, was 27 when she wrote the
journal for her mother.

Covert spoke at the Harmony Museum in 2006 after publishing "Map of Butler County, 1858".
That unique book connected an important map with county history and information on
townships, school districts and historical sites to create a travel and research guide useful to the
general public. This book is available for sale at the Harmony Museum Shop.

Back to Top
FAMILY'S 1800 JOURNEY ACROSS STATE DISCUSSED AT HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- The public is invited to a presentation at the Harmony Museum on Tuesday,
Sept. 9, by Violet Covert in which she interprets the 1800 journal of Sally Hastings describing
her pioneer family's journey from Lancaster across the Allegheny Mountains to settle in
Washington County.

Admission is free. The program begins at 7:30 p.m. in the museum's Stewart Hall, Main and
Mercer streets in Harmony's National Historic Landmark District.

Covert's "Reflections from a Grass Widow" is a novel based on the Hastings family's experience.
But she also included in the book the complete text of Hastings' journal, "A Tour to the West
1800" -- its first reprinting in more than 200 years. Hastings, who died in 1812, was 27 when she
wrote the journal for her mother.

Self-published in April with Chicora's Mechling Bookbindery, the book can be purchased at the
program.

Covert also spoke at the Harmony Museum in 2006 after publication of her "Map of Butler
County, 1858." That unique book connected the important 150-year-old map with county history
and information on townships, school districts and historical sites to create a county research and
travel guide.
####
Back to Top


DINE AS IN GERMANY AT HARMONY MUSEUM: MUCH SHORTER TRIP, AND
VERY MODEST COST

HARMONY, Pa. -- Harmony is commonly compared with typical rural southwestern Germany
villages. The comparison becomes even stronger when the Harmony Museum serves up one of
its very popular German dinners, as it does again on Saturday, Aug. 16.

Excellent food reasonably priced is reason enough to be there. But also important these days --
an easy car hop burning little gasoline, an air conditioned respite from August's heat, plus other
things for the family to do before or after dinner. No wonder seating at these occasional feasts
always sells out quickly.

The menu this time: beef rouladen, assorted sausages, chicken cordon bleu, sauerkraut, spaetzle
(German pasta), German potato salad, red cabbage, garden vegetables, cucumber and tomato
basil salads, assorted breads and rolls, and homemade desserts. Iced tea and coffee are offered
for those who don't bring their favorite German beverage.

Reservations are required for buffet seatings at 4:30 and 6:15 p.m., and can be obtained through
the museum office by phoning 724-452-7341 or toll-free 888-821-4822. Cost is $15 per person,
with proceeds benefiting museum operations.
Folks interested in regional history will want to tour Harmony's National Historic Landmark
District and the museum (open 1-4 p.m.) to learn more about a truly rich heritage spanning 250
years: Delaware Indians, Murdering Town and George Washington, pacifist German Lutheran
Separatists who founded Harmony in 1804 and formed 19th century America's most successful
communal group, pacifist Mennonites who led area resettlement from 1815 after the Harmony
Society moved away, fine percussion rifles made in Harmony 1850-1897 by ex-coal miner
Charles Flowers, and much more. Families are also encouraged to visit Harmony's specialty
shops while discovering why this picturesque town, honored for its ongoing historic preservation
success, has been a cultural tourism destination for two centuries.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and 30 miles
north of Pittsburgh’s Point.

####
CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
7/27/08
Back to Top


HARMONY MUSEUM'S 4TH ANNUAL "REGION-MADE" ANTIQUE GUN SHOW

HARMONY, Pa. -- The Harmony Museum presents its 4th annual antique firearms show and
sale on Saturday, Aug. 9. As with previous shows, visitors will find an emphasis on 18th and
19th century guns and accoutrements made in the Western Pennsylvania-Eastern Ohio region.

The event's founding chair is Richard Rosenberger, an authority on antique firearms who co-
authored "The Longrifles of Western Pennsylvania - Allegheny and Westmoreland Counties."
Admission to the 9 a.m.-4 p.m. show is $5. Visitors are welcome to bring items from their own
collections to learn more about them and obtain informal values from exhibitors. Lunch and
refreshments will be available. The museum shop and Harmony’s other specialty shops are
added attractions for gun show visitors.

Pennsylvania and Ohio collectors will exhibit mostly non-cartridge firearms made before 1898 in
the museum's Stewart Hall in Harmony's National Historic Landmark District. Many were used
to hunt game and for target competition, although some will have military histories linked to the
French & Indian War, American Revolution, War of 1812, Civil War and other conflicts. Many
guns on display are rare and historically important, and those representing exceptional
craftsmanship are also considered works of art in metal and wood.

Exhibits are expected to include more than a dozen custom-built percussion hunting or target
longrifles made ca. 1850 to 1897 by Harmony gunsmith Charles Flowers. Previously unknown
Flowers rifles have also turned up at each of the museum's past shows, owned by Butler County
residents who brought the family heirlooms to be examined by show experts. Hourly Harmony
Museum guided tours will be available 10 a.m.-4 p.m. for an additional fee, where visitors can
see the museum's outstanding Ball Collection of Flowers longrifles.
Additional information about the antique firearms show and exhibitor registration can be
obtained from the Harmony Museum office, 724-452-7341 or, toll-free, 888-821-4822.

Harmony, which has attracted cultural tourism for 200 years, is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 10
miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and 30 miles south of I-80. The area’s recorded history
began with an Indian village visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission to the
region that sparked the French & Indian War. Nearby, the war's first shot, fired from only about
40 feet away by a "French Indian," missed Washington. The communal Harmony Society of
German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804, but the Germans moved away in 1814
and the area was soon resettled by Mennonites. Harmony became the region's first National
Historic Landmark District in 1974.

####
CONTACT: Administrator Kathy Luek, 724-452-7341
7/20/2008
Back to Top

HISTORIC HARMONY SPONSORS ALLEGHENY BRASS BAND CONCERT

HARMONY -- Historic Harmony, which operates the Harmony Museum, will sponsor the
Allegheny Brass Band concert celebrating U.S. Independence at 8 p.m. on Thursday, July 3.

Always the most popular of Harmony's free summer concerts, it will be performed in front of the
Harmony Inn and conclude with Zambelli Fireworks, sponsored this year by the Inn, Kenny Ross
Chevrolet-Buick and Swimming Pool Discounters.

The Allegheny Brass Band concert is the second of the 2008 series, originated in 1996 by
Harmony Business Association and now co-presented by the borough. Several of Harmony's
specialty shops, including the Museum Gift Shop, will be open during the concert.

Remaining concerts, all at 7:30 p.m.: July 17, Highway 18 (rockabilly); July 31, 706 Union
(honkytonk/western swing); and Aug. 14, Kardaz (classic '50s-'60s-'70s).

Harmony is just off Pa. 68 near I-79 exits 87-88. Its recorded history began with an Indian
village visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission to demand French withdrawal
from the region, sparking the French & Indian War. Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists began
to settle Harmony in 1804 and organized as what became the internationally famous communal
Harmony Society. After they went to Indiana Territory in 1814, Harmony's resettlement was led
by pacifist Mennonites whose congregation faded away as the 20th century began.
####
6/26/2008
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator
724-452-7341 or hmuseum@zoominternet.net
Back to Top
ANNUAL HARMONY MUSEUM HERB & GARDEN FAIR JUNE 14

HARMONY, Pa. -- The Harmony Museum’s annual Herb & Garden Fair, offering an
opportunity to exchange as well as purchase plants, will be held 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday, June
14, at the museum's historic barn annex on Mercer Road just north of the Connoquenessing
Creek. Admission is free.

Gardeners may trade potted plants as specialty vendors offer roses and other ornamentals, herbs
and garden art. Seminars will take place throughout the day.

Plant donors and exchangers who bring plants to the event receive exchange vouchers. Museum
volunteers recommend that plants be potted well ahead of time to assure they have a fresh,
vigorous appearance when displayed at the fair.

A homemade lunch will be available, including quiches and basil tomato salad seasoned with
herbs from the museum's garden. Visitors may also want to walk Harmony's 3/4-mile trail along
the Connoquenessing, linking the 1805 barn with the museum's 1825 Harmony Mennonite
meetinghouse, to look for birds and other wildlife.

Visitors are also encouraged to enjoy a few-blocks walk into Harmony's shopping and museum
area. Back yard garden plantings at the museum's Wagner House annex on Mercer Street, in
Harmony's National Historic Landmark District, include herbs as well as rare and unusual roses.
A large arbor supports productive grape vines imported more than 150 years ago from Germany.
The Museum Gift Shop there, and Harmony’s other specialty shops, also welcome browsers
seeking the unusual and hard-to-find.

Guided tours of three Harmony Museum buildings, including a mid-1800s log house, are
available from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is charged.

Harmony is one of the region’s most significant historic places. In the mid-1700s it was the site
of the Lenni Lenape (Delaware) Murdering Town, visited by young Virginia Maj. George
Washington during his 1753 mission to demand French withdrawal from the region, sparking the
French & Indian War. A "French Indian" fired the war’s first shot at Washington nearby -- and
missed.

The Harmony founded in 1804 by pacifist German Lutheran Separatists spanned some 7,000
acres of what is now Harmony Borough and Jackson and Lancaster townships. Their Harmony
Society became 19th century America’s most successful communal group. A heritage tourism
site for 200 years and Western Pennsylvania's first National Historic Landmark District,
Harmony reflects an architectural character much like that of the southwest Germany hometowns
of its founders.

In 1814 the Harmonists moved to Indiana Territory, and Mennonite Abraham Ziegler bought the
society’s town and surrounding land. The Harmony Society returned in 1824 to settle 22 miles
southwest of Harmony, and disbanded in 1905. Its final home is commemorated at Old Economy
Village in Ambridge.
During the second half of the 19th century, Harmony’s Charles Flowers made fine hunting and
target rifles, now collected as works of art as well as firearms. Oil and gas booms benefited the
region in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Harmony Museum exhibits present these and other elements of the area’s remarkably rich
history. It is open 1-4 p.m. daily except Mondays and holidays. Harmony is at I-79 exits 87 and
88, about 30 miles north of downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles north of Pennsylvania Turnpike exit
28, and 30 miles south of I-80.
####
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
5/19/08
Back to Top


KNOECHEL RETURNS TO HARMONY MUSEUM WITH POPULAR QUILT IN A
DAY PROGRAM

HARMONY, Pa. -- Zelienople native Patricia Knoechel brings her annual Quilt in a Day program to the
Harmony Museum's Stewart Hall at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 27.

This year's two-hour presentation is "Victory Quilts and Eleanor Burns' Signature Patterns." It will be
based on the newest publications by Knoechel and her sister, Quilt in a Day founder and internationally
popular television quilter Eleanor Burns, who now reside in California. Quilts will be displayed, and Quilt in
a Day books and supplies may be purchased.

Admission is $6, will all proceeds benefiting museum operations. Reservations and advance ticket
purchases are recommended because Knoechel's Harmony Museum appearances always fill Stewart
Hall. Reservations may be made through the museum office at 724-452-7341 or toll-free 888-821-4822,
or by e-mail at hmuseum@zoominternet.net. Tickets may be purchased at the Museum Shop in the
museum's Wagner House annex, 222 Mercer Street.

The Museum is open for guided tours following the program.

Harmony, the region's first National Historic Landmark District, is among Western Pennsylvania’s most
significant historic places. In the mid-1700s it was the site of the Leni Lenape (Delaware) Murdering Town
visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission seeking French withdrawal from the region,
sparking the French & Indian War. A "French Indian" fired the war’s first shot at Washington nearby.
Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804, their Harmony Society becoming 19th
century America’s most successful communal group. Mennonite Abraham Ziegler bought the society's
town and surrounding land in 1815.

Museum exhibits present these and other elements of the area's extraordinary history, and the
architectural character of the town remains largely reminiscent of a village in Germany.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 30 miles north of downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles north of the
Pennsylvania Turnpike, and 30 miles south of I-80.

####
5/8/2008
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
NOTE: Knoechel is pronounced nay-gehl
Back to Top

"THE INVISIBLE SEX" AUTHOR TO SPEAK, SIGN BOOKS AT HARMONY
MUSEUM PROGRAM

HARMONY, Pa. -- James M. Adovasio, founding director of Mercyhurst Archaeological
Institute at Erie's Mercyhurst College and co-author of the book The Invisible Sex, will speak at
the Harmony Museum's Stewart Hall on Saturday evening, May 3.

Admission is free for Adovasio's illustrated presentation, which begins at 7 p.m. He will discuss
his newest book that unveils the important but previously ignored roles and contributions of
women as the human race developed throughout the Stone Age. He will also sign copies of The
Invisible Sex, published by Smithsonian Books, which will be available for purchase ($29
including tax). A wine and cheese reception follows the program.

Shaped by cartoons and museum dioramas, the public's typical image of human activity in the
Paleolithic period is of fur-clad men attacking mammoths while women remain in hiding. More
recent research -- by Adovasio, Invisible Sex co-author and University of Illinois anthropology
professor Olga Soffer and others -- demonstrates a much different reality.

Adovasio and Soffer, among the world's leading experts on perishable artifacts such as basketry,
cordage and weaving, present an exciting new look at prehistory in The Invisible Sex. They argue
that women had a central role in development of language and social life, and invented such
critical materials as clothing necessary to life in cold climates, rope for rafts that enabled water
travel, and nets for communal hunting. The authors also note that it is unlikely anyone ever
hunted mammoths, and that "Lucy," the hominid whose 3.3 million year old fossilized remains
were found in 1974 in Ethiopia and whose name was suggested by a Beatles song, could well
have been a man. The vision they present about women in prehistory offers provocative
implications for gender assumptions in modern life.

BookLoon.com reviewer Alex Telander describes The Invisible Sex as "an amazing read that
charts our ancestry from times when apes were the most evolved animal around, to some 4,000
to 6,000 years ago when humanity settled down and began farming. What makes this book
different is that the authors [address] the known history of each period and then reveal evidence
that shows women having a much larger role than was previously believed. Incorporating up-to-
date information and discoveries on our ancestry, The Invisible Sex is a great, easy to read book
for anthropology or archaeology addicts, and for anyone who wants to know what really was
going on with our species in the last two million years."

According to Adovasio, "a variety of stereotypes have persisted on the role of women in the
[prehistoric] past" largely because of "the inability of investigators to entertain alternative
explanations as well as a fundamental failure to recognize and appropriately evaluate evidence
contradictory to these stereotypes. This myopia was compounded by the domination of
Paleoanthropology by males until relatively recently...If mentioned at all, women, as well as the
old and young of both sexes, are characterized solely as minor players."
Adovasio is also provost, senior counselor to the president and dean of the Zurn School of
Natural Sciences and Mathematics at Mercyhurst College and a former commissioner of the
Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. His first international acclaim came during
the 1970s when he began the archaeological exploration of Meadowcroft Rockshelter near
Avella, southwest of Pittsburgh, site of North America's earliest proven human habitation that
dates from ca. 14,000 B.C. Significant among Adovasio's ongoing fieldwork are the
multidisciplinary investigations of the Meadowcroft Rockshelter as well as of sites at Mezhirich,
Ukraine; Dolni Vestonice/Pavlov, Czech Republic, and Caesarea, Israel. He has published
extensively and is a frequent presenter at national and international meetings.

He drew a capacity audience to the Harmony Museum in 2003 when he spoke about origins of
the hemisphere’s earliest inhabitants following publication of The First Americans - In Pursuit of
Archaeology’s Greatest Mystery. It was written with former Natural History editor and former
Smithsonian science editor Jake Page, the third co-author of The Invisible Sex.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and 30 miles
north of downtown Pittsburgh. Its recorded history began with Murdering Town, a Delaware
Indian village visited by Virginia Maj. George Washington during his 1753 mission demanding
the French leave the region, sparking the French & Indian War. Pacifist German Lutheran
Separatists, fleeing European militarism and a state church they considered corrupt, settled
Harmony in 1804 and organized as what became the internationally famous communal -- and
celibate -- Harmony Society. They went to Indiana Territory in 1814 and returned to Beaver
County in 1824 to found Economy, now Ambridge, where its last members dissolved the society
in 1905. Harmony's resettlement began in 1815, led by pacifist Mennonites whose congregation
also faded away at the dawn of the 20th century.

Harmony Museum exhibits interpret the area's extraordinary array of history, from the Indians,
Washington and the Harmony Society, to maker of fine percussion hunting and target rifles
Charles Flowers and oil and gas booms of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Its Wagner
House annex houses exhibits on local railroads and physicians.

LIMITED NUMBER OF SIGNED COPIES OF THE INVISIBLE SEX NOW AVAILABLE!




####
4/13/2008
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator
724-452-7341 or hmuseum@zoominternet.net
Back to Top


19TH CENTURY HARMONIST CLOTHING TO BE SHOWN AT HARMONIEFEST
HARMONY, Pa. -- Examples of attire worn by communal Harmony Society members when they
immigrated from southwest Germany to settle Harmony in the early 1800s will be modeled at the 41st
annual Harmoniefest on Saturday, Feb. 16. The dinner and historical program, a fundraiser to benefit the
Harmony Museum, is held in the museum's Stewart Hall at Main and Mercer streets.

Admission is $25 per person. Reservations are required, and must be received by Friday, Feb. 8.

Curator Sarah Buffington of Old Economy Village in Ambridge will narrate the fashion show. Historic
Harmony, the volunteer historical society and preservation advocate that operates the nine-property
Harmony Museum, will contribute part of the evening's proceeds to a program providing authentic
costumes for Old Economy docent-interpreters. Commemorating the communal Harmony Society's third
and final home, Old Economy Village is operated by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum
Commission.

Historic Harmony will also present two Heritage Awards for outstanding restoration projects, and
recognize volunteers who contributed the most hours to museum activities last year. This year's Heritage
Awards will honor James and Elizabeth Kelleher for restoring the facade of their ca. 1890 home on East
New Castle Street in Zelienople, and Belynda Slaugenhaupt and Suzanne Spohn for restoring the 1862
Stauffer farmstead barn at their home on Camp Run Road in Lancaster Township.

Harmony was founded late in 1804 by German Lutheran Separatists. led by Johann George Rapp. They
left the Stuttgart area to escape militarism and conduct their religious affairs free of state interference.
They organized formally as the Harmony Society in February 1805, an event celebrated with an annual
February feast they called Harmoniefest. Their first American home, called Harmonie, which eventually
had a population of nearly 900, encompassed the town and 7,000 acres of what became Jackson and
Lancaster townships. The celibate Harmonists, who anticipated the imminent return of Christ, moved to
southwestern Indiana in 1814, returning in 1824 to found Economie, now Ambridge in Beaver County,
only 22 miles from their original home. The Harmony Society, which became 19th century America's most
successful communal group, was dissolved there in 1905 by its last survivors.

Although Historic Harmony’s Harmoniefest does mark the founding anniversaries of Harmony and the
Harmony Society, it celebrates two and a half centuries of extraordinary history. The area's recorded
history began with young British Virginia Maj. George Washington's visit with local Delaware Indians
during his 1753 mission to the region seeking withdrawal of a growing French occupation, thus sparking
the French & Indian War. Nearby, the war's first shot was fired at Washington by a "French Indian."

Harmony is one of western Pennsylvania’s most significant historic sites. The Harmony National Historic
Landmark District comprises 10 old-town blocks as well as the Harmony Society cemetery in adjacent
Jackson Township. When "second founder" Abraham Ziegler bought the Harmony Society’s holdings in
1815, his and other Mennonite families began resettling the area. The Mennonite congregation, also
pacifist, faded away as the Harmony Society met a similar end.

Harmoniefest begins with a 6 p.m. reception. Dinner entree choices are stuffed pork chop, chicken
scaloppini and vegetarian lasagna. Information and reservations can be obtained from the Harmony
Museum office, 724-452-7341, toll-free 888-821-4822, or hmuseum@zoominternet.net.
####
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
1/27/08
Back to Top



HARMONY NEW YEAR'S EVE ON GERMAN TIME OFFERS TOURS, DINNER,
FILM, FAMILY FUN
Harmony, Pa. -- The Harmony Museum will be open for tours, show a short comedy film that's
become a New Year's Eve must-see in Germany, provide a traditional German opportunity to
foretell what the new year will bring, and offer a pork and sauerkraut buffet dinner as its part in
the borough's inaugural family-oriented "Silvester" New Year's Eve celebration.

The historic borough of Harmony invites residents and visitors from throughout the region to
observe 2008's arrival on German time -- six hours earlier than U.S. Eastern Standard Time -- in
recognition of Harmony's important German heritage that originated more that 200 years ago.

Pacifist Lutheran Separatists from near Stuttgart in the duchy of Wurttemberg, now part of the
German state of Baden-Wurttemberg, founded Harmony in 1804. They organized as the
communal Harmony Society, which soon gained international renown. The group, which
adopted celibacy, moved on to settle two more towns -- New Harmony, Ind., and Economy, now
Ambridge, on the Ohio River only 22 miles from Harmony. Its last members disbanded the
society there in 1905. The Harmonist heritage led to Harmony's designation more than 30 years
ago as western Pennsylvania's first National Historic Landmark District.

According to legend, St. Sylvester, the Catholic pope 314-335, converted Emperor Constantine I
to Christianity and cured him of leprosy. The year's last day, St. Sylvester's feast day, is known
in Germany as Silvester or Silvesterabend.

Harmony's New Year's Eve party begins at 2 p.m. with the NexTier Bank Silvester 5K Run.
Celebrants welcome 2008 four hours later when the Sign Innovation Ball Drop counts down to
Armstrong's Silvester Zambelli Fireworks finale at 6 p.m. -- midnight in Germany.

The Harmony Museum will be open 3-5:30 p.m. for a token $1 donation, with free admission for
continuous showings of "Dinner for One" at the Main Street end of the museum's Stewart Hall.
For $1 a try at the adjacent Wagner House museum annex, visitors can have a go at Bleigiessen -
- using the shape of melted lead to interpret what the new year may bring. The museum's $10
German dinner that begins at 4:30 p.m. in the main section of Stewart Hall will continue until the
buffet is depleted.

In the humorous and somewhat politically incorrect "Dinner for One" English-language film
short from the 1960s that has somehow become a very popular German New Year's Eve
entertainment, butler James and lady of the manor Miss Sophie -- both elderly and increasingly
tipsy -- conduct a dinner party with imaginary guests.

Bleigiessen involves placing a bit of lead in a spoon, heating it with a candle until the lead melts,
dropping the molten lead into water and interpreting its shape when chilled to predict what to
expect in the new year. A flower, angel, beetle or sailboat are among shapes bearing good
tidings. An apple, broom, pants or lance -- not so good. The Harmony Museum folks have found
a guide to help lead melters decide what their bit of metal says is ahead for them in 2008.

Harmony's Silvester also includes a German band concert 3:30-5:30 p.m. in front of the
Harmony Inn, craft demonstrations and activities for kids. Weather permitting, there will be free
rides on Antique Motor Coach Association of Pennsylvania's restored 1947 Harmony Short Line
bus. Harmony's antique and specialty shops, including the museum gift shop, will offer post-
Christmas sales.

Additional information about the Silvester celebration, as well as 5K race entry forms, are
available at the borough's Web site, www.harmony-pa.us.
####
12/26/2007
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
Back to Top

ELEGANT DINNER & CANDLELIGHT TOURS OPEN HOLIDAYS AT HARMONY
MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- Visitors attending Historic Harmony's annual holiday season Candlelight
Christmas fundraiser on Sunday, Dec. 9, can again choose to enjoy an elegant, reservations-only
dinner in addition to touring Harmony Museum buildings that are decked out in Christmas trim.

The dinner option was introduced at the 2006 Candlelight Christmas and sold out quickly. The
single-seating dinner will be served at 5:30 p.m. in the museum's Stewart Hall, with entree
choices of Wellington style beef, chicken or salmon. Diners are welcome to bring their own
beverage. The $25 per person fee, the same as a year ago, includes a museum tour before or after
dinner. Reservations must be placed with the museum office no later than Tuesday, Dec. 4, at
724-452-7341/888-821-4822 or hmuseum@zoominternet.net.

The decorated and candlelit main museum, Ziegler log house and Wagner House annex will be
open 4-8 p.m. Harmony's historic center, reminiscent of a rural German village and core of the
first National Historic Landmark District in Western Pennsylvania, becomes especially
picturesque when luminaries are lighted at dusk around the diamond and along Mercer Street.
The winner of Historic Harmony's annual handmade quilt raffle will be drawn at 8 p.m., and the
museum's gift shop and Harmony's other antique and specialty shops will be open into the
evening.

A $2 Candlelight Christmas admission donation is requested of those not having dinner;
proceeds benefit Historic Harmony and its museum operations.

A unique model railroad platform that delighted museum visitors during the 2006 Christmas
season is again a special holidays-only attraction in the Wagner House. Donated to Historic
Harmony by the Ronald Eckstein family of Forward Township, the layout's highlights are
remarkable log buildings and accessories made in the 1930s and early '40s by the late William
Yobp of New Kensington and an O-27 gauge Lionel train and trolley from the 1950s.

Harmony is 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and 30 miles south of I-80 at I-79 exits
87-88. The area’s recorded history began with a Delaware Indian village visited by George
Washington during his 1753 mission demanding French withdrawal from British territory,
sparking the French & Indian War; its first shot was fired at him nearby by a "French Indian."
Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony late in 1804, and their communal
Harmony Society gained international renown. After their 1814 departure, the area's resettlement
was led by pacifist Mennonites. These and many other aspects of area history are interpreted by
the Harmony Museum.
####
11/20/2007
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or 888-821-4822
Back to Top


HARMONY MUSEUM SCHEDULES WASHINGTON 1753 COMMEMORATION

HARMONY, Pa. -- History fans of all ages are invited to participate in a Harmony Museum
commemoration on Saturday, Dec. 1, to learn more about 21-year-old Virginia Maj. George
Washington's 1753 mission to western Pennsylvania that sparked the French & Indian War as
well as other aspects of Harmony's rich history.

The two-mile walk begins at 1 p.m. in Harmony's diamond. A donation of $5 per person is
requested.

Washington came to the region from Williamsburg, Va., late in 1753 with an ultimatum from
Gov. Robert Dinwiddie for French withdrawal from British territory, virtually assuring war --
officers at Fort LeBoeuf (Waterford, Erie County) responded that the British should stay out of
New France. The significance of the mission and some of its incidents will be discussed during
the walk over historic ground with Washington and guide Christopher Gist reenactors Jason
Cherry and Kenneth Cherry of Butler.

The program marks the 254th anniversary of Washington's overnight Nov. 30-Dec. 1, 1753, stay
at Murdering Town, a Lenni Lenapi (Delaware) village across the Connoquenessing Creek from
where Harmony would be established 51 years later. The French & Indian War's first shot, fired
at Washington by a "French Indian" east of Murdering Town 26 days later, missed its target --
also with great historical consequence. The French soon drove Virginians from the Forks of the
Ohio and constructed Ft. Duquesne there. After a small force led by Washington ambushed a
French party at Great Meadows (near Uniontown) in May 1754, French troops secured
Washington’s surrender at Ft. Necessity, and what would become the first global war was truly
under way.

During the Harmony Museum's Dec. 1 program, Washington and Gist will lead participants to
where it is believed Washington's party forded the Connoquenessing, then through Harmony and
along a creek-side trail to the approximate site of Murdering Town. Historians believe that the
village was on high ground near where Mennonites established a cemetery and meetinghouse in
the early 19th century. Walkers will be offered refreshments at the historic 1825 meetinghouse
before returning to Harmony.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike and 30 miles
south of I-80. Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists, fleeing European militarism and a state
church they considered corrupt, founded Harmony in 1804 and organized as the internationally
known communal Harmony Society. When they left for Indiana in 1814, resettlement was led by
Mennonites from eastern Pennsylvania, also pacifists whose congregation faded away at the
beginning of the 20th century. A pioneering school for girls was established here in 1817 by a
Pittsburgh pastor, and the area benefited from local oil and gas discoveries in the late 19th
century and again early in the 20th century. Exhibits at the Harmony Museum, open daily 1-4
p.m. except Mondays and holidays, interpret all of this and other aspects of area history.
####

11/14/07
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341 or 888-821-4822, or
hmuseum@zoominternet.net

Back to Top

HARMONY MUSEUM SUMMER HISTORY CAMP DATES SET

HARMONY -- Historic Harmony has scheduled its annual Harmony Museum summer History
Camps, with the session for beginner campers (third, fourth and fifth graders) held
July 23-27 and advanced camp (last summer's beginners) July 30-Aug. 3 for. Each
day's session is held from 9 a.m. to noon.

Activities for first-year campers include museum tour, nature walks, and such
pioneer crafts as tin piercing, weaving and candle making. The advanced program
focuses on German culture, Harmony history with related field trips, and crafts.

Preregistration is required with the museum office, 724-452-7341. The fee is $27 for
Historic Harmony members. The $30 fee for others includes a student membership.
Beginner camp coordinator is Valerie Cuccaro and advanced camp coordinators are
Marcy Luek and Margaret Miller.

Harmony, Western Pennsylvania's first National Historic Landmark District, is one of
the region’s most significant historic places. In the mid-1700s it was the site of a
Delaware village visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission into the
region that sparked the French & Indian War.

Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804 and organized as the
Harmony Society, 19th century America’s most successful communal group. Mennonite
Abraham Ziegler bought the society’s town and thousands of surrounding acres in
1815. Harmony Museum exhibits present these and many other elements of the area’s
remarkably rich history.

CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
Back to Top

ANNUAL HARMONY MUSEUM HERB & GARDEN FAIR JUNE 9
HARMONY, Pa. -- The Harmony Museum’s 3rd annual Herb & Garden Fair, featuring a plant
exchange and sale, will be held 10 a.m.-3 p.m. on Saturday, June 9, at the historic 200-year-old
barn museum annex on Mercer Road just north of the picturesque Connoquenessing Creek.

Gardeners may trade potted plants as specialty vendors offer roses and other ornamentals, herbs
and garden art. Seminars will take place throughout the day.

Plant donors and exchangers should bring their plants to the barn on Friday to be displayed
properly when the fair opens. They will receive vouchers for use during Saturday's exchange.
Museum volunteers recommend that plants be potted well ahead of time to assure they are perky
in time for the fair.

Homemade lunch will be offered, incorporating herbs from the museum garden. Selections will
include quiches and basil tomato salad. Visitors to the Wagner House museum annex gift shop a
few blocks away, at 222 Mercer St. in the National Historic Landmark District, can enjoy various
rare and unusual roses blooming in its garden. Guided museum tours will be available 1-4 p.m.,
and Harmony’s many other antiques and specialty shops invite browsing.

Harmony, just off I-79 in Butler County, is one of the region’s most significant historic places. In
the mid-1700s it was the site of the Lenni Lenape (Delaware) Murdering Town, visited by
George Washington during his 1753 mission to demand French withdrawal from the region that
sparked the French & Indian War; a "French Indian" fired the war’s first shot at Washington
nearby.

Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804. Their Harmony Society became
19th century America’s most successful communal group. A decade later the Harmonists
relocated to Indiana Territory and Mennonite Abraham Ziegler bought the society’s town and
thousands of surrounding acres in what would become Jackson and Lancaster townships. The
Harmony Society returned in 1824 to settle 20 miles west of Harmony in Beaver County and
disband in 1905; its final home is commemorated at the Old Economy Village historic site in
Ambridge.

During the second half of the 19th century, Harmony’s Charles Flowers made fine hunting and
target rifles, now collected as works of art. Oil and gas booms benefited the region in the late
19th and early 20th centuries.

Harmony Museum exhibits present these and other elements of the area’s remarkably rich
history. A heritage tourism site for 200 years and Western Pennsylvania's first National Historic
Landmark District, Harmony retains the architectural character of the hometowns of its German
founders.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87 and 88, about 30 miles north of downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles north
of Pennsylvania Turnpike exit 28, and 30 miles south of I-80.
####
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341
Back to Top
QUILT IN A DAY PROGRAM RETURNS TO HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- Patricia Knoechel's annual how-to-quilt appearance always fills the
Harmony Museum's Stewart Hall, so another full house is expected when she returns for this
year's Quilt in a Day presentation at 10 a.m. on Tuesday, May 29.

Her two-hour presentation will focus on a traditional flowered 1930s "Magic Vine" design as
well as "Quick Trip" strip-pieced quilting techniques suitable for beginners as well as experts.
Both are based on new books by Knoechel and her sister, Quilt in a Day founder and television
quilter Eleanor Burns. The area natives, who reside in California, have written many popular
quilting books.

Quilts will be displayed, and Quilt in a Day books and supplies may be purchased. Admission is
$6, with proceeds benefiting the Harmony Museum. Reservations or advance ticket purchases
are recommended strongly because of the popularity of Knoechel's museum presentations each
spring. Reservations may be made with the museum office, 724-452-7341 or e-mail
hmuseum@fyi.net, and tickets are available at the Museum Shop, Wagner House museum
annex, 222 Mercer Street.

The Museum is open for guided tours following the program.

Harmony, a National Historic Landmark 30 minutes north of downtown Pittsburgh, is among
Western Pennsylvania’s most significant historic places. In the mid-1700s it was the site of the
Leni Lenape Murdering Town visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission seeking
French withdrawal from the region, sparking the French & Indian War; a "French Indian" fired
the war’s first shot at Washington nearby. Pacifist German Lutheran Separatists founded
Harmony in 1804, their Harmony Society becoming 19th century America’s most successful
communal group. Mennonite Abraham Ziegler bought the society's town and surrounding land in
1815.

The Harmony Museum exhibits present these and other elements of the area's unusually rich
history, and the architectural character of the town remains much like that of a rural German
village.

Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 30 miles north of downtown Pittsburgh, 10 miles north of
Pennsylvania Turnpike exit 28, and 30 miles south of I-80.
####
5/6/2007
CONTACT: Kathy Luek, Administrator, 724-452-7341

NOTE TO BROADCASTERS: Knoechel is pronounced nay-gehl

Back to Top
SEE GEORGE WASHINGTON AT HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- The public is invited to a program at the Harmony Museum to view the
History Channel's special "Search for George Washington" production. The presentation begins
at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, May 8, in the museum’s Stewart Hall, and admission is free.

The program expands on and further illuminates the historical detective work and 21st century
technologies that determined Washington's true appearance in a project described by Jeffrey
Schwartz at the museum's Harmoniefest program in February.

Project leader Schwartz, forensic anthropologist and University of Pittsburgh professor, appears
throughout the 50-minute History Channel program broadcast one week after he spoke in
Harmony. It shows the challenges encountered and technologies applied -- including advanced
forensics and 3-D laser scanning -- to create accurate images of Washington as 19-year-old
surveyor, 45-year-old Colonial army commander and first American president at 57. The
program also shows how life-sized figures of Washington were produced, and their installation
last September at a new museum at Mount Vernon, Washington's Virginia estate.

The Harmony area’s recorded history began with a Lenni Lenape (Delaware) village visited by
Washington during his 1753 mission on behalf of Virginia's governor to demand French
withdrawal from the region, sparking the French & Indian War. Nearby, a "French Indian" fired
the war’s first shot at the 21-year-old major. The Indians had left the area many years before the
Harmony Society of pacifist German Lutheran Separatists came to western Butler County's
wilderness in 1804 to establish Harmony as its first American home. The religious commune
soon attracted international attention as its population grew to about 850 immigrants convinced
of Christ’s imminent return and dedicated to separation of church and state.

The Harmonists departed in 1814 to Indiana Territory, returning in 1824 to build their final home
at what became Ambridge in Beaver County, commemorated by Old Economy Village there.
Their Butler County property was bought in 1815 by Mennonite blacksmith Abraham Ziegler,
Harmony's "second founder."

Harmony Museum exhibits present these and other elements of the area's rich history. Access to
additional historic sites and National Historic Landmark District walking tours may be arranged
by appointment. Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania
Turnpike, 30 miles north of downtown Pittsburgh and 30 miles south of I-80

Back to Top

CELEBRATE NEW SEASON WITH HARMONY MUSEUM SPRING FEAST

HARMONY, Pa. -- Spring brings warmer, sunnier times and, in Harmony, revival of the
Harmony Museum's popular reservations-only German dinners, beginning on Saturday, April 14
with a Frühlingfest, or spring feast. The buffet dinner will be served 5-7 p.m. in the museum’s
Stewart Hall.
Selections will include pork schnitzel, sauerbraten, meatballs in gravy, sauerkraut, red cabbage,
German potato salad, spaetzle (German pasta), dandelion salad, cucumber salad, beets, carrots,
breads, homemade desserts, and coffee, tea, and water. Diners are always welcome to bring
along their favorite German beverage.

Cost is $13 per person, and proceeds benefit museum operations. Reservations may be made
with the museum office: 724-452-7341, toll-free 888-821-4822, or www.harmonymuseum.org.

Diners are encouraged to spend the day exploring the museum, the National Historic Landmark
District, and Harmony's many specialty shops with goods ranging from antiques and crafts to
souvenirs of one of the region's most historic sites.

Recognized in 2004 with a statewide award for its long-standing historic preservation efforts, the
picturesque town with an architectural character not unlike that of a German village has been a
heritage tourism destination for nearly 200 years. Harmony is at I-79 exits 87-88, a quick 10
miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles north of Pittsburgh’s Point and 30 miles
south of I-80.

The area’s recorded history began with a Delaware Indian village visited in 1753 by George
Washington during his mission to the region that sparked the French & Indian War. Nearby, a
"French Indian" fired the war’s first shot at him on Dec. 27, 1753. The communal Harmony
Society of German Lutheran Separatists founded Harmony in 1804 as its first American home
and was soon attracting international attention. With their 1814 departure, resettlement was led
by Mennonite blacksmith and "second founder" Abraham Ziegler.
Back to Top

RENOVATION COMPLETED AT HARMONY MUSEUM

HARMONY, Pa. -- Completion of an eight-week Harmony Museum renovation project has
reopened all exhibit rooms in the main museum building to public view.

Museum volunteers removed a deteriorated floor in the multi-subject History Room, constructed
a substantial subfloor and installed and stained southern pine flooring, repainted the room's
walls, installed new cases for its display of Native American artifacts, and reorganized its other
exhibits. The adjoining Victorian Room was also painted and its displays of period furnishings
and artifacts refreshed.

The project finished a two-phase rehabilitation that began with the similar rehabilitation of the
adjacent Mennonite Room in early 2006.

Historic Harmony President John Ruch said the old History and Mennonite room floors were
badly-built replacements dating from the first half of the 20th century, and no significant artifacts
were found under them. The building, on the diamond at the center of the Harmony National
Historic Landmark District, was built in 1809 by the communal Harmony Society as a
warehouse and granary with a massive wine cellar as its basement.
The Harmony Museum, established in 1955 and one of the region's few history museums that
operates all year,

is open 1-4 p.m. daily except Mondays and holidays. Regular admission fees are $5 for adults
and $2 for children for a guided tour that includes three historic buildings.

The Harmony area’s recorded history began with Murdering Town, a Delaware Indian village
visited by George Washington during his 1753 mission to demand French withdrawal from the
territory, sparking war between Britain and France. The first shot of the French & Indian War
was fired at him nearby by a "French Indian." The Harmony founded in 1804 by German
Lutheran Separatists as the first home of their famed communal Harmony Society encompassed
much of Jackson and Lancaster townships as well as the town. After the Harmonists left, their
town and extensive property was purchased in 1815 by "second founder" blacksmith Abraham
Ziegler, who with his and other Mennonite families led the area's resettlement.

Among additional aspects of Harmony's rich history interpreted in Harmony Museum exhibits
are pioneer life, a late 19th-early 20th century oil and gas boom, and the medical practice of rural
doctors.

Harmony, is at I-79 exits 87-88, about 10 miles north of the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 30 miles
north of Pittsburgh’s Point and 30 miles south of I-80.
Back to Top

FLOOD PLAIN DEVELOPMENT CHALLENGED;
WASHINGTON'S TRUE APPEARANCE DECIPHERED

HARMONY, Pa. -- "Why in the world should new construction be allowed in the
Connoquenessing flood plain while millions of dollars are being spent to buy and vacate flood
plain properties damaged in the 2004 flood?"

Local, county, state and federal officials are about to be asked to respond to that question with
regard to the controversial Creekside Manor housing plan, said Historic Harmony President John
Ruch during the historical society and preservation advocate's annual Harmoniefest on Saturday
evening (Feb. 10).

The annual fundraising event's 80 diners, including public officials, applauded University of
Pittsburgh Professor Jeffrey Schwartz's illustrated presentation about his four-year forensics
project to determine George Washington's appearance as youth, middle-aged Colonial army
commander and first U.S. president. His internationally recognized undertaking is the subject of
"Save Our History: The Search for George Washington" on the History Channel, 10 p.m. this
coming Saturday (Feb. 17).

Historic Harmony also presented awards to honor recent building restorations and recognized
members for volunteer service to the Harmony Museum during 2006.

The 47-acre Creekside Manor site and three adjacent properties are eligible for the National
Register of Historic Places. Directly across the Connoquenessing Creek from Harmony's historic
district and west of Mercer Road, it was probably the site of the Delaware Indian village visited
by young Virginia Maj. George Washington in 1753. It was also the first land cleared by the
communal Harmony Society that founded Harmony in 1804, for its physician's herb garden,
crops and sheep-grazing, as well as its religious labyrinth. It has been in agricultural use ever
since.

Ruch revealed that the property was offered to Historic Harmony last June, when the
organization was given up to three years to finance and complete the purchase to preserve it as
green space. The historical society began immediately to pursue grants and related support with
foundations and other organizations, but was "incredibly shocked" when told last month the
property was being sold to a builder -- "what must certainly be the greatest disappointment in
this organization's history" and "shortest three years we'll ever experience."

"In The Creek Manor" would be a better name for the development, he added, because nearly
half of the property was under water in the September 2004 flood and half of the plan's
construction would occupy the flood plain.

"If it is built, it will mean worse damage to surrounding properties in future floods," Ruch said.
"In fact, that's exactly what the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection told the
developer, as well as Harmony and Jackson Township officials, just a few days before the
property was offered to Historic Harmony. There's simply no question that if Creekside Manor is
built, the consequences will be terrible for the community in terms of public safety, future
economic viability and loss of nationally important historic resources. This is a project for which
there is no rational justification."

He called on the public to demand "meaningful protections when it comes to the flood plain, and
to preserve that very historic landscape across the Connoquenessing."

Schwartz's project resulted in creation of three life-sized representations of Washington that in
September were installed in a new museum and education center at Mount Vernon, Washington's
Virginia estate. The work involved using computer and laser technology to interpret 18th century
art and sculpture, anatomical forensics and even Washington's clothing. The images produced
differ distinctly from such popular representations as the Gilbert Stuart portrait that once hung in
many school classrooms and that on the U.S. $1 bill.

The interpretation of Washington as a surveyor in 1751 would be similar to his appearance
during his mission to western Pennsylvania two years later to demand French withdrawal from
the region. He spent a night with Delaware Indians across the Connoquenessing from the future
site of Harmony, and four weeks later an Indian allied with the French shot at him nearby.

Historic Harmony presented two Heritage Awards for 2007 during Harmoniefest. Robert
Householder, Zelienople, honored for renovation of the facade of the building at 115 S. Main St.,
Zelienople, was also a 1999 recipient for restoration of Zelienople's former First National Bank
building. Beth Nicklas and Alan Miles received an award for barn and outbuilding facade
restoration at the ca. 1830 Ziegler-Peffer farmstead, their home at 129 Textor Hill Rd., Jackson
Township.

Volunteer Service Recognition awards honored four Harmony Museum volunteers contributing
the most hours of service during the past year. Recipients were Sharon Anno, Lancaster
Township, 121.5 hours; Sam Regal, Zelienople, 81.5 hours; and Kathy Luek, Harmony, and
Suzie Rape, Zelienople, 80 hours each. Ruch noted that 74 volunteers contributed more than
3,800 hours to museum activities during 2006.

The original Harmoniefest was a feast celebrating the Harmony Society's founding. The pacifist
commune's members came to the United States seeking religious freedom and believing in
separation of church and state. The event conducted by Historic Harmony celebrates all of the
area's rich history.

Harmony is one of western Pennsylvania’s most significant historic sites and includes western
Pennsylvania's first National Historic Landmark District. The first American home of the
Harmony Society had a population of nearly 900 when the commune relocated to southwest
Indiana in 1814; it returned to Beaver County in 1824 to establish Economy (now Ambridge),
where the society dissolved in 1905 and is commemorated by the state's Old Economy Village
historic site.

When blacksmith Abraham Ziegler, Harmony’s "second founder," bought the Harmony
Society’s town and extensive property in 1815, his and other Mennonite families led the area's
resettlement and Ziegler sold the town lot by lot. The Mennonite congregation also faded away at
the beginning of the 20th century.
Back to Top


WHAT DID GEORGE WASHINGTON REALLY LOOK LIKE? FIND OUT AT
HARMONY MUSEUM HARMONIEFEST

HARMONY, Pa. --The University of Pittsburgh's Jeffrey H. Schwartz will present an illustrated
program, "What Did George Washington Really Look Like? The First Forensic Reconstruction
of Our First President," during Historic Harmony's 41st annual Harmoniefest program on
Saturday, Feb. 10, at the Harmony Museum's Stewart Hall..

Historic Harmony will also present two Heritage Awards for area renovation projects and
recognize volunteers who contributed the most hours to the organization's 2006 activities.
Reservations are required for Harmoniefest and must be received at the museum by Friday, Feb.
2.

The annual museum fundraiser dinner and historical program commemorates Harmony’s 1804
founding by German Lutheran Separatists and their organization as the communal Harmony
Society on Feb. 15, 1805. Historic Harmony officials note that this is an appropriate occasion for
Schwartz's presentation because Feb. 22 marks the 275th birth anniversary of Washington, who
contributed importantly to the history of Harmony and the region.
Schwartz, professor in Pitt's departments of Anthropology and History and Philosophy of
Science, led a four-year project to determine Washington's true appearance at three stages of his
life: teen-aged surveyor, gentleman farmer taking command of the Revolution's Colonial army,
and at his inauguration as first American president. The work was used to create life-sized
models for a new museum-education center at Washington's Virginia estate, Mount Vernon.

The effort combined 18th century art, sculpture, dentistry and clothing with digital computer
technology and knowledge of skeletal and soft tissue changes of the aging process. Schwartz
describes the result, which has attracted international attention, as the first "de-aging" of an
individual -- recognizable as Washington, but notably different from popular representations.

The image of Washington at 19 depicts his appearance two years before he came to western
Pennsylvania in 1753 as a Virginia major with an ultimatum demanding French withdrawal from
the region, setting the stage for the French & Indian War. He spent a night with Delaware
Indians at their Murdering Town near the future site of Harmony, camped at three other Butler
County locations, and was the target of the war's first shot, fired several miles east of Murdering
Town by a "French Indian."

Schwartz, author of many articles and books, is also a resident fellow of Pitt's Center for
Philosophy of Science, research associate of the American Museum of Natural History and
Carnegie Museum of Natural History, and forensic anthropologist for the Allegheny County
Coroner's office. The New Jersey native received master's and doctoral degrees at Columbia
University after undergraduate study at the university's Columbia College.

This year’s Heritage Awards honor Robert Householder, Zelienople, for renovation of the facade
of the building at 115 S. Main St., Zelienople; and Beth Nicklas and Alan Miles for barn and
outbuilding facade restoration at the ca. 1830 Ziegler-Peffer farmstead, their home at 129 Textor
Hill Rd., Jackson Township.

The original Harmoniefest was an annual feast celebrating the Harmony Society's founding. The
pacifist commune's members, anticipating the imminent return of Christ, came to the United
States to flee militarism and seek religious freedom grounded in separation of church and state.
Historic Harmony’s event, begun in 1967, celebrates more than 250 years of area history, and
since 1991 has been the occasion for presenting its preservation awards.

Harmony is one of western Pennsylvania’s most significant historic sites. The Harmony National
Historic Landmark District comprises about 10 blocks in the borough that separated in 1840
from Connoquenessing Township and the noncontiguous Harmony Society cemetery in what in
1854 became Jackson Township.

Separatists from the German Duchy of Wurttemberg began developing what they called
Harmonie late in 1804 as their first American home. The Harmonist community, then numbering
about 850, moved to southwest Indiana in 1814 to build a second Harmony. It returned to Beaver
County in 1824 to establish Economy (now Ambridge), where the celibate society dissolved in
1905 and is commemorated by the state's Old Economy Village historic site.
Pacifist Mennonites led by Abraham Ziegler, Harmony’s "second founder" who bought the
Harmony Society’s extensive property in 1815, resettled the area. Ziegler ultimately sold off the
town in lots. Although their congregation faded away as the Harmony Society was meeting a
similar end 20 miles away, many descendants of Mennonites reside in the area.

Harmoniefest begins with a 6 p.m. reception. Dinner is roasted game hen or stuffed brisket
served with potato, caramelized root vegetables, salad and dessert; vegetarian lasagna is also
available. Admission is $25 per person, reservations are required and must be received by
Friday, Feb. 2. Additional information and reservations can be obtained from the Harmony
Museum, 724-452-7341 or toll-free 888-821-4822, or e-mail at hmuseum@fyi.net

Back to Top

HISTORIC HARMONY INSTALLS INCUMBENT OFFICERS, DIRECTORS

HARMONY -- Officers and two additional directors, all incumbents, were installed during
Historic Harmony's annual Christmas membership dinner (on Tuesday, Dec. 12) for new terms
that begin Jan. 1. The nonprofit historical society and preservation advocate operates the nine-
site Harmony Museum.

Officers are members of Historic Harmony's 10-seat governing board. Unanimously reelected to
two-year terms were President and Chief Executive Officer John S. Ruch, Jackson Township,
retired PPG Industries manager of corporate public information; Vice President Cathryn Rape,
Harmony, First Energy meter service and Harmony Borough mayor; Secretary Samuel F. Regal,
Zelienople, retired Consolidated Natural Gas controller; and Treasurer Joseph White, Harmony,
University of Pittsburgh associate professor of history.

Non-officer directors reelected to serve three-year terms through 2009 were Tim Shaffer,
Prospect, attorney with Dillon McCandless King Coulter & Graham and former state senator;
and Eleanor M. Wise, Jackson Township, retired Seneca Valley School District fourth grade
teacher.


Continuing non-officer directors are Barbara Pabst, Evans City; co-owner of Pabst Blue Ribbon
Farms and Pabst Blue Ribbon Antiques and retired Rockwell International executive secretary;
Joan M. Szakelyhidi, Harmony, Butler Memorial Hospital microbiology supervisor; Barbara
Vickerman, Zelienople, retired dairy farmer; and John L. Wise III, Center Township, vice
president and secretary, Butler Eagle.


Harmony, western Pennsylvania's first National Historic Landmark District, ranks among the
region's most significant historic sites. George Washington visited a Indian village here during
his 1753 mission to New France’s Fort LeBoeuf that sparked the French & Indian War; a
"French Indian" fired the war’s first shot at him nearby. Harmony originally encompassed about
7,000 acres spanning today's Jackson and Lancaster townships as the 1804 first American home
of the Harmony Society of pacifist German Lutheran Separatists that gained international fame
as 19th century America’s most successful communal group. The society sold its Harmony in
1815 to Mennonite "second founder" Abraham Ziegler. All of this, and other aspects of the area's
rich history, are interpreted at the Harmony Museum, one of the region's few history museums
that is open year-round.
Back to Top

								
To top