Phys Ed Program Review 2009

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					                  Fullerton College Program Review – Academic Programs


Program: ___________Physical Education____________________________________________

Year: ______________2009-10__________________
                                                         Cover Page

Title of Program, Division

Division:       Physical Education
Program:        P.E./Athletics Program

List of persons participating in the review, including the Division Dean.

Faculty:        Pamela Lewin
                Gina Bevec
                Aric Juarez
Dean:           Pete Snyder, Ph.D.

Statement of Preparation (and signatures of the Department Coordinator and Dean.

This program review was prepared by those listed in an open and collaborative
process. All full-time faculty in the program have had an opportunity to review
the report, and the report was made available to the division as a whole prior to
being submitted to PCC.

Pamela Lewin                      __________________

Gina Bevec                        __________________

Aric Juarez                       __________________

Dean: Pete Snyder, Ph.D. __________________




Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 1
Date December 13, 2009

I.      Program Description

        A. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND HISTORY
        One to two paragraphs regarding the scope and the purpose of the program including a
        statement regarding evolution of the program over time, acceptable standards for retention,
        GPA, etc.

        In its first year (1918) Fullerton College offered Boys and Girls “Physical Training.” Six years
        later, the field became its own entity offering sections under Physical Education for Men and
        Physical Education for Women.

        The College has fielded an intercollegiate team for over ninety years. From its beginnings, the
        intercollegiate program has grown to 22 sports – 12 women, 10 men. The intercollegiate
        program is part of the larger entity of the P.E. Division which includes Dance, Physical
        Education activities and theory, Recreation and Wellness. There were approximately 517
        Divisional sections offered this past year.

        The classes in Physical Education offer a diverse assortment of curricula in contemporary
        fitness issues, nutrition, physiological conditioning, and a variety of physical activities. The
        objective of the program is to provide a quality and well-balanced set of offerings aimed at
        creating a lifelong concept of physical fitness.

        The number of majors has risen over 100% over the past five years. The Division course
        retention (85%) and success (76%) rates rank fifth and second, respectively among all College
        Divisions. The annual section size is at 25.8, for a fill rate of 89% and a WSCH to FTEF ratio of
        558.

        The Division has 18 full-time faculty, three of whom are in the Dance Department. All faculty
        members have both classroom curricula responsibilities in addition to recruiting, organizing,
        coaching, and producing performances involving teams and groups ranging in size from 10-
        150 members. These performances display student skills in Dance and Athletics and total over
        200 per semester, with 50% of the events being held on the College campus. The crowds in
        attendance range up to 2,000 people.


        B. PROGRAM GOALS
        Key instructional goals defined in terms of student learning outcomes and workplace
        outcomes

        As a result of participation in the program, students will have the following 5-7 skills and
        knowledge sets:
           1. Acquisition of basic physical skills in a wide variety of activities and exercise movements.
           2. Knowledge of techniques for successful performance of skills and group activity.
           3. Understanding and application of rules and strategy of various games and sport.
           4. Application and knowledge of physiological measures of various forms of movement.
Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 2
            5. Understanding of principles of safety as related to risk factors in human movement,
                games and sport.
            6. Identification and application of knowledge and practical skill to various forms of injury.
            7. Understanding of organizational variables, structure, and applications to history,
                psychology, sociology and management of sport and physical education.

Additional Programmatic Goals:


Assure excellence in instruction, student support, and college operations. (Mission Statement: “We
prepare students to be successful learners”)

Provide a broad-based program encouraging wide varieties of physical exercise and competitive
opportunities. These skill performances involve cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains (Core
Value #4: “We expect everyone to continue growing and learning”)

Develop students’ physical skills as applicable to lifelong learning and wellness (Goal#1: Instructional
programs provide….. life-long learning options to meet the needs of our students and communities.”)

Provide a positive image and connections to the community and the historical traditions of the
College. (Core Value #2: “We value tradition and innovation.”)

Originate, develop, and refine curriculum to attract a diverse student population and enhance
students’ fitness and health. (Core Value #1: we respect and value the diversity of our entire
community.”)

Outreach to local, statewide, and nationwide audiences regarding performances and competitions so
as to display high quality educational experiences and attract the best quality students. (Goal #8.1,
8.2: Establish a campus-side external community outreach….Expand and coordinate internal and
external Marketing and Outreach efforts.”)

Develop necessary and practical certificate programs in order to service the occupational needs and
workplace success for our students.

C.      PROGRAM DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES OFFERED

A.A. Degrees: Physical Education, Dance
A.S. Degree: Physical Education – Fitness
Certificates:
        Aquatic Specialist Certificate
        Athletic Coach Certificate
        Group Fitness Instructor Certificate
        Outdoor Recreation and Safety Certificate
        Personal Trainer Certificate
        Therapeutic and Sports Massage Therapist – Level I
        Therapeutic and Sports Massage Therapist – Level II
        Dance Technique Certificate

PROGRAM DEGREES AND CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

Admissions requirements (if appropriate)
Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 3
List of required courses by degree/certificate


A.A. Dance Curriculum leads to the Associate in Arts Degree. This degree requires that you select 18
units from the courses listed below:



DANC 103AB                              Dance Technique I (1) or
DANC 104AB                              Dance Technique II (1)
DANC 105AB                              Ballet I (1) or
DANC 106AB                              Ballet II (1)
DANC 107AB                              Modern Dance I (1) or
DANC 108AB                              Modern Dance II (1)
DANC 111AB                              Jazz I (1) or
DANC 112AB                              Jazz II (1)
DANC 202AB                              Dance Composition and Choreography (2)
DANC 203ABCD                            Dance Production (2)
DANC 204ABCD                            Dance Rehearsal and Performance (1-4)
PE 233                                  Movement and Dance Education for Children (2)
ART 110                                 Introduction to Art (3) or
MUS 116                                 Music Appreciation (3)
PSY 101                                 General Psychology (3)
SOC 101                                 Introduction to Sociology (3)

A.S. Degree – Physical Education – Fitness Professional

Curriculum leads to the Associate in Science Degree for employment in the fitness industry. The
Fullerton College Fitness Professional Program is designed to educate students that are entering into
the fitness industry or for those that are interested in coaching, exercise training, counseling and
fitness training. This industry has a need for trained instructors and exercise test technicians in sports
medicine clinics, health clubs, fitness studios and in the area of coaching.

The degree requires completion of 26 units of which 18 units are required courses. An additional 8
units must be chosen from the restricted electives listed below.


Required Courses (18 units):
ANAT 216                 Human Anatomy and Physiology (5)
NUTR 210                 Nutrition Today (3)
PE 154ABCD               Fitness Testing w/Exercise Prescription (2)
PE 235                   First Aid, CPR and Self Education (2)
PE 248                   Psychology of Sport (3)
WELL 200                 Applied Exercise Physiology (2)
WELL 243ABCD             Stress Management Through Physical Activity (2)
WELL 266                 Physical Fitness as Life Long Concept (2)


Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 4
Restricted electives (8 units)
ACCT 1                      Accounting for Small Business (3)
FOOD 60                     Foods for Fitness (2)
HED 140                     Health Science (3)
PE 150ABCD                  Rhythmic Aerobic Exercise (1)
PE 182ABCD                  Body Building/Body Development and Weight Lifting (1)
PE 236                      Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3)

Group Fitness Instructor Certificate

The Group Fitness Instructor Certificate Program requires a total of 19 units of which 15 units are in
required courses. An additional 4 units must be chosen from the restricted units listed below.



Required Courses (15 units)
NUTR 210 F               Nutrition Today (3 units)
PE 110 F                 Pilates - Alignment/Correctives (1unit)
PE 129 F                 Step Aerobics (1unit)
PE 130 F                 Advanced Fitness Training (2 units)
PE 150 F                 Rhythmic Aerobic Exercise (1 unit)
PE 154 F                 Fitness Test W/Exercise Pres (2 units)
PE 235 F *               First Aid, CPR, Safety Education (2 units)
PE 236 F                 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3 units)

Restricted Electives (4 units)
PE 102 F                      Yoga (1 unit)
PE 147 F                      Relaxation/Flexibility Fitness (1 unit)
PE 151 F                      Aqua Aerobics (1 unit)
PE 161 F                      Body Conditioning & Fitness (1 unit)
PE 163 F                      Kickboxing (1 unit)
PE 266 F                      Phys Fitness As Lifelong Concept (2 units)
WELL 230 F                    The Body-Mind Connection (3 units)
* American Red Cross certification can be substituted at the discretion of the Division.
Aquatic Specialist Certificate Program

The Aquatic Specialist Certificate Program requires the completion of 20 units, 19 of which are in
required courses. An additional one unit must be chosen from restricted electives below; minimum
grade of “C” required.

Required Courses (19 units)
PE 235 F *                First Aid, CPR, Safety Education (2 units)
PE 236 F                  Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3 units)
Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 5
PE 238 F                            Water Safety Instruction (3 units)
PE 239 F                            Open Water I/Scuba (3 units)
PE 245 F                            Lifesaving Basic Rescue (2 units)
PE 199 F or 299 F                   Independent Study (1-2 units)
PE 154 F                            Fitness Testing with Exercise Prescription (1 unit)

Restricted Elective (1 unit)
PE 134 F                       Swimming (1 unit)
PE 149 F                       Swim for Fitness (1 unit)
PE 151 F                       Aquatic Aerobics/Pool Exercise (1 unit)
PE 165 F                       Lifetime Fitness (1 unit)
PE 192 F                       Water Polo (1 unit)
PE 248 F                       Psychology of Sport (3 units)
* American Red Cross certification can be substituted at the discretion of the division. Student must
take an additional two units from restricted electives.
Athletic Coach Certificate

The Athletic Coach Certificate Program requires the completion of 19 units, of which 17 are in
required courses. An additional two units must be chosen from the restricted electives shown below.

This certificate is being revised because Natural Science is deleting ANAT 216 which is a required
course.

Required Courses (17 units)
PE 235 F*          First Aid, CPR, & Safety Education (2 units)
PE 236 F           Prevention/Care/Athletic Injuries (3 units)
PE 240 F           Sports Officiating for Men (2 units)
PE 241 F           Sports Officiating for Women (2 units)
PE 247 F           Sports Management (3units)
PE 248 F           Psychology of Sport (3 units)
PE 199 For 299 F   Independent Study (2 units)
PE 154 F           Fitness Testing with Exercise Prescription (2 units)
PE 243 F           Stress Management Through Physical Activity (2 units)

Restricted Electives (2 units)
PE 152 F              Fitness Training - Circuit Lab (1-2 units)
PE 159 F              Strength Training Lab (Olympic Weights) (1 unit)
PE 165 F              Lifetime Fitness (1 unit)
PE 280-285            Professional Activities (Theory) (2units)
PE 202 F              Baseball (2 units)
PE 203 F              Basketball - Men (2 units)
PE 204 F              Basketball - Women (2 units)
PE 205 F              Cross Country - Men & Women (2 units)
Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 6
PE 207 F               Football (2 units)
PE 208 F               Intercollegiate Golf (2 units)
PE 209 F               Soccer - Men (2 units)
PE 210 F               Softball - Women (2 units)
PE 211 F               Swimming - Men (2 units)
PE 212 F               Swimming - Women (2 units)
PE 214 F               Tennis - Women (2 units)
PE 215 F               Track - Men/Women (2 units)
PE 218 F               Intercollegiate Women's Volleyball (2 units)
PE 219 F               Intercollegiate Water Polo (2 units)
PE 22 F                Badminton - Women (2 units)
* American Red Cross certification can be substituted at the discretion of the Division. Student must
take an additional two units from restricted electives.




Therapeutic and Sports Massage Therapist Level I Certificate

The Therapeutic and Sports Massage Therapist Level I Certificate Program requires a total of 19-20
units of which are all in required courses.

This certificate is being revised because Natural Science is deleting ANAT 216 which was one of the
required courses.

Required courses (19 or 20 units)
PE 235 F **          First Aid, CPR, & Safety Education (2 units)
WELL 119 F *         Applied Biomechanics (2 units)
WELL 230 F *         The Body-Mind Connection (3 units)
WELL 232 F *         Basic Intro to Massage (4 units)
WELL 236 F           Sports Massage (3 units)
WELL 238 F *         Massage and Bodywork Lab (2 units)
**American Red Cross Certification may be substituted for PE 235 F First Aid, CPR, and Safety
Education.
Current card required
*These courses must be taken at Fullerton College.

Personal Trainer Certificate

The Personal Trainer Certification Program requires a total of 21 units of which 17 units are in
required courses. An additional 4 units must be chosen from the restricted units listed below.


Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 7
Required Courses (17 units)
ANAT 231 F          General Human Anatomy (4 units)
or                  or
BIOL 102 F          Human Biology (3 units)
BIOL 102LF          Human Biology Laboratory (1 unit)
NUTR 210 F          Nutrition Today (3 units)
PE 154 F            Fitness Test W/Exercise Pres (2 units)
PE 235 F            First Aid, CPR, & Safety Education (2 units)
WELL 119 F          Applied Biomechanics (2 units)
WELL 200 F          Applied Exercise Physiology (2 units)
WELL 221 F          Personal Training Internship (2-4 units)

Restricted Electives (4 units)
PE 147 F               Relaxation and Flexibility Fitness (1 units)
PE 152 F               Fitness Training Laboratory (Circuit) (1 units)
PE 159 F               Strength Training - Olympic Weights (1 units)
PE 165 F               Lifetime Fitness (1 units)
PE 266 F               Physical Fitness as a Lifelong Concept (2 units)
WELL 230 F             The Body-Mind Connection (3 units)
* American Red Cross certification can be substituted at the discretion of the division.

D. PROGRAM COURSES OFFERED
List by course number and title, e.g., PHYS 130 Elementary Physics
Activity

   #                           Course Name
   PE 060 F                    Student-Athlete Seminar
   PE 083 F                    Fitness for Athletes
   PE 093 F                    Weight Lifting for Athletes
   PE 100 F                    Adaptive PE-Weight Training
   PE 102 F                    Yoga
   PE 103 F                    Aikido
   PE 104AF                    Spinning
   PE 105 F                    Badminton
   PE 107 F                    Table Tennis
   PE 108 F                    Bowling
   PE 110 F                    Pilates (Alignment/Correctives)
   PE 111 F                    Decathlon
   PE 112 F                    Fencing
   PE 113 F                    Billiards
   PE 114 F                    Cardiovascular Conditioning
   PE 115 F                    Golf
   PE 117 F                    Gymnastics
   PE 120 F                    Mountain Biking

Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 8
   PE 121 F                    Walking for Fitness
   PE 122 F                    Surfing
   PE 123 F                    Outrigger Paddling
   PE 124 F                    Kayaking
   PE 126 F                    Beach Volleyball
   PE 127 F                    Racquetball-Indoors
   PE 128 F                    Racquetball-Outdoors
   PE 129 F                    Step Aerobics
   PE 130 F                    Advanced Fitness Training
   PE 132 F                    Skiing
   PE 133 F                    Snowboarding
   PE 134 F                    Swimming
   PE 136 F                    Springboard Diving
   PE 137 F                    Triathlon
   PE 138 F                    Ultimate Frisbee
   PE 139 F                    Tennis
   PE 141 F                    Tennis Workshop
   PE 142 F                    Mountaineering/Rock Climbing
   PE 144 F                    Volleyball
   PE 145 F                    Intermediate / Advanced Volleyball
   PE 147 F                    Relaxation/Flexibility Fitness
   PE 148 F                    Non-Impact Aerobics
   PE 149 F                    Swim for Fitness
   PE 150 F                    Rhythmic Aerobic Exercise
   PE 151 F                    Water Aerobics/Pool Exercise
   PE 152 F                    Fitness Training Lab-Circuit
   PE 154 F                    Fitness Test with Exercise Presence
   PE 155 F                    Aquatic Conditioning- Seniors
   PE 158 F                    Personalized Fitness
   PE 159 F                    Strength Training-Olympic Weights
   PE 160 F                    Basketball
   PE 161 F                    Body Conditioning &Fitness
   PE 162 F                    Conditioning for Athletes
   PE 163 F                    Kick Boxing
   PE 164 F                    Tai Chi Chuan
   PE 165 F                    Lifetime Fitness
   PE 166 F                    Shao-lin Kung Fu
   PE 167 F                    Cardio Kick Boxing Aerobics
   PE 170 F                    Self-Defense
   PE 171 F                    Soccer
   PE 172 F                    Softball
   PE 174 F                    Inline Skating
   PE 175 F                    Volleyball
   PE 176 F                    Tennis
   PE 179 F                    Pep Squad Training
   PE 180 F                    Baseball
Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 9
   PE 181 F                    Basketball
   PE 182 F                    Body Building/Development/Weight Training
   PE 183 F                    Conditioning for Athletes
   PE 185 F                    Football – Defense
   PE 186 F                    Football – Offense
   PE 187 F                    Physical Fitness
   PE 188 F                    Self Defense- Boxing
   PE 189 F                    Soccer
   PE 190 F                    Softball

Theory

            #              Course Name
         PE 235 F          First Aid, CPR, & Safety Education
         PE 236 F          Prevention/Care/ Athletic Injuries
         PE 238 F          Water Safety Instruction
         PE 239 F          Open Water I Scuba
         PE 240 F          Sports Officiating for Men
         PE 241 F          Sports Officiating for Women
         PE 245 F          Lifesaving, Basic Rescue/CPR
         PE 246 F          Advanced / Master SCUBA Diver
         PE 247 F          Sports Management
         PE 248 F          Psychology of Sport
         PE 249 F          Caribbean Diving Tour
         PE 250 F          Sport & the US Society
         PE 251 F          Philosophy of Martial Arts
         PE 252 F          Intro to Physical Education
         PE 280 F          Professional Activity-Theory/Baseball
         PE 281 F          Professional Activity-Theory/Basketball
         PE 282 F          Professional Activity-Theory/Softball
         PE 283 F          Professional Activity-Theory/Football
         PE 284 F          Professional Activity-Theory/Soccer
         PE 285 F          Professional Activity-Theory/Volleyball


Indicate number of adjunct faculty E. PROGRAM FACULTY
       List faculty
Fullerton College Physical Education Staff

    Instructor Name:           Position:
    Dr. Pete Snyder            Dean of Physical Education
                               Softball Coach
    Lisa Bassi
                               Women's Golf Coach
                               Women's Track & Field Coach
    Gina Bevec
                               Cross Country Coach
    Tim Byrnes                 Head Football Coach
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                               Women's Badminton Coach
    Connie Carroll
                               Message Therapy Training
    Robin Conrad               Professor of Dance
    Brian Crooks               Assistant Football Coach
    Nick Fuscardo              Baseball Coach
                               Athletic Director
    Scott Giles                Strength & Conditioning Coach
                               Women's Tennis Coach
    Jeff Jespersen             Assistant Football Coach
    Aric Juarez                Men's Track & Field Coach
                               Women's Soccer Coach
    Pamela Lewin
                               Assistant Women's Badminton Coach
    Rhett Price                Men's Water Polo Coach
    Eddie Rapp                 Women's Volleyball Coach
    Melanie Rosa               Professor of Dance
    Roger See                  Men's Tennis Coach
    Kathleen Whalen            Professor of Dance
    Alix Plum-Widner           Cheer Coach
    Debi Woelke                Women's Basketball Coach

Adjunct faculty as of Fall 2009 number forty-three (43).

F. PROGRAM ADVISORY COMMITTEES
List members and their role/title

        Dance Technique – chair: Melanie Rosa
        Gloria DeFore – Business
        Erin Landry – Industry
        Aracely Ellis - Special Populations
        Melanie Kay Rosa – Faculty
        Cody Wilbourn and Cerissa Gilligan – Students

        Aquatic Specialist – chair: Rhett Price
        Don Luethke - Athletic Director, Western h.s.
        Dave Johnson – Water Polo Coach, Social Science teacher – El Dorado h.s.
        Bernard Ma – Aquatics Coach, Social Science teacher – Valencia h.s.
        Katina Kitchens – Aquatics Coach, History teacher – Magnolia h.s.

        Athletic Coach – chair: Pam Lewin
        Jim Brumm - Swim & Water Polo Coach, Social Science teacher, Foothill h.s.
        Ted Clark - Swim Coach, Teacher, Buena Park h.s.
        Steve Anderson – Athletic Director, Canyon h.s.
        Sharon Caperton – Athletic Director, Brea h.s.

        Group Fitness Instructor – chair: Alix Plum Widner
        Judy Chan - Adjunct Professor, Fullerton College
        Marsha Kramer – Adjunct Professor, Fullerton College
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        Vanessa Juarez – Adjunct Professor, Fullerton College

        Outdoor Recreation and Safety – chair: Ed Rapp
        Eric Ching – Huntington Beach City Lifeguard, Supervisor
        Billy Whitford - Newport Aquatic Center
        Stein Metzger – United Expeditions

        Personal Trainer – chair: Scott Giles
        Brian Bukosky – President, Sports Performance Academy
        Heidi Giles – Boot Camp Director, Sports Performance Academy
        Jerry Urias – Adjunct Professor, Fullerton College

        Therapeutic and Sports Massage – Level I and II – chair: Connie Carroll
        Dr. Mike Kelley – Chiropractor, Adjunct Professor, Fullerton College
        Loretta Gallagher – President, Changing Attitudes
        Robin Matthews – President, Orange County Chapter, A.M.T.A.
        Isaac Guerrero – Director, Business Relations, Glen Ivey Day Spa

II.     Program Key Performance Indicators

        Attach data sheet from institutional research to the report.

III.    Program Outcomes Analysis

        A. REPORT ON STATUS OF PREVIOUS REVIEW OUTCOMES ANALYSIS
        One to two paragraphs regarding accomplishments since the previous review and
        objectives/activities still outstanding.

        The Division of Physical Education has accomplished many of its goals. To date, over 90% of
the courses listed in the Division have student learning outcomes and the faculty have begun to work
on attaching assessments to all of these outcomes.
        New distance education courses – P.E. 235 First Aid & C.P.R. (hybrid) and P.E. 250 Sport and
the U.S. Society have been added and refined so that enrollments flourish and quality instruction is
provided.
        New facilities have been added which have increased student demands and sectional
offerings. The Aquatics classes – swimming, diving, water polo, SCUBA, aquatic fitness have
expanded by 20% as a result of the new 50 meter by 25 yard pool.
        The Wellness and Massage Therapy programs have grown dramatically and have formalized
processes for valid certificates and state-approved classifications while developing an open lab for
students to practice their skills on the general public.
        The Division’s presence has been expanded dramatically via the website: http://pe.fullcoll.edu
http://dance.fullcoll.edu and http://sports.fullcoll.edu . These three electronic platforms have provided
vital and up-to-the minute information for students and the public at large.
        Successful outreach has been repeated several times with the events sponsored by the
Division and the bi-annual Fullerton College Athletic Hall of Fame. Important connections and
community involvement have been and will continue to be enhanced by these functions.
        Still outstanding is the goal of completing assessments for all of the 181 classes listed for the
Division.
        Also, pending construction of the new facilities – track, turf, gymnasia, dance studio - the re-
connecting of the appropriate classes to the proper facilities will provide an enhanced environment for
continued growth in all aspects of the Division.
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       Future on-line curricular development can be expanded in the areas of Sports Management,
Psychology and Coaching Methods.
       The expansion of curricula and programmatic validation in the Schoepe Wellness Center is a
goal that is still in progress. As our culture advances in age, this area is essential in benefiting the
health and well being of our elderly.

        B. SUMMARY OF DATA – Recommend Evaluation of Data
        One paragraph each on program access, program resources, program efficiency,
        and program success. What does the data show?

        Program access – students can access Physical Education classes with relative ease.
Instructors are accommodating to late enrolling students particularly due to the extensive on-line add
and drop methods. In the Division, there are 382 listed majors with 15,774 students generating 1,394
FTES and 41,816 Weekly Student Contact Hours.
        The Division offers a total of 138 different courses for its 631 sections. The majority of the
classes are offered on weekdays during the day (57%).
        New classes within the past three years include Spinning, Advanced Pilates, Body Boarding,
Kinesiology, and Sports Massage.
        Program resources have been stretched with the loss of three full-time faculty positions and
shortages in classified areas. The Division is thus at 15 P.E. and 3 Dance full-time instructors.
        The Division has been operating for the last 25 years with the same number of classified
support. There is also an inequity between men’s equipment manager assigned to 12 month 100%
contract whereas women’s manager assigned to a 10-month 50% contract with no service for
summer school students.
        The Division classified office personnel must assist in managing the volume of 631 yearly class
sections and 22 bursar accounts along with 30 general fund accounts. In addition, there is re-
assigned time available only for athletic administration resulting in negligible amounts for Division
Chair, curriculum representative, and faculty senate representatives.
        The efficiency of the Division is high, with an average class size of 25.8 and a fill rate of 89% at
census. This efficiency is high despite a shortage of class space due to construction and renovation
of facilities.
        The programmatic success indices for the Division are strong, with a course retention rate of
85% and a student success of 76%.

        C. IDENTIFICATION OF TRENDS

        Two to three paragraphs on factors influencing the program: workplace trends, changes in
        curriculum/content, changes in pedagogy, other factors.

       Societal trends point to the necessity of increased physical activity and exercise for better
health and well being. The state of California spends 200 billion dollars on health care and the
community colleges educate nearly 3 million students, 50% of whom are 25 years and older. P.E. is
therefore an integral part of improving the health and well being of Fullerton College students.
       In addition, with a 35% Hispanic student population, diabetes prevention is an important facet
of physical activity. Hispanics are nearly twice as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites.
Therefore, the inclusion of physical education as a regular part of the schedule is beneficial for
improved health with this ethnic background.
       The market for coaching certification has been heightened dramatically as a result of statewide
requirements for all high school coaches to be certified. An additional segment of the existing Athletic
Coach certification could address this large segment of future coaches needing certification.

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        D. IMMEDIATE SHORT-TERM PLANS

        Drawing from the data, external influences, trends in the discipline and College
        goals/initiatives, identify concrete activities the program needs to engage in to modify the
        program. Can activities be accomplished in 1-2 years?

       In the Cal State University System, Kinesiology as a major is ranked in the top ten among
student choices. This statistic, combined with the 100% increase in Fullerton College students choice
of the P.E. major (173 to 382) in the past five years casts a positive light on the upward trend of the
major.
       Another short-term plan is to add one or more on-line classes – for example, Sport Psychology
or Sport Management so as to expand access and grow enrollment.
       The Pilates program is close to completing its teaching certification which will add students in
this ever-growing area.
       The Wellness program should continue its growth by adding physical and natural science
applications to its evolving program.
       The Division is considering a possible change of name from Physical Education to Kinesiology,
mirroring the Cal State System.

        E. LONG-TERM PLANS
        Drawing from data, external influences, trends in the discipline, and college goals/initiatives,
        identify concrete activities the program needs to engage in to modify the program. Can
        activities be accomplished in 3-5 years?

        Continue to promote and emphasize the integrity of the program as part of the essential
curriculum for the College.
        Recruit and hire superb teachers for the work force, particularly with increased numbers of
retirements in the Division.
        Showcase and care for new facilities in order to involve community in a positive fashion and
recruit highly-skilled and academically talented students.
        From a governance standpoint, a full-time athletic director and facility coordinator is needed in
order to guide the intercollegiate program and preserve and maintain the superb new facilities.

        REQUEST FOR RESOURCES
        Identify specific resources needed for specific activities (and potential sources for support).

       Operating budgets for the individual sports are in critical need of augmentation in order to
remain competitive with local College programs.
       Deferred maintenance on many of the P.E. facilities is a necessity as the program continues to
grow. The safety of the students as well as cleanliness and functionality of the classroom
environments is very much dependent on quality maintenance.
       The necessity of utilizing off-campus facilities is a difficult financial burden, all the more reason
for completing the bond project construction in a timely fashion.
       Big screen televisions are essential for effective large group video presentation and
technological state-of-the art teaching.



Program Review Response Form   PCC Approved March 6, 2002; External review rubrics removed 8/11/09 WSC   Page 14

				
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