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					Planning Applications Sub-Committee                    Item No. 0

REPORT FOR CONSIDERATION AT PLANNING APPLICATION SUBCOMMITTEE

Reference No: HGY/2005/1439                    Ward: Northumberland Park

Date received: 01/08/2005           Last amended date: 19/09/2005

Drawing number of plans:

6th Form Centre: 1204/100; 110; 111; 112; 113; 114; 120; 121; 122; 130; 131; 140;
141; 142; 143; 144; 145;
Residential Units: A4350/ 2.1/001; 2.1/010; 2.1/020RevA; 2.1/021; 2.1/100RevB;
2.1/101RevA; 2.1/102RevA; 2.1/103RevA; 2.1/200RevA; 2.1/201RevA; 2.1/500
(Last Date Amended: 19/09/2005)

Address: Middlesex University, White Hart Lane, N17

Proposal: Erection of new buildings to provide:

i) New sixth form centre comprising a 2/4 storey building with central atrium to
provide performing arts, catering, sport, media, music and ICT facilities with 98 car
park spaces, new access and 2.4m high perimeter fencing (Full Planning
Application);

ii) New 3 /4 storey residential buildings to provide 42 x 1 bed, 67 x 2 bed, 13 x 3 bed
and 1 x 4 bed units (all affordable) with 68 car parking spaces and new access (Full
Planning Application);

iii) New 70 bed care home for elderly, associated parking & access from College
Road (Outline Application)

Existing Use: University Campus (Use Ceased)

Proposed Use: Sixth Form Centre, Residential Units (123 Units), Care Home (70 Bed)

Applicant: Genesis Housing Group Ltd and Mosaic Housing Association
Ownership: Private

PLANNING DESIGNATIONS
Road - Classified
Area of Community Regeneration
Site Specific Proposal

Officer Contact: Stuart Cooke / Michelle Bradshaw

RECOMMENDATION

GRANT PERMISSION subject to conditions and subject to section 106 Legal
Agreement

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1.0   SITE AND SURROUNDINGS

The site is located to the north east of Haringey. The site is currently known
as the Middlesex University site, located on White Hart Lane. The site is
bounded by White Hart Lane to the south, Pretoria Road to the east and
Queen Street to the west. The north end of the site is bounded by the back of
the houses on Durban Road.

The Middlesex University site opened in 1896 as a college for training school
mistresses. The site operated as a university campus until mid 2005. The
campus is currently vacant.

The application site area measures 2.85 hectares. The site currently consists
of student hall accommodation, lecture theatres and classrooms, offices and
other ancillary facilities. The existing buildings on site vary between two and
four storeys. The former student halls adjacent to the site‟s northern boundary
are part three and four storeys. These particular buildings are in close
proximity to the rear gardens of the properties on Durban Road.

The surrounding land use is predominantly residential. The most common
housing type is two-storey terraced-dwellings, located along Pretoria Road,
College Road, Durban Road and Queen Street. To the south of the site, along
White Hart Lane, are four storey blocks containing one and two bed flats and
three-storey terrace dwellings. The Haringey Irish Centre abuts the site to the
south-east. This is an existing community and social facility.

White Hart Lane train station is located 300m to the south of the site. The
railway line runs in a north-south direction parallel to the site‟s eastern
boundary, on the other side of Pretoria Road.

Local convenience facilities are provided at the eastern end of White Hart
Lane and further east on Tottenham High Road.

2.0   PLANNING HISTORY

The Middlesex University site has been in educational use since it opened as
a college in 1896. Various planning applications have been received since this
time for alterations and extensions to the buildings on site.

An application was submitted in June 2005 for the “Demolition of existing
buildings and erection of new 2/3/4/5 storey buildings for use as sixth form
centre including sports hall and performance arts hall with 110 car spaces and
associated landscaping”. The applicant withdrew the application.

As such, no planning history exists, which represents a material planning
consideration in the determination of this particular application.




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3.0    DETAILS OF PROPOSAL

The application comprises three distinct land uses, representing a mixed-use
development.

In brief the proposal includes the erection of new buildings to provide:

i) New sixth form centre comprising a 2/4 storey building with central atrium to
provide performing arts, catering, sport, media, music and ICT facilities with
98 car park spaces, new access and 2.4m high perimeter fencing (Full
Planning Application);

ii) New 3 /4 storey residential buildings to provide 42 x 1 bed, 67 x 2 bed, 13 x
3 bed and 1 x 4 bed units (all affordable) with 68 car parking spaces and new
access (Full Planning Application);

iii) New 70 bed care home for elderly, associated parking & access from
College Road (Outline Application)


3.1 Sixth Form Centre

The college would occupy the majority of the site, covering some 1.61
hectares of the total 2.85 hectares. All existing structures on the site would be
demolished and replaced with a new build 6th Form Centre. The centre would
provide post-16 year education. The building would cater for up to 1200
students and up to 100 staff and support.

The college would provide facilities for a broad curriculum including
Performing Arts, Hospitality and Catering, Sports Development and Fitness,
Media Production and Music, Business Studies and ICT.

The building is designed with a central atrium with 2-storey build to the south
and 4-storey build to the north. The building would consist of pavilions set
around two internal courtyards. The central atrium provides the main entrance
from White Hart Lane. The forecourt to the building is to be set back from the
road to relieve the existing congestion on White Hart Lane. The total floor area
of the centre would be 14,450 square metres. The site perimetre is to be
secured with 2.4m high, galvanised steel, palisade fencing.

The primary access to the sixth form centre would be from White Hart Lane. A
secondary entrance would be available from College Road, which is to be
extended through to Queen Street. A total of 98 car-parking spaces would be
provided with access from College Road.




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3.2 Residential Units

The residential element of the proposal would be situated at the northern end
of the site. The units would be located on the site of the existing student
accommodation halls, which are to be demolished. The residential units would
cover 0.95 hectares of the 2.85-hectare site.

The height of the residential development would be predominantly 3-storeys.
However, elements of the scheme would be 4-storeys adjacent to the site‟s
western boundary at Queen Street.

A total of 123 residential units are proposed, providing a mix of 42 x 1
bedroom, 67 x 2 bedroom, 13 x 3 bedroom and 1 x 4 bedroom units.

The proposed residential development would represent a density of 128
dwellings per hectare or 356 habitable rooms per hectare.

All 123 units would be affordable housing and allocated to Registered Social
Landlords (RSL‟s). Genesis Housing Group would be responsible for 68 units.
Mosaic Homes would be responsible for the remaining 55 units. The 123 units
would provide a 60/40 percent split of intermediate housing (shared equity
and key worker) and social rented respectively. This would result in 74 units
being allocated for intermediate tenure and 49 units being allocated as social
rented units.

To provide vehicle access to the site, College Road would be extended
westwards joining Queen Street. The proposed residential units would be to
the north of this proposed new highway. Vehicle movements along the new
part of College Road would be one way only (in an easterly direction). As
such, access to Queen Street from College Road would be prohibited.

A total of 68 parking bays are proposed. These parking spaces would be
provided on-street along College Road, representing 55% of the total
dwellings. In addition, secure cycle stores would be provided.

3.3 Care Home

The application seeks outline planning consent, to establish the principle of a
70-bed care home for the elderly, frail elderly and for those who suffer from
dementia. The building would be located at the eastern side of the site and
would cover an area of 0.29 hectares. Illustrative plans demonstrating the type
of care home that could be accommodated on site are provided with the
application. All other matters pertaining to this application, except for access,
are to be reserved for future determination.




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4.0   CONSULTATION

Ward Councillors
– Northumberland Park (Sheila Peacock, John Bevan, Ray Dodds)
– White Hart Lane (Charles Adje, Gideon Bull, Liz Santry)

Haringey Council – Housing Service
Haringey Council – Children‟s Service
Haringey Council – Social Service
Haringey Council – Transportation Group
Haringey Council – Waste Management
Haringey Council – Legal Services
Haringey Council – Building Control
Haringey Council – Environmental Health (Noise Team)
Haringey Council – Environmental Health (Food and Hygiene)
Haringey Council – Recreation Service (Borough Arboriculturalist)

Greater London Authority
English Heritage – Archaeology Advisory Service
Transport For London
Thames Water
Metropolitan Police – Crime Prevention Officer
London Borough of Enfield – Planning Service

Local Residents:

1 – 63 (o) Allington Avenue
2 – 32 (e) Allington Avenue

1 – 4 (c) College Park Road

1 – 8 (c) College Road

1a Durban Road
34a Durban Road
1 – 99 (o) Durban Road
2 – 92 (e) Durban Road

1 – 26 (c) Bradford Close

1 – 26 (c) Castleford Close

50 – 94 (c) Meridian Walk

1 – 7 (c) Hebden Crescent

1 – 17 (c) Pretoria Road
34 – 45 (c) Pretoria Road
46 – 67 (c) Pretoria Road
Haringey Irish Centre, Pretoria Road

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1 – 15 (o) Queen Street
23 – 29 (o) Queen Street
Unit 1 – 33 (c) Queen Street
1, 2, 3 Trafalgar Cottages, Queen Street
Church Hall, Queen Street

6, 8 Princes Street

1 – 7 (o) Selby Road
15 – 19 (o) Selby Road
2 – 48 (e) Selby Road
Sports Centre, Selby Road
1 – 31 (c) Dalbys Crescent

2, 4 Oak Avenue

1 – 48 (c) Trafalgar Avenue

1 – 6 (c) White Hart Terrace, White Hart Lane
6a White Hart Lane
57 – 65 White Hart Lane
65a White Hart Lane
72 White Hart Lane
72a White Hart Lane
72b White Hart Lane
74 – 122 (e) White Hart Lane
126 – 132 (e) White Hart Lane
134 – 144 (e) White Hart Lane
176 – 186 (e) White Hart Lane
188 – 198 (c) White Hart Lane
200 – 210 (e) White Hart Lane
258 – 276 (e) White Hart Lane

1 – 113 (o) Creighton Road
Family Health Centre, 4 Creighton Road

1 – 77 (c) Somerset Gardens
78 – 113 (c) Somerset Gardens
114 - 219 (c) Somerset Gardens
220 - 324 (c) Somerset Gardens

1 – 81 (c) Somerset Hall, White Hart Lane

Builders Yard, Beaufoy Road
Wedge House, Beaufoy Road




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5.0   CONSULTATION RESPONSES

5.1 Ward Councillors

Cllr John Bevan – “As a member of the planning committee I will not be
making any prior submission”.

5.2 Haringey Council – Housing Services

The Housing Service has been fully consulted and involved in the residential
element of Middlesex University proposals, we are therefore fully supportive of
the proposals. Concluding the scheme mix, tenure split and required funding
levels. The Housing Corporation has been fully informed and is also
supporting the proposals. The proposed scheme for residential
accommodation would comprise 123 units, all of which would be affordable
housing. Genesis Housing Group would be responsible for 68 units and
Mosaic Homes would be responsible for the remaining 55 units. Of the 123
units, 74 would be intermediate tenure and 49 social rented units, creating a
60/40 split.

The Housing service has negotiated directly with the Housing Corporation on
the issue of the schemes tenure balance and have agreed that this scheme
should be based on a 60/40 split so that the overall balance between rent and
intermediate in the current ADP program is maintained.

On the issue of the number of 3& 4 bed units the Housing service has
satisfied itself that the schemes underlying viability would be damaged if
further larger units were to be sought from the developers. Further, the
Housing Service views these proposals in it's entirety and notes that the
scheme provides for a 100% affordable housing provision on the site rather
than the 50% we would seek under current planning policy.

5.3 Haringey Council – Children’s Service

These are the formal comments of the Children's Service on this proposal.

The Children's service fully supports proposal i) the new sixth from centre.
This design is based upon a curriculum model that we have developed
partnership with the LSC and local schools.

The facility will be an essential community resource, helping to increase the
number of young people remaining in education beyond the statutory school
leaving age.

We believe that the development of the new Sixth Form Centre will play a
major part in the councils efforts to raise the achievement levels of the
borough‟s 16-19 year olds and to encourage more of them to stay in full-time
education.



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Following a series of negotiations with the new owners of the land (I.e. Inner
Circle), the council has purchased a proportion of the former Middlesex
University site. The land purchased is sufficient for the Council to develop the
new Sixth Form Centre. The Architects representing the Council and Inner
Circle have worked together to produce an integrated design for this site.

5.4 Haringey Council – Social Service

Haringey Council – Social Service have no objection to the proposed care
home and consider that this use provides for local need.

5.5 Haringey Council – Transportation Group

We have accepted the applicant's transport assessment report which
analysed the transport impact of this development and has shown that overall,
this development proposal would only generate a combined traffic
inflow/outflow increase of 17 and 21 vehicles in the a.m. and p.m. peak hours
respectively, over the existing situation. These, in our opinion, are not
significant. Also, since the public transport accessibility level for this site is low
and taking into account the associated parking demand as well as the need to
minimise the car parking impact on the adjoining highway network, the level of
car parking spaces proposed is acceptable. Concerning the site access
arrangement, the proposed combination of one-way gyratory west of College
Road, with a priority junction connecting this section to the two-way eastern
segment of this road and the traffic calming method used, are acceptable.

In addition, since the applicant's consultants' trip forecast suggests that the
Sixth Form Centre aspect of the development would generate some 94% of
the total vehicular trips associated with these development proposals, it is
deemed appropriate for the Council to adopt the eastern segment of College
Road. This would be done under S.228 of the Highways Act.

Nevertheless, as acknowledged by the applicant's consultants, some
improvements to pedestrian safety provisions and to encourage walking to the
development, especially along Queen Street and Pretoria Road, are required.
Similarly, improvements to encourage access by cycles would be desirable. It
is anticipated that such enhancement to the conditions for pedestrians would
be addressed as part of other highway safety schemes identified at this
location.

The highways and transportation authority would not object to this application.
Informative: The new development will require naming and numbering. The
applicant should contact the Transportation Group at least six weeks before
the development is occupied (tel. 020 8489 5573) to arrange for the allocation
of a suitable address.

5.6 Haringey Council – Waste Management

The Waste Management Team has been involved in the consultation from the
early stages. Extensive comments and suggestions were put forward by the

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waste management team at the pre-application stage and subsequently
incorporated into the final scheme submitted. Not withstanding this, the
council will condition any planning consent to require a detailed scheme for
the provision of refuse, waste storage and recycling within the site to be
submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority prior to
the commencement of the works. In addition, such a scheme as approved,
shall be implemented and permanently retained thereafter to the satisfaction
of the Local Planning Authority.

5.7 Haringey Council – Building Control

Vehicle access for fire fighting can be considered satisfactory subject to:

1. The College Road extension width should be a minimum of 3.70m
   (between parked vehicles)
2. Access to serve the sports building/hall should be at least into the theatre
   gardens
3. A hammerhead turning point is required at the west end of the car-park

5.8 Haringey Council – Environmental Health (Noise Team)

Standard conditions on noise should apply.

5.9 Haringey Council – Environmental Health (Food and Hygiene)

“Condition for a site investigation, detail of previous/present usage, risk
assessment and details of any remediation required”

5.10 Haringey Council – Recreation Service (Borough Arboriculturalist)

The following comments and observations relate to the effects of the
proposed new development on trees within the above site.

Tree cover - There is good tree coverage across the whole site, consisting of
many different species, age classes and condition. However, a large
percentage of them are proposed for removal, many in a good condition.
Adjacent to the main entrance is a group of trees, of mixed species, including
Ash, Sycamore, False Acacia and Hawthorn. These trees are to be retained.
They are of significant amenity value forming a valuable green screen /
habitat. Along the Eastern boundary is a group of mature Lime trees of high
amenity value. Both of these groups of trees are worthy of Tree Preservation
Orders.

Tree Protection - Tree protection measures, in line with BS5837: 1991 Trees
in relation to construction are necessary to prevent any damage to the trees to
be retained on site.

A specification for tree protection measures prepared by an Arboriculturist will
be required. This must include details of design, height and distances from
tree stems. A site plan illustrating this will also be required. The tree protection

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measures must be implemented before any works are carried out on site, and
inspected by the Local Authority Arboriculturist.

Tree Planting / Replacements - Adequate replacement trees must be planted,
as part of this development, to ensure there is no loss in overall tree
coverage. A landscaping proposal will be required indicating how many trees
are to be planted, their species and size at time of planting.

Conclusions

The trees at the main entrance to the site and along the eastern boundary are
of high amenity value and worthy of Tree Preservation Orders (TPO's). An
application will be made to the Planning department for two group TPO's. The
trees to be retained must be protected by strong robust fencing to ensure their
long-term health and their retention is successful.

An Arboricultural method statement must be produced specifying tree
protection measures and listing the chronology of events with regard to the
tree removals / construction process.

A landscaping proposal must be produced detailing new tree planting.

All tree felling must take into consideration nesting birds / bat roosts. All wild
birds and bats are protected under The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981,
damage to bird nests / bat roosts is a criminal offence.

5.11 Greater London Authority - Planning Decisions Unit

Haringey Council consulted the Mayor of London on this planning application.
On the 21st September 2005, the Mayor considered a report on this proposal
(Ref: PDU1277/01). A copy of the full report is attached in appendix 3.

Having considered the report, the Mayor has concluded that the proposed
mixed scheme meets a number of strategic policy objectives, particularly as
the proposal enables the safeguarding of part of the site for educational
purposes and would deliver 100% affordable housing. There remain however,
a number of matters of strategic importance to the Mayor that need to be
addressed. A full assessment of how these issues are to be dealt with are
contained within section 12.0. These matters include:

1. Haringey Council should ensure that it is satisfied with the proposal‟s
   urban design, particularly with a focus on safety and whether the building
   fits comfortably within its context, or creates its own. The spaces in and
   around the site need more careful consideration.

2. The applicant needs to demonstrate that the residential element offers
   housing choice in terms of mix of bedroom sizes. Strategically, a higher
   proportion of 3 and 4-bedroom dwellings are preferred. A revisit of the
   housing mix is requested unless adequate justification is given.


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3. An access statement should be submitted. This should include a
   statement committing to the provision of 100% lifetime homes standard
   and 10% accessible/adaptable housing. A marked-up plan should be
   submitted illustrating how wheelchair users, disabled people and people
   with mobility impairments could move around the site and access all
   buildings and public transport.

4. The proposal has the potential to impact on the three key strategic
   transport routes (A406, A10 and the A1010).             Further information
   regarding trip rates for public transport, details of modal share, and more
   information regarding traffic generation on the surrounding roads is
   requested.

5. TfL requests that Haringey Council imposes a condition to require the
   applicant to prepare a travel plan for each component of the development,
   as well as a condition securing the provision of adequate cycle parking.

6. An assessment of the impact of the proposals on the existing and new
   communities should be undertaken. This is particularly relevant because of
   the introduction of increased affordable housing in an area with a high
   concentration of social-rent accommodation. Where necessary, these
   impacts could be addressed by planning contributions and investing in
   existing facilities and services.

7. Initiatives to create training and employment opportunities for local people
   and to address other barriers to employment (e.g. childcare) should also
   be included. Haringey Council should also ensure the employment of local
   people during the construction and on-going operation of the older persons
   care home and college in the development.

8. Further information (as outlined in the report PDU/1277/01) should be
   submitted to demonstrate consistency with the Mayor‟s energy policies
   (4A.7-4A.9).

If Haringey Council decides in due course that it is minded to approve the
application, it should allow the Mayor fourteen days to decide whether or not
to direct the Council to refuse planning permission (under article 4(1)(b)(i) of
the Town & Country Planning (Mayor of London) Order 2000).

5.12 English Heritage – Archaeology Advisory Service

“In this instance, it is unlikely that significant archaeological remains will be
affected by the development proposals. The site is considered to have a low
archaeological potential, and this will have been further compromised b the
amount of truncation that will have occurred during the construction of the
present buildings.

I am satisfied that the proposals do not pose a significant threat to the
archaeological heritage, and consequently I would not advise that any
archaeological condition should be attached to Planning Approval for this
current proposal should planning permission be granted”.
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5.13 Transport For London - Street Management

“Having considered the application, I can confirm that Transport for London
has no comments or observations on the proposal”.

5.14 Thames Water – Development Control Department

Waste Comments

Thames Water must recommend that the applicant consults with the Thames
Water Development Control Department on telephone number 01923 898072
who will determine the ability of the local sewers to dispose of foul and surface
water. If investigations find that insufficient capacity is available, Thames
Water will provide the additional capacity as soon as is practicable. To ensure
Thames Water has sufficient lead-in time to provide such additional services
we would like the following condition to be imposed - "Development shall not
commence until details of on site drainage works have been submitted to, and
approved by, the local planning authority in consultation with the sewerage
undertaker. No works which result in the discharge of foul or surface water
from the site shall be commenced until the onsite drainage works referred to
above have been completed" or in the case of off-site drainage works a
Section 106 agreement be recommended for the development. Thames Water
would then recommend the following clause be included - "Not to commence
the development or any part thereof unless and until a) details of off site foul
and surface water drainage have been approved in writing by the Planning
Authority in consultation with the Sewerage Undertaker and b) arrangements
have been made to satisfaction of the Planning Authority, in consultation with
the Sewerage Undertaker for the provision of adequate foul and surface water
drainage for the whole of the development. Such drainage should be secured
where appropriate by means of a public sewer requisition pursuant to sections
98 to 101 of the Water Industry Act 1991." Reason - To ensure that the foul
and / or surface water discharge from the site shall not be prejudicial to the
existing sewerage system.

Surface Water Drainage - With regard to surface water drainage it is the
responsibility of a developer to make proper provision for drainage to ground,
water courses or surface water sewer. It must not be allowed to drain to the
foul sewer, as this is the major contributor to sewer flooding. Thames Water
recognises the environmental and economic benefits of surface water source
control and encourages its appropriate application where it is to the overall
benefit of our customers. Hence, in the disposal of surface water, Thames
Water will recommend that the Applicant a) Looks to ensure that new
connections to the public sewerage system do not pose an unacceptable
threat of surcharge, flooding or pollution b) check the proposals are in line with
advice from the DETR which encourages, wherever practicable, disposal on
site without recourse to the public sewerage system - for example in the form
of soakaways or infiltration areas on free draining soils c) looks to ensure the
separation of foul and surface water sewerage on all new developments.

Where disposal of surface water is other than to a public sewer, then the

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applicant should ensure that approval for the discharge has been obtained
from the appropriate authorities.

In respect of surface water it is recommended that the applicant should
ensure that storm flows are attenuated or regulated into the receiving network
through on or off site storage.

Thames Water would recommend that petrol / oil interceptors to be fitted in all
car parking/washing/repair facilities. Failure to enforce the effective use of
petrol / oil interceptors could result in oil-polluted discharges entering local
watercourse.

Water Comments

Insufficient information has been provided by the Developer to allow Thames
Water to determine the water supply infrastructure needs for the proposed
development. In order that the development does not detrimentally effect the
water supply infrastructure, Thames Water recommend the following condition
be imposed: Development should not be commenced until: a) full details,
including anticipated flow rates, and detailed site plans have been submitted
to, and approved in writing by, the local planning authority (in consultation with
Thames Water) b) Where this development forms part of a larger
development, arrangements have been made to the satisfaction of the
Planning Authority (in consultation with Thames Water) for the provision of
adequate water supplies for the whole of the development. Reason: To
ensure that the water supply infrastructure has sufficient capacity to cope with
the/this additional demand.

Supplementary Comments

In order for Thames Water to assess the impact that this proposed
development site will have on both the sewerage network and sewage
treatment, detailed information regarding the proposed use for the site in
addition to the existing use of the site is required. Where possible the
developer should provide details of the existing and predicted discharge from
the site.

5.15 Metropolitan Police – Crime Prevention Officer

With regard to the planning application for Middlesex University, White Hart
Lane N22, reference HGY/2005/1439. I request that the developer liases with
the Crime Prevention Department on 020 8345 2164 in order that crime
prevention measures can be included in the final scheme. We will make
ourselves available to meet with the developer or agent in order to promote
measures to “design out crime” and provide a safe, sustainable environment.




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5.16 Local Residents;

Local residents responded with 3 letters, raising the following grounds of
objection:

-   Mix of Use Inappropriate
-   Overdevelopment of Site - Existing high density in the area
-   Middlesex University Building worthy of retention
-   Duplication of services throughout the borough
-   Traffic and Parking problems exacerbated
-   Height of buildings impact on privacy of adjacent residential properties
-   Pressure on existing services
-   Environmental Impacts
-   Loss of open character of the existing site
-   Impact Social Cohesion - Housing mix and tenure mix inappropriate
-   Fencing, 2.4m high impression of a prison




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6.0      RELEVANT PLANNING POLICY

6.1 Planning Policy Statement 1 – Delivering Sustainable Development

PPS 1 advises that sustainable development is the core principle
underpinning planning. The guidance advises that, planning should promote
sustainable and inclusive patterns of urban development by:

     Ensuring that development supports existing communities and contributes
      to the creation of safe, sustainable, liveable and mixed communities with
      key services for all members of the community.

6.2 Planning Policy Guidance 3 - Housing

The principal national policy guidance relating to residential development is
contained in Planning Policy Guidance Note 3: Housing. This PPG provides
guidance on a range of issues relating to the provision of housing. Circular
6/98 Planning and Affordable Housing will continue to apply, within the
framework of policy set out in this guidance. PPG 3 states that Local planning
authorities should:

     provide sufficient housing land but give priority to re-using previously-
      developed land within urban areas, bringing empty homes back into use
      and converting existing buildings, in preference to the development of
      greenfield sites;
     promote improved quality of developments which in their design, layout
      and allocation of space create a sense of community; and
     Introduce greater flexibility in the application of parking standards, which
      the Government expects to be significantly lower than at present.

6.3 Planning Policy Guidance 13 - Transport

Planning Policy Guidance 13 Transport was issued in March 2001. It aims to:

     promote more sustainable transport choices for people & for moving freight
     promote accessibility to jobs, shopping by public transport/walking/ cycling
     reduce the need to travel especially by car

6.4 Planning Policy Guidance 22 – Renewable Energy

Planning Policy Guidance 22 Renewable Energy aims to put the UK on a path
to cut its carbon dioxide emissions by some 60% by 2050.

The Government has already set a target to generate 10% of UK electricity
from renewable sources by 2010.

PPS22 states that “small-scale projects can provide a limited but valuable
contribution to overall outputs of renewable energy to meeting energy needs
both locally and nationally.


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6.5 The London Plan

The London Plan has now been formally adopted having been issued in draft
in June 2002 by the Greater London Authority. The London Plan forms the
emerging Spatial Development Strategy for Greater London. It contains key
policies covering housing, transport, design and sustainability in the capital. It
will replace Regional Planning Guidance Note 3 - Regional Planning
Guidance for London.

The London Plan sets housing targets for individual boroughs for the period
up to 2016. The target for Haringey is 19370 additional „homes‟ (970 per
year) of a target for London of 457950 (23000 per year).

In terms of density, the London Plan states that appropriate density ranges
are dependent on location, setting and public transport accessibility (PTAL)
rating. A site with a PTAL rating of 2, where flats are predominantly proposed,
the density range suggested is 300 – 450 habitable rooms per hectare. The
car parking provision for such locations should be less than 1 space per unit.

The London Plan sets affordable housing targets for individual boroughs. The
target for Haringey is 50%. This figure should include a range of affordable
housing following the guide 70:30 for social rented to intermediate housing.
However, the actual proportions for any individual site will depend on the
boroughs housing need priorities, the characteristics of the residential
proposal, the level of affordable housing in the surrounding area & the
economic viability of the scheme.

For higher and further education, the Mayor, by way of Policy 3.A.22,
encourages boroughs to ensure that he needs of the education sectors are
addressed and that adequate provision for different types of educational
facilities are provided. Adequate provision for social infrastructure and
community facilities should be ensured in accordance with policy 3A.16. This
includes services for older people.




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6.6 Haringey Unitary Development Plan (1998)

HSG 1.1     Strategic Housing Target
HSG 1.2     Sites For New Housing
HSG 1.3     Change of Use to Residential
HSG 2.1     Dwelling Mix for New Build Housing
HSG 2.2     Residential Densities
HSG 2.23    Affordable Housing
HSG 2.17    Provision of Residential Care and Nursing Homes (Class C2)
HSG 2.18    Location of Residential Care and Nursing Homes (Class C2)

SPG 1.3     Privacy and Overlooking
SPG 2.2     Density for Residential and Mixed Use Developments
SPG 2.3     Standards Required in New Residential Development

CSF 2.1     New Educational Facilities
CSF 2.3     Dual Use of Educational Facilities
CSF 2.4     Surplus Educational Land or Buildings

DES 1.1     Good Design and How Design Will Be Assessed
DES 1.2     Assessment of Design Quality(1):Fitting New Buildings Surrounding
Area
DES 1.3     Assessment of Design Quality (2): Enclosure, Height and Scale
DES 1.4     Assessment of Design Quality (3):BuildingLines, Layout, Rhythm
DES 1.5     Assessment of Design Quality (4): Detailing and Materials
DES 1.9     Privacy and Amenity of Neighbours
DES 1.10    Overdevelopment

TSP 7.1     Parking For Development
TSP 7.6     Means of Access and Crossovers
TSP 5.1     Road Schemes

RIM 1.2     Upgrading Areas in Greatest Need
RIM 1.6     Mixed Use Developments
RIM 3.1     Energy Conservation and Development
RIM 3.8     Waste Management




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6.7 Haringey Unitary Development Plan – Second Deposit (2004)

UD 1A       Sustainable Design and Construction
UD2         General Principles
UD 3        Quality Design
UD 6        Waste Storage
UD 8        New Development Location and Accessibility
UD 9        Parking for Development

HSG 1       New Housing Developments
HSG 4       Affordable Housing
HSG 7       Housing for Special Needs
HSG 8       Density Standards
HSG 9       Dwelling Mix

CW1         New Community Facilities

OS14        Open Space Deficiency and New Developments

M4          Road Schemes

ENV 6       Energy Efficiency
ENV 6A      Renewable Energy and Mitigating Climate Change

SPG 3a      Density, Dwelling Mix, Floor space Minima & Lifetime Homes
SPG 3b      Privacy/Overlooking, Aspect/Outlook and Daylight/Sunlight
SPG10       The Negotiation, Management & Monitoring of Planning Obligations
SPG10a      Affordable Housing




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7.0    ANALYSIS/ASSESSMENT OF THE APPLICATION

7.1    Principle of Mixed-Use

This application proposes the redevelopment of the former Middlesex University
Site, White Hart Lane N17. The site is a large, previously development piece of
land, covering an area of 2.85 hectares.

A mixed-use development is proposed, representing three distinct and separate
land uses within the one application site boundary. In brief the proposal includes
the erection of new buildings to provide: i) New sixth form centre comprising a
2/4 storey building with central atrium to provide performing arts, catering, sport,
media, music and ICT facilities with 98 car park spaces, new access and 2.4m
high perimeter fencing; ii) New 3 /4 storey residential buildings to provide 42 x 1
bed, 67 x 2 bed, 13 x 3 bed and 1 x 4 bed units (all affordable) with 68 car
parking spaces and new access; iii) New 70 bed care home for elderly,
associated parking & access from College Road

Each of the three uses will be assessed separately. Firstly however, the principle
of a mixed-use development will be assessed.

Planning Policy Statement 1: “Delivering Sustainable Development” advises that
sustainable development is the core principle underpinning planning. The
guidance advises, in paragraph 27 (viii), that planning should “promote the more
efficient use of land through higher density, mixed-use development and the use
of suitably located previously development land and buildings”.

The London Plan advocates mixed-use developments, unless such a mix would
conflict with other policies within the plan. Haringey Unitary Development Plan
policy RIM 1.6 “Mixed Use Developments” states that „the Council will encourage
proposals to incorporate a mix of land uses appropriate to the scale and location
of development‟. Similarly, UD5 “Mixed Use Developments” of the emerging UDP
states that „where appropriate, developments should include a mix of uses in
order to ensure sustainable development, particularly where such developments
are located in town centres, areas of high public transport accessibility and within
major new developments‟.

The Greater London Authority, planning report (PDU/1227/01), dated 21 st
September (Appendix 3), states that the mixed use proposal offers to meet a
number of Mayoral objectives, providing a range of residential uses and
safeguarding an existing site for educational use. The reports states “the
proposal injects a good mix and balance of uses for regenerating this area”. As
such the GLA supports the principle of a mixed-use development on this site.
Haringey Council also finds the principle of a mixed-use development on the site
acceptable. Haringey Council - Children‟s Service has confirmed that the whole
site is not required for the provision of the sixth form centre and therefore it is
appropriate to explore the alternative uses available for the remainder of the site.
Each of the uses, Education, Residential and Care Home are addressed in
section 8.0, 9.0 and 10.0. On this basis, the proposal is found to be in line with
the intentions of the PPS1, The London Plan and policy RIM 1.6.

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8.0   Education

There are six issues to be addressed:

1.    Principle of Education Use
2.    Bulk, Scale, Height and Amenity
3.    Design
4.    Transportation – Access, Traffic, Car Parking and Cycling
5.    Waste Management
6.    Sustainability

8.1 The Principle of Education Use

This application seeks full planning permission to redevelop the, 2.85-hectare,
former Middlesex University site. The use as a university campus has recently
ceased, as part of the Middlesex University strategy for centralisation and
expansion. The land and buildings are currently vacant. A sixth form college
would occupy the majority of the site, covering 1.61 hectares. All existing
structures on the site would be demolished and replaced with a new build 6th
Form Centre. The centre would provide post-16 year education. The building
would cater for up to 1200 students and up to 100 staff and support staff.

The London Plan, in policy 3A.22 “Higher and Further Education” states that
“The Mayor will and boroughs should work with the LDA and the higher and
further education sectors to ensure that the needs of the education sectors
are addressed”. The plan recognises that “access to further education is
important for the large proportion of Londoners who do not go into higher
education. It plays a key role in skills development and life long learning”.

The proposals map of the emerging Haringey Unitary Development Plan –
Deposit Consultation Draft 2004 allocates the application site as a “Site
Specific Proposal” (SSP3).

Schedule 1, page 186, of the Revised Deposit Unitary Development Plan lists
all the site-specific proposals. Site No. 3 comprises the application site. This
designation confirms the site‟s allocation for “Education” purposes.

The principle of educational use on the site is in line with the designation of
the land as a Site Specific Proposal allocated for educational purposes within
the emerging Unitary Development Plan. The application therefore delivers,
on the majority of the site, the preferred use that the council is seeking.
Haringey Council – Children‟s Service have been consulted and fully support
the proposal for a new sixth form centre. On this basis the principle of
educational use is found to be appropriate for the site.

Policy CSF 2.1 “New Educational Facilities” states that new facilities would be
expected to meet Department for Education standards as well as the
Council‟s standards set out in the Unitary Development Plan and in
Supplementary Planning Guidance. Policy CSF 2 aims “to facilitate the


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provision of nursery, educational and training facilities to meet the needs of
the Borough‟s residents and, where appropriate, the wider needs of London”.

The proposed building has been designed in close collaboration with the Local
Education Authority and additional consultation has occurred with a variety of
interest groups in order to meet the requirements of an approved curriculum.
These groups include the curriculum group, Learning Skills Council, Haringey
Council – Special Education Needs (SEN), consultant educationalist, Vice
Principal White Hart Lane School, Special Educational Needs Heads and staff
of William C Harvey School, Moselle School and Vale School. The college
would provide facilities for a broad curriculum including Performing Arts,
Hospitality and Catering, Sports Development and Fitness, Media Production
and Music, Business Studies and ICT as well as traditional AS and A2
subjects. As such the proposal meets the requirements of policy CSF 2.1.

Policy CW1 “New Community Facilities” states proposals for the development
of new community facilities will be considered if the facility is appropriate to its
location, the facility will meet a local need, the building is designed so that it
can be used for more than one purpose and the facility is located where it can
be easily reached by walking or by public transport. Policy CSF 2.3 “Dual Use
of Educational Facilities” states that “the council will encourage the dual and
community use of suitable educational facilities providing it does not conflict
with the delivery of the education service”.

Considering the former use of the site as a university campus, the location of
a new educational facility on the site is considered to be appropriate for the
location. The allocation of the site within the emerging UDP for educational
purposes signifies the need for such facilities in the borough. The sixth form
college sports and cultural facilities would be available for use by the
community out of hours or by arrangement. White Hart Lane train station is
located 300m to the south of the site. The railway line runs in a north-south
direction parallel to the site‟s eastern boundary, on the other side of Pretoria
Road. As such, the scheme is considered to satisfy the criteria set out in
policy CW1 and CSF 2.3.

8.2 Bulk, Scale, Height, and Amenity

Policies DES 1.1 „Good Design and How Design Will Be Assessed‟, DES 1.2
„Assessment of Design Quality (1): Fitting New Buildings into the Surrounding
Area‟, DES 1.3 „Assessment of Design Quality (2): Enclosure, Height and
Scale‟ and DES 1.4 „Assessment of Design Quality (3): Building Lines, Layout,
Form, Rhythm and Massing‟ require that new buildings are of an acceptable
standard of design and be in keeping with the character of the surrounding
area. The overriding aim of these policies is to encourage good design of new
buildings in order to enhance the overall quality of the built environment and
the amenity of residents.

In addition, the council wishes to ensure that the amenities of adjacent
occupiers and the area as a whole are not materially harmed as a result of a
proposed development. Policy DES 1.9 seeks to protect the reasonable

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amenity of neighbours by ensuring that new developments do not
unacceptably reduce the degree of privacy enjoyed by adjoining properties
and that new problems of overlooking are not created.

The surrounding land use is predominantly residential. The most common
housing type is two-storey terraced-dwellings, located along Pretoria Road,
College Road, Durban Road and Queen Street. To the south of the site, along
White Hart Lane, are four storey blocks containing one and two bed flats and
three-storey terrace dwellings. The Haringey Irish Centre, a part 2 part 4
storey building, abuts the site to the south-east.

The site currently consists of student hall accommodation, lecture theatres
and classrooms, offices and other ancillary facilities. The existing buildings on
site vary between two and four storeys.

The sixth form centre will be situated toward the south end of the site. The
south pavilion would be two-storeys, at a height of 10.30m fronting White Hart
Lane. Part of the roof of the performing arts amphitheatre, located at the
south-east corner, will rise an additional storey, to 16.10m in order to house
the performing arts lighting gantry. The central atrium will rise toward the
north to a height of 18.80m. The majority of the north pavilion will be three-
storeys, at a height of 13.70m. The central section of the north pavilion will be
four-storeys, at a height of 17.10m. There will be a one-storey element, at a
height of 6.0m housing a crèche to the west of the north pavilion. The total
floor area of the sixth form centre would be 14,450 square metres.

The height, scale and bulk of the proposed sixth form centre are comparable
to the existing buildings on the site. The four-storey element makes up a small
proportion of the building with the majority being two and three storeys in
height. The height, scale and bulk of the development has been designed to
relate to the nearby existing buildings and proposed buildings and to conform
to pattern of development of adjoining sites. Therefore, it is considered that
the proposed sixth form centre building responds well to the pattern of
development in the surrounding area and is in keeping with the character of
the locality. The proposed Sixth Form College is not considered to result in
any significant issues of overlooking or loss of privacy to neighbouring
properties, in compliance with policy DES 1.9. The overall height, bulk and
scale is deemed to be appropriate for the location and in line with the aims of
policy DES 1.1, DES 1.2, DES 1.3, DES1.4 and UD3.

8.3 Design

Policy DES 1.5 “Assessment of Design Quality (4): Detailing and Materials”
and UD3 “Quality Design” encourage good and appropriate design, which is
sustainable, improves the quality of the existing environment and reinforces a
sense of place and promotes civic pride.

The proposed sixth form centre is designed around a central atrium with 2-
storey build to the south and 4-storey build to the north. The building would
consist of four pavilions set around two internal courtyards.

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The building as a whole is oriented on a east-west axis and has been
designed with extensive solar shading devices to control the potential for
overheating whilst still taking advantage of natural daylight.

The central atrium provides the main entrance from White Hart Lane and links
all areas of the building. The atrium and stairwells are to be Kalwall
translucent insulated glazing system and powder coated aluminium frames.
The atrium is to have a Kalzip mill finish standing seam roof. The high level
glazing to the atrium is to be translucent, insulated glass thus reducing effects
of solar gain within the atrium whilst allowing infiltration of natural daylight
without glare. The atrium will therefore create a light, airy internal space. It is
also the visual centrepiece of the building and a striking external design
feature of the building.

The main building is to have fair faced white glazed brickwork to external walls
adjacent to public areas and Kingspan powder coated aluminium panels to
external walls. To he south façade and around the amphitheatre powder
coated aluminium perforated louver blades are to be used. These louvers not
only provide a practical function, by shading the building from solar heat and
glare but also break up the otherwise plain façade and provide an interesting
design feature.

The sixth form centre is to have an inverted roof with pre cast concrete
pavers. Windows to all facades are to be clear double glazed powder coated
aluminium windows.

External staircases are to be galvanised steel. The site perimetre is to be
secured with 2.4m high, galvanised steel, palisade fencing and 2.4m high
painted steel railings to White Hart Lane. All exposed external steelwork is to
be galvanised, primed, etched and painted. A condition is to be attached to
any planning consent requiring full details of all boundary treatment, including
fencing, to be submitted to and approved by the Local Planning Authority.

In terms of amenity space, there will be a gain in usable open green space
within the proposal, which includes two landscaped courtyard gardens, private
secluded gardens for the crèche, and a secluded piazza adjacent to the
theatre. These open spaces will be for the users of the sixth form centre.

The sixth form centre scheme is modern in design and would connect with the
design approach of the adjacent residential units proposed for the north of the
site. Due consideration has been given to the surrounding urban grain and
building lines, height, scale and massing as outlined in section 8.3. The result
is a contemporary building, which respects and assimilates with the prevailing
development in the area. The building has been planned with consideration of
sustainability, in the orientation of the building to incorporate passive-solar
design. It is considered that the sixth form centre will have a positive
regenerative impact on the streetscape and the amenity of the area. The
centre, with the use of high quality materials and quality of design will
contribute to the improvement of the existing environment, reinforce a sense

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of place and promote civic pride. As such, the proposal is found to comply
with policy DES 1.5 Assessment of Design Quality (4): Detailing and Materials
and UD3 Quality Design.

8.4 Transportation – Access, Traffic, Car Parking and Cycling

National planning policy seeks to reduce the dependence on the private car in
urban areas such as Haringey. The advice in both PPG3 Housing and PPG13
Transport make clear recommendations to this effect. This position is also
reflected in the London Plan. Unitary Development Plan Policy TSP 5.1 and
M4 “Road Schemes” support road schemes that benefit public transport
operations, cyclists, the safety of pedestrians and other road users or provide
necessary access to new developments. Policy TSP 7.1 and UD9 “Parking for
Development” sets out the Councils parking requirements for new
developments.

Part of the proposed development includes the extension of College Road
westwards to join Queen Street. Vehicle movements along the new part of
College Road would be one way only (in an easterly direction), up to the point
of a priority junction, from which point the road would be a two-way street. As
such, access to Queen Street from College Road would be prohibited.

Haringey Council – Transportation Team has commented that concerning the
site access arrangement, the proposed combination of one-way gyratory west
through College Road, with a priority junction connecting this section to the
two-way eastern segment of this road and the traffic calming method used,
are considered to be acceptable.

The trip forecast, within the Transport Assessment Report suggests that the
Sixth Form Centre element of the development would generate some 94% of
the total vehicular trips associated with the development proposal. Due to the
high level of usage it is deemed appropriate for the Council to adopt the
eastern segment of College Road. As such the section of College Road, from
Pretoria Road to the priority junction, has been acquired by the London
Borough of Haringey with a commitment to adopt this section of road by 31 st
August 2008. This would be done under S.228 of the Highways Act.

The primary access to the sixth form centre would be from White Hart Lane
and a drop off point will be created at this front entrance. A secondary
entrance would be available from College Road, which is to be extended
through to Queen Street. A total of 98 car-parking spaces would be provided
at the north side of the sixth form centre. The provision of parking for disabled
people will be included with 8 designated spaces at the rear and 4 designated
spaces at the front, off White Hart Lane. The use of the car park would be for
staff of the sixth form centre and for the public using centre facilities out side
of normal hours. There will be no parking for students. Cycle parking for the
college is to be provided at one space per six students (200 spaces in total).

Haringey Council – Transportation Team has accepted the applicant's
transport assessment report, which analysed the transport impact of this

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development. The assessment report has shown that overall, this
development proposal would only generate a combined traffic inflow/outflow
increase of 17 and 21 vehicles in the a.m. and p.m. peak hours respectively,
over the existing situation. It is considered that these traffic flow rates are not
significant.

Since the public transport accessibility level for this site is low and taking into
account the associated parking demand, as well as the need to minimise the
car parking impact on the adjoining highway network, the level of car parking
spaces proposed is deemed to be acceptable.

Transport for London – Street Management Team has considered the
application, and confirmed that they have no comments or observations on
the proposal.

The Greater London Authority has submitted comments on the scheme. The
GLA notes that the amount of parking proposed represents a lower level of
parking compared to the previous use as a university campus. Whilst there is
no specific parking standard in the London Plan for college uses, this level of
provision appears to be reasonably restrained. A College Travel Plan is
proposed which will be used to regulate car parking. TFL, through the GLA
have suggested that a condition be attached to any planning consent, to
ensure that the travel plan is monitored and delivered.

On this basis, the proposal is found to comply with PPG13 “Transport”, The
London Plan and Unitary Development Plan policies TSP 5.1/M4 “Road
Schemes” and TSP 7.1/UD9 “Parking for Development”.

8.5 Waste Management

The scheme has been designed with a refuse management system that
allows for the external waste collection and the storage of recyclable waste
products. An external waste storage area is located within the western
landscaped courtyard. The service yard will accommodate service vehicles
collecting waste from the sixth form centre and will also provide facilities for
refuse, separate food waste and recycling.

The Waste Management Team has been involved in the consultation from the
early stages. Extensive comments and suggestions were put forward by the
Waste Management Team at the pre-application stage and subsequently
incorporated into the final scheme submitted as part of the application. Not
withstanding this, the council will condition any planning consent to require a
detailed scheme for the provision of refuse, waste storage and recycling within
the site to be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning
Authority prior to the commencement of the works. In addition, such a scheme
as approved, shall be implemented and permanently retained thereafter to the
satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority. On this basis, the council finds the
scheme compliant with policy RIM 3.8 “Waste Management” and UD6 “Waste
Storage”.


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8.6 Sustainability

PPS 1 advises that sustainable development is the core principle
underpinning planning. The guidance advises that, planning should promote
sustainable and inclusive patterns of urban development by:

   Ensuring that development supports existing communities and contributes
    to the creation of safe, sustainable, liveable and mixed communities with
    key services for all members of the community.

It is a requirement that a Sustainability Checklist (SC) accompany all major
planning applications. A comprehensive Sustainability Checklist has been
included with the application submission.

SC1    Air Quality

Air intakes for the project are generally located at high level in order to avoid
fumes from nearby roads.

SC2    Fumes/Light/Glare and Land Contamination

Contamination - Geotechnical site survey has been undertaken without any
contentious issues arising. Nonetheless, Haringey Council – Environmental
Health has requested a condition be attached to planning consent to a site
investigation, detail of previous/present usage, risk assessment and details of
any remediation required.

Lighting - Security lighting is to be designed to minimise annoyance to
adjoining areas

Glare – Glazing to external window to be clear glass. Glazing limited to
maximum of 40% of external wall area to control solar heat gain.

SC3    Waste Storage and Recycling Facilities

Waste storage has been addressed in section 8.5 above.

SC4    Solar Design and Renewable Energy

The building is orientated on a east-west access and has been designed to
avoid the need for mechanical refrigeration. Cooling to the internal spaces is
to be achieved by passive means and the south facing facades have been
designed with extensive solar shading devices to control the potential for
overheating whilst allowing daylight to penetrate. As such the sixth form
centre is found to comply with policy UD 1A “Sustainable Design and
Construction”.

The Greater London Authority (GLA) has been consulted on this scheme. The
GLA are keen for sustainability, particularly in relation to energy efficiency to
be incorporated into new developments. As such, they have requested that

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the Local Planning Authority “impose a condition requiring the applicant to
carry out an energy demand assessment on the proposed college element
and submit a financial and technical feasibility study on incorporating
renewable energy technologies into the proposed design. This condition
should be carried out in consultation with and to the satisfaction of the GLA”.
In order to address the energy requirements set by the GLA specialist
consultants, Faber Maunsell and EDS have been employed. The Council will
attach a condition to meet the GLA requirements. On this basis, the proposal
is deemed to be in line with policy RIM 3.1 Energy Conservation and
Development, ENV 6 Energy Efficiency and ENV 6A Renewable Energy and
Mitigating Climate Change.

SC5    Efficient Use of Land and Buildings

The site is not within a „sensitive area‟ as defined in Regulation 2(1). The site
is not within a Conservation Area or an SSSI or National Park, Area of Natural
Beauty or World Heritage Site. The buildings on site are not listed building, of
national or local importance or of any particular architectural quality. As such
the demolition of the buildings on site is considered to be acceptable.

SC6    Sustainable Materials

Suitability of re-claimed materials from demolition works to be assessed. No
insulants containing CFC‟s or HCFC‟s are to be used in the building fabric.

Where possible and economically viable transportation distances will be
considered in the specification and procurement of materials for construction.

SC7    Sustainable Drainage and Water Conservation

The rainwater from the building is to be collected, stored and used to flush
toilets and urinals, so reducing the demands on both the water supply and
sewerage disposal networks. Depending on the design, it is likely that this
water, when available will also be used to supplement any irrigation of the
grounds. Treatment of the remaining storm water will be investigated during
the detail design stage. Initially infiltration tests will be undertaken across the
site to ascertain possibility of run-off being controlled on-site rather than
discharged into the local sewerage system. Options to be considered include:
1. The use of form pave or alternate hard standing systems that allow storm
water to pass through the surface into permeable material below; 2. The use
of conventional soakaways and trench soakaways; 3. Balancing attenuation
ponds.

In addition, Thames water have requested the following conditions be
attached to any planning consent:

"Development shall not commence until details of on site drainage works have
been submitted to, and approved by, the local planning authority in
consultation with the sewerage undertaker. No works which result in the


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discharge of foul or surface water from the site shall be commenced until the
onsite drainage works referred to above have been completed"

Reason - To ensure that the foul and / or surface water discharge from the
site shall not be prejudicial to the existing sewerage system.

Development should not be commenced until: a) full details, including
anticipated flow rates, and detailed site plans have been submitted to, and
approved in writing by, the local planning authority (in consultation with
Thames Water) b) Where this development forms part of a larger
development, arrangements have been made to the satisfaction of the
Planning Authority (in consultation with Thames Water) for the provision of
adequate water supplies for the whole of the development.

Reason: To ensure that the water supply infrastructure has sufficient capacity
to cope with the/this additional demand.

Further the following informative will be attached:

Thames Water recognises the environmental and economic benefits of
surface water source control and encourages its appropriate application
where it is to the overall benefit of our customers. Hence, in the disposal of
surface water, Thames Water will recommend that the Applicant a) Looks to
ensure that new connections to the public sewerage system do not pose an
unacceptable threat of surcharge, flooding or pollution b) check the proposals
are in line with advice from the DETR which encourages, wherever
practicable, disposal on site without recourse to the public sewerage system -
for example in the form of soakaways or infiltration areas on free draining soils
c) looks to ensure the separation of foul and surface water sewerage on all
new developments.

SC8    Trees and Landscape

A topographical survey and demolitions drawing is included within the
application. The existing mature trees where possible are to be retained.

Haringey Council – Recreational Services (Borough Arboriculturalist) has
made the following comments:

Tree cover

There is good tree coverage across the whole site, consisting of many
different species, age classes and condition. However, a large percentage of
them are proposed for removal, many in a good condition.

Adjacent to the main entrance is a group of trees, of mixed species, including
Ash, Sycamore, False Acacia and Hawthorn. These trees are to be retained.
They are of significant amenity value forming a valuable green screen /
habitat.


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Along the Eastern boundary is a group of mature Lime trees of high amenity
value.

Both of these groups of trees are worthy of Tree Preservation Orders.

Tree Protection

Tree protection measures, in line with BS5837: 1991 Trees in relation to
construction are necessary to prevent any damage to the trees to be retained
on site.

A specification for tree protection measures prepared by an Arboriculturist will
be required. This must include details of design, height and distances from
tree stems. A site plan illustrating this will also be required.

The tree protection measures must be implemented before any works are
carried out on site, and inspected by the Local Authority Arboriculturist.

Tree Planting / Replacements

Adequate replacement trees must be planted, as part of this development, to
ensure there is no loss in overall tree coverage. A landscaping proposal will
be required indicating how many trees are to be planted, their species and
size at time of planting.

Conclusions

The trees at the main entrance to the site and along the eastern boundary are
of high amenity value and worthy of Tree Preservation Orders (TPO's). An
application will be made to the Planning department for two group TPO's. The
trees to be retained must be protected by strong robust fencing to ensure their
long-term health and their retention is successful.

An Arboricultural method statement must be produced specifying tree
protection measures and listing the chronology of events with regard to the
tree removals / construction process.

A landscaping proposal must be produced detailing new tree planting.

All tree felling must take into consideration nesting birds / bat roosts. All wild
birds and bats are protected under The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981,
damage to bird nests / bat roosts is a criminal offence.

SC9    Biodiversity

The site is not identified as being within a particular policy area or site specific
proposal area in the adopted UDP. The site is not a designated area of
ecological importance.

SC10 Listed Buildings and Locally Listed Buildings

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The site does not contain any listed buildings. The site is not adjacent to any
listed buildings.

SC11 Conservation Areas and Other Built Heritage

An archaeological survey has been undertaken by the agents for the
applicant, without any contentious issues arising.

English Heritage – Archaeology Advisory Service have forwarded the
following comments on the proposal “In this instance, it is unlikely that
significant archaeological remains will be affected by the development
proposals. The site is considered to have a low archaeological potential, and
this will have been further compromised by the amount of truncation that will
have occurred during the construction of the present buildings. I am satisfied
that the proposals do not pose a significant threat to the archaeological
heritage, and consequently I would not advise that any archaeological
condition should be attached to Planning Approval for this current proposal
should planning permission be granted”.

SC12 Urban Design Quality, Views and Public Art

The proposal is of quality design to meet the curriculum needs of the facility.

SC13 Designing Out Crime

Extensive use is to be made of CCTV both to cover the perimetre of the
building and certain internal areas. Care will be taken in the final citing of
cameras in order not to invade the public right of privacy. The sixth form
centre will be secured on all boundaries with 2.4m high fencing with controlled
access gates. In addition, the Crime prevention officer requests that the
developer liases with the Crime Prevention Department on 020 8345 2164 in
order that crime prevention measures can be included in the final scheme. We
will make ourselves available to meet with the developer or agent in order to
promote measures to “design out crime” and provide a safe, sustainable
environment”.

SC14 Access by All

The sixth form centre will be designed to DDA plus standards with access to
all and an inclusive environment being a high priority. This is demonstrated by
the full integration of Special Needs Education (SEN) facilities and students,
which will provide immediate access to all mainstream learning
accommodation. The building is fully compliant with the Building Regulations
2000 Approved Document M (edition 2004) and Disability Discrimination Act
1995.




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SC15 Open Space

In terms of amenity space, there will be a gain in usable open green space
within the proposal, which includes two landscaped courtyard gardens, private
secluded gardens for the crèche, and a secluded piazza adjacent to the
theatre. These open spaces will be for the users of the sixth form centre.

SC16 Affordable Housing

Refer to 9.0 generally and specifically 9.8 below.

SC17 Education/Health

The sixth form centre is to provide an education facility for post 16 year olds.

SC18 Leisure and Culture

A sports hall, performing arts hall, amphitheatre and restaurants will be
provided with access to the community outside normal hours.

SC19 Local Shops/Services

The sixth form centre, staff and students will utilise the existing services
available and there will be opportunities for new and improved services.

SC20 Jobs and Training

The sixth form centre will provide 100 staff positions plus support staff. A
condition will be attached to planning consent requiring a percentage of local
labour be used during the construction phase.

SC21 Other Renewable Energy

A BREEAM assessment is to be undertaken during the detailed design stage.

SC22 Demand for Public Transport

Full details of transportation assessment are in section 8.4 above. A condition
will be attached to planning consent requiring a travel plan be submitted.

SC23 Major Trip Generating

Full details of transportation assessment are in section 8.4 above. A condition
will be attached to planning consent requiring a travel plan be submitted.

SC24 Environmental Impact Assessment

The site is not identified as being within a particular policy area relating to
biodiversity, ecological heritage or conservation.


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On 28th June 2005, RPS, on behalf of the applicant requested a Screening
Opinion under Regulation 5(1) of the Town and Country Planning
(Environmental Impact Assessment) (England and Wales) Regulations 1999.

The Council provided a Schedule 2: Development Screening Opinion on 22 nd
July 2005. The Council, determined that, as Local Planning Authority, the
proposed development is not likely to have any significant effect on the
environment and will not require the submission of an Environmental Impact
Assessment under the terms of the Environmental Impact Regulations 1999.
The full screening opinion is attached in appendix 2.

SC25 Out of Town Centre

Not Applicable

SC26 Tall Buildings

Not Applicable

SC27 Crèche/Nurseries and Other Community Benefits

A 25-place crèche is provided at ground floor level for the use of students and
staff. This will allow students to continue their education with childcare
facilities conveniently located on site.




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9.0    Residential

There are thirteen issues to be addressed:

The Principle of Residential Use
Density
Scale, Height and Massing
Privacy and Amenity
Design
Open Space and Amenity
Dwelling Mix
Affordable Housing
Unit and Room Size, Layout and Stacking
Access and Lifetime Homes Standards
Transport – Traffic, Car – Parking and Cycling
Waste Management
Sustainability

9.1 Principle of Residential Use

The proposals map of the emerging Haringey Unitary Development Plan –
Deposit Consultation Draft 2004 allocates the application site as a “Site
Specific Proposal” (SSP3). Schedule 1 (page 186) of the Revised Deposit
Unitary Development Plan lists all the site-specific proposals. Site No. 3
comprises the application site. This designation confirms the site‟s allocation
for “Education” purposes.

The use as a University Campus has recently ceased. The land and buildings
are currently vacant.

Haringey Council – Children‟s Service have stated that “Following a series of
negotiations with the new owners of the land…the council has purchased a
proportion of the former Middlesex University site. The land purchased is
sufficient for the Council to develop the new Sixth Form Centre. The
Architects representing the Council and [the developer] have worked together
to produce an integrated design for this site”. As such, the entire former
Middlesex University site is not required for educational purposes, therefore a
non-educational use on the part of the site is considered to be appropriate in
principle.

The scheme should then be assessed against policy CSF 2.4 “Surplus
Educational Land or Buildings”. This policy states that “where educational
sites or premises are no longer required for education purposes, the Council
will allocate alternative uses to them, taking into account the nature of the site,
the policies of this Plan and the views of local residents”. “Educational
properties are a community resources and, if they are no longer required for
educational or training purposes, an alternative use that benefits the local
community should be sought wherever possible”. The majority of surrounding
development is in residential use and therefore considered appropriate for a
part of the remaining area. As such, the relevant national, regional and local

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relating to residential use will be used to assess the residential element of the
proposal.

National Policy Guidance PPG 3 “Housing” and the London Plan encourage
the residential development of brownfield sites. The pressure for new housing
in the Borough means that brownfield sites, i.e. previously developed sites,
are increasingly considered for housing development. In the Borough's tight
urban fabric the opportunities for an acceptable form of development are
increasingly limited as the availability of sites decrease.

The London Plan sets housing targets for Local Authorities for the period up to
2016. The target for Haringey is 19,370 additional „homes‟ (970 per year).
These targets are generally reflected in Unitary Development Plan policy HSG
1.1 „Strategic Housing Target‟ which states that the Council will seek to
increase the number of dwellings in Haringey by 6,700 units between 1992
and 2006. As such, the redevelopment of part of the site for residential
purposes will contribute toward the Council meeting its housing targets, in line
with policy HSG 1.1.

Policy HSG 1.2 “Site for New Housing” and Policy HSG 1.3 “Change of Use to
Residential” states that the need to provide additional housing is recognised at
a strategic and local level. Therefore, when sites become available for
development their use for housing will be encouraged unless there is a conflict
with other policies. PPG3, paragraph 17, states that it is essential that the
planning system should continue to identify and realise the development
potential of derelict, underused and waste land in urban area, both to assist
urban regeneration and to reduce pressure for development in the
countryside.

The use of the site for residential purposes is considered to be acceptable in
principle. The Council acknowledges that the site can make a contribution to
housing supply, and provide an acceptable environment for residential use.
The principle of making full re-use of previously developed and accessible
urban land for housing purposes is in line with PPG3, HSG 1.2, HSG 1.3,
HSG1 and HSG2. In addition, the regeneration potential of the scheme
complies with UDP Policy RIM 1.2 “Upgrading Areas in Greatest Need”.

9.2 Density

The scheme proposes to create a total of 123 residential units. The
development would provide a mix of 42 x 1-bedroom units (84 habitable
rooms), 67 x 2 bedroom units (201 habitable rooms), 13 x 3 bedroom units (52
habitable rooms) and a 1 x 4-bedroom unit (5 habitable rooms).

In total, the scheme has 342 habitable rooms. Therefore, applying the method
set out in Supplementary Planning Guidance Note 2.2 “Residential Densities”,
the density of the proposed development is 356 habitable rooms per hectare
(hrh).



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PPG3 recommends that more efficient use of land be made by maximising
use of previously developed land. It recommends that local planning
authorities “avoid housing development which makes inefficient use of land
and provide for more intensive housing development in and around existing
centres and close to public transport nodes”.

The London Plan sets a density of 250 – 350 habitable rooms per hectare for
developments, consisting mostly of flats, in urban areas along transport
corridors and sites close to town centres. The Greater London Authority,
planning report (PDU/1227/01), dated 21st September, supports the density of
the scheme. The report states “the density is appropriate and in line with the
London Plan density matrix (Table 4B.1).

Policy HSG 2.2 of the adopted Unitary Development Plan sets a density range
of 175 – 250 habitable rooms per hectare. Where higher densities are
acceptable, in all cases, the upper limit will be 350 habitable rooms per
hectare. Policy HSG8 of the emerging plan policy sets the density range
between 200 – 400 habitable rooms per hectare.

The density of 356 hrh is in line with the density range of 350 set out in the
current Unitary Development Plan. The proposed density is within the range of
200 – 400 set out in the emerging Unitary Development Plan. In the context of
the surrounding area, the proposed density is considered appropriate. As
such, the scheme is considered to have an acceptable density, in compliance
with the London Plan, Policy HSG 2.2 and HSG8, SPG 2.2 and SPG3a.

9.3 Scale, Height and Massing

Policy DES 1.1 „Good Design and How Design Will Be Assessed‟, DES 1.2
„Assessment of Design Quality (1): Fitting New Buildings into the Surrounding
Area‟, DES 1.3 „Assessment of Design Quality (2): Enclosure, Height and
Scale‟ and DES 1.4 „Assessment of Design Quality (3): Building Lines, Layout,
Form, Rhythm and Massing‟ require that new buildings are of an acceptable
standard of design and be in keeping with the character of the surrounding
area. The overriding aim of these criteria based policies is to encourage good
design of new buildings in order to enhance the overall quality of the built
environment and the amenity of residents.

The surrounding land use is predominantly residential. The most common
housing type is two-storey terraced-dwellings, located along Pretoria Road,
College Road, Durban Road and Queen Street. To the south of the site, along
White Hart Lane, are four storey blocks containing one and two bed flats as
well as three-storey terraced housing prevalent on White Hart Lane. The
Haringey Irish Centre, a part 2 and part 4 storey building, abuts the site to the
south-east.

This application proposes to create 123 residential units on the north part of
the site, where the existing student accommodation halls are currently
located. The height of the residential development would be predominantly 3-


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storeys. Elements of 4-storeys would be provided adjacent to the sites
western boundary at Queen Street.

The backs of the proposed units are 21.50m away from the rear building line
of the houses on Durban Road for almost the entire length of the terrace
(houses - odd numbers 39 to 95 Durban Road). The dwelling at number 97
Durban Road is set further back on the block and is therefore 20.50m away
from the rear of the proposed units. The dwelling at number 99 Durban Road
is set further back again and is 16.0m away from the proposed units. The
dwellings proposed would be set further away from the rear gardens of
Durban Road than the existing student accommodation halls, which are 8.0m
away from the boundary fence and 18.50m away from the rear building line of
the terrace.

There would be no difference in height between the buildings to be
demolished and the proposed housing. The scale and massing has been
designed to relate to the nearby buildings as such it is considered that the
height & scale of the proposed scheme should not have an adverse effect on
the surrounding area. The Greater London Authority, planning report
(PDU/1227/01), dated 21st September, states that “the design of the units to
the north respect the existing context”. As such, the residential development is
considered to be appropriate in terms of scale, height and massing in
compliance with policy DES 1.1, DES 1.2, DES 1.3 and DES 1.4.

9.4 Privacy and Amenity

Policy DES 1.9 „Privacy and Amenity of Neighbours‟ seeks to protect the
existing privacy and amenity of neighbouring occupiers. SPG3b
„Privacy/Overlooking, Aspect/Outlook and Daylight/Sunlight‟ states that the
Council expects new developments not to result in the degree of privacy
enjoyed by adjoining properties to be reduced and that new problems of
overlooking are not to be created.

The principles set out in Supplementary Design Guidance 3b have been
applied to windows on the rear of the building to ensure that there is no
adverse overlooking of the neighbouring properties. The SPG states that all
rear facing habitable room windows directly opposite one another should be a
minimum of 20 metres apart for two storey developments and additional 10
metres of each additional storey. Further, the development should not restrict
daylight/sunlight access to adjoining properties.

The proposed building is to be 21.50m away from the rear building line of the
Durban Road terraces. This is closer at second floor level than the distance
set out in the guidance. However, at all levels the sleeping accommodation is
situated at the rear of the building and living rooms situated at the front. As
such, overlooking would be minimised. In addition, the proposed buildings are
set further away than and, are the same height as, the existing buildings in
this location. In effect, the outlook from the houses on Durban Road will not be
impinged upon and the development will not have an unduly overbearing
affect on the neighbouring properties.

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It is considered that there will be no significant loss of sunlight and daylight to
any adjoining property as a result of the development. The proposal will not be
unacceptably detrimental to the amenity of adjacent users, residents and
occupiers or the surrounding area in general. As such, the proposed
residential units are considered to be in line with the aims of policy DES 1.9
“Privacy and Amenity of Neighbours”, SPG 1.3 “Privacy and Overlooking” and
SPG3b “Privacy/Overlooking, Aspect/Outlook and Daylight/Sunlight”.

9.5 Design

The proposal is a contemporary building model and uses a modern approach
in design. The buildings are predominantly brickwork/masonry. Lightweight
cladding will be used at top floor level of the front elevation and a contrasting
material to be used at ground and first floor level of the front elevation. The
roof finish is to be agreed. As full details of all materials is not available, a
condition will be attached to planning permission requiring full details of
materials be submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning
Authority prior to works commencing. As such the proposal is deemed to
comply with policy DES 1.5 “Assessment of Design Quality (4): Detailing and
Materials”. Overall, the design solution meets the aims of policy DES 1.1 and
UD3, in that the proposal contributes positively to the character of the street,
amenity of neighbours and the intermediate locality.

9.6 Open Space and Amenity

In terms of the principle of open space provision borough wide, the adopted
Unitary Development Plan does not specifically refer to public open space
deficiency or identify areas of public open space deficiency.

To assess where areas of deficiency may be in the borough, an Open Space
Survey was carried out on behalf of the Council by Atkins in 2003. This
identified areas more than 400 metres walking distance from existing public
open space. In the light of this survey, Policy OS14 of the emerging Unitary
Development Plan sets out the Councils policy position regarding the
provision of public open space in areas identified as deficient in the borough.
The policy states “the Council will seek to increase the provision of public
open space and improve public access in areas of open space deficiency.
Proposals for major new developments will be expected to provide an area of
open space, or improve access to open space that is currently inaccessible,
and/or has a low level of usage.”

The application site falls within a small area identified as being deficient in
open space. However, given the creation of a new access from the site into
Queen Street, the proposed residential development will be within 400 metres
walking distance of the Selby Centre and the Bull Lane playing fields in LB
Enfield. It will however be just in excess of 400 metres from Bruce Castle
Park.



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Given the nature of the site and its context in terms of its proximity to these
open spaces, it is considered that it would be inappropriate to require the
application site to provide additional new public open space. However, there
is a justification to consider improving the access to the existing areas of open
space close by.

This could best be achieved by the introduction of new crossings at Queen
Street to access Selby Centre and Bull Lane or an improved crossing at White
Hart Lane to access Bruce Castle Park probably via Beaufoy Road.

A contribution is included in the S106 to be attached to this proposal, for
environmental improvement works. The funding for these works could be
made available via this contribution, where alternative funding avenues are
not available.

In terms of the amenity provision within the development itself SPG3a states
that all new residential development should provide external amenity space.
Wherever possible, family houses should be provided with back gardens of a
minimum of 50sqm. Where a family dwelling cannot be located on the
basement or ground floor level, either individual private gardens, or communal
space at a minimum of 25sqm for each unit should be provided. For non-
family or flatted development, communal open space, provided for the
exclusive use of occupants of the development, may be acceptable.

Within the residential element all ground floor family units have private patio
gardens. At ground level there is an access way linking the communal
entrance door on the street side to communal amenity space at the rear of the
proposed residential buildings. In addition, there are balconies to the majority
of upper floor one and two bed flats. Based on the formula for calculating
minimum amenity space, set out in SPG3a, the total amenity space required
for this development would be 1,270 sq. metres (based on 50 sq. metres for
3-bedroom flats and 50 sq. metres plus 5 sq. metres for each unit over and
above 5 units). The total amenity space provided for the residential element is
2,915 sq. metres. As such, the amenity space provided is well in excess of the
minimum standard and therefore considered to be acceptable in relation the
requirements of SPG3a..

9.7 Dwelling Mix

Policy HSG 2.1 “Dwelling Mix for New Build Housing” requires that
development include a mix of housing types for both family and non-family
households. The scheme comprises 42 x 1 bed units (34.15%), 67 x 2 bed
units (54.47%), 13 x 3 bed units (10.57%) and 1 x 4 bed unit (0.81%).
Haringey Council - Housing Service has been fully consulted and involved in
the residential element of the Middlesex University proposals.

The Greater London Authority, planning report PDU/1227/01 (refer to
Appendix 3) has questioned the number of 3 and 4 bedroom units within the
scheme. The report states that “further information is needed to demonstrate


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the mix of unit sizes. It is preferable to have a higher proportion of 3 and 4
bedroom dwellings, in particular, the social rented provision.

The Housing Service is fully supportive of the proposal in terms of housing
mix. The Housing Corporation has been fully informed and is also supporting
the proposals. The Housing service has satisfied itself that the schemes
underlying viability would be damaged if further larger units were to be sought
from the developers. Further, the Housing Service views these proposals in
it's entirety and notes that the scheme provides for a 100% affordable housing
provision on the site rather than the 50% we would seek under current
planning policy.

As such, it is considered that the proposed dwelling mix provides a suitable
mixture of housing types, in line with the guidance set out in policy HSG 2.1
and HSG9.

9.8 Affordable Housing

PPG3, Circular 6/98 and local policy HSG 2.23 and HSG4 “Affordable
Housing”, require that all major developments include provision of affordable
housing. In respect of affordable housing, paragraph 4.16 of policy HSG4
advises that Haringey has a large unmet housing need, with just under 20,000
additional affordable homes needed before 2006. It is therefore important to
ensure that the maximum amount of affordable housing is secured through
the planning system.

SPG 10a state that “In the East, 30% of the affordable units should be social
rented and 70% to be shared ownership and key worker housing. This is
intended to act as a general guide. The exact mix will be a matter for
negotiation in each case to take into account issues of viability and mix”.

The proposed scheme for residential accommodation would comprise 123
units, all of which would be affordable housing. Genesis Housing Group would
be responsible for 68 units and Mosaic Homes would be responsible for the
remaining 55 units. Of the 123 units, 74 would be intermediate tenure and 49
social rented units, creating a 60/40 split. The Housing service has negotiated
directly with the Housing Corporation on the issue of the schemes tenure
balance and have agreed that this scheme should be based on a 60/40 split
so that the overall balance between rent and intermediate in the current ADP
programme is maintained.

The Housing Service has been fully consulted and involved in the residential
element of Middlesex University proposal. The Housing Service is fully
supportive of the proposal, in terms of tenure type, tenure split and required
funding levels. The Housing Corporation has been fully informed and is also
supporting the proposal.

In addition, The Greater London Authority, planning report (PDU/1227/01)
paragraph 13 – 14 (refer to Appendix 3 for full report) states that the


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affordable housing provision is welcomed in terms of implementing the
London Plan and that the tenure split is acceptable.

A planning obligation agreement would be required to ensure that the
dwellings provided continue to be available as affordable housing for
successive occupiers. The proposal complies with UDP policy HSG 2.23 and
HSG 4 in that it includes in excess of 50% housing to be affordable/provided
by a Registered Social Landlord (RSL).

9.9 Unit and Room Size, Layout and Stacking

In terms of the standard of accommodation provided, the proposal must be
assessed against SPG 2.3 “Standards Required in New Residential
Development” and SPG3a “Density, Dwelling Mix, Floor space Minima,
Conversions, Extensions & Lifetime Homes”. The policy outlines minimum flat
and room size requirements for new residential developments, which ensures
that the amenity of future occupiers is protected.

The majority of the one-bedroom units have a floor area of 46m². One of the
one-bedroom units has a floor area of 51m². The one-bedroom units fall
slightly short of the 48m² suggested as the minimum flat size requirement (for
a 1-bedroom, 2 person flat). Nonetheless, the one-bedroom units are
considered to provide a satisfactory standard of accommodation. The two-
bedroom units are predominantly 67m², while several are 68m² and 72m². All
the two-bedroom units meet the minimum flat size requirement of 60m² (for a
2-bedroom, 3 person flat). The three-bedroom units are all 93m², which is in
excess of the size requirements of a 73m² (4 person flat), 82m² (5-person flat)
and 90m² (for 6 person flat). The four-bedroom unit is 106m², which exceed
the minimum units size requirement of 95m² for a 7 person flat.

All flats, except the ones located on the north corner of Queens Road and
College Road are dual aspect. As such, all units/rooms are considered to
have adequate light and ventilation. In addition, the stacking and layout
arrangement is deemed to be acceptable, with all habitable rooms located
above or below habitable rooms in other units. The proposed units provide a
satisfactory standard of accommodation and internal layout appropriate for the
development. As such, the residential accommodation is found to comply with
policy HSG 2.3, SPG 2.3 and SPG3a.

9.10 Access and Lifetime Homes Standards

The London Plan, policy 3A.4 and 4B.5 expect that all new housing be built to
„Lifetime Homes‟ standards and that a minimum of 10% be designed for
wheelchair accessibility. Haringey Supplementary Planning Guidance 2.3
“Standards Required in New Residential Development” and 3a “Density,
Dwelling Mix, Floor space Minima, Conversions, Extensions & Lifetime
Homes” sets out council standards of access and lifetime homes.

The concept of lifetime homes was developed so that people with disabilities
or with impaired mobility through ageing, could continue to live in

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accommodation for life instead of being forced to move to specialist
accommodation at certain times in their lives. The design of lifetime homes
incorporates improved accessibility and other features that enable changes to
be made to the internal layout of accommodation providing flexible, high
quality accommodation.

The Greater London Authority, planning report (PDU/1277/01) states that “an
access statement should be submitted. This should include a statement
committing to the provision of 100% lifetime homes standard and 10%
accessible/adaptable housing. A marked-up plan should be submitted
illustrating how wheelchair users, disabled people and people with mobility
impairments could move around the site and access all buildings and public
transport”

An access statement has been submitted to the GLA, along with access
diagram, wheelchair housing provision diagram. The GLA are to confirm their
satisfaction with the access statement and associated plans. A condition will
be attached to planning consent should the application be approved, requiring
“that at least 10% of the dwelling should be capable of being converted for
wheelchair access and that 100% of the dwellings should be built to meet
Lifetime Homes standards, unless otherwise agreed in writing by the Local
Planning Authority”. On this basis, the proposal is found to meet the aims of
the London Plan, SPG 2.3 and SPG3a.

9.11 Transportation – Traffic, Car Parking and Cycling

National planning policy seeks to reduce the dependence on the private car in
urban areas such as Haringey. The advice in both PPG3 Housing and PPG13
Transport make clear recommendations to this effect. This position is also
reflected in the London Plan. Unitary Development Plan Policy TSP 7.1 and
UD9 “Parking for Development” sets out the Councils requirements for parking
for this type of use.

A total of 68 parking bays are proposed. These bays would be on-street
parking (along the newly formed College Road) and represent 55% of the total
dwellings. These car-parking spaces would be accessed from Queen Street
only, since College Road would be one way.

Haringey Council – Transportation Team has accepted the applicant's
transport assessment report, which analysed the transport impact of this
development. The assessment report has shown that overall, this
development proposal would only generate a combined traffic inflow/outflow
increase of 17 and 21 vehicles in the a.m. and p.m. peak hours respectively,
over the existing situation. It is considered that these traffic flow rates area not
significant.

Since the public transport accessibility level for this site is low and taking into
account the associated parking demand as well as the need to minimise the
car parking impact on the adjoining highway network, the level of car parking
spaces proposed is deemed to be acceptable.

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Each residential unit includes secure internal cycle storage facilities, the
equivalent of one cycle space per unit. These standards conform to the
London Cycle Network Design Manual and are therefore welcomed by the
GLA. However, TFL through the GLA have recommended that cycle parking
provision be secured by a planning condition. In addition, a full Travel Plan will
be required by condition if planning consent is granted. On this basis, it is
considered that the proposal complies with PPG13 “Transportation” and
Unitary Development Plan policies TSP 7.1/UD9 “Parking for Development”.

9.12 Waste Management

The scheme has been design with a refuse management system that allows
for the external waste collection and the storage of recyclable waste products
(containers for glass, paper and cans). The Waste Management Team has
been involved in the consultation from the early stages. Extensive comments
and suggestions were put forward by the Waste Management Team at the
pre-application stage and subsequently incorporated into the final scheme
submitted as part of the application. Not withstanding this, the council will
condition any planning consent to require a detailed scheme for the provision
of refuse, waste storage and recycling within the site to be submitted to and
approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority prior to the
commencement of the works. In addition, such a scheme as approved, shall
be implemented and permanently retained thereafter to the satisfaction of the
Local Planning Authority. On this basis, the council finds the scheme
compliant with policy RIM 3.8 “Waste Management” and UD6 “Waste
Storage”.

9.13 Sustainability

PPS 1 advises that sustainable development is the core principle
underpinning planning. The guidance advises that, planning should promote
sustainable and inclusive patterns of urban development by:

   Ensuring that development supports existing communities and contributes
    to the creation of safe, sustainable, liveable and mixed communities with
    key services for all members of the community.

It is a requirement that a Sustainability Checklist (SC) accompany all major
planning applications. A comprehensive Sustainability Checklist has been
included with the application submission.

SC1    Air Quality

The scheme provides cycle storage for one bike per unit to encourage
alternatives to road vehicle use. All homes are designed to EcoHomes “very
good” standard.

SC2    Fumes/Light/Glare and Land Contamination


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Contamination - Geotechnical site survey has been undertaken without any
contentious issues arising. Nonetheless, Haringey Council – Environmental
Health has requested a condition be attached to planning consent to a site
investigation, detail of previous/present usage, risk assessment and details of
any remediation required.

All new street lighting will be selected to focus on the road surface and
minimise unnecessary light spillage and night sky pollution. All other external
lights will be controlled by movement sensors to minimise light pollution and
energy consumption.

SC3    Waste Storage and Recycling Facilities

Waste storage has been addressed in section 9.12 above.

SC4    Solar Design and Renewable Energy

The building is orientated on a east-west axis. The majority of units will be
south facing. All dwellings, except for the units on the northern corner of
College road and Queen Street will be dual aspect. As such, passive solar
design has been incorporated, in line with policy UD 1A “Sustainable Design
and Construction”.

The Greater London Authority (GLA) has been consulted on this scheme. The
GLA are keen for sustainability, particularly in relation to energy efficiency to
be incorporated into new developments. As such, they have requested that
the Local Planning Authority “impose a condition requiring the applicant to
carry out an energy demand assessment on the proposed college element
and submit a financial and technical feasibility study on incorporating
renewable energy technologies into the proposed design. This condition
should be carried out in consultation with and to the satisfaction of the GLA”.
In order to address the energy requirements set by the GLA specialist
consultants, Faber Maunsell and EDS have been employed. The Council will
attach a condition to meet the GLA requirements. On this basis, the proposal
is deemed to be in line with policy RIM 3.1 Energy Conservation and
Development, ENV 6 Energy Efficiency and ENV 6A Renewable Energy and
Mitigating Climate Change.

SC5    Efficient Use of Land and Buildings

The site is not within a „sensitive area‟ as defined in Regulation 2(1). The site
is not within a Conservation Area or an SSSI or National Park, Area of Natural
Beauty or World Heritage Site. The buildings on site are not listed building, of
national or local importance or of any particular architectural quality. As such
the demolition of the buildings on site is considered to be acceptable.

The proposed buildings will have much higher level of insulation and use
lower levels of energy than the existing buildings, which are to be demolished.

SC6    Sustainable Materials

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Where appropriate, demolition materials will be reused as hardcore and for
reshaping of gradients where necessary to minimise transfer of waste to
landfill sites. The residential buildings will avoid the use of harmful materials.
No insulants containing CFC‟s are to be used. All timber will be from managed
and sustainable sources and the use of PVC based materials will be
minimised, e.g. timber windows throughout.

SC7    Sustainable Drainage and Water Conservation

Dual flush WC‟s and spray taps will be used in bathrooms. Kitchen taps will
have mousseur aerators. Water butts will be considered for the collection of
rainwater for watering communal gardens.

Thames water have requested the following conditions be attached to any
planning consent:

"Development shall not commence until details of on site drainage works have
been submitted to, and approved by, the local planning authority in
consultation with the sewerage undertaker. No works which result in the
discharge of foul or surface water from the site shall be commenced until the
onsite drainage works referred to above have been completed"

Reason - To ensure that the foul and / or surface water discharge from the
site shall not be prejudicial to he existing sewerage system.

Development should not be commenced until: a) full details, including
anticipated flow rates, and detailed site plans have been submitted to, and
approved in writing by, the local planning authority (in consultation with
Thames Water) b) Where this development forms part of a larger
development, arrangements have been made to the satisfaction of the
Planning Authority (in consultation with Thames Water) for the provision of
adequate water supplies for the whole of the development.

Reason: To ensure that the water supply infrastructure has sufficient capacity
to cope with the/this additional demand.

Further the following informative will be attached:

Thames Water recognises the environmental and economic benefits of
surface water source control and encourages its appropriate application
where it is to the overall benefit of our customers. Hence, in the disposal of
surface water, Thames Water will recommend that the Applicant a) Looks to
ensure that new connections to the public sewerage system do not pose an
unacceptable threat of surcharge, flooding or pollution b) check the proposals
are in line with advice from the DETR which encourages, wherever
practicable, disposal on site without recourse to the public sewerage system -
for example in the form of soakaways or infiltration areas on free draining soils
c) looks to ensure the separation of foul and surface water sewerage on all
new developments.

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SC8   Trees and Landscape

A topographical survey and demolitions drawing is included within the
application. The existing mature trees where possible are to be retained.
Existing mature trees on the care home site will be maintained.

Haringey Council – Recreational Services (Borough Arboriculturalist) has
made the following comments:

Tree cover

There is good tree coverage across the whole site, consisting of many
different species, age classes and condition. However, a large percentage of
them are proposed for removal, many in a good condition.

Adjacent to the main entrance is a group of trees, of mixed species, including
Ash, Sycamore, False Acacia and Hawthorn. These trees are to be retained.
They are of significant amenity value forming a valuable green screen /
habitat.

Along the Eastern boundary is a group of mature Lime trees of high amenity
value.

Both of these groups of trees are worthy of Tree Preservation Orders.

Tree Protection

Tree protection measures, in line with BS5837: 1991 Trees in relation to
construction are necessary to prevent any damage to the trees to be retained
on site.

A specification for tree protection measures prepared by an Arboriculturist will
be required. This must include details of design, height and distances from
tree stems. A site plan illustrating this will also be required.

The tree protection measures must be implemented before any works are
carried out on site, and inspected by the Local Authority Arboriculturist.

Tree Planting / Replacements

Adequate replacement trees must be planted, as part of this development, to
ensure there is no loss in overall tree coverage. A landscaping proposal will
be required indicating how many trees are to be planted, their species and
size at time of planting.

Conclusions

The trees at the main entrance to the site and along the eastern boundary are
of high amenity value and worthy of Tree Preservation Orders (TPO's). An

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application will be made to the Planning department for two group TPO's. The
trees to be retained must be protected by strong robust fencing to ensure their
long-term health and their retention is successful.

An Arboricultural method statement must be produced specifying tree
protection measures and listing the chronology of events with regard to the
tree removals / construction process.

A landscaping proposal must be produced detailing new tree planting.

All tree felling must take into consideration nesting birds / bat roosts. All wild
birds and bats are protected under The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981,
damage to bird nests / bat roosts is a criminal offence.

SC9    Biodiversity

The site is not identified as being within a particular policy area or site specific
proposal area in the adopted UDP. The site is not a designated area of
ecological importance.

SC10 Listed Buildings and Locally Listed Buildings

The site does not contain any listed buildings. The site is not adjacent to any
listed buildings.

SC11 Conservation Areas and Other Built Heritage

An archaeological survey has been undertaken by the agents for the
applicant, without any contentious issues arising.

English Heritage – Archaeology Advisory Service have forwarded the
following comments on the proposal “In this instance, it is unlikely that
significant archaeological remains will be affected by the development
proposals. The site is considered to have a low archaeological potential, and
this will have been further compromised by the amount of truncation that will
have occurred during the construction of the present buildings. I am satisfied
that the proposals do not pose a significant threat to the archaeological
heritage, and consequently I would not advise that any archaeological
condition should be attached to Planning Approval for this current proposal
should planning permission be granted”.

SC12 Urban Design Quality, Views and Public Art

High quality and robust street furniture and materials; paving, tree grilles,
street lighting will be used throughout the new road. All boundaries to the
public realm will be metal railings or brick walls when abutting near gardens.
Semi-mature tree planting will be provided. Traffic in new access road will be
calmed to 10 miles per hour.

SC13 Designing Out Crime

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The layout creates a clearly defined hierarchy of defensible spaces, front
gardens and secure rear gardens.

The Crime prevention officer requests that the developer liases with the Crime
Prevention Department on 020 8345 2164 in order that crime prevention
measures can be included in the final scheme. We will make ourselves
available to meet with the developer or agent in order to promote measures to
“design out crime” and provide a safe, sustainable environment”.

SC14 Access by All

Site gradients will be adjusted to allow wheelchair access throughout. All
ground level entrances have level thresholds. All homes will be designed to
comply with Part M of the Building Regulations and will be to Lifetime Homes
Standards.

A condition will be attached to planning consent should the application be
approved, requiring “that at least 10% of the dwelling should be capable of
being converted for wheelchair access and that 100% of the dwellings should
be built to meet Lifetime Homes standards, unless otherwise agreed in writing
by the Local Planning Authority”.

SC15 Open Space

Amenity space is addressed in section 9.6 above.

SC16 Affordable Housing

Refer to 9.0 generally and specifically 9.8 above.

SC17 Education/Health

The sixth form centre is to provide an education facility for post 16 year olds.

SC18 Leisure and Culture

A sports hall, performing arts hall, amphitheatre and restaurants will be
provided with access to the community outside normal hours.

SC19 Local Shops/Services

The residents will utilise the existing services available and there will be
opportunities for new and improved services. Existing local services include
Irish Community Centre, Chemist, News Agents, Cafes, Take-away shops.

SC20 Jobs and Training




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The sixth form centre will provide 100 staff positions plus support staff. A
condition will be attached to planning consent requiring a percentage of local
labour be used during the construction phase.

SC21 Other Renewable Energy

A BREEAM assessment is to be undertaken during the detailed design stage.

SC22 Demand for Public Transport

Full details of transportation assessment are in section 8.4 above. A condition
will be attached to planning consent requiring a travel plan be submitted.

SC23 Major Trip Generating

Full details of transportation assessment are in section 8.4 above. A condition
will be attached to planning consent requiring a travel plan be submitted.

SC24 Environmental Impact Assessment

The site is not identified as being within a particular policy area relating to
biodiversity, ecological heritage or conservation.

On 28th June 2005, RPS, on behalf of the applicant requested a Screening
Opinion under Regulation 5(1) of the Town and Country Planning
(Environmental Impact Assessment) (England and Wales) Regulations 1999.

The Council provided a Schedule 2: Development Screening Opinion on 22 nd
July 2005. The Council, determined that, as Local Planning Authority, the
proposed development is not likely to have any significant effect on the
environment and will not require the submission of an Environmental Impact
Assessment under the terms of the Environmental Impact Regulations 1999.
The full screening opinion is attached in appendix 2.

SC25 Out of Town Centre

Not Applicable

SC26 Tall Buildings

Not Applicable

SC27 Crèche/Nurseries and Other Community Benefits

N/A




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10.0   Care Home

There are three issues to be addressed:

1.     Outline Application
2.     The Principle of Use
3.     Access to the Site

10.1 Outline Application

All matters, except for access, pertaining to this element of the application are
to be reserved for future determination. This third part of the application seeks
to establish the principle of a 70-bed care home for the elderly, frail elderly
and for those who suffer from dementia. This would be provided at the eastern
side of the site, within a site area of 0.29 hectares. Illustrative plans
demonstrating the type of 70-bed care home that could be accommodated on
the site are provided with the application submission.

10.2   The Principle of Use

The proposals map of the emerging Haringey Unitary Development Plan –
Deposit Consultation Draft 2004 allocates the application site as a “Site
Specific Proposal” (SSP3). Schedule 1 (page 186) of the Revised Deposit
Unitary Development Plan lists all the site-specific proposals. Site No. 3
comprises the application site. This designation confirms the site‟s allocation
for “Education” purposes.

The use as a University Campus has recently ceased. The land and buildings
are currently vacant.

Haringey Council – Children‟s Service have stated that “Following a series of
negotiations with the new owners of the land…the council has purchased a
proportion of the former Middlesex University site. The land purchased is
sufficient for the Council to develop the new Sixth Form Centre. The
Architects representing the Council and [the developer] have worked together
to produce an integrated design for this site”. As such, the entire former
Middlesex University site is not required for educational purposes, therefore a
non-educational use on the part of the site is considered to be appropriate in
principle.

The scheme should then be assessed against policy CSF 2.4 “Surplus
Educational Land or Buildings”. This policy states that “where educational
sites or premises are no longer required for education purposes, the Council
will allocate alternative uses to them, taking into account the nature of the site,
the policies of this Plan and the views of local residents”. “Educational
properties are a community resources and, if they are no longer required for
educational or training purposes, an alternative use that benefits the local
community should be sought wherever possible”.



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The London Plan states that adequate provision for social infrastructure and
community facilities should be ensured in accordance with policy 3A.16. This
includes services for older people.

Policy HSG 2.17 “Provision of Residential Care and Nursing Homes (Class
C2)” and HSG 2.18 “Location of Residential Care and Nursing Homes (Class
C2)” asserts that in considering applications for residential care and nursing
homes, the Council will have regard to their geographical distribution
throughout the borough. Where an undue concentration exists, which creates
local amenity problems the Council may refuse application for further homes
in the area. Conversely, more favourable considerations will be given to
proposals for residential care or nursing homes in areas with deficient
provision.

Policy HSG 7 “Housing For Special Needs” provides advice in respect of
housing for special needs. It advises that the Council will support applications
for housing developments that meet specific housing needs within the
borough including residential care and nursing homes.

The applicants state that the minimum viable number of bed spaces in an
elderly care home is approximately 60 due to revenue funding. The
application seeks to establish the principle of a 70-bed space care home. If
the principle is acceptable, the precise layout would be a reserved matter but
at present, it is anticipated that the care home would be based on the „cluster
model‟, where groups of bedrooms are arranged together, share communal
facilities, with approximately on member of staff for every five residents.

Haringey Council – Social Service have confirmed their support for the
scheme. Social Service has no objection to the proposed care home and
consider that this use provides for local need. As such, Haringey Council –
Social Services, would encourage the provision of an aged–care home in this
area provided the quality of accommodation was of a high standard.

The use of the site as a Care Home for the elderly is considered to be
acceptable in principle. The Council acknowledges that the site can make a
contribution to providing housing for special needs. The principle of
redeveloping the 0.29-hectare site for a Care Home is in line with The London
Plan and policy HSG 2.17, HSG 2.18 and HSG7 of the Unitary Development
Plans (1998) and The Haringey Unitary Development Plan - Second Deposit
(2004).

10.3   Access to the Site

The access to the proposed care home would be from College Road. This
access point is considered to provide a suitable access to the care home site
without prejudicing the free-flow of traffic or highway safety and would not be
out of keeping with the character of the area. As such the proposed access is
found to be in line with the requirements of policy TSP 7.6 “Means of Access
and Crossovers”.


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11.0 Community Consultation

A Development Control Forum was held on 31st August 2005 at the Irish
Community Centre, Pretoria Road, N17. The minutes from the Forum are
attached in Appendix 1. The council undertook extensive community
consultation as part of the application process. A full list of all properties
consulted is contained within section 4.0. Local residents responded with 3
letters, raising the following grounds of objection:

1. Mix of Use Inappropriate - This ground of objection is addressed in section
   7.1 “Principle of Mixed Use”.

2. Overdevelopment of Site - This ground of objection is addressed in section
   8.2 “Scale, Height and Massing”, 9.2 “Density”, 9.3 “Scale, Height and
   Massing”, 9.4 “Privacy and Amenity”.

3. Middlesex University Building worthy of retention - This ground of objection
   is addressed in section 8.6 and 9.13 “Sustainability”, specifically SC5.

4. Duplication of services throughout the borough - This ground of objection
   is addressed in section 7.1 “Principle of Mixed Use”.

5. Traffic and Parking problems exacerbated - This ground of objection is
   addressed in section 8.4 and 9.11 “Transportation – Access, Traffic, Car
   Parking and Cycling”.

6. Height of buildings impact on privacy of adjacent residential properties -
   This ground of objection is addressed in section 8.2 “Scale, Height and
   Massing”, 9.3 “Scale, Height and Massing” and 9.4 “Privacy and Amenity”.

7. Environmental Impacts - This ground of objection is addressed in section
   8.6 and 9.13 “Sustainability”

8. Fencing, 2.4m high – impact on amenity of area - This ground of objection
   is addressed in section 8.3 “Design”

9. Loss of open character of the existing site - This ground of objection is
   addressed in section 9.6 “Open Space and Amenity”

10. Housing mix and tenure mix inappropriate - This ground of objection is
    addressed in section 9.7 “Dwelling Mix” and 9.8 “Affordable Housing”.

11. Pressure on existing services - This ground can be dealt with in part
   through s106 contributions




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12.0 GREATER LONDON AUTHORITY

Haringey Council consulted the Mayor of London on this planning application.
On the 21st September 2005, the Mayor considered a report on this proposal
(Ref: PDU1277/01). A copy of the full report is attached in appendix 3.

Having considered the report, the Mayor has concluded that the proposed
mixed scheme meets a number of strategic policy objectives, particularly as
the proposal enables the safeguarding of part of the site for educational
purposes and would deliver 100% affordable housing. There remain however,
a number of matters of strategic importance to the Mayor that need to be
addressed. These matters include:

1. Haringey Council should ensure that it is satisfied with the
   proposal’s urban design, particularly with a focus on safety and
   whether the building fits comfortably within its context, or creates its
   own. The spaces in and around the site need more careful
   consideration.

   The design philosophy for the Sixth Form Centre is to create a local
   distinctive „international‟ style while remaining in keeping with the massing
   of proposed and neighbouring buildings. The perspective views included in
   the application serve to demonstrate the concept of the general massing of
   the proposed Sixth Form Centre but do not accurately indicate the
   fenestration to the facades. Reference should be made to the detailed
   plans and elevations.

   The college has been designed in a series of pavilions as an expression of
   the various curriculum study areas contained within. The specialist high
   profile curriculum areas, namely Hospitality and Catering, Performing Arts
   and Sports, which all offer out of normal college hours services to the local
   community, have been strategically located at prime locations on both
   main boundaries of the site to promote their individual presence and
   interactive functions while maximising opportunities for natural surveillance
   on both boundaries.

   The Curriculum for general teaching studies is housed in the linear
   northern pavilion fronting College road and shares mutual aspect to both
   the new road link from College road to Queen Road and the secure
   landscaped gardens. This pavilion is set back from the new road link to
   respect and not inhibit the proposed housing development opposite. This
   also provides the opportunity to locate all staff car parking on the northern
   boundary adjacent to the „on-road parking‟ serving the housing
   development and diverting traffic away from the predominantly congested
   White Hart Lane.

   The curriculum area of Hospitality and Catering and associated main
   college refectory is awarded a prominent position on the White Hart Lane
   frontage, adjacent to the main entrance, with a generous and transparent
   visual connection to the White Hart Lane street scene. The main

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   restaurant, refectory and café bar areas are outward looking onto the main
   entrance piazza with a generous, and solar protected, glazed facade. With
   reference to viewpoint 02 indicating a predominantly blank west façade,
   we propose to improve this connection to the street scene through
   amendments to this west façade of the pavilion by incorporating additional
   glazed elements to the refectory. This will also serve to enhance the
   notion of natural surveillance to the adjacent cycle compound area.

   The main grande entrance hall, as well as binding the entire development
   together, links the two prime functions, Performing Arts and Hospitality and
   Catering, at the front end of the building providing a fluid interconnection
   which will be highly visible from the piazza and general street scene
   particularly during evening hours. The use of external lighting together with
   the general transparency of the White Hart Lane façade and out of hours
   access will enhance the opportunities for natural surveillance at this
   boundary. The frugal use of security fencing on this primary „shop window‟
   façade will also achieve the notion of a „less defensive‟ and therefore
   welcoming social environment at the main entrance.

   The visual interest of the White Hart Lane frontage is enhanced with the
   presence of the covered amphitheatre which will provide both architectural
   interest and visual status to the Performing Arts pavilion, whilst providing a
   unique facility in the borough.

   The scheme in general has been designed to provide a secure and safe
   environment both within and around the site. The two secure gardens
   dedicated to student use are overlooked by the surrounding pavilions on at
   least three sides. The cycle compound, service yard, staff and visitors
   parking are all secured with fencing. All students and visitors will enter and
   leave via the front door ensuring that movement through the site is
   governed only by the control measures provided in the central hall. The
   central gardens will provide the mechanism for external movement within
   the site.

   The irregularities of the site boundary has resulted in pockets of site which
   are to be landscaped for specific use. The single storey crèche is located
   to the west boundary and will enjoy south facing dedicated gardens and
   play area. This particular area of site has limited development potential
   due to the proximity of neighbouring and proposed residential buildings
   and ideally serves this function.

2. The applicant needs to demonstrate that the residential element
   offers housing choice in terms of mix of bedroom sizes.
   Strategically, a higher proportion of 3 and 4-bedroom dwellings are
   preferred. A revisit of the housing mix is requested unless adequate
   justification is given.

   The Housing Service has been fully consulted and involved in the
   residential element of Middlesex University proposals, we are therefore
   fully supportive of the proposals. Concluding the scheme mix, tenure split

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   and required funding levels. The Housing Corporation has been fully
   informed and is also supporting the proposals.

   On the issue of the number of 3& 4 bed units the Housing service has
   satisfied itself that the schemes underlying viability would be damaged if
   further larger units were to be sought from the developers. Further, the
   Housing Service views these proposals in it's entirety and notes that the
   scheme provides for a 100% affordable housing provision on the site
   rather than the 50% we would seek under current planning policy.

3. An access statement should be submitted. This should include a
   statement committing to the provision of 100% lifetime homes
   standard and 10% accessible/adaptable housing. A marked-up plan
   should be submitted illustrating how wheelchair users, disabled
   people and people with mobility impairments could move around the
   site and access all buildings and public transport.

   An access statement has been submitted to the GLA, along with access
   diagram, wheelchair housing provision diagram. The GLA are to confirm
   their satisfaction with the access statement and associated plans. A
   condition will be attached to planning consent should the application be
   approved, requiring that “At least 10% of the dwelling should be capable of
   being converted for wheelchair access and that 100% of the dwellings
   should be built to meet Lifetime Homes standards, unless otherwise
   agreed in writing by the Local Planning Authority”.

4. The proposal has the potential to impact on the three key strategic
   transport routes (A406, A10 and the A1010). Further information
   regarding trip rates for public transport, details of modal share, and
   more information regarding traffic generation on the surrounding
   roads is requested.

   On going discussions are taking place between the agent and Transport
   for London to address these transportation concerns.

5. TfL requests that Haringey Council imposes a condition to require
   the applicant to prepare a travel plan for each component of the
   development, as well as a condition securing the provision of
   adequate cycle parking.

   A Travel Plan for each individual element of the scheme is a condition of
   planning consent should the application be granted planning permission.

6. An assessment of the impact of the proposals on the existing and
   new communities should be undertaken. This is particularly relevant
   because of the introduction of increased affordable housing in an
   area with a high concentration of social-rent accommodation. Where
   necessary, these impacts could be addressed by planning
   contributions and investing in existing facilities and services.

   Assessment to be provided by the applicant.

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7. Initiatives to create training and employment opportunities for local
   people and to address other barriers to employment (e.g. childcare)
   should also be included. Haringey Council should also ensure the
   employment of local people during the construction and on-going
   operation of the older persons care home and college in the
   development.

   The use of local labour and training provision, through Construction Web,
   is to be contained within the section 106 legal agreement.

   Further information (as outlined in the report PDU/1277/01) should be
   submitted to demonstrate consistency with the Mayor’s energy
   policies (4A.7-4A.9).

   The following condition will be attached:

   1. No development shall commence until 2) and 3) are carried out to the
      approval of LB Haringey and the Greater London Authority.

   2. The Applicant will submit a site-wide energy strategy for the proposed
      development. This strategy must meet the following criteria:

         a. Inclusion of a site-wide energy use assessment showing
            projected annual demands for thermal (including heating and
            cooling) and electrical energy, based on contemporaneous
            building regulations minimum standards. The assessment must
            show the carbon emissions resulting from the projected energy
            consumption.

         b. Explanation of how total energy demand will be reduced by 20%
            relative to the baseline developed in b), through improvements
            to building energy efficiency standards. Calculation of the
            resulting carbon savings.

         c. The strategy must examine the potential use of CHP to supply
            thermal and electrical energy to the site. The scale of the CHP
            generation and distribution infrastructure to be determined
            through agreed feasibility studies. Resulting carbon savings to
            be calculated.

         d. Inclusion of onsite renewable energy generation to reduce the
            remaining carbon emissions (i.e. after b. and c. are accounted
            for) by 10% subject to feasibility studies carried out to the
            approval of LB Haringey and the Greater London Authority.

   3. All reserved matters applications must contain an energy statement
      demonstrating consistency with the site wide energy strategy
      developed in 2). Consistency to be approved by LB Haringey and the
      Greater London Authority prior to the commencement of development.


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13.0 SECTION 106 CONTRIBUTIONS

The application is subject to a legal agreement as required by SPG10 “The
Negotiation, Management and Monitoring of Planning Obligations”.

Affordable Housing

A planning obligation agreement would be required to ensure that the
dwellings provided continue to be available as affordable housing for
successive occupiers. SPG 10a “Affordable Housing” sets out the specific
requirement for affordable housing in schemes over 10 units. This proposal
falls within this criterion and proposes that all the units are affordable with a
tenure split of 40% social renting and 60% shared ownership. This is
considered acceptable within the guidance contained in SPG 11 and is in line
with the Guidelines being pursued by the Housing Corporation.

Environmental Infrastructure

Environmental infrastructure contributions set at £330, 000.

Cost Recovery

Cost Recovery contributions are set at £20,000.

14.0   SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

The proposal is submitted as a hybrid application comprising three separate
elements, viz:

1. The Sixth Form Centre

The Sixth Form Centre occupies the majority of the site, covering some 1.61
hectares of the total 2.85 hectares. The centre would provide post-16 year
education. The building would cater for up to 1200 students and up to 100
staff and support. The Centre would provide facilities for a broad curriculum
including Performing Arts, Hospitality and Catering, Sports Development and
Fitness, Media Production and Music, Business Studies and ICT. This
element of the application is submitted in full.

The primary access to the sixth form centre would be from White Hart Lane. A
secondary entrance would be available from College Road, which is to be
extended through to Queen Street. A total of 98 car-parking spaces would be
provided with access from College Road.

2. Residential Units

123 residential units are proposed, providing a mix of 42 x 1 bedroom, 67 x 2
bedroom, 13 x 3 bedroom and 1 x 4 bedroom units situated to the north of the
site. The residential units would cover 0.95 hectares of the 2.85-hectare site.


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All 123 units would be affordable housing. The 123 units would provide a
60/40 percent split between intermediate housing (shared equity and key
worker) and social rented. A total of 68 parking bays are proposed. This
element of the application is submitted in full.

3. Care Home

A 70-bed care home for the elderly, frail elderly and for those who suffer from
dementia would be located at the easterly side of the site and would cover an
area of 0.29 hectares. Illustrative plans demonstrating the type of care home
that could be accommodated on site are provided with the application. All
other matters pertaining to this application, except for access, are to be
reserved for future determination.

The scheme includes important new facilities and represents a significant
investment for the borough as a whole, providing a much needed new
educational facility for 16-18 year olds offering a broad range of opportunities
and interests, and 123 new affordable homes for both shared ownership and
rent.

The proposal is subject to a S106 agreement to provide:

   affordable housing
   local labour agreement
   first right of refusal for bed spaces in care home
   £330,000 contribution for environmental infrastructure
    £20,000 cost recovery

The scheme has been assessed against the relevant national, regional and
local policies and has been referred to the Greater London Authority for
direction as required by the Regulations. The scheme is considered to meet
the requirements of the relevant policies and appropriate conditions are
attached where necessary to ensure the scheme complies with these
requirements. On this basis, it is recommended that planning permission be
GRANTED subject to conditions and section 106 legal agreement.

15.0   RECOMMENDATION

GRANT PERMISSION subject to conditions & subject to section 106 Legal
Agreement

Registered No: HGY/2005/1439
Applicant‟s drawing No‟s:

6th Form Centre: 1204/100; 110; 111; 112; 113; 114; 120; 121; 122; 130;
131; 140; 141; 142; 143; 144; 145;

Residential Units: A4350/ 2.1/001; 2.1/010; 2.1/020RevA; 2.1/021;
2.1/100RevB; 2.1/101RevA; 2.1/102RevA; 2.1/103RevA; 2.1/200RevA;
2.1/201RevA; 2.1/500 (Last Date Amended: 19/09/2005)
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Subject to the following conditions:

16.0 Conditions:

Residential

The following conditions (LIST) relate to the residential element of the
development:

R1.    EXPIRATION OF PERMISSION

       The development hereby authorised must be begun not later than the
       expiration of 3 years from the date of this permission, failing which the
       permission shall be of no effect.

       Reason: This condition is imposed by virtue of the provisions of the
       Planning & Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 and to prevent the
       accumulation of unimplemented planning permissions.

R2.    IN ACCORDANCE WITH APPROVED PLANS

       The development hereby authorised shall be carried out in complete
       accordance with the plans and specifications submitted to, and
       approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority.

       Reason: In order to ensure the development is carried out in
       accordance with the approved details and in the interests of amenity.

R3.    TOTAL SEPARATE UNITS

       That not more than 123 separate units, whether flats or houses, shall
       be constructed on the site.

       Reason: In order to avoid overdevelopment of the site.

R4.    At least 10% of the dwelling should be capable of being converted for
       wheelchair access and that 100% of the dwellings should be built to
       meet Lifetime Homes standards, unless otherwise agreed in writing by
       the Local Planning Authority.

       Reason: In order to ensure adequate accessibility for disabled and
       mobility impaired throughout their lifetime.

R5.    BUILDING SAMPLES

       Samples of all materials to be used for the external surfaces of the
       development shall be submitted to, and approved in writing by, the
       Local Planning Authority before any development is commenced.
       Samples should include sample panels or brick types and a roofing


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      material sample combined with a schedule of the exact product
      references.

      Reason: In order for the Local Planning Authority to retain control over
      the exact materials to be used for the proposed development and to
      assess the suitability of the samples submitted in the interests of visual
      amenity.

R6.   CRIME PREVENTION - SECURED BY DESIGN

      The development hereby authorised shall comply with BS 8220 (1986)
      Part 1, 'Security Of Residential Buildings' and comply with the aims and
      objectives of the police requirement of 'Secured By Design' and
      'Designing Out Crime' principles.

      Reason: In order to ensure that the proposed development achieves
      the required crime prevention elements as detailed by Circular 5/94
      'Planning Out Crime'.

R7.   CENTRAL AERIAL SYSTEM

      The proposed development shall have no more than 4 central
      dishes/aerial systems for receiving all broadcasts for all the residential
      units created, details of such a scheme shall be submitted to and
      approved by the Local Planning Authority prior to the occupation of the
      property and the approved scheme shall be implemented and
      permanently retained thereafter.

      Reason: In order to protect the visual amenities of the neighbourhood.

R8.   DETAILS STORAGE/COLLECTION OF REFUSE

      That a detailed scheme for the provision of refuse, waste storage and
      recycling within the site shall be submitted to and approved in writing
      by the Local Planning Authority prior to the commencement of the
      works. Such a scheme as approved shall be implemented and
      permanently retained thereafter to the satisfaction of the Local Planning
      Authority.

      Reason: In order to protect the amenities of the locality.

R9.   TRAVEL PLAN

      A Travel Plan shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the
      Local Transportation Planning Authority.

      Reason: In order to minimise the traffic impact on the adjoining
      highway network.

R10. PARKING MAINTAINED

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     That the accommodation for car parking and/or loading and unloading
     facilities be specifically submitted to, approved in writing by and
     implemented in accordance with the requirements of the Local
     Planning Authority before the occupation of the building and
     commencement of the use; that accommodation to be permanently
     retained for the accommodation of vehicles of the occupiers, users of,
     or persons calling at the premises and shall not be used for any other
     purposes.

     Reason: In order to ensure that the proposed development does not
     prejudice the free flow of traffic or the conditions of general safety along
     the neighbouring highway.

R11. CYCLE PARKING CONDITION

     That details of secure, covered parking spaces for 123 bicycles shall be
     submitted to, and approved in writing by, the Local Planning Authority
     prior to the development hereby approved being commenced.

     Reason: to ensure adequate provision of cycle parking within the
     scheme.

R12. SITE INVESTIGATION

     A full site investigation, history, details of previous and present usage,
     risk assessment and details of any remediation required should be
     submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority
     before works may commence onsite.

     Reason: In order to protect the health of future occupants of the site.

R13. SOIL CONTAMINATION

     A site history and soil contamination report shall be prepared;
     submitted to the Local Planning Authority and approved before any
     works may commence on site.

     Reason: In order to protect the health of future occupants of the site.

R14. LEVELS AND THRESHOLDS

     That the levels of all thresholds and details of boundary treatment be
     submitted to and approved by the Local Planning Authority.

     Reason: In order to safeguard the visual amenity of the area and to
     ensure adequate means of enclosure for the proposed development.

R15. EXISTING TREES – NO UNAUTHORISED WORKS


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    Other than those trees consented for removal, the existing trees on the
    site shall not be lopped, felled or otherwise affected in any way
    (including raising and lowering soil levels under the crown spread of the
    trees) and no excavation shall be cut under the crown spread of the
    trees without the prior written permission of the Local Planning
    Authority.

    Reason: In order to safeguard the trees in the interest of visual amenity
    of the area.

R16. TREES – EXCLUSION FENCING

    Before any works herein permitted are commenced, all those trees to
    be retained, as indicated on the approved drawings, shall be protected
    by secure, stout, exclusion fencing erected at a minimum distance
    equivalent to the branch spread of the trees and in accordance with BS
    5837:1980 and to a suitable height. Any works connected with the
    approved scheme within the branch spread of the trees shall be by
    hand only. No storage of materials, supplies or plant machinery shall
    be stored, parked, or allowed access beneath the branch spread of the
    trees or within the exclusion fencing.

    Reason: In order to ensure the safety and well being of the trees on the
    site during constructional works that are to remain after building works
    are completed.

R17. LANDSCAPING SCHEME TO BE APPROVED

    Notwithstanding the details of landscaping referred to in the application,
    a scheme for the landscaping and treatment of the surroundings of the
    proposed development to include detailed drawings of those existing
    trees to be retained, those existing trees to be removed and those new
    trees and shrubs to be planted together with a schedule of species
    shall be submitted to, and approved in writing by, the Local Planning
    Authority prior to the commencement of the development. Such an
    approved scheme of planting, seeding or turfing comprised in the
    approved details of landscaping shall be carried out and implemented
    in strict accordance with the approved details in the first planting and
    seeding season following the occupation of the building or the
    completion of development (whichever is sooner). Any trees or plants,
    either existing or proposed, which, within a period of five years from the
    completion of the development die, are removed, become damaged or
    diseased shall be replaced in the next planting season with a similar
    size and species. The landscaping scheme, once implemented, is to
    be maintained and retained thereafter to the satisfaction of the Local
    Planning Authority.

    Reason: In order for the Local Authority to assess the acceptability of
    any landscaping scheme in relation to the site itself, thereby ensuring a


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     satisfactory setting for the proposed development in the interests of the
     visual amenity of the area.

R18. ENERGY

     No development shall commence until 2) and 3) are carried out to the
     approval of LB Haringey and the Greater London Authority.

1.   The Applicant will submit a site-wide energy strategy for the proposed
     development. This strategy must meet the following criteria:

2.
        a) Inclusion of a site-wide energy use assessment showing
           projected annual demands for thermal (including heating and
           cooling) and electrical energy, based on contemporaneous
           building regulations minimum standards. The assessment must
           show the carbon emissions resulting from the projected energy
           consumption.

        b) Explanation of how total energy demand will be reduced by 20%
           relative to the baseline developed in b), through improvements
           to building energy efficiency standards. Calculation of the
           resulting carbon savings.

        c) The strategy must examine the potential use of CHP to supply
           thermal and electrical energy to the site. The scale of the CHP
           generation and distribution infrastructure to be determined
           through agreed feasibility studies. Resulting carbon savings to
           be calculated.

        d) Inclusion of onsite renewable energy generation to reduce the
           remaining carbon emissions (ie after b. and c. are accounted for)
           by 10% subject to feasibility studies carried out to the approval
           of LB Haringey and the Greater London Authority.

3.   All reserved matters applications must contain an energy statement
     demonstrating consistency with the site wide energy strategy
     developed in 2). Consistency to be approved by LB Haringey and the
     Greater London Authority prior to the commencement of development.

R19. DRAINAGE WORKS

     Details of on site drainage works to be submitted to, and approved by,
     the local planning authority in consultation with the sewerage
     undertaker. No works which result in the discharge of foul or surface
     water from the site shall be commenced until the onsite drainage works
     referred to above have been completed"

     Reason - To ensure that the foul and / or surface water discharge from
     the site shall not be prejudicial to the existing sewerage system.

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R20. FLOW RATES

     a) Full details, including anticipated flow rates, and detailed site plans
     have been submitted to, and approved in writing by, the local planning
     authority (in consultation with Thames Water)
     b) Where this development forms part of a larger development,
     arrangements must be made to the satisfaction of the Planning
     Authority (in consultation with Thames Water) for the provision of
     adequate water supplies for the whole of the development.

     Reason: To ensure that the water supply infrastructure has sufficient
     capacity to cope with the/this additional demand.

R21. HARD LANDSCAPING

     Details of a scheme depicting those areas to be treated by means of
     hard landscaping shall be submitted to, approved in writing by, and
     implemented in accordance with the approved details. Such a scheme
     to include a detailed drawing of those areas of the development to be
     so treated, a schedule of proposed materials and samples to be
     submitted for written approval on request from the Local Planning
     Authority.

     Reason: In order to ensure the development has satisfactory
     landscaped areas in the interests of the visual amenity of the area.

R22. CONSTRUCTION WORKS - HOURS

     The construction works of the development hereby granted shall not be
     carried out before 0800 or after 1800 hours Monday to Friday or before
     0800 or after 1200 hours on Saturday and not at all on Sundays or
     Bank Holidays.

     Reason: In order to ensure that the proposal does not prejudice the
     enjoyment of neighbouring occupiers of their properties.

R23. ROUTING OF LORRIES

     That a routing of lorries delivering plant or materials will only use
     designated road agreed in advance with the Local Planning Authority

     Reason: To minimise the impact of lorry traffic in local residential roads.

R24. UN/LOADING WITHIN THE BUILDING SITE

     Vehicles may arrive, depart, be loaded or unloaded within the general
     area of the application site only between 08000 hours and 1800 hours
     Monday to Friday and 1000 hours and 1600 hours Saturday and not at
     all on Sunday or Bank Holidays.


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      Reason: In order to ensure that the proposed development does not
      prejudice the free flow of traffic or the conditions of general safety along
      the neighbouring highway.

      Education

The following conditions (LIST) relate to the education element of the
development

E1.   EXPIRATION OF PERMISSION

      The development hereby authorised must be begun not later than the
      expiration of 3 years from the date of this permission, failing which the
      permission shall be of no effect.

      Reason: This condition is imposed by virtue of the provisions of the
      Planning & Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 and to prevent the
      accumulation of unimplemented planning permissions.

E2.   IN ACCORDANCE WITH APPROVED PLANS

      The development hereby authorised shall be carried out in complete
      accordance with the plans and specifications submitted to, and
      approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority.

      Reason: In order to ensure the development is carried out in
      accordance with the approved details and in the interests of amenity.

E3.   BUILDING SAMPLES

      Samples of all materials to be used for the external surfaces of the
      development shall be submitted to, and approved in writing by, the
      Local Planning Authority before any development is commenced.
      Samples should include sample panels or brick types and a roofing
      material sample combined with a schedule of the exact product
      references.

      Reason: In order for the Local Planning Authority to retain control over
      the exact materials to be used for the proposed development and to
      assess the suitability of the samples submitted in the interests of visual
      amenity.

E4.   HOURS OF OPERATION

      That the sixth form centre hearby approved shall not be used before
      the hours of 0700 or after 2200 hours Monday to Friday, before 0800
      hours or after 1800 hours Saturdays and not at all on Sundays and
      Bank Holidays.



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      Reason: In order to protect the amenities of adjoining residential
      properties.

E5.   DETAILS STORAGE/COLLECTION OF REFUSE

      That a detailed scheme for the provision of refuse, waste storage and
      recycling within the site shall be submitted to and approved in writing
      by the Local Planning Authority prior to the commencement of the
      works. Such a scheme as approved shall be implemented and
      permanently retained thereafter to the satisfaction of the Local Planning
      Authority.

      Reason: In order to protect the amenities of the locality.

E6.   CENTRAL AERIAL SYSTEM

      The proposed development shall have no more than 4 central
      dishes/aerial systems for receiving all broadcasts for all the residential
      units created, details of such a scheme shall be submitted to and
      approved by the Local Planning Authority prior to the occupation of the
      property and the approved scheme shall be implemented and
      permanently retained thereafter.

      Reason: In order to protect the visual amenities of the neighbourhood.

E7.   EXTRACT FAN

      The extract fan shall be mounted with flexible connections and
      installed, together with any associated ducting, so as to prevent the
      transmission of noise and vibration into any neighbouring premises.

      Reason: In order that the proposed development does not prejudice the
      enjoyment by neighbouring occupiers of their property.

E8.   ENERGY

      No development shall commence until 2) and 3) are carried out to the
      approval of LB Haringey and the Greater London Authority.

1.    The Applicant will submit a site-wide energy strategy for the proposed
      development. This strategy must meet the following criteria:

         a) Inclusion of a site-wide energy use assessment showing
            projected annual demands for thermal (including heating and
            cooling) and electrical energy, based on contemporaneous
            building regulations minimum standards. The assessment must
            show the carbon emissions resulting from the projected energy
            consumption.



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         b) Explanation of how total energy demand will be reduced by 20%
            relative to the baseline developed in b), through improvements
            to building energy efficiency standards. Calculation of the
            resulting carbon savings.

         c) The strategy must examine the potential use of CHP to supply
            thermal and electrical energy to the site. The scale of the CHP
            generation and distribution infrastructure to be determined
            through agreed feasibility studies. Resulting carbon savings to
            be calculated.

         d) Inclusion of onsite renewable energy generation to reduce the
            remaining carbon emissions (ie after b. and c. are accounted for)
            by 10% subject to feasibility studies carried out to the approval
            of LB Haringey and the Greater London Authority.

3.    All reserved matters applications must contain an energy statement
      demonstrating consistency with the site wide energy strategy
      developed in 2). Consistency to be approved by LB Haringey and the
      Greater London Authority prior to the commencement of development.

E7.   DRAINAGE WORKS

      Details of on site drainage works to be submitted to, and approved by,
      the local planning authority in consultation with the sewerage
      undertaker. No works which result in the discharge of foul or surface
      water from the site shall be commenced until the onsite drainage works
      referred to above have been completed"

      Reason - To ensure that the foul and / or surface water discharge from
      the site shall not be prejudicial to the existing sewerage system.

E8.   FLOW RATES

      a) Full details, including anticipated flow rates, and detailed site plans
      have been submitted to, and approved in writing by, the local planning
      authority (in consultation with Thames Water)
      b) Where this development forms part of a larger development,
      arrangements must be made to the satisfaction of the Planning
      Authority (in consultation with Thames Water) for the provision of
      adequate water supplies for the whole of the development.

      Reason: To ensure that the water supply infrastructure has sufficient
      capacity to cope with the/this additional demand.

E7.   TRAVEL PLAN

      A Travel Plan shall be submitted to and approved in writing by the
      Local Transportation Planning Authority.


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      Reason: In order to minimise the traffic impact on the adjoining
      highway network.

E8.   PARKING REQUIRED - OUTLINE

      Adequate turning space, circulation space and parking accommodation
      in accordance with the standard adopted by the Local Planning
      Authority shall be constructed within the curtilage of the building to the
      satisfaction of and in accordance with details to be submitted to and
      approved by the Local Planning Authority and shall be retained to the
      satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority.

      Reason: In order to ensure that the proposed development does not
      prejudice the free flow of traffic or the conditions of general safety along
      the neighbouring highway.

E9.   PARKING – LOADING/UNDLOADING PROVISION

      98 spaces shall be provided within the site (as shown on the plan
      attached) for loading, unloading and parking of vehicles.

      Reason: In order to enable vehicles using the site to stand clear of the
      highway in the interests of road safety

E10. PARKING FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

      That 11 wider parking spaces be provided and permanently maintained
      close to the main entrance of the proposed development for people
      with disabilities.

      Reason: In order to ensure that people with disabilities are not
      excluded from using the proposed development, pursuant to Policy

E11. RETAIN ACCESS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

      Adequate facilities should be maintained in accordance with the details
      indicated on the approved drawings, to enable ambulant and
      wheelchair bound people with disabilities to use the building.

      Reason: In order to secure the satisfactory provision of facilities and
      access for people with disabilities.

E12. SITE INVESTIGATION

      A full site investigation, history, details of previous and present usage,
      risk assessment and details of any remediation required should be
      submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority
      before works may commence onsite.

      Reason: In order to protect the health of future occupants of the site.

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E13. CYCLE PARKING CONDITION

    That details of secure, covered parking spaces for 200 bicycles shall be
    submitted to, and approved in writing by, the Local Planning Authority
    prior to the development hereby approved being commenced.

    Reason: to ensure adequate provision of cycle parking within the
    scheme.

E13. SOIL CONTAMINATION

    A site history and soil contamination report shall be prepared;
    submitted to the Local Planning Authority and approved before any
    works may commence on site.

    Reason: In order to protect the health of future occupants of the site.

E14. LEVELS AND THRESHOLDS

    That the levels of all thresholds and details of boundary treatment be
    submitted to and approved by the Local Planning Authority.

    Reason: In order to safeguard the visual amenity of the area and to
    ensure adequate means of enclosure for the proposed development.

E15. LANDSCAPING SCHEME TO BE APPROVED

    Notwithstanding the details of landscaping referred to in the application,
    a scheme for the landscaping and treatment of the surroundings of the
    proposed development to include detailed drawings of those existing
    trees to be retained, those existing trees to be removed and those new
    trees and shrubs to be planted together with a schedule of species
    shall be submitted to, and approved in writing by, the Local Planning
    Authority prior to the commencement of the development. Such an
    approved scheme of planting, seeding or turfing comprised in the
    approved details of landscaping shall be carried out and implemented
    in strict accordance with the approved details in the first planting and
    seeding season following the occupation of the building or the
    completion of development (whichever is sooner). Any trees or plants,
    either existing or proposed, which, within a period of five years from the
    completion of the development die, are removed, become damaged or
    diseased shall be replaced in the next planting season with a similar
    size and species. The landscaping scheme, once implemented, is to
    be maintained and retained thereafter to the satisfaction of the Local
    Planning Authority.

    Reason: In order for the Local Authority to assess the acceptability of
    any landscaping scheme in relation to the site itself, thereby ensuring a


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    satisfactory setting for the proposed development in the interests of the
    visual amenity of the area.

E16. HARD LANDSCAPING

    Details of a scheme depicting those areas to be treated by means of
    hard landscaping shall be submitted to, approved in writing by, and
    implemented in accordance with the approved details. Such a scheme
    to include a detailed drawing of those areas of the development to be
    so treated, a schedule of proposed materials and samples to be
    submitted for written approval on request from the Local Planning
    Authority.

    Reason: In order to ensure the development has satisfactory
    landscaped areas in the interests of the visual amenity of the area.

E17. TREES – NO UNAUTHORISED WORKS

    Other than those trees consented for removal, the existing trees on the
    site shall not be lopped, felled or otherwise affected in any way
    (including raising and lowering soil levels under the crown spread of the
    trees) and no excavation shall be cut under the crown spread of the
    trees without the prior written permission of the Local Planning
    Authority.

    Reason: In order to safeguard the trees in the interest of visual amenity
    of the area.

E18. TREES – EXCLUSION FENCING

    Before any works herein permitted are commenced, all those trees to
    be retained, as indicated on the approved drawings, shall be protected
    by secure, stout, exclusion fencing erected at a minimum distance
    equivalent to the branch spread of the trees and in accordance with BS
    5837:1980 and to a suitable height. Any works connected with the
    approved scheme within the branch spread of the trees shall be by
    hand only. No storage of materials, supplies or plant machinery shall
    be stored, parked, or allowed access beneath the branch spread of the
    trees or within the exclusion fencing.

    Reason: In order to ensure the safety and well being of the trees on the
    site during constructional works that are to remain after building works
    are completed.

E19. CONSTRUCTION WORKS - HOURS

    The construction works of the development hereby granted shall not be
    carried out before 0800 or after 1800 hours Monday to Friday or before
    0800 or after 1200 hours on Saturday and not at all on Sundays or
    Bank Holidays.

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     Reason: In order to ensure that the proposal does not prejudice the
     enjoyment of neighbouring occupiers of their properties.

E20. ROUTING OF LORRIES

     That a routing of lorries delivering plant or materials will only use
     designated road agreed in advance with the Local Planning Authority.

     Reason: To minimise the impact of lorry traffic in local residential roads.

E21. UN/LOADING WITHIN THE BUILDING SITE

     Vehicles may arrive, depart, be loaded or unloaded within the general
     area of the application site only between 08000 hours and 1800 hours
     Monday to Friday and 1000 hours and 1600 hours Saturday and not at
     all on Sunday or Bank Holidays.

     Reason: In order to ensure that the proposed development does not
     prejudice the free flow of traffic or the conditions of general safety along
     the neighbouring highway.

     Care Home

     The following conditions (LIST) relate to the Care Home element of the
     development:

CH1. OUTLINE – DETAILS REQUIRED

     This permission is granted in OUTLINE, in accordance with the
     provisions of Regulations 3 & 4 of the Town & Country Planning
     (General Development Procedure) 1995 and before any development
     is commenced, the approval of the Local Planning Authority shall be
     obtained to the following reserved matters, namely: a) siting, b) design,
     c) external appearance, e) means of enclosure, f) landscaping.

     Full particulars of these reserved matters, including plans, sections and
     elevations, all to an appropriate scale, and any other supporting
     documents indicating details of B1) the materials to be used on all
     external surfaces, B2) details of boundary walls, fencing and other
     means of enclosure, B3) the provision for parking, loading and turning
     of vehicles within the site, shall be submitted to the Local Planning
     Authority for the purpose of obtaining their approval, in writing. The
     development shall then be carried out in complete accordance with
     those particulars.

CH2. OUTLINE – TIME LIMIT 3 YEARS

     Application must be made to the Local Planning Authority for approval
     of any matters reserved in this OUTLINE planning permission, not later
     than the expiration of 3 years from the date of this permission, and the

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    development hereby authorised must be begun not later than
    whichever is the later of the following dates, failing which the
    permission shall be of no effect:

    a) The expiration of 5 years from the date of this permission.

    or

    b) The expiration of 2 years from the final date of approval of any of the
    reserved matters.

    Reason: This condition is imposed by virtue of Section 91 of the Town
    & Country Planning Act 1990 and to prevent the accumulation of
    unimplemented planning permissions.

CH3. TOTAL NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS

    No more than 70 persons, including any resident staff, if any, shall
    occupy the premises at any one time.

    Reason: In order to limit the total number of occupants in the interests
    of the amenity of current and future occupants in the premises and
    locality.

CH4. BUILDING SAMPLES

    Samples of all materials to be used for the external surfaces of the
    development shall be submitted to, and approved in writing by, the
    Local Planning Authority before any development is commenced.
    Samples should include sample panels or brick types and a roofing
    material sample combined with a schedule of the exact product
    references.

    Reason: In order for the Local Planning Authority to retain control over
    the exact materials to be used for the proposed development and to
    assess the suitability of the samples submitted in the interests of visual
    amenity.

CH5. DETAILS STORAGE/COLLECTION OF REFUSE

    That a detailed scheme for the provision of refuse, waste storage and
    recycling within the site shall be submitted to and approved in writing
    by the Local Planning Authority prior to the commencement of the
    works. Such a scheme as approved shall be implemented and
    permanently retained thereafter to the satisfaction of the Local Planning
    Authority.

    Reason: In order to protect the amenities of the locality.



                                                                            AGENDA1
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E6.        The proposed development shall have no more than 4 central
           dishes/aerial systems for receiving all broadcasts for all the residential
           units created, details of such a scheme shall be submitted to and
           approved by the Local Planning Authority prior to the occupation of the
           property and the approved scheme shall be implemented and
           permanently retained thereafter.

           Reason: In order to protect the visual amenities of the neighbourhood.

E6.        ENERGY

           No development shall commence until 2) and 3) are carried out to the
           approval of LB Haringey and the Greater London Authority.

     1. The Applicant will submit a site-wide energy strategy for the proposed
        development. This strategy must meet the following criteria:

      2.
              a) Inclusion of a site-wide energy use assessment showing
                 projected annual demands for thermal (including heating and
                 cooling) and electrical energy, based on contemporaneous
                 building regulations minimum standards. The assessment must
                 show the carbon emissions resulting from the projected energy
                 consumption.

              e) Explanation of how total energy demand will be reduced by 20%
                 relative to the baseline developed in b), through improvements
                 to building energy efficiency standards. Calculation of the
                 resulting carbon savings.

              f) The strategy must examine the potential use of CHP to supply
                 thermal and electrical energy to the site. The scale of the CHP
                 generation and distribution infrastructure to be determined
                 through agreed feasibility studies. Resulting carbon savings to
                 be calculated.

              g) Inclusion of onsite renewable energy generation to reduce the
                 remaining carbon emissions (ie after b. and c. are accounted for)
                 by 10% subject to feasibility studies carried out to the approval
                 of LB Haringey and the Greater London Authority.

3.         All reserved matters applications must contain an energy statement
           demonstrating consistency with the site wide energy strategy
           developed in 2). Consistency to be approved by LB Haringey and the
           Greater London Authority prior to the commencement of development.

CH7. DRAINAGE WORKS

           Details of on site drainage works to be submitted to, and approved by,
           the local planning authority in consultation with the sewerage

                                                                                AGENDA1
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     undertaker. No works which result in the discharge of foul or surface
     water from the site shall be commenced until the onsite drainage works
     referred to above have been completed"

     Reason - To ensure that the foul and / or surface water discharge from
     the site shall not be prejudicial to the existing sewerage system.

CH8. FLOW RATES

     a)Full details, including anticipated flow rates, and detailed site plans
     have been submitted to, and approved in writing by, the local planning
     authority (in consultation with Thames Water)
     b) Where this development forms part of a larger development,
     arrangements must be made to the satisfaction of the Planning
     Authority (in consultation with Thames Water) for the provision of
     adequate water supplies for the whole of the development.

     Reason: To ensure that the water supply infrastructure has sufficient
     capacity to cope with the/this additional demand.

CH6. EXTRACT FAN

     The extract fan shall be mounted with flexible connections and
     installed, together with any associated ducting, so as to prevent the
     transmission of noise and vibration into any neighbouring premises.

     Reason: In order that the proposed development does not prejudice the
     enjoyment by neighbouring occupiers of their property.

CH7. PARKING REQUIRED - OUTLINE

     Adequate turning space, circulation space and parking accommodation
     in accordance with the standard adopted by the Local Planning
     Authority shall be constructed within the curtilage of the building to the
     satisfaction of and in accordance with details to be submitted to and
     approved by the Local Planning Authority and shall be retained to the
     satisfaction of the Local Planning Authority.

     Reason: In order to ensure that the proposed development does not
     prejudice the free flow of traffic or the conditions of general safety along
     the neighbouring highway.

CH11. SITE INVESTIGATION

     A full site investigation, history, details of previous and present usage,
     risk assessment and details of any remediation required should be
     submitted to and approved in writing by the Local Planning Authority
     before works may commence onsite.

     Reason: In order to protect the health of future occupants of the site.

                                                                           AGENDA1
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                                                                Sub-Committee Report
CH12. SOIL CONTAMINATION

     A site history and soil contamination report shall be prepared;
     submitted to the Local Planning Authority and approved before any
     works may commence on site.

     Reason: In order to protect the health of future occupants of the site.

CH13. LEVELS AND THRESHOLDS

     That the levels of all thresholds and details of boundary treatment be
     submitted to and approved by the Local Planning Authority.

     Reason: In order to safeguard the visual amenity of the area and to
     ensure adequate means of enclosure for the proposed development.

CH14. LANDSCAPING SCHEME TO BE APPROVED

     Notwithstanding the details of landscaping referred to in the application,
     a scheme for the landscaping and treatment of the surroundings of the
     proposed development to include detailed drawings of those existing
     trees to be retained, those existing trees to be removed and those new
     trees and shrubs to be planted together with a schedule of species
     shall be submitted to, and approved in writing by, the Local Planning
     Authority prior to the commencement of the development. Such an
     approved scheme of planting, seeding or turfing comprised in the
     approved details of landscaping shall be carried out and implemented
     in strict accordance with the approved details in the first planting and
     seeding season following the occupation of the building or the
     completion of development (whichever is sooner). Any trees or plants,
     either existing or proposed, which, within a period of five years from the
     completion of the development die, are removed, become damaged or
     diseased shall be replaced in the next planting season with a similar
     size and species. The landscaping scheme, once implemented, is to
     be maintained and retained thereafter to the satisfaction of the Local
     Planning Authority.

     Reason: In order for the Local Authority to assess the acceptability of
     any landscaping scheme in relation to the site itself, thereby ensuring a
     satisfactory setting for the proposed development in the interests of the
     visual amenity of the area.

CH15. HARD LANDSCAPING

     Details of a scheme depicting those areas to be treated by means of
     hard landscaping shall be submitted to, approved in writing by, and
     implemented in accordance with the approved details. Such a scheme
     to include a detailed drawing of those areas of the development to be
     so treated, a schedule of proposed materials and samples to be


                                                                          AGENDA1
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     submitted for written approval on request from the Local Planning
     Authority.

     Reason: In order to ensure the development has satisfactory
     landscaped areas in the interests of the visual amenity of the area.

CH16. TREES – NO UNAUTHORISED WORKS

     Other than the trees consented for removal, the existing trees on the
     site shall not be lopped, felled or otherwise affected in any way
     (including raising and lowering soil levels under the crown spread of the
     trees) and no excavation shall be cut under the crown spread of the
     trees without the prior written permission of the Local Planning
     Authority.

     Reason: In order to safeguard trees in the interest of visual amenity of
     the area.

CH17. TREES – EXCLUSION FENCING

     Before any works herein permitted are commenced, all those trees to
     be retained, as indicated on the approved drawings, shall be protected
     by secure, stout, exclusion fencing erected at a minimum distance
     equivalent to the branch spread of the trees and in accordance with BS
     5837:1980 and to a suitable height. Any works connected with the
     approved scheme within the branch spread of the trees shall be by
     hand only. No storage of materials, supplies or plant machinery shall
     be stored, parked, or allowed access beneath the branch spread of the
     trees or within the exclusion fencing.

     Reason: In order to ensure the safety and well being of the trees on the
     site during constructional works that are to remain after building works
     are completed.


CH18. CONSTRUCTION WORKS - HOURS

     The construction works of the development hereby granted shall not be
     carried out before 0800 or after 1800 hours Monday to Friday or before
     0800 or after 1200 hours on Saturday and not at all on Sundays or
     Bank Holidays.

     Reason: In order to ensure that the proposal does not prejudice the
     enjoyment of neighbouring occupiers of their properties.

CH19. ROUTING OF LORRIES

     That a routing of lorries delivering plant or materials will only use
     designated road agreed in advance with the Local Planning Authority.


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     Reason: To minimise the impact of lorry traffic in local residential roads.

CH20. UN/LOADING WITHIN THE BUILDING SITE

     Vehicles may arrive, depart, be loaded or unloaded within the general
     area of the application site only between 08000 hours and 1800 hours
     Monday to Friday and 1000 hours and 1600 hours Saturday and not at
     all on Sunday or Bank Holidays.

     Reason: In order to ensure that the proposed development does not
     prejudice the free flow of traffic or the conditions of general safety along
     the neighbouring

INFORMATIVE:

1.   The new development will require naming and numbering. The
     applicant should contact the Transportation Group at least six weeks
     before the development is occupied (tel. 020 8489 5573) to arrange for
     allocation of a suitable address.

2.   Haringey Council - Building Control department request that the
     developer contact them on 0208 489 5504 in order that Fire Fighting
     access be included in the scheme.

3.   Developer is requested to liase with Crime Prevention Department on
     020 8345 2164 in order that crime prevention measures can be
     included in final scheme.

4.   Thames Water recognises the environmental and economic benefits of
     surface water source control and encourages its appropriate
     application where it is to the overall benefit of our customers. Hence, in
     the disposal of surface water, Thames Water will recommend that the
     Applicant a) Looks to ensure that new connections to the public
     sewerage system do not pose an unacceptable threat of surcharge,
     flooding or pollution b) check the proposals are in line with advice from
     the DETR which encourages, wherever practicable, disposal on site
     without recourse to the public sewerage system - for example in the
     form of soakaways or infiltration areas on free draining soils c) looks to
     ensure the separation of foul and surface water sewerage on all new
     developments.




                                                                           AGENDA1
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APPENDIX 1:
DEVELOPMENT CONTROL FORUM – MEETING MINUTES



   HARINGEY COUNCIL
PLANNING & ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL SERVICE
DEVELOPMENT CONTROL DIVISION



                              MINUTES



         Meeting         :   DEVELOPMENT CONTROL FORUM - MIDDLESEX
                             UNIVERSITY

                             WHITE HART LANE, TOTTENHAM N17

         Date            :   31st August 2005

         Place           :   Irish Centre, Pretoria Road, N17

         Present         :   Paul Smith (Chair), Tay Makoon, Cllr Charles Adje - Leader of
                             the Council; Cllr Lister, Davidson, Hare, Rice, Prescott,
                             Isidores, Engert, Newton, Bloch, Applicants Agents, Local
                             Residents

         Minutes         :   Tay Makoon
         by



         Distributi      :
         on




  Item                                                                                   Action

  1.        Paul Smith welcomed everyone to the meeting, introduced
            officers and Members. Explained the purpose of the meeting,
            also covering all the house rules. PS explained that the meeting
            will deal with the main issues regarding this application.

  2.        The Proposal
            Erection of new buildings to provide
             New sixth form centre comprising a 2/4 storey building with

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Item                                                                               Action
           central atrium to provide performing arts, catering, sport,
           Media, music and ICT facilities with 98 car park spaces, new
           access and 2.4m high perimeter fencing (full)
          New 3/4 storey residential buildings to provide 48 x 1 bed, 61
           x 2 bed, 13 x 3 bed and 1 x 4 bed units (all affordable) with
           68 car parking spaces and new access (full); and
          New 70 bed care home for the elderly with associated
           parking and access from College Road (Outline)

       Main Issues
3.      The principle of use
        The size, bulk and location
        The issue of traffic

       Presentation by Applicant
       Sixth Form Centre
4.
       The college would occupy the majority of the site, covering some
       1.61 hectares of the total 2.85 hectares. All existing structures
       on the site would be demolished and replaced with a new build
       6th Form Centre. The centre would provide post-16 year
       education. The building would cater for up to 1200 students and
       up to 100 staff and support.

       The college would provide facilities for a broad curriculum
       including Performing Arts, Hospitality and Catering, Sports
       Development and Fitness, Media Production and Music,
       Business Studies and ICT.

       The building is designed with a central atrium with 2-storey build
       to the south and 4-storey build to the north. The building would
       consist of pavilions set around two internal courtyards. The
       central atrium provides the main entrance from White Hart Lane.
       The forecourt to the building is to be set back from the road to
       relieve the existing congestion on White Hart Lane. The total
       floor area of the centre would be 14, 450 square metres. The
       site perimeter is to be secured with 2.4m high, galvanised steel,
       palisade fencing.

       The primary access to the sixth form centre would be from White
       Hart Lane. A secondary entrance would be available from
       College Road, which is to be extended through to Queen Street.
       A total of 98 car-parking spaces would be provided with access
       from College Road.

       Residential Units

       The residential element of the proposal would be situated at the
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Item                                                                               Action
       northern end of the site. The units would replace the existing
       student accommodation halls in this location. The residential
       units would cover 0.95 hectares of the 2.85 hectare site.

       The height of the residential development would be
       predominantly 3-storeys. However, elements of the scheme
       would be 4-storeys adjacent to the site‟s western boundary at
       Queen Street.

       A total of 123 residential units are proposed, providing a mix of
       42 x 1 bedroom, 67 x 2 bedroom, 13 x 3 bedroom and 1 x 4
       bedroom units.

       The proposed residential development would represent a density
       of 128 dwellings per hectare or 356 habitable rooms per hectare.

       All 123 units would be affordable housing and allocated to
       Registered Social Landlords (RSL‟s). Genesis Housing Group
       would be responsible for 68 units. Mosaic Homes would be
       responsible for the remaining 55 units. The 123 units would
       provide a 60/40 percent split of intermediate housing (shared
       equity and key worker) and social rented respectively. This
       would result in 74 units being allocated for immediate tenure and
       49 units being allocated as social rented units.

       To provide vehicle access to the site, College Road would be
       extended westwards joining Queen Street. The proposed
       residential units would be to the north of this proposed new
       highway. Vehicle movements along the new part of College
       Road would be one way only (in an easterly direction), as such
       access to Queen Street from College Road would be prohibited.

       A total of 68 parking bays are proposed. These parking spaces
       would be provided on-street along College Road, representing
       55% of the total dwellings. In addition, secure cycle stores would
       be provided.

       Care Home
       The application seeks outline planning consent, to establish the
       principle of a 70-bed care home for the elderly, frail elderly and
       for those who suffer from dementia. The building would be
       located at the easterly side of the site and would cover an area
       of 0.29 hectares. Illustrative plans demonstrating the type of care
       home that could be accommodated on site are provided with the
       application. All other matters pertaining to this application,
       except for access, are to be reserved for future determination

5.     Questions from the floor

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Item                                                                                  Action
        Question: Logic behind hybrid application?
       Answer: Hybrid application justified by the need to build 6th form
       centre on time leaving details of care home to be dealt with later.

         Question: Council is pushing the 6th form centre through its
          planning committee; consultation is a sham?
       Answer: Planning Application Sub-Committee is independent
       and governed by Government legislation. The consultation
       process is genuine and meets best practice.

         Question: Cllr Bloch: The building is quite low is there
          capability for extra floors to be added?
       Answer: No intention to add extra floors to 6th Form Centre.

          Question: What type of care home is to be provided? No
           details to consider?
       Answer: Application is in outline. If the Committee were
       minded to approve the outline application, this would be subject
       to details being submitted in the future. Further discussion will
       take place on the details.

         Question: Why do we need this scheme we already have
          New River Sports Centre?
       Answer: Separate facility required to support the new
       educational curriculum to be provided in the 6th Form Centre

         Question: Are you not competing with the chocolate factory
          for funding?
       Answer: No Funding is separate from DEFS and LSC

        Question: Who else was consulted?
       Answer: Younger people under 16.

          Question: Colleges are a waste of money, kids need the
           input early on, there is enough provision for this already?
       Answer Cllr Adje - this scheme is required in this area for
       youngsters. It is a provision for the local community. Schools
       and youths want this facility. It will be the state of the art dealing
       with youth under 16. I would expect Council staff to understand
       the Council agenda for provision for local communities.

         Question: Somerset Hall: Lots of buildings going up, hence
          lots of children running wild with no facilities for them to play,
          no open space provided, no play area, can this scheme
          accommodate a play area for these children?
       Answer: Scheme might provide a play area.
       Mosaic/genesis Housing Associations- reflect housing needs as
       a whole, monitor and look after kids Associations can consider
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Item                                                                               Action
       this.

         Question: Need to spend money on the upkeep on local
          parks, improve the conditions of open land space.
       Answer: A contribution may come out of the Section 106

        Question: Cllr Bevan what is the tenure?
       Answer: 60% shared ownership; 40% affordable rent

         Question: Cllr Rice - What sort of materials, is it going to be
          brick or concrete?
       Answer: The majority will be brick and brickwork at low level
       and panel.

         Question: Open space - what surveys have been done? We
          have already lost Bull Lane playing fields and we can't afford
          to go on losing more green spaces?
       Answer: The proposed development would contain an adequate
       level of provision of amenity space.

        Question: How is the scheme to be funded?
       Answer: Cllr Adje -DFES - not entirely Council project is funded
       by Government and Learning Schools Council.

          Question: Cllr Bloch - with 300 additional people on site,
           how can this go to PASC, without detailed information on
           play provision and recreational space?
       Answer: The report to Committee will cover these issues in
       relation to provision made by the Scheme.

         Question: what about the maintenance, parking restriction
          and congestion extra parking on Spurs match day in College
          Road and Queen Street?
       Answer: The road is a private road and therefore is not
       maintained by the Council. The frontages could have the road
       gated, Adopted roads will be maintained by the Council. The
       scheme cannot itself resolve the wider issues of match day
       parking which are being dealt with separately by the Council.

         Question: Very concerned about the level of noise of the 6th
          Form Centre next to a very busy college. What is the
          financial gain?
       Answer: It is not considered that there would be there would be
       excessive noise from the 6th Form Centre. Care home providers
       are market driven and would not build the care home if they felt
       that there wasn't a need and that the accommodation wouldn't
       be used.

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   Item                                                                                                    Action
                   Question: Cllr Hare - This is a constricted site. All parts to
                    be built on. what degree of flexibility and adaptability is built
                    into the design for expansion in the future?
                Answer: There is space for extension sideways but there is no
                intention to increase the height of the buildings. The layouts
                within the buildings have
                been designed for maximum flexibility of use in the future.

                  Question: Article in the press stated that the Council can
                   exercise CPO powers. Is that correct?
                Answer: Yes the Council has CPO powers under the planning
                acts

                  Question: Transport: Add more buses; crowd control on
                   main road
                Answer: Transport Assessment deals with these issues. Less
                people on site than before. Sum of money may be available for
                improvements.
                This locality is well served by buses and train.

                PS thanked everyone for attending the meeting and further
                comments can be
                sent to the planning department and further representations can
                be made at Committee and the date is 4th October. All
                comments noted tonight will be attached to the officers' report.


     6.         Close of Meeting


-------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------      -----------




APPENDIX 2:
DEVELOPMENT SCREENING OPINION


                                                                                            AGENDA1
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                                                                                 Sub-Committee Report
        SCHEDULE 2 DEVELOPMENT SCREENING OPINION


      TOWN AND COUNTRY PLANNING (ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
      ASSESSMENT) (ENGLAND AND WALES) REGULATIONS 1999


Location of Development

The site comprises the former Middlesex University campus, White Hart Lane,
London, N17. It is located between White Hart Lane and Pretoria Road
adjacent to the Irish Community Centre in an otherwise generally residential
area.

Description of Proposed Development

Redevelopment of the site to provide:
 A new educational facility for 16, 17 and 18 year olds. This facility will
   comprise a 4/5-storey building incorporating sports hall and performance
   space for approximately 1200 students and staff. This element of the
   scheme has 95 parking spaces.
 New residential development comprising 123 dwellings of which 50% will
   be affordable. The scheme includes 45x1-bed, 63x2-bed, 11x3-bed and
   3x4-bed units. 78 car spaces will be provided.
 New residential care home for the elderly comprising 105 bed spaces. 11
   car spaces will be provided in association with this element of the
   scheme.

The Councils Formal Screening Opinion

It is the Council‟s opinion that the above development is a “Schedule 2
development” within the meaning of the Town and Country Planning
(Environmental Impact Assessment) (England and Wales) Regulations 1999,
being an urban development project where the area of the development
exceeds 0.5 hectares.

The Local Planning Authority has considered the environmental impact of the
above “Schedule 2 development” in accordance with the above Regulations,
having regard to the selection criteria for screening specified in Schedule 3 of
the Regulations and the guidance to the these Regulations set out in Circular
02/99.

The Council hereby determines that, as Local Planning Authority, it considers
the proposed development is not likely to have any significant effect on the
environment, and will not require the submission of an Environmental Impact
Assessment under the terms of the Environmental Impact Assessment
Regulations 1999.

Selection Criteria for Screening the Proposed Development

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The proposed development has being assessed using the following selection
criteria:-

1. Characteristics of development

(a) the size of the development;
(b) the use of natural resources;
(e) pollution and nuisances;

2. Location of development

(a) the existing land use;


3. Characteristics of the potential impact

(a) the extent of the impact;
(c) the magnitude and complexity of the impact;
(d) the probability of the impact;
(e) the duration, frequency and reversibility of the impact.

Reasoning for the Screening Opinion

I consider that the site is not within a “sensitive area” as defined in Regulation
2(1). The site is not within a Conservation Area or an SSSI or National Park,
AONB or World Heritage Site. The site is not identified as being within a
particular policy area or site specific proposal area in the adopted Unitary
Development Plan. The emerging Unitary Development Plan identifies the
site as a Site Specific Proposal for education use as set out in Schedule 1
attached to the emerging Plan.

I consider that the proposed development will not have a significant effect on
the local environment. In coming to this view, I have taken account of the
selection criteria set out in Schedule 3 of the Regulations, and I do not see
anything under these criteria in Section 1 “Characteristics of the Development”
in terms of size of the development, use of natural resources or pollution or
nuisance, that would adversely affect the environment in a significant manner.
Similarly, I do not consider that any of the areas of geographical sensitivity or
natural resources referred to in Section 2, “Location of Development”, would
be of reference to this application. As there are no significant effects by this
development on the environment, it is not necessary to evaluate the
characteristics or magnitude of any potential impact referred to in Section 3 of
Schedule 3.

The applicant has provided additional information regarding estimated
comparative traffic generation between the existing and proposed uses. This
information indicates that the proposed development is not likely to result in a
significant increase in trips over the existing use. Taking this into account, I
see no reason to alter my view having regard to the selection criteria above.


                                                                            AGENDA1
                                                                  Planning Applications
                                                                 Sub-Committee Report
Paul Smith
Head of Development Control (East)

Date: 22 July 2005
APPENDIX 3:
GREATER LONDON AUTHORITY – PLANNING REPORT

                            Planning Report PDU/1277/01
                                 21 September 2005

                             London Borough of Haringey
                   Former Middlesex University White Hart Lane N17
                       Planning Application No: HGY/2005/1439


Strategic Planning Application – Stage 1 Referral
Town & Country Planning Act 1990 (as amended); Greater London Authority
Act 1999; Town & Country Planning (Mayor of London) Order 2000

The Proposal

Involves a hybrid application for the erection of a sixth form college; 123
(affordable) dwellings; and a 70-bed elderly care home.

Strategic Issues

This mixed-use proposal offers to meet a number of Mayoral objectives,
providing a range of residential uses and safeguarding an existing site for
educational purposes. The proposal offers 100% affordable housing with an
appropriate density for its location. The urban design in many respects is good
but raises concerns whether the development creating distinctiveness or fits
comfortably in the local context. There are a number of outstanding strategic
matters that need to be addressed. The applicant needs to demonstrate the
appropriate housing choice and justify the mix of unit sizes. Further
information on inclusive design and sustainability (energy) is needed.
Transportation for London requests a travel plan be prepared and requires
further discussions with the applicant regarding the impact on strategic routes.
The development lacks provision of adequate spaces addressing the needs of
the whole community, particularly children‟s play spaces and a demonstration
that older people have ease of access to community facilities and services
etc. A section 106 agreement is required to ensure appropriate training
employment initiatives are secured.

Recommendation

That Haringey Council be advised that the proposal is acceptable in principle.
However, there are a number of issues, as set out in this report, that need to
be addressed before the final referral to the Mayor.

                                                                           AGENDA1
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                                                                Sub-Committee Report
Context

1. On 8 August 2005, Haringey Council consulted the Mayor of London on a
   proposal to develop the above site for the above uses. Under the provisions
   of the Town & Country Planning (Mayor of London) Order 2000 the Mayor
   has the same opportunity as other statutory consultees to comment on the
   proposal. This report sets out information for the Mayor‟s use in deciding
   what comments to make.

2. The application is referable under Category 1B (c) of the Schedule of the
   Order 2000: -“Development (other than development which only comprises
   the provision of houses, flats, or houses and flats) which comprise or
   includes the erection of a building or buildings outside Central London and
   with a total floorspace of more than 15,000 square metres.”

3. If Haringey Council subsequently decides that it is minded to grant planning
   permission, it must first allow the Mayor an opportunity to decide whether to
   direct the Council to refuse permission.

4. The Mayor of London‟s comments on this case will be made available on the
   GLA website www.london.gov.uk.
Site description

5. The site, previously used as a university, is located off White Hart Lane,
   Tottenham. Although vacant, a number of buildings remain on the 2.85
   hectares site. These vary in size and character and range from 2-4 storeys
   in height. The site is predominately surrounded by residential with some
   mixed-use local facilities and services to the southeast. To the north of the
   sire are large commercial units. White Hart train station is approximately
   300m to the south of the site.

Details of the proposal

6.    The application comprises three different uses including:

Sixth Form College


10 The full application for a sixth form college would take 1.61 hectares. The
   school would comprise performing arts, hospitality and catering, sports
   development and fitness, media and music and business studies etc. The
   college would support 1200 students and up to 100 staff and support. The
   development consists of two buildings comprising two and four storeys in
   height. The total gross internal floor area is 14,450 sq.m. The site is
   secured with a 2.4m high fence. Primary access would be from White Hart
   Lane and a secondary entrance would be available from College Road. 98
   car parking spaces would be provided from College Road. The sport
   facilities within the school are proposed to be available for public use after-
   hours and on weekends. Cycle parking for the college is to be provided at
   one space per 4 students (200 spaces in total).

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Residential


8.    Full planning permission is sought for 123 residential units to the north of
      the site. The proposal is for 3-4 storey buildings. New access is
      proposed by extending College Road westwards linking Queen Street. 86
      parking spaces are proposed. Each unit includes secure cycle storage
      internally to provide one space per unit.

Elderly Care Home
9.     The application is for outline permission for a 70-bed care home. It is
       proposed to be located on the eastern side of the site, along Pretoria
       Road. Cycle parking for the Care Home is proposed at 6 spaces for staff.

Strategic planning issues and relevant policies and guidance

10    The relevant issues and corresponding policies are as follows:
 Mix of uses                 London Plan
 Housing                     London Plan; draft Housing Provision SPG
 Affordable housing          London Plan; PPG3; draft Affordable Housing
                              SPG
 Density                     London Plan; PPG3; draft Housing Provision
                              SPG
 Urban Design                London Plan; PPS1
 Transport                   London Plan; the Mayor’s Transport Strategy;
                              PPG13
 Parking                     London Plan; the Mayor’s Transport Strategy;
                              PPG13
 Access                      London Plan; PPS1; SPG “Accessible London:
                              achieving an inclusive environment”; ODPM
                              Planning and Access GPG
 Sustainable development     London Plan; PPS1, PPG3; PPG13; PPS22; the
                              Mayor’s Energy Strategy; draft Sustainable
                              Design and Construction SPG

11.      For the purposes of Section 38(6) of the Planning and Compulsory
      Purchase Act 2004, the development plan in force for the area is the 1998
      Haringey Unitary Development Plan and the 2004 London Plan. The
      Haringey UDP has been subject to revision and the most current version
      is the 2nd Deposit, consulted on in December 2004.

Mix of uses & strategic importance

12.          The proposed mix of uses is, in principle, acceptable. The site is
      located in close proximity to Tottenham Hale Opportunity Area and
      Haringey Heartlands / Wood Green Area of Intensification. Paragraph
      5.130 of the London Plan recognises the important relationship of sites
      between designated areas for regeneration in North London. Each
      development should seek to assist regenerating local communities.

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      Despite Middlesex University having sold its interest in the Tottenham
      Hale area and will relocate outside Haringey, the proposal injects a good
      mix and balance of uses for regenerating this area.

Housing / density / mix

13.   The proposal is for 123 dwellings with the following mix: 46 one-bedroom,
      61 two-bedrooms, 13 three-bedrooms, and 1 four-bedrooms dwellings.
      The density is approximately 128 dwellings per hectare. The total
      habitable rooms per hectare would be 350. The affordable housing
      provision is welcomed in terms of implementing the London Plan. The
      dwellings split is 60/40 between intermediate housing (shared equity and
      key worker) and social rent. This provides 74 intermediate units and 49
      social rented units.

14.   The tenure split is acceptable given the surrounding high concentration of
      socially rented accommodation relative to the London average (55%
      versus the average of 26% on a ward basis). Given the low public
      transport accessibility level (2), the density is appropriate and in line with
      the London Plan density matrix (table 4B.1) which indicates a density of
      100-150 dwellings per hectare. However, further information is needed to
      demonstrate the mix of unit sizes. It is preferable to have a higher
      proportion of 3 and 4 bedroom dwellings, in particular, the social rented
      provision. The applicant is expected to readdress this mix in line with
      Policy 3A.4 and the Mayor‟s draft Supplementary Planning Guidance on
      Housing Provision (page 29) or at least provide adequate justification for
      the proposed provision.

Urban design
15.   The applicant has given some attention to achieving the design principles
      set out in London Plan policy 4B.1. Physical linkages along the east-west
      boundary have been improved by extending College Road to Queen
      Street and the design of the residential units to the north respect the
      existing context. However there is some concern about the college and
      its relationship to the existing fabric.
16.   London Plan policy 4B.7 outlines the opportunity that new development
      presents to respect the existing local context while creating and adding to
      the local distinctiveness of an area. The “shopping mall” ethos adopted in
      this proposal, while bringing internal design benefits (good legibility and
      circulation), has created an inward-looking development. Although the
      atrium offers transparency and ground floor visual access in some areas,
      a number of the external walls throughout the college and presenting to
      the street, remain unbroken by windows and opportunities for natural
      surveillance (and natural light) are lost. This external appearance has the
      potential to reduce the sense of safety and security when students move
      through (particularly after-hours) and around the site and does little to
      provide a visual interest. The proposed 2.4m high fence around the
      perimeter reinforces the sense of an inward-looking development.



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17.   Given that this is a constrained urban site there appears to be a lot of
      unresolved spaces at the edges of the development. The planning of the
      site should be more efficient, at present there are a number of “spaces left
      over after planning” around the edges of the buildings. The submitted
      aerial perspective 03 illustrates the awkward relationship between the
      proposed and existing buildings on the western boundary. Viewpoint 04
      illustrates the large scale and impact of the continuous building line and
      expansive car parking fronting College Road and the awkward
      relationship between the proposed and neighbouring buildings. It is
      uncertain whether the college will fit comfortably within the existing
      context or alternatively create its own local distinctiveness.

Access

18.          Policies 3A.4 and 4B.5 of the London Plan expects that all of the
      new housing will be built to „lifetime home‟ standards, and that a
      minimum of 10% of the new housing will be designed to be wheelchair
      accessible, or easily adaptable for residents who are wheelchair users.
      The applicant has made written commitment to meet this provision, but
      further details should be provided prior to referral back to the Mayor.

19.   The applicant is required to provide a comprehensive access
      statement, showing how the proposals will promote an inclusive
      environment. The access statement needs to go further than simply
      being a commitment to meet the minimum standards of Part M of the
      Building Regulations. It should clearly demonstrate the applicant‟s
      approach to inclusion, and show that all potential users, regardless of
      disability, age or gender, can enter the site, move around the site, enter
      the buildings and use the facilities. A marked-up plan at an appropriate
      scale, including sections showing relevant gradients and any changes
      in level, should been submitted with the written access statement. This
      plan should illustrate: the main step-free pedestrian routes internally
      and externally, showing how people move up and down as well as
      around the building(s) and the spaces between the buildings; access to
      car parking and public transport facilities; staff and visitor entrances
      and other relevant facilities and features.

A diverse London

20.   London Plan policy 3A.14 aims at addressing the diverse needs of the
      London‟s population. This policy and the paragraphs which follow are
      applicable to the mix of uses proposed, particularly because of the
      introduction of older and younger populations. Before the final referral to
      the Mayor, the applicant is expected to demonstrate how the proposal
      addresses these needs with a particular focus on children‟s play spaces
      and initiatives relating to community safety and crime reduction. The
      Mayor‟s draft Children and Young People’s Strategy should be referred
      to.

21.   The applicant should also demonstrate the appropriateness of the site
      and surrounding area for older people. This should focus on the site‟s
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      ability to access shops, health and leisure facilities in a safe and secure
      environment.

Sustainable development

22.   The London Plan seeks to improve the sustainability and environmental
      performance of London‟s built environment by requiring a reduction in
      carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions through improvements in energy
      efficiency and securing renewable energy technologies in
      developments (Policies 4A.7-4A.9), in support of the Mayor‟s Energy
      Strategy. Under these policies, applicants should submit an energy
      demand and carbon dioxide emissions assessment for the proposed
      development, investigate the feasibility of a range of energy efficient
      and renewable energy technologies, incorporating those that are
      feasible, and demonstrate the proportion of carbon dioxide emissions
      that have been offset by the incorporation of energy efficient and
      renewable energy technologies. Applicants should also select heating
      systems in line with the Mayor‟s hierarchy in Policy 4A.8.

23.   From the current information, no energy efficiencies or renewable
      technologies have been incorporated in the scheme. This is of
      particular concern for the proposed college element of the proposal.
      Haringey Council requires that the applicant undertakes an energy
      demand assessment and submits a financial and technical feasibility
      study on incorporating renewable energy technologies into the college
      building. Appendix 1 sets out a brief guide to the work required to be
      carried out.

24.   Other impacts were investigated. None posed threats to the environment.
      However, the noise report failed to consider the impact of existing noise
      (mainly road traffic) on the residential and elderly care home elements.
      Although it appears that existing noise would not present significant
      problems, Haringey Council could address this by relevant planning
      conditions.

Transport for London (TfL)

25.   The site has a public transport accessibility level of 2 (where 6 is the
      highest and 1 is the lowest). Currently routes W3 and 318 directly
      serve the site. Other routes that operate in the vicinity include routes
      149, 259, 279 and 349, which are high frequency services that operate
      at a minimum of 8 buses per hour during the weekday peak hours. The
      transport assessment has included routes that serve Great Cambridge
      Road in its assessment of bus accessibility. These routes are up to
      1000 metres walk away and therefore it is unreasonable to suggest that
      they serve the proposed development.

26.   There will be 68 spaces for the residential element of the scheme,
      arranged along College Road as parallel parking. This includes twelve
      existing spaces. This equates to less than one space per unit and is
      therefore below London Plan standards. The care home is currently in

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      outline form only. But it is anticipated that 16 spaces will be provided,
      including disabled parking. Car parking for the college element is
      proposed at 92 spaces, with eighty-eight spaces for staff and four
      spaces for visitors. There will be no parking for students. This
      represents a lower level of parking compared with the existing use as a
      university. Whilst there is no specific parking standard in the London
      Plan for college uses, this level of provision appears to be reasonably
      restrained. A college travel plan is proposed which will be used to
      regulate car parking, which is welcomed. TfL suggests that a condition
      be imposed to ensure that the travel plan is monitored and delivered.

27.   Cycle parking for the college is to be provided at one space per four
      students (200 spaces in total). Each residential unit includes secure
      cycle storage internally to provide one space per unit. Cycle parking
      for the care home is proposed at six spaces for staff. These standards
      conform with the London Cycle Network Design Manual and are
      therefore welcomed. TfL encourages the applicant to ensure that cycle
      parking is secure, covered where possible, and with adequate lighting
      and CCTV. TfL recommends that cycle parking provision be secured
      by planning condition. Cycling to work will be promoted through the
      care home travel plan. The college travel plan should similarly promote
      cycling. The development also proposes a designated cycle lane on
      the northern side of the new section of College Road. This should be
      linked in with the surrounding cycle network. Overall, provision for
      cycling is welcomed.

28.   TfL recommends that consideration be given to ensuring that footways
      and lighting levels in the vicinity of the site, particularly at main access
      points, are adequate, given the level of pedestrian activity that are likely
      to result as part of the development, particularly between the campus
      and public transport facilities.

29.   In order for TfL to ascertain the requirements of the London bus
      network, more information is required regarding trip rates for public
      transport as well as more details of modal share. TfL also requires
      additional information regarding traffic generation on the surrounding
      roads. The development is adjacent to three key strategic transport
      routes (the A406, the A10, which are Transport for London Road
      Network and the A1010, which is part of the Strategic Road Network).
      No mention has been made in the transport assessment about the
      impact of the development on these roads. Of particular concern is the
      A1010 (High Road and Fore Street), which is heavily congested
      throughout most parts of the day. Further discussion with TfL on these
      aspects would be welcomed.

30.   A travel plan for all uses should be required by condition should the
      proposal be acceptable.




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London Development Agency (LDA)

31.   The LDA supports this proposal in principle as it provides for the
      redevelopment of a vacant education site following it being declared
      redundant by Middlesex University as part of its strategy for
      centralisation and expansion. The proposed mix of uses is considered
      appropriate and will contribute towards a number of key London Plan
      objectives.

32.   It is important to ensure that local residents and businesses benefit
      from jobs created by this proposal as set out in London Plan Policy
      3B.12. Initiatives to create training and employment opportunities for
      local people and to address other barriers to employment (e.g. child
      care) should be formalised through a section 106 agreement between
      Haringey Council and the applicant. Initiatives arising from the section
      106 agreement should also ensure the employment of local people
      during the construction and on-going operation of the elderly care
      home and education uses in the development. The Agency would be
      pleased to discuss the inclusion of these initiatives further with the
      applicant and the Council, and will welcome the opportunity to review a
      draft of this agreement either before or during the final referral to the
      Mayor.

33.   The LDA supports the social infrastructure that is proposed, such as the
      sixth form college and its related sport facilities available for public use,
      and the elderly care home facility. The LDA requests the applicant to
      consider the incorporation of other social infrastructure such as local
      community facilities, childcare, children‟s play spaces, and health facilities
      to meet the needs of new residents in accordance with London Plan
      policy 3A.14 and 3A.15. The potential for /or need to include other social
      infrastructure on-site should be assessed, or if appropriate, alternative
      funding should be secured for off-site provision, to allow existing needs in
      the local area to be met.

Local planning authority’s position

34.   Haringey Council has indicated support for the proposal.

Legal considerations

35.   Under the arrangements set out in article 3 of the Town and Country
      Planning (Mayor of London) Order 2000 the Mayor has an opportunity to
      make representations to Haringey Council at this stage. If the Council
      subsequently resolves to grant planning permission, it must allow the
      Mayor an opportunity to decide whether to direct it to refuse planning
      permission. There is no obligation at this present stage for the Mayor to
      indicate his intentions regarding a possible direction, and no such
      decision should be inferred from the Mayor‟s comments unless
      specifically stated.

Financial considerations

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36.   There are no financial considerations at this stage.

Conclusion

37.   The proposal is for the redevelopment of a former university campus.
      Straddled between two strategic areas, Wood Green & Haringey
      Heartlands and Tottenham Hale, the site is of potential strategic
      importance. The proposal offers to achieve a number of London Plan
      objectives including safeguarding a part of the site for educational
      purposes, providing 100% affordable housing and allocating a site for
      elderly care. However, there are a number of strategic matters to be
      addressed before the Mayor can make a final decision on whether he
      wishes to direct refusal.

38.   Haringey Council should ensure its satisfaction with the proposal‟s urban
      design, particularly with a focus on safety and whether the building fits
      comfortably within its context, or creates its own. The spaces in and
      around the site need more careful consideration.

39.   The applicant needs to demonstrate that the residential element offers
      housing choice in terms of mix of bedroom sizes. Strategically, a higher
      proportion of 3 and 4-bedroom dwellings are preferred. A revisit of the
      housing mix is requested unless adequate justification is given.

40.   The applicant has expressed a commitment to providing equal access,
      but, a proper access statement should be submitted. This should include
      a statement committing to the provision of 100% lifetime homes standard
      and 10% accessible/adaptable housing. A marked-up plan should be
      submitted illustrating how wheelchair users, disabled people and people
      with mobility impairments can move around the site and access all
      buildings and public transport.

41.   Cycle and parking provision are adequate. TfL‟s main concern is the
      potential impact of the proposal on the 3 key strategic transport routes
      (A406, A10 and the A1010). Further information regarding trip rates for
      public transport, details of modal share, and more information regarding
      traffic generation on the surrounding roads is requested. TfL request
      Haringey Council impose a condition to require the applicant to prepare a
      travel plan for each component of the development, as well as a condition
      securing the provision of adequate cycle parking.

42.   It is recommended that a proper assessment of the impact of the
      proposals on the existing and new communities be undertaken. This is
      particularly relevant because of the introduction of increased affordable
      housing in an area with a high concentration of social-rent
      accommodation. Where necessary, these impacts could be addressed by
      planning contributions and investing in existing facilities and services.
      Initiatives to create training and employment opportunities for local people
      and to address other barriers to employment (e.g. child care) should also
      be included. Haringey Council should also ensure the employment of


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          local people during the construction and on-going operation of the older
          persons care home and college in the development.

43.       Haringey Council should impose a condition requiring the applicant to
          undertake an energy demand assessment and feasibility study for the
          incorporation of renewable energy technologies into the design of the
          school.




For further information, contact Planning Decisions Unit:
Giles Dolphin, Head of Planning Decisions
020 7983 4271; email: giles.dolphin@london.gov.uk
Colin Wilson, Planning Decisions Manager (Development Planning)
020 7983 4783; email: colin.wilson@london.gov.uk
Emma Demaine, Case Officer
020 7983 4493; email: emma.demaine@london.gov.uk


Appendix 1-
Suggested Information to demonstrate consistency with London Plan
energy policies
      Energy demand assessment
         Predicted average annual heat and electricity demand (see toolkit
          chapter for advice) in Kilowatt hours (kWh)
         Where the feasibility of a technology is determined by the variations of
          heat and/or electricity demand through the year, a graph to show this
          predicted variation.

         Energy efficiency – design
         Where standards exceed building regulations baseline figure for
          carbon dioxide emissions for the scheme built to building regulations
          standard.
         A figure for carbon dioxide emissions for the scheme with energy
          efficiency measures included.
         The percentage of carbon emissions savings against building
          regulation standards.
         Details of the energy efficiency design measures incorporated.
         A figure for the capital cost/saving of including energy efficiency
          measures and predicted annual savings
      Energy efficiency – plant
         Details of how the Mayor‟s heating hierarchy has been followed.
         Justification for rejecting those technologies higher up in the hierarchy.
      CHP and renewable energy
         For each technology in policy 4A.7, detail the technical considerations,
          namely the aspects of the site and scheme that offer the potential to

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       include the technology, or those that constrain that potential. Refer to
       the toolkit for detailed support.
      For those technologies that are technically feasible, set out the
       economic considerations, including capital costs of inclusion, any
       reduction in capital costs of other technologies/plant (for example if a
       renewable technology enables smaller capacity plant to be installed),
       running costs, payback period and cost as a % of build costs.
      Where a decision has been made not to include a technology this
       should be fully justified.


REASON FOR APPROVAL:

The proposed development has been assessed against and found to comply
with PPS 1 "Delivering Sustainable Development", PPG 3 "Housing", PPG 13
"Transport", PPG 22 "Renewable Energy", The London Plan, Haringey
Unitary Development Plan (1998) policy HSG 1.1 Strategic Housing Target,
HSG 1.2 Sites For New Housing, HSG 1.3 Change of Use to Residential,
HSG 2.1 Dwelling Mix for New Build Housing, HSG 2.2 Residential Densities,
HSG 2.23 Affordable Housing, HSG 2.17 Provision of Residential Care and
Nursing Homes, (Class C2), HSG 2.18 Location of Residential Care and
Nursing Homes (Class C2), SPG 1.3 Privacy and Overlooking, SPG 2.2
Density for Residential and Mixed Use Developments, SPG 2.3 Standards
Required in New Residential Development, CSF 2.1 New Educational
Facilities, CSF 2.3 Dual Use of Educational Facilities, CSF 2.4 Surplus
Educational Land or Buildings, DES 1.1 Good Design and How Design Will Be
Assessed, DES 1.2 Assessment of Design Quality(1):Fitting New Buildings
Surrounding Area, DES 1.3 Assessment of Design Quality (2): Enclosure,
Height and Scale, DES 1.4 Assessment of Design Quality (3):Building
Lines,Layout,Rhythm,Massing, DES 1.5 Assessment of Design Quality (4):
Detailing and Materials, DES 1.9 Privacy and Amenity of Neighbours, DES
1.10 Overdevelopment, TSP 7.1Parking For Development, TSP 7.6 Means of
Access and Crossovers, TSP 5.1 Road Schemes, RIM 1.2 Upgrading Areas
in Greatest Need, RIM 1.6 Mixed Use Developments, RIM 3.1 Energy
Conservation and Development, RIM 3.8 Waste Management and Haringey
Unitary Development Plan - Second Deposit (2004) policy UD 1A Sustainable
Design and Construction, UD2 General Principles, UD 3 Quality Design, UD 6
Waste Storage, UD 8 New Development Location and Accessibility, UD 9
Parking for Development, HSG 1 New Housing Developments, HSG 4
Affordable Housing, HSG 7 Housing for Special Needs, HSG 8 Density
Standards, HSG 9 Dwelling Mix, CW1 New Community Facilities, OS14 Open
Space Deficiency and New Developments, M4 Road Schemes, ENV 6 Energy
Efficiency, ENV 6A Renewable Energy and Mitigating Climate Change, SPG
3a Density, Dwelling Mix, Floor space Minima & Lifetime Homes, SPG 3b
Privacy/Overlooking, Aspect/Outlook and Daylight/Sunlight, SPG10 The
Negotiation, Management and Monitoring of Planning Obligations SPG10a
Affordable Housing.




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