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					           Licensed 2316 issued by the Commission for Independent Education, Florida Department of Education.
Additional Information regarding this institution may be obtained by contacting the Commission for Independent Education at:
                                  325 West Gaines Street Suite 1414, Tallahassee FL 32399
                                 toll free telephone number 888/224-6684 – (850) 245-3200




                                     HOURS OF OPERATION
          The Business Office is open Monday through Thursday from 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.,
                                    and from 4:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
                              4801 S. University Dr, 114 Davie Fl 33328
                                          www.unilatina.edu
                                           (954) 607 - 4344




                    Published by UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE, Davie, Florida
                                          January 2010, Vol. IX

                                                             2
                                  ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                      2010 Calendar

       EVENT                    MONTH                DAY        YEAR
   Christmas Holiday        December - January       12 - 11   2009 -2010
  Winter Term Starts             January               11         2010
    Withdrawal Date              January               25         2010
M. L. King Jr. B. Holiday        January               18         2010
     President's Day            February               15         2010
      Final Exams                 March              22 - 25      2010
   Winter Term Ends               March                25         2010
    Spring Vacations          March - April          26 - 5       2010
     Easter Holiday               April               1-4         2010
  Spring Term Starts              April                5          2010
    Withdrawal Date               April                19         2010
 Memorial Day Holiday              May                 31         2010
      Final Exams                  June              14 -17       2010
   Spring Term Ends                June                17         2010
   Summer Vacation              June - July          18 - 5       2010
 Summer Term Starts                July                6          2010
    Withdrawal Date                July                20         2010
       Labor Day                September              6          2010
  UNIEMPRESARIOS                September             8-10        2010
      Final Exams               September            13 -16       2010
  Summer Term Ends              September              16         2010
      Fall vacation             September            17 – 27      2010
   Fall Term Starts             September              27         2010
    Withdrawal Date              October               11         2010
      Veteran’s Day             November               11         2010
  Thanksgiving Break            November             25 - 29      2010
      Final Exams               December              6-9         2010
    Fall Term Ends              December               9          2010
   Christmas Holiday        December - January       10 - 10   2010 - 2011




                                                 3
                                  ACADEMIC CALENDAR
                                      2011 Calendar

       EVENT                    MONTH                DAY        YEAR
   Christmas Holiday        December - January       10-10     2010 -2011
  Winter Term Starts             January               10         2011
M. L. King Jr. B. Holiday        January               17         2011
    Withdrawal Date              January               24         2011
     President's Day            February               21         2011
      Final Exams                 March              21 - 24      2011
   Winter Term Ends               March                24         2011
    Spring Vacations          March - April          25 - 3       2011
  Spring Term Starts              April                4          2011
     Easter Holiday               April              22-24        2011
    Withdrawal Date               April                18         2011
 Memorial Day Holiday              May                 30         2011
      Final Exams                  June              13-16        2011
   Spring Term Ends                June                16         2011
   Summer Vacation              June - July           17-4        2011
 Summer Term Starts                July                5          2011
    Withdrawal Date                July                18         2011
       Labor Day                September              5          2011
      Final Exams               September            12 - 15      2011
  Summer Term Ends              September              15         2011
      Fall vacation             September            16 - 26      2011
   Fall Term Starts             September              26         2011
  UNIEMPRESARIOS                 October              5 -7        2011
    Withdrawal Date              October               10         2011
      Veteran’s Day             November               11         2011
  Thanksgiving Break            November             24 -27       2011
      Final Exams               December              5-8         2011
    Fall Term Ends              December               8          2011
   Christmas Holiday        December - January        9-9      2011 - 2012




                                                 4
FOUNDER’S MESSAGE




Thank you for thinking about us while selecting your academic home, the incubation of your enterprise,
and our TOTAL EDUCATION model. Unilatina is an institution where you will drink from the fountain
of the reason and intuition, develop your intellectual conciseness and also your emotional intelligence.

During the next few weeks, after selecting a major of the higher education, you will be making the
fundamental decision which will open infinite possibilities in your future. We want to facilitate your
decision because your personal project's life is of great interest to us. First of all, independently of what
your relatives or others influent persons believe, think of yourself and the things that are really kind,
pleasant and important to you.

In the next few pages, you will be able to explore this noble institution. You will have the opportunity to
decide between being a common citizen or a brilliant successful entrepreneur. You will choose between a
common mentality or a creative, communicative and critical mentality with divergent thought and
flexibility to find noble solutions; a leader balanced mentality, focused to personal and organizational
success, with a vision of the future. A mind capable of working with the entire brain, one that feels and
respects the intuitive, one that knows how to establish and conserve relationships, one that works in teams
or individually in moments of intensive flow. As well, you will be able to choose between an common
institution or another where you will find entrepreneur formation, a warm environment, emotional
intelligence, multicultural focus, personalized education, quality, and overall, well being and innovation.
This place is called UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE.

 You will be able to experience your own education in a warm environment where you are not just a
number within the multitude, but in essence, a human being with feelings, emotions, and virtues.
Welcome to the UNILATINA fraternity. We are ready to offer you all the help that you will need to make
your enterprise a reality. Your wonderful presence makes us greatly happy.




Julio Alberto Moyano Ferrer
Sep. 1940 – Jan. 2004




                                                     5
                                                            TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOUNDER’S MESSAGE ............................................................................................................................ 5
I. INSTITUTIONAL DESIGN .................................................................................................................. 8
   HISTORY ................................................................................................................................................. 8
   MISSION STATEMENT ......................................................................................................................... 8
      Our Purposes ........................................................................................................................................ 8
      Our Mission .......................................................................................................................................... 9
   OWNERSHIP ........................................................................................................................................... 9
   GOVERNING BODY .............................................................................................................................. 9
   FACULTY PERSONNEL ...................................................................................................................... 10
II. SCHOOL POLICIES .......................................................................................................................... 12
   ADMISSION POLICIES ....................................................................................................................... 12
   International Students ............................................................................................................................. 12
   TUITION AND FEES ............................................................................................................................ 13
      Payment Options ................................................................................................................................ 13
   Veteran’s Assistance Programs .............................................................................................................. 13
   ACADEMIC POLICIES ........................................................................................................................ 13
      School Calendar ................................................................................................................................. 13
      Holidays ............................................................................................................................................. 13
      Academic Year ................................................................................................................................... 14
      Class Schedule ................................................................................................................................... 14
      Definition of Credit Hour ................................................................................................................... 14
      Definition of a Clock Hour................................................................................................................. 14
      Description of Course Codes
      Credit for Previous Training .............................................................................................................. 15
      Veterans’ Transfer of Credits ............................................................................................................. 15
      Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress .................................................................................... 15
      Academic Probation ........................................................................................................................... 15
      Academic Suspension ........................................................................................................................ 15
      Academic Dismissal ........................................................................................................................... 16
      Appeal ................................................................................................................................................ 16
      Records and Grading System ............................................................................................................. 16
      Graduation Requirements ................................................................................................................... 17
      Absence & Tardiness ......................................................................................................................... 17
      Veterans Attendance Policy ............................................................................................................... 17
      Leave of Absence (Not for veterans) ................................................................................................. 17
      Make-Up Policy ................................................................................................................................. 17
      Withdrawals ....................................................................................................................................... 17
      Refund Policy ..................................................................................................................................... 18
      Veterans Refund Policy...................................................................................................................... 18
   STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES ................................................................................. 19
      Student Grievance Procedure ............................................................................................................. 19
   SCHOOL RULES AND REGULATIONS ............................................................................................ 20
III. STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES .................................................................................................. 21
   Induction Seminar................................................................................................................................... 21
   Counseling Office ................................................................................................................................... 21
   Student Placement Assistance ................................................................................................................ 22
   Host Families .......................................................................................................................................... 22
   Tertulia ................................................................................................................................................... 22
   Tuna Unilatina – Musical Group ............................................................................................................ 23
   Uniempresarios - Small Business Entrepreneur Seminar ....................................................................... 23
   Unilatina’s Sentinel ................................................................................................................................ 24

                                                                               6
  Health and Prevention ............................................................................................................................ 24
  Student Record Services ......................................................................................................................... 24
  The Physical Plant .................................................................................................................................. 24
IV. PROGRAM OUTLINES ................................................................................................................... 25
  A.S. BUSINES ADMINISTRATION .................................................................................................... 26
     Program Objective.............................................................................................................................. 25
     Program Description .......................................................................................................................... 25
     Program Curriculum........................................................................................................................... 25
  A.S. TRAVEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT .............................................................................. 35
     Program Objective.............................................................................................................................. 27
     Program Description .......................................................................................................................... 27
     Program Curriculum........................................................................................................................... 27
  A.S. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT ...................................................................... 35
     Program Objective.............................................................................................................................. 29
     Program Description ......................................................................................................................... 29
     Program Curriculum........................................................................................................................... 29
  A.A. COMMUNICATIONS AND MASS MEDIA ............................................................................... 35
     Program Objective.............................................................................................................................. 31
     Program Description ......................................................................................................................... 31
     Program Curriculum........................................................................................................................... 32
  DIPLOMA SMALL BSUNESS MANAGEMENT ............................................................................... 35
     Program Objective.............................................................................................................................. 33
     Program Description .......................................................................................................................... 33
     Program Curriculum........................................................................................................................... 33
  DIPLOMA MARKETING AND SALES MANAGEMENT ................................................................ 35
     Program Objective.............................................................................................................................. 35
     Program Description .......................................................................................................................... 35
     Program Curriculum........................................................................................................................... 35
  DIPLOMA ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE .......................................................................... 37
     Program Objective.............................................................................................................................. 37
     Program Description .......................................................................................................................... 37
     Program Curriculum........................................................................................................................... 37
V. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................................................ 39
  Accounting ............................................................................................................................................. 39
  Communication ...................................................................................................................................... 39
  Computer Information Systems .............................................................................................................. 40
  Economics .............................................................................................................................................. 40
  English .................................................................................................................................................... 40
  English as a Second Language ............................................................................................................... 41
  Ethics ...................................................................................................................................................... 43
  History .................................................................................................................................................... 43
  International Business Management ....................................................................................................... 44
  Management ........................................................................................................................................... 45
  Marketing ............................................................................................................................................... 47
  Mathematics............................................................................................................................................ 48
  Sociology ................................................................................................................................................ 48
  Spanish ................................................................................................................................................... 49
  Travel and Tourism Management ........................................................................................................... 49
Thoughts from our founder ..................................................................................................................... 51




                                                                               7
                          I. INSTITUTIONAL DESIGN
                                               HISTORY




UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE is an institution providing private higher education in the
field of business, tourism, communication arts and languages. It was founded on January 2000, under the
corporate by law of the State of Florida, as a contribution to higher education on the new millennium. The
institution is managed by a group of experienced educators with the goal of providing Holistic Education
and training to individuals who want to be entrepreneurs, be part of the labor market or increase language
skills.

The school offers the associate degree programs of Business Administration, Travel and Tourism
Management, International Business Management and Communications and Mass Media. As well we
offer the diploma programs of Small Business Management, Marketing and Sales Management, and
English as a Second Language.



                                       MISSION STATEMENT

Our Purposes

UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE’ purpose is to bring each student to the business world as
a proprietor of his/her own enterprise, or as an entrepreneur executive for the economic market.

     The School will strive continuously to improve its operation in order to keep up to date with the
      changing developments and new technology related to the field of Business Management and
      Marketing.
     The School will encourage its faculty to keep up to date with all the latest changes and
      developments related to teaching methods.
     The School will maintain a honest and fair relationship with its students and staff.
     The school will maintain excellent relationships with Federal and State governmental
      organizations, and also with other institutions of the educational, business and labor sectors.




                                                    8
Our Mission

In accordance with the purposes just mentioned, UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE, an
institution of excellence within the American education system, has adopted the following commitment:

    To prepare executive leaders with an advanced emotional intelligence for the creation of
     enterprises or for the labor market
    To provide quality social service of counseling and assessment to the entrepreneur by establishing
     alliances with business sectors of production, distribution and government.

In UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE, we interact as hard workers, creative and
communicative, enjoying our freedom, uniqueness, honesty and fraternity. We are dreamers of our own
growth through self-management and involvement, in a positive environment filled with human warmth
and care while having a clear vision of our country in an international focus.


                                              OWNERSHIP

UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE is owned and operated by Unilatina Corp., a corporation
registered and established under the corporate by laws of the State of Florida to provide Post-Secondary
Education. Its address is:

                                         4801 S. University Dr
                                     The Atrium Centre – Suite 114
                                         Davie, Florida 33328
                              Tel (954) 607 – 4344 – Fax (954) 357 - 1766
                                   E-Mail: admissions@unilatina.edu
                                     Web Page: www.unilatina.edu

       Lydia B Bautista Möller..………..President/Co-Owner
       Angélica Moyano………………...Secretary/Co-Owner
       Marcela Moyano…………………Treasurer/Co-Owner
       Lina Maria Moyano.........................Director/Co-Owner
       Liliana Moyano……………..……..Director/Co-Owner



                                          GOVERNING BODY

Its owners, Lydia Beatriz Bautista Möller and Angelica Moyano manage UNILATINA
INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE at the present. Additional administrative members will be added later.

    Lydia B. Bautista Möller                                         Angélica Moyano Bautista
School Director & Academic Director                                    Admissions Director




                                                      9
                         FACULTY PERSONNEL
   FACULTY MEMBER       COURSES TAUGHT               CREDENTIAL(S) HELD AND
                                                     SCHOOL

Bautista, Lydia B.      MAN 324, MAN 416, MAN      M.S. Higher Education
                        423, MAN 425, IHD 136, IHD Management, The Andes
                        138, ECO 205               University
                                                   B.S. Economy, The Externado
                                                   de Colombia
Carreno, Jose           STM 235, MAT 215           B.S. Mechanical Engineer,
                                                   Central University of
                                                   Venezuela
Colmenares, Robert A.   MAN 215, ECO 205           B.S. Statistics
                                                   Universidad Central de
                                                   Venezuela
Fermin, Jose            TTM 104, TTM 106, TTM B.S Business Administration
                        203, TTM 205, TTM 308, Minor Tourism and
                        TTM 310, TTM 316, MKT Hospitality
                        423                        Universidad Simon Rodriguez
Giffuni, Blas           ACC 102, MAN 207           B.A. Accounting, National
                                                   University of Colombia
Culmer, Michele         ENG 126, ENG 224, ENG      Master of Arts. Saint Mary's
                        342, ENG 424, ENG 234, ESL University
                        I, II, III, IV
Guaqueta, Nicolas       MKT 106, MKT 210, MKT      B.S. International Business
                        316, MKT 416, IBM 108,     and Marketing
                        IBM 114, TTM 423           Concordia University
Martinez, Clara         MAN 211, MAN 418           B.A. Psychology, The Andes
                                                   University
Moyano, Angelica        SPN 125, SPN 223, MAN      M.S. Higher Education
                        104, MAN 215, MAN 114,     Administration,
                        MAN 326, MAN 414, MKT      Barry University
                        312                        B.A. Business Management,
                                                   St. Thomas University
Moyano, Liliana         MKT 312, MKT 413, MKT M.S. International Business
                        424, IBM 210, CMN 105, B.S Marketing, minor in
                        CMN 127, ITA 101           Business Administration,
                                                   B.S. Communication, St.
                                                   Thomas University
Moyano, Lina M.         SPN 125, SPN 223, ESL,     B.A in Sociology
                        HUM 334, ETH 207, ETH      Minor in psychology and
                        234, PHY 201, PHE 231,     philosophy, St Thomas
                        PHE321, SOC201             University
Moyano, Marcela         SPN 341, SPN 423, CMN      M.S. Arts in Communication,
                        342, CMN 102, CMN 234,     Barry University
                        CMN 423                    B. A. Arts In Communications
                                                   St. Thomas University

Rosero, Fernando        HIS 221, HIS 224, HUM 325    B.A. Communications
                                                     Minor History
                                                     St. Thomas University

                                       10
Rene, Claire          MAN 326, MAN 418               Bachelor Business
                                                     Management. Florida
                                                     International University.
                                                     M.B.A. R.E. Development
Zarcone, Teresa       ESL I, II, III, IV, CMN 232,   B.A. Mass Communication,
                      CMN 324, ENG 324               Bloomsburg University of
                                                     Pennsylvania
Cristancho, Alberto   IBM 324, MAN 207, IBM          B.S. in Professional
                      423, MAN 416, IBM 211,         Management. Nova
                      IBM 315                        Southeastern University
                                                     M.B.A. in Global
                                                     Management. University of
                                                     Phoenix.
Montejo, Mario        MAN 114, MAN 414               Juris Doctor. Universidad de
                                                     Puerto Rico. Master of arts
                                                     Public Administration. Florida
                                                     International University.
                                                     Bachelor of Arts Public
                                                     Administration. FIU.
                                                     Associate in Arts. Miami
                                                     Dade College.




                       Graduation Ceremony, Dec 2009




                                        11
                                II. SCHOOL POLICIES
                                       ADMISSION POLICIES

UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE is an institution open to every individual looking for an
equal opportunity for quality education regardless of sex, race, color, age, and religion, social or
economic status. We do not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, age, religion, social or economic
status, and disabled applicants in its admissions policies, administration, scholarships, and other school
programs.

All applicants will be accepted for admission to the School as long as they meet the following:

For Associate Degree/Diploma Programs
1. High school Diploma or GED
2. Be an American citizen or legal alien.
3. Fill out the school Application for admission and present an
  entrance interview

For ESL Diploma
1. Be an American citizen or legal alien.
2. Take Placement Test
3. Fill out the school Application for admission and present an entrance interview.


Reasons for Denying Admissions
Unilatina will document reasons for denying admission, and will keep those records on file for at least
one year
A student will be denied for admissions if:

    1. He/She has not completed the admission requirements,
    2. If the submitted documents cannot be verified to be true

International Students

8 CFR 214.3 (J)
This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students.

International students are always welcome and we are committed to provide the same quality education to
help them become successful in their endeavors. International students wishing to attend our school must
meet the admission standards following to issue form I-20 for their student visa:

1. Applicants must prove that sufficient funds are available from source to defray all living and school
   expenses during the entire period of study in the United States. The last three bank statements of the
   sponsor or the student must be presented along with a letter from the sponsor or student.
2. Present to school a photocopy of passport
3. Persons applying for M/F visas with the initial I-20 will require payment of SEVIS fee of $200. The
   check or money order should be made payable to the Immigration and Naturalization Service
4. Make a first payment of $800.00 as part of tuition
5. If you are changing your status you must fill out form I-539 and pay a fee of $300. School will assist
   you in the process


                                                    12
                                        TUITION AND FEES


Registration Fee                                  $100.00
Tuition per Quarter credit Diploma                $110.00
Tuition per Quarter credit Associate              $140.00
Tuition per Quarter credit ESL                    $105.00
Credit by Examination                             $45.00

The registration fee of $100 is a one-time fee. Tuition is broken down for each term. Payment of tuition is
to be made prior the first day of class each term unless prior arrangement for payment has been agreed
upon.

Payment Options

For those who prefer to budget annual school cost out of a monthly income, the following options are
available for those who qualify:

1. Credit cards: Visa and Master Card may make Payments for any school charges within the credit
   limits for those cards.
2. Payment-plan: We offer monthly payments, with different credit corporations as a convenient
   alternative to pay.
3. Sallie Mae Loans

Veteran’s Assistance Programs

CFR 21.4252 (h)(1)This school is Approved for Veterans Benefits by the State Approving Agency
Veteran Education and Employment Assistance Act of 1976 as amended: Veterans eligible for training
under the Montgomery G.I. Bill are entitled to a monthly allowance while attending school. Veterans with
over 3 years of active duty or 2 years of active duty and 4 years in the selected reserve are entitled to a
maximum of 36 months of training. The school will assist in preparing and submitting applications.

                                       ACADEMIC POLICIES

UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE has adopted the following academic policies:

School Calendar

UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE operates on a continuous basis throughout the year
excluding weekends and legal holidays as listed. Classes will begin every term or every three months.
Ending dates will depend on the date students started classes.

Holidays

Our institution will be closed the following holidays:
M. L. King Jr. Birthday
President's Day
Easter Holiday
Memorial Day Holiday
Labor Day Holiday
Veteran’s Day
Thanksgiving Day Holiday


                                                    13
In addition, we will be off for the following breaks and vacations:

1.   1 week March                        Spring Break
2.   2 weeks June/July                   Summer Vacation
3.   1 week September                    Fall Break
4.   4 weeks December/January            Christmas Vacation

Academic Year

The academic year is divided into four terms. Term I (Winter), Term II (Spring), Term III (Summer), and
Term IV (Fall). Each term is eleven weeks in length. Programs are designed where the student may enroll
at the beginning of any term. The academic year should be a twelve-month year for those students
enrolled as full time students. Part time students may take longer but no more than 24 months to complete
their program.

Class Schedule

Classes are in session from 9:00am to 4:00pm and 6:00pm to 9:00 pm, Monday through Thursday. Full
time students are expected to attend a minimum of 30 academic hours per week and part time students, 20
academic hours per week. If a situation arises where the school has to close due to bad weather or any
other situation, we will contact all the students and inform them of the fact by phone or it will be listed on
the main page of our website.

Definition of Credit Hour

This institution will be using a quarter-credit hour system to keep track of the student’s progress in
completing the program. A quarter-credit hour represents ten hours of classroom lecture instruction, or
twenty hours of laboratory work, or thirty hours of internship. A minimum of 12 credit hours per term is
required for full time students.
An academic hour is equal to 50 minutes of instruction in the presence of an instructor and a 10 minute
break.

Definition of a Clock Hour

An academic clock hour equals 50 minutes of instruction and a 10 minute break. In order to culminate a
program, the student must complete all the required hours.

Description of the Course Code Numbering

Please find below the description of the course code numbering that the college uses:
ACC Accounting
CMN Communication
ECL Ecology
ECO Economics
ENG English
ESL English as a Second Language
ETH Ethics
HIS     History
HUM Humanities
IBM International Business Management
ITA     Italian
IHD Integral Human Development
MAN Management

                                                     14
MKT     Marketing
MAT     Mathematics
PSY     Psychology
PHE     Physical Education
SOC     Sociology
SPN     Spanish
CIS     Computer Information Systems
TTM     Travel and Tourism Management

Credit for Previous Training

A student may be given credit hours after an evaluation of official transcripts from other educational
institutions. Also, a written evaluation will be needed and provided by the School’s Director. Student
tuition’s account will be adjusted to reflect the reduced hours of training. At least 50 percent of the credits
or hours required for completion of any of our Diploma programs must be earned through UNILATINA
INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE.

Veterans’ Transfer of Credits

Students must report all education and training. The school will evaluate and grant credit, if appropriate,
with the training time shortened, the tuition reduced proportionately, and the VA and student notified.

Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress

Our institution will strive to provide the highest quality of education and support services. Our students
will be continually evaluated to ensure that standards of progress are achieved and assist those students
that are experiencing academic difficulties. Our institution is committed to assist all of our students in
order to provide an optimal learning experience so that the students will be able to succeed in achieving
their educational goals.

We define satisfactory progress as a student who:
Receives and maintains a grade point average of 2.0 or better on all work completed and;
Completes the minimum required quarter-credit hours for the term.

Academic Probation

If a student fails to earn a GPA of 2.0 or complete the minimum required quarter credit hours at the
completion of the first term, the student will receive an Academic Warning. If actions are not taken to
correct this situation and the student again fails to earn a GPA of 2.0 or complete the minimum required
quarter-credit hours at the completion of the second term, the student will be placed under Academic
Probation. On both situations the student must see the school counselor or advisor.

Academic Suspension

A student on probation will be placed under Academic Suspension for one of two reasons:
1. Failure to meet the GPA of 2.0 during the term after the probation.
2. Failure to complete the required minimum quarter credit for the term.

Students suspended will not be able to re-enroll for a period of one term. To re-enter the school after the
suspension period, the student must obtain an approval from the School’s Director and must follow the
counselor’s instructions.



                                                      15
Academic Dismissal

Any student that fails to achieve a GPA of 2.0 and higher or fails to complete the minimum required
quarter-credit hours for the term after the suspension will be academically dismissed.
The student will be able to re-enter the school after a twelve-month period following the dismissal. The
student must also re-apply and get approval from the School Director.

Appeal

Students who feel that they have been unfairly evaluated, graded or dismissed and wish to appeal the
probation, suspension or dismissal may do so by submitting a letter to the School’s Director. The letter
should describe in detail any special circumstances that the student feels is deserved of further
consideration. The School’s Director will then render a decision regarding the student’s appeal within
three business days. The student will then be notified. The School Director’s decision will be final. For
unsolved matters, contact the Commission for Independent Education 325 West Gaines Street Suite 1414,
Tallahassee FL 32399 toll free telephone number 888/224-6684 – (850) 245-3200

Records and Grading System

Academic records of all students, including dismissed students, will be held at our location on locked in
file cabinets. Only authorized administration personnel, officials, Education Department officials, and the
student will have access to the records. No records will be released without the expressed written consent
from the student or parent/legal guardian (if student is a minor) to any one requesting such information. In
the case of a minor, defined as a student under the age of eighteen, the parents or legal guardian will be
given access to the student’s records without the consent of the student.

Final grades for each term are recorded and given to the students at the end of the term. Grade Point
Average (GPA) is calculated by adding the grades received for all work for the term and divided by the
number of grades. The following are the grades and their values used in the calculation of the GPA:


         Grade                   Points
         A                        4.0     Excellent
         A-                       3.7
         B+                       3.4
         B                        3.0     Good
         B-                       2.7
         C+                       2.4
         C                        2.0     Average
         C-                       1.7
         D                        1.0     Poor
         F                        0.0     Failing
         I                        0.0     Incomplete
         W                        0.0     Withdrawn
         T                        ----    Transfer Credit
         E                        ----    Credit by Examination




                                                      16
Graduation Requirements

All students that successfully complete our program will receive a diploma.
In order for a student to graduate and receive a diploma from our school, the student must meet the
following graduation requirements:

1. Complete all the quarter credit hours as required
2. Complete all work and tests required in areas of study
3. Receive a minimum GPA of 2.0 = C
4. Meet all financial obligations with the school.

Absence & Tardiness

Our institution wants to provide an atmosphere conductive to learning, free of distractions and
interruptions. Students are expected to attend school regularly and punctually. Any student arriving to
school late fifteen minutes or more will not be permitted in class unless they have a valid excuse. The
student is responsible to make-up these hours on a weekly or monthly basis. Any student missing more
than 20% of a course will automatically be dismissed from the class. Disciplinary steps up to dismissal
may be taken for those students who have continuously failed to maintain the prescribed attendance
minimums as defined in the Standards of Academic Progress.

Veterans Attendance Policy

Excused absences will be granted for extenuating circumstances only. Excused absences will be
substantiated by entries in student files. Early departures, class cuts, tardies, etc., for any portion of an
hour will be counted as a full hour of absence. Students exceeding three days of unexcused absences in a
calendar month will be terminated from their VA benefits for unsatisfactory attendance.

Leave of Absence (Not for veterans)

A leave of absence may be granted for up to 60 days for reasonable causes like family illness, disability,
or emergency. The request must be documented and signed by the student. If student fails to return from
the leave of absence, he or she will be considered withdrawn for academic purposes.

Make-Up Policy

Students must complete all requirements for graduation within the stated time frames found in the
enrollment agreement. All work and quarter-credit hours that must be made up, due to absences, must be
completed within the time frame of the agreement; otherwise, this make-up time will be subject to
additional tuition charges as stated in the enrollment agreement.

Withdrawals

Students may voluntarily withdraw from school. To withdraw, a student must submit a letter stating
withdraw reasons and date of withdrawal. The students will received a full refund of any tuition if they
withdraw within 10 days from start of school, minus registration fees.
Any withdrawal refunds after that will be prorated according to the time attended at school.
A student will be withdrawn if he/she fails to attend class for 15 consecutive class days while not making
academic progress, fails to complete minimum required quarter-credit hours, has a tuition payment
default or creates a breach of school rules.




                                                     17
Refund Policy

1.    Refunds will be based on all monies paid directly by the student; any money if received from a
      government financial assistance program will be returned to such agency.
2.    All monies paid will be refunded, including registration fees, if the student cancels within three
      business days after signing the enrollment agreement.
3.    Any withdrawals prior to 40% completion of the program will result in a pro-rated refund based on
      the days attended, not including books and registration fees.
4.    Any withdrawals after completing 40% of the program will result in no refund.
5.    The termination date for refund calculation purpose is the last date of actual attendance unless an
      earlier written notice is received.
6.    Refunds will be made within 30 days following the determination of termination or receipt of the
      cancellation notice.
7.    In the unlikely event of closure, all monies received will be returned to the sources from which they
      were received, unless the school arranges for a transfer out with another school.
8.    If a course is cancelled by the school, the student will receive a total refund.

Veterans Refund Policy

The refund of the unused portion of tuition, fees, and other charges for veterans or eligible persons who
fail to enter a course, withdraw or discontinue prior to completion, will be made for all amounts paid
which exceed the approximate pro-rated portion of the total charges that the length of the completed
portion of the course bears to the total length of the course. The pro-ration will be determined on the ratio
of the number of days or hours of instruction completed by the student to the total number of instructional
days or hours in the course.

Course Cancellations/Refunds

If it becomes necessary for us to cancel, postpone or combine courses, change instructors, or change a
course location, the student will be notified by phone/mail/e-mail. If a course is cancelled, the student
may transfer to another course during the same term or receive a full refund.




                                                     18
                          STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

We respect your time and desire to help you improve yourself. We know education cost you money, time,
effort, and sacrifice. We do not want all of this to go to waste; therefore, here at UNILATINA
INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE, we want you to be aware of your rights as a student, as well as your
responsibilities to the school.

Your rights
1. To ask for the name and address of the licensing organization, in case that you may have to lodge a
   complaint that may have gone unresolved at the school level.
2. To have facilities and services available to the handicapped.
3. To know how Satisfactory Academic Progress is determined, if you are making satisfactory progress
   and consequences if the level of progress is not meet.
4. To be thoroughly informed regarding the School’s programs, services, staff and facilities.
5. To be thoroughly informed about the cost of attending and the School policies regarding refunds for
   students who withdraw.
6. To be thoroughly informed regarding student graduation rates and employment rates.

Your responsibilities
1. To read all information regarding our programs and services before you enroll.
2. To read, understand and keep copies of all forms you are asked to sign.
3. To notify the School if you change your home address, phone number or attendance status.
4. To make sure you understand the School’s Refund policy.
5. To try you best.

Student Grievance Procedure

Students who need to solve any problem or have any complaint should contact their academic advisor
through a written manner. After an evaluation and consideration of the students’ situations, the advisor
gives responses to the students within seven working days through a memorandum format. If the problem
persists and cannot be solved by the advisor, students should turn to the president of the school for
solutions. For unsolved matters, contact the Commission for Independent Education 325 West Gaines
Street Suite 1414, Tallahassee FL 32399 toll free telephone number 888/224-6684 – (850) 245-3200




                                    Group Entrepreneurship Dynamic


                                                  19
                                SCHOOL RULES AND REGULATIONS

Students are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that will reflect the integrity and
professionalism of the school. The following rules and regulations have been established to guarantee an
atmosphere conductive to continuous high levels of education. Any breach of these rules may lead to
disciplinary action up to and including probation and dismissal.

1. Students are required to wear clothing that will not be offensive to others or may be unprofessional.
    For safety, proper footwear must be worn. (See Student Rules and Regulation booklet for more
    information.)
2. Students must be in class on time. Students’ who are late fifteen minutes or more must go to front
    office to get a pass in order to be admitted to class.
3. Students must be responsible for all of their personal belongings.
4. Smoking is not permitted anywhere inside the school building.
5. Eating or drinking is only allowed in designated areas.
6. The use or distribution of alcohol beverages or illegal drugs is strictly prohibited. In the case of illegal
    drugs, students will be reported to the local authorities and will be dismissed permanently.
7. Students are responsible for their personal hygiene and appearance.
8. Students must complete all assignments and follow the direction of the instructor.
9. Personal phone calls will not be permitted during class time, unless they are of an emergency nature.
10. Students must use public pay phones to make personal calls; phones at offices are reserved for
    business use only.
11. All cellular phones and/or beepers must be turned off at the start of class as to not interrupt or create a
    distraction in class. If the phone or beeper has a vibrating feature, you may leave it on.
12. Weapons of any kind are strictly prohibited in school property and grounds.
13. Any kind of vandalism or willful damage to school property will be grounds for immediate dismissal
    and legal action will be brought against the student.




                                                      20
                       III. STUDENT LIFE AND SERVICES
The Institutional Well-Being office is in charge of all student activities and complementary actions to the
school’s mission, which support the development of the primary functions of the organization. The
purpose of the well being office is the permanent search of the "Being good", trying to obtain the
affective, physical and social development of all people whom join the UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL
COLLEGE family; such as: students, professors, administrative personnel and the directors. For this
purpose, UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE counts on the following services and events:




                                              Halloween 2009

Induction Seminar

Each new student will enter a three day orientation seminar before the regular class calendar begins.
There, he/she strives to integrate into the group of students so that they become acquainted with one
another, become friends, and relate to the directors, the professors and the administrative personnel.
Students will also acquire knowledge about the academic service processes and procedures as much as the
administrative well being. In addition, students learn about the processes of enterprise formation, the
curricula for world globalization, emotional intelligence, and inner peace. In conclusion, it is essential to
have this initiation ritual.

Counseling Office

The main purpose of the Counseling Office is to assist students in their own development, including
career planning, and skills building. All students in need of objective insights or merely have the "need of
someone to lend an ear" are encouraged to make good use of this service.
This is usually accomplished through one-on-one counseling, although it also gives opportunities for
group interaction on certain topics and outreach programming for students, teachers, and administrative
personnel. Students are encouraged to discuss with their instructor, any problem that may be affecting
their academic progress. If the student does not feel comfortable talking with the instructor, the student
may request a counseling session with the School Counselor to try to resolve the situation. Records of
counseling will be maintained in the student’s file. The school only offers academic, skills building and
career planning services. Personal needs counseling will need to be referred to a licensed professional in
the community.


                                                     21
Student Placement Assistance

The institution will assist the student with employment but cannot guarantee job placement. Graduates
from the Spanish-speaking program may encounter employment limitations due to the fact that most
business require fluency in the English language. The school has a professional relationship with local
businesses, governmental and private agencies for a small business boost, or for employee development
organizations that will keep the goals of promoting our students and making positions available in their
area of studies. The services of the student’s placement assistance include the following:

- Presentation of the student before the organisms of promotion of small business.
- Information on federal programs of support to small businesses.
- Consultant offices in the transaction of the financing for small business.
- Personal employment guidance on resume writing, interviewing and job search strategies.
- Literature describing opportunities with employers.
- Internet listing of current jobs openings, including Co-op and Internships.
- Campus interviews by representatives of business, industry, and government.
- Internet listing of business opportunities and part time and summer employment plans.

Host Families

This institution offers American family housing in and around the area of Davie, Florida for students
coming from other states and other countries. These hosts include families with children, married couples,
retired senior citizens, and single professionals. These people open their homes to students and share
simple day to day activities, family dinners and holiday traditions. Find out how wonderful the experience
of becoming part of a real American family can be for your personal growth as a bilingual individual. The
host-family plan includes a private room, one meal each day, and laundry facilities. Most host family
residences are located on city bus lines for easy travel. Take advantage of this great opportunity to live in
and learn about American culture and language in the beautiful setting of Ft. Lauderdale.

Tertulia

“Friday of Tertulia” is a social, educational and cultural event celebrated the third Friday of every month
with the purpose of spreading Hispanic culture and arts throughout south Florida. It usually consists of an
artist showing his or her art exhibition, which can include samples of poetry, painting, sculpture or other
artistic manifestations. In addition, there is always a musical guest and a guest speaker. Moreover, there is
a business card exchange which promotes small businesses, helps our student entrepreneurs and monitors
our alumni success.




                          Monthly Networking Activity - Viernes de Tertulia

                                                     22
Tuna Unilatina – Musical Group

The Tuna UNILATINA “Tribute to J. Alberto Moyano” is a musical group, which resembles the Spanish
tradition born in the middle Ages. The Tuna is a VIII century tradition from the college and university
students, who used to musically entertain banquets and social celebrations in order to be able to eat the
leftovers of the parties and reunions. In the colonization of the Americas, the Spanish brought the
tradition primarily to Colombia, which is the country with more tuna groups in the world, after Spain. The
Tuna expanded throughout South America and became very popular as a musical group from the colleges
and universities.




Our College is proud to present for the first time in the United States the TUNA UNILATINA “Tribute to
J. Alberto Moyano.” The Tuna Unilatina carries the name of UNILATINA’s founder, J. Alberto Moyano,
whose dream when he was alive, was to have a Tuna as part of the student life.

Uniempresarios - Small Business Entrepreneur Seminar

This seminar is especially designed for those international entrepreneurs who wish to conquer new
markets, internationalize their enterprises, and establish businesses in South Florida.

Prestigious entrepreneurs and speakers put together a special presentation on businesses openings and
franchises; modern marketing strategies; international market and regulations; investments, credits, and
real estate in south Florida. The interaction of entrepreneurs with our academic community allows the
participants to learn from the experiences of successful entrepreneurs, who daily contribute to the strength
of the economy.




                                                    23
Unilatina’s Sentinel

This institution develops a monthly written journal called “UNILATINA’s Sentinel” written in English
and Spanish, with the participation of the students, faculty, personnel, and other people from the labor
sector. This journal is prepared by the students, organized within a student committee, and advised by
communication experts and faculty to obtain a proper edition.

Health and Prevention

Each person’s health is understood as the complete state of physical and mental well-being, totally absent
of disease. The individual enjoys good health to be in diverse scopes of human life and to be able to the
socially participate within all of society’s sectors.

We strive to keep our students void of any psychoactive substances. We argue that drug consumption
strongly weakens the individual’s integral health, and therefore changes their immediate surroundings
(familiar, social, environmental). Their culture diminishes along with their productivity, which prevents
them from obtaining personal profits. We like to create atmospheres that stimulate positive attitudes of
social protagonists as well as personal and group development; such as: friendship, solidarity, dialogue,
coexistence, self-esteem, and self-evaluation. All students must have medical insurance that also covers
accidents that can cause physical damage as well as elderly problems that need surgical attention.

Student Record Services

The students will be able to obtain a listing of the grades quarterly. Students who desire to request a copy
of their transcripts will be charged a fee of $6; they will be mailed to them or sent to the institution or
organization of their choice. Official transcripts will have the Academic Director’s signature and
institutional seal.

The Physical Plant

The school is located in Davie, Florida in a one-story masonry structure, with 2439 square feet of space.
The physical layout consists of an administrative office, an academic office, five classrooms, a big
conference room, a library/study hall, a lunch/recreational room, a locker room, and two restrooms. The
physical plant is located in a plaza facing Griffin road for easy access. Besides having plenty of parking
and being very accessible to I-595 and Florida’s Turnpike, there is convenient public transportation. The
parking facilities are sufficient for all students. There is also a section for the directors, the staff and the
administrative personnel. Unusual Drivers with physical problems will be given special consideration.

The School complies with all the provisions of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 where it
states that any qualified, handicapped individual, regardless of handicap, shall not be denied the
opportunity or be excluded from enrolling in a school program.

The physical plant has been designed taking in consideration the needs of handicapped students by
providing the following: Handicapped parking and ramps, handicapped accessible restrooms, doorways,
halls and aisles wide enough for wheel chairs.




                                                      24
                            IV. PROGRAM OUTLINES
                                    BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
                                       90.5 Quarter Credit Hours

Credential Issued: Associate in Science
Prerequisites: Please find each course prerequisite in the course description section.

Program Objective

To prepare students for the labor market to assume management or supervisory positions in business,
industry, and government.

Program Description

The student who finishes and approves this program will be able to participate in the business sector by:

1. Planning, organizing, directing and controlling a business, with emphasis on selected theories of
   management and decision making and the knowledge and understanding necessary for managing
   people and functions.
2. Interpreting, applying and analyzing the different principles and administrative theories
3. Structuring and executing plans and strategic programs for the development of the company, human
   talent, remuneration, well being and personnel development.
4. Analyzing, evaluating and diagnosing the administrative management on the areas of the chosen
   specialization.


Program Curriculum

                Course Code              Course Title             Quarter Credit Hour

                                        General Education Courses
                MAT     115             Introduction to Algebra                    4
                ENG     234             English Composition I                      4
                ENG     324             English Composition II                     4
                HIS     221             Western Civilization                       4
                HUM     325             Critical Thinking                          4
                PHE     231             Stress Management and Yoga I               1.5
                        Students will choose one of the following classes:
                PHE     233             Aerobics for Health                        2
                PHE     235             Weight Lifting                             2
                PHE     321             Stress Management and Yoga II              2
                PHE     323             Balanced Life with Thai Chi                2

                                             Core Courses
                MAN     104              General Administration                    4
                MAN     114              Business Law                              4
                MAN     207              Financial Administration                 4
                MAN     326              Organizational Behavior                   4
                MAN     414              Organizational Leadership                 4
                MKT     106              Principles of Marketing                   4
                CIS     235              Workshop of Computer Science              4

                                                    25
Course Code           Course Title              Quarter Credit Hour

CMN   234             Introduction to Public Speaking             4
CMN   342             Workshop of Communication                   4
ACC   102             Principles of Accounting                    4
ECO   205             Principles of Economics                     4
ETH   207             Introduction to Business Ethics             4
IHD   136             Emotional Intelligence                      4
IHD   138             Personality Eneagram                        1

      Student will complete one of the following specializations

                      Management
MAN   211             Human Resources Management                  4
MAN   215             Production Administration                   4
MAN   418             Management Theories                         4
MAN   423*            Enterprise Fair                             2

                      International Business
IBM   114             International Finance & Law                 4
IBM   210             Global Marketing                            4
IBM   324             Import & Export                             4
IBM   423*            Enterprise Fair                             2

                      Marketing
MKT   210             Creation and Development of Products 4
MKT   316             Psychology and Strategy of Sales      4
MKT   413             Sales Promotion                       4
MKT   423*            Enterprise Fair                       2
                                      Total Quarter Credits 90.5
                               *This course requires 20 self-study hours




                                 26
                              TRAVEL AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT
                                     90.5 Quarter Credit Hours

Credential Issued: Associate in Science
Prerequisites: Please find each course prerequisite in the course description section.

Program Objective

To prepare students for the labor market to assume management or supervisory positions in the travel and
tourism industry.

Program Description

The student who finishes and approves this program will be able to participate in the business sector by:

1. Planning, organizing, directing and controlling a business within the Travel and Tourism Industry,
   including travel agencies, airlines, car rental companies, rail and bus companies, cruise lines, and our
   companies among others.
2. Applying effective communication: verbal, nonverbal, written, and electronic.
3. Maintaining high standards of customer service demonstrating prompt attention to customers,
   building rapport with customers to create an overall positive experience for the customer.
4. Identifying custom regulations involving articles free of U.S. Duty Tax, personal exemption,
   forbidden and restricted items, and duty-free ports.
5. Guiding the customer during the buying process of tourism products.

Program Curriculum

                Course Code      Course Title             Quarter Credit Hour

                                         General Education Hours
                MAT      115             Introduction to Algebra                   4
                ENG      234             English Composition I                     4
                ENG      324             English Composition II                    4
                HIS      221             Western Civilization                      4
                HUM      325             Critical Thinking                         4
                PHE      231             Stress Management & Yoga                  1.5
                        Students will choose one of the following courses:
                PHE      233             Aerobics for Health                       2
                PHE      235             Weight Lifting                            2
                PHE      321             Stress Management & Yoga II               2
                PHE      323             Balanced Life with Thai Chi               2


                                         Core Credit Hours
                MAN     104              General Administration                    4
                MAN     207              Financial Administration                  4
                MAN     211              Human Resources Management                4
                MKT     106              Principles of Marketing                   4
                IHD     136              Emotional Intelligence                    4
                IHD     138              Personality Eneagram                      1
                STM     235              Workshop of Computer Science              4
                CMN     342              Workshop of Communication                 4


                                                    27
Course Code   Course Title            Quarter Credit Hour

ACC   102     Principles of Accounting                  4
ECO   205     Principles of Economics                   4
TTM   104     Intro. to travel and Tourism Industry     4
TTM   106     Travel and Tourism Geography              4
TTM   206     Process Reservations                      4
TTM   208     Marketing in travel and tourism           4
TTM   306     Process Reservations and Technology       4
TTM   310     Travel and tourism laws                   4
TTM   316     Travel Agency Management                  4
TTM   318     Enterprise Fair*                          2

                             Total Quarter Credits 90.5
                     *This course requires 20 self-study hours




                        28
                           INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
                                    90.5 Quarter Credit Hours

Credential Issued: Associate in Science
Prerequisites: Please find each course prerequisite in the course description section.

Program Objective

1. To prepare students for the labor market in the international business management sector to compete
for the positions of: Assistant Managers, Office Manager/Administrative Services, and Personnel
Manager/Assistant, among others.

2. To prepare students for the creation of small business.

Program Description

The student who finishes and approves this program will be able to participate in the International
business sector by:

1. Implementing managerial skills necessary for maintaining a high quality work environment, goals, and
    strategic planning in international business settings.
2. Understanding the concept of a global economy with attention given to economic, cultural, and
    political factors affecting international business.
3. Coordinating activities of clerical and administrative personnel in an organization involved in
   International business.


Program Curriculum


                Course Code              Course Title             Quarter Credit Hour

                                         General Education Hours
                MAT      115             Introduction to Algebra                   4
                ENG      234             English Composition I                     4
                ENG      324             English Composition II                    4
                HIS      221             Western Civilization                      4
                HUM      325             Critical Thinking                         4
                PHE      231             Stress Management & Yoga I                1.5
                         Students will choose one of the following classes:
                PHE      233             Aerobics for Health                       2
                PHE      235             Weight Lifting                            2
                PHE      321             Stress Management & Yoga II               2
                PHE      323             Balanced Life with Thai Chi               2




                                                     29
Course Code   Course Title              Quarter Credit Hour

               Core Credit Hours
MAN   104     General Administration                   4
MAN   207     Financial Administration               4
MAN   211     Human Resources Management               4
MKT   106     Principles of Marketing                  4
IHD   136     Emotional Intelligence                   4
IHD   138     Personality Eneagram                     1
CIS   235     Workshop of Computer Science             4
CMN   342     Workshop of Communication                4
ACC   102     Principles of Accounting                 4
ECO   205     Principles of Economics                  4
ETH   207     Introduction to Business Ethics          4
IBM   108     Introduction to International Business 4
IBM   114     International Finance and Law            4
IBM   210     Global Marketing                       4
IBM   211     International Trade                      4
IBM   315     Logistics Management                     4
IBM   324     Import and Export                      4
IBM   423     Enterprise Fair*                         2


                Total Quarter Credit/Clock Hours 90.5
                *This course requires 20 self-study hours




                         30
                              COMMUNICATIONS AND MASS MEDIA
                                   94.5 Quarter Credit Hours


Credential Issued: Associate in Arts
Prerequisites: Please find each course prerequisite in the course description section.

Program Objective

To prepare students for the labor market to assume positons in the mass media industry such as: news
writter, tv anchord, news anouncer, and radio news assistant among others.

Program Description

The student who finishes and approves this program will be able to participate in the mass media sector
by:
1.Demonstrating appropoate communications skills to be used in the mass media sector
2. Producing writing appropriate to journalistic media.
3. Organizing and using production modes appropriate to journalistic media.
4.Demonstrating ability to identify different types of script copy.
5. Differentiating between news, commentary, and editorials.
6. Demonstrating an understanding of entrepreneurship.




                             Broadcast interview from Radio Caracol Studio




                                                    31
Program Curriculum

                     Course Code     Course Title             Quarter Credit Hour


                                     General Education Hours
            MAN      104             General Administration                     4
            MAT      115             Introduction to Algebra                    4
            CIS      235             Workshop of Computer Science               4
            ENG      234             English Composition I                      4
            ENG      324             English Composition II                     4
            ITA      101             Introduction to Italian                    4
            HIS      224             History of Art                             4
            HIS      221             Western Civilization                       4
            ECL      210             Ecology                                    4
            ECL      221             Ecology and Conservation                   4
            SOC      201             Introduction to Sociology                  4
            HUM      334             Holistic Human Development                 4
            PHE      231             Stress Management & Yoga I                 1.5
            PSY      201             Introduction to Psychology                 4

                     Students will choose one of the following courses:
            PHE      233             Aerobics for Health                        2
            PHE      235             Weight Lifting                             2
            PHE      321             Stress Management & Yoga II                2
            PHE      323             Balanced Life with Thai Chi                2


                                     Core Credit Hours
            CMN      102             Speech Communication                       4
            CMN      105             Introduction to Journalism                 4
            CMN      127             Theater                                    4
            CMN      232             Writing for Media                          4
            CMN      234             Introduction to Public Speaking            4
            CMN      324             Speaking on Radio and TV                   4
            CMN      342             Workshop of Communication                  4
            FIA      103             Introduction to Photography                4
            ETH      234             Ethics and Mass Media                      4
            IHD      136             Emotional Intelligence                     4
            IHD      138             Personality Eneagram                       1
            CMN      423*            Enterprise Fair                            2




                                                     Total Quarter Credits 94.5
                                             *This course requires 20 self-study hours




                                                32
                                 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
                                69 Quarter Credit Hours /750 Clock Hours

Credential Issued: Diploma
Prerequisites: Please find each course prerequisite in the course description section.

Program Objective

1. To prepare students for the labor market in the small business management sector to compete for the
   positions of: Assistant Managers, Office Manager/Administrative Services, and Personnel
   Manager/Assistant, among others.
2. To prepare students for the creation of small
   business.

Program Description

The student who finishes and approves this program will be able to participate in the small business sector
by:
1. Assisting in the process of planning, directing, or coordinating the operations of small companies.
2. Supporting the process of formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of
    materials and human resources.
3. Coordinating activities of clerical and administrative personnel in organization.

Program Curriculum

                Course Code              Course Title             Quarter Credit Hour

                                         Administration
                MAN     104              General Administration                    4
                MAN     114              Business Law                              4
                MAN     211              Human Resources Management                4
                MAN     215              Production Administration                 4
                MAN     207              Financial Administration                  4
                MAN     324              Enterprises Planning                      4

                                         Marketing
                MKT     106              Principles of Marketing                   4
                MKT     210              Creation & Develop of Prod                4
                MKT     316              Psychology & Strat. of Sales              4

                                 Personal & Professional Development
                CIS 235                Workshop Computer Science                   4
                CMN 342                Workshop of Communication                   4
                IHD 136                Emotional Intelligence                      4

                                         Modern Languages**
                ENG 126/SPN 125          English or Spanish I                      4
                ENG 224/SPN 223          English or Spanish II                     4
                ENG 342/SPN 341          English or Spanish III                    4
                ENG 424/SPN 423          English or Spanish IV                     4




                                                    33
                Course Code              Course Title            Quarter Credit Hour

                                         Other Credit Hours
                MAN 416                  Internship                               2
                MAN 423*                 Enterprise Fair                          2
                MAN 425*                 Preparation of Enterprise                 1

                                         Total Quarter Credit/Clock Hours 69/750

*This course requires 20 self-study hours
** Before taking any language class, the student must take a verbal and written placement test to verify
his/her English/Spanish level.




                                                    34
                            MARKETING AND SALES MANAGEMENT
                              69 Quarter Credit Hours/750 Clock Hours

Credential Issued: Diploma
Prerequisites: Please find each course prerequisite in the course description section.

Program Objective

1. To prepare students for the labor market in the small business marketing sector to compete for the
   positions of: Assistant Marketing Managers, Sales Assistant Executives, Sales representatives, and
   Sales executive, among others.
2. To prepare students for the creation of small business, in the marketing sector.

Program Description

The student who finishes and approves this program will be able to participate in the marketing and sales
industry by:

1. Assisting in the direction of the actual distribution or movement of a product or service to the
   customer.
2. Supporting sales distribution by establishing sales territories, quotas, and goals.
3. Analyzing sales statistics gathered by staff to determine sales potential and inventory requirements
   and monitor the preferences of customers.
4. Developing pricing strategies with the goal of maximizing the company’s profits while ensuring the
   firm's customers satisfaction.
5. Participating in the design, launch, and development of new goods and services for the market.
6. Collaborate in the decision making about efficient strategies of market development for the company.
7. Participating in the process of developing a marketing plan.

Program Curriculum


                Credits                  Course Title          Quarter Credit Hours

                                         Marketing
                MKT       106            Principles of Marketing                   4
                MKT       210            Creation & Develop of Prod                4
                MKT       316            Psychology & Strategy of Sales            4
                MKT       413            Sales Promotion                           4
                MKT       312            Distribution Channels                     4

                                         Administration
                MAN       104            General Administration                    4
                MAN       114            Business Law                              4
                MAN       207            Financial Administration                  4
                MAN       324            Enterprises Planning                      4

                                 Personal & Professional Development
                CIS 235                Workshop of Computer Science                4
                CMN 342                Workshop of Communication                   4
                IHD 136                Emotional Intelligence                      4



                                                    35
        Credits                 Course Title          Quarter Credit Hours

                                Modern Languages**
        ENG 126/SPN 125         English or Spanish I                     4
        ENG 224/SPN 223         English or Spanish II                    4
        ENG 342/SPN 341         English or Spanish III                   4
        ENG 424/SPN 423         English or Spanish IV                    4

                                Other Credit Hours
        MAN 416                 Internship                          2
        MAN 423*                Enterprise Fair                     2
        MAN 425*                Preparation of Enterprise           1
                                Total Quarter Credit/Clock Hours 69/750

*This course requires 20 self-study hours

** Before taking any language class, the student must take a verbal and written placement test to
verify his/her English/Spanish level.




                                            36
                               ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE
                               68 Quarter Credit Hours/720 Clock Hours
Credential Issued: Diploma
Prerequisites: Please find each course prerequisite in the course description section.

Program Objective

1. To achieve enough English skills, to be able to communicate effectively at the workplace and in the
   social world
2. To help students fit within and understand the American culture, having everyday conversations,
   focusing in Grammar, Reading, Listening and Speaking modules.


Program Description

Our group of highly qualified instructors and staff at this Institution will strive to guide each student
through the learning process. Upon graduation, each student who successfully completes this program
will be able to:

1.   Communicate effectively in the English language
2.   Feel comfortable within the American Culture
3.   Write, understand and speak the language correctly
4.   Establish effective communication at the workplace


Program Curriculum

                Credits                  Course Title          Quarter Credit Hours
                LEVEL I
                ESL 101                  Grammar I                                 4
                ESL 103                  Reading and Composition I                 4
                ESL 105                  Listening I                               4
                ESL 107                  Conversation I                            4
                ESL 111*                 Language Lab I                            1

                LEVEL II
                ESL 201                  Grammar II                                4
                ESL 203                  Reading and Composition II                4
                ESL 205                  Listening II                              4
                ESL 207                  Conversation II                           4
                ESL 211*                 Language Lab II                           1

                LEVEL III
                ESL 301                  Grammar III                               4
                ESL 303                  Reading and Composition III               4
                ESL 305                  Listening III                             4
                ESL 307                  Conversation III                          4
                ESL 311*                 Language Lab III                          1



                                                    37
        Credits                 Course Title        Quarter Credit Hours

        LEVEL IV
        ESL 401                 Grammar IV                             4
        ESL 403                 Reading and Composition IV             4
        ESL 405                 Listening IV                           4
        ESL 407                 Conversation-American Culture          4
        ESL 411*                Language Lab IV                        1

                                 Total Quarter Credit/Clock Hours 68/750

*This course requires20 self-study lab hours

Before taking any of the language classes, the student must take a verbal and written placement
test to verify his/her English level.




                                           38
                                V. COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
                                               Accounting

ACC 102 Principles of Accounting                 Pre: (MAT 115)
This course provides an introductory study of the fundamental principles of recording, summarizing and
reporting the financial activities of proprietorships. Students will learn the basics, from what accounting
information is to how managers use it. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

                                            Communication

CMN 102 – Speech Communications
Designed to introduce students to the basics of the field in a clear, concise, and engaging way. Areas of
study include: Verbal – Non-Verbal Communication, Personal and Intrapersonal Communication, writing
and delivering a speech among others. (4/40 Credit Hours)

CMN 105 – Introduction to Journalism
An introduction to the field, covering how news is produced and delivered, how news organizations work,
and how audiences react to and interact with the news media. Basic instruction in the fundamental
practices of journalism: reporting, writing, editing, and presentation. It also provides an overview of the
rich history of journalism in America (4/40 Credit Hours)

CMN 127 – Theater
Theatre is presented as a global and multicultural form that reflects both traditional and evolving world
views. While the American commercial theatre and European forms are central to the course, alternative
theatres are placed side by side for comparison and contrast. (4/40 Credit Hours)

CMN 232 – Writing for Media
An introduction to the basics of media writing. Areas of study include: Improving overall writing style
with sentence building and punctuation techniques using paper and electronic media material, common
mistakes and linguistic factors. Essay/Composition style, class work/homework based. (4/40 Credit
Hours)

CMN 234 Introduction to Public Speaking
This course is designed to provide students with fundamental training and practical experience for
speaking in public, business, and professional situations. Topics include: audience analysis, speech
anxiety, critical listening, and preparation and delivery of speeches in various cultural contexts. (4/40
quarter credit/clock hours)

CMN 324 Speaking on Radio and Television
Speaking on Radio and Television offers a complete study of creating, writing and broadcasting news.
This course combines the theory of communications and mass media, applied to becoming an effective
storyteller. (4/40 Credit Hours)

CMN 342 Workshop of Communication.
Spelling. Stumbling blocks of the language. Literary figures. Read, write and idiomatic reflections.
Professional Writing. Non-verbal Communication. Verbal Communication. Voice Modulation. Breathing
and Phonation. Body Language. Modalities of Expression. Dialogue and Interview. Social
Communication. Handling of the Professional Language. Professional and Personal Image. Facial
Expression. The excellent presentation. Handling of approach groups. Assertive communication. Public,
enterprise and personal relations. Institutional management. Organization of contests. Mass media. (4/40
quarter credit/clock hours)

                                                    39
CMN 423* Enterprise Fair
In the enterprise fair, the students will present or display their prototype of a new company or product
within the mass media industry. For the project the students will display the objectives of their
participation in the fair, their goals, logistics, prepare an organized logical presentation and a self-
evaluation of their project. (2/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

                                    Computer Information Systems

CIS 235 Workshop of Computer Science
Windows 2000 operating system: Recognition of the writing desk of Windows 2000. To incorporate the
direct access to the writing desk. Arrangement of the writing desk. Tips for the use of the accessories of
Windows. Microsoft Word 2000: How to create a new document. How to open and publish documents.
How to draft documents with presentation of excellence. Falsified resources of Word. Microsoft Excel
2000: How to create new books and spreadsheets. How to create spreadsheets with presentation of
excellence. From the numbers to the images, everything on graphs. Falsified resources of Excel.
Microsoft Power Point 2000: How to create a new presentation. How to process presentations of
excellence. Internet: How to use and navigate the Internet efficiently. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

                                                 Ecology

ECL 210 Ecology
Ecology is a combination of main concepts of natural science presented in an applied perspective rather
than a mainly theoretical. The course is an evolutionary journey beginning with the natural history of the
planet and finishing with current global ecology and aspects of landscaping and geography. (4/40 Credit
Hours)

ECL 221 Ecology and Sustainability
This course presents a broad range of methods and techniques for managing environmental sustainability.
It also examines ecological theory at the individual, populations, and community levels, and it is an
excellent tool for anyone looking to improve the health of their local ecosystems. (4/40 Credit Hours)

                                               Economics

ECO 205 Principles of Economics
A course in principles of economics designed to cover basic economic problems and concepts. Topics
discussed include the role of government in various economic systems, aspects of economic instability,
budgets, supply and demand, and the impact of the public debt. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

                                                 English

ENG 126 English I.
The basic and elementary foundations of the English language. Emphasis in the grammar structures,
elementary phonetics, and simple text understanding to be implemented in the development of vocabulary
and conversation skills. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ENG 224 English II                             Pre: (ENG 126)
The vocabulary is increased. The writing of text intensifies so that the student practices this type of
communication. Study of grammar structures of greater complexity, simultaneously with extended
vocabulary texts as the newspaper content. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)




                                                    40
ENG 234 English Composition I
This course provides a detailed approach to basic writing compositions and English Literature. Students
begin writing basic paragraphs, improving their vocabulary and understanding the mechanic of putting
together sentences in a logical order and using the correct grammar and punctuation. (4/40 quarter
credit/clock hours)

ENG 324 English Composition II                  Pre: (ENG 234)
This course provides a complete analysis of writing in APA Style using the latest edition of the APA
Manual. Students learn and implement formal writing mechanisms which throughout the course should be
applied in a Research Proposal due at the end of the term. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ENG 342 English III                         Pre: (ENG 224)
Specific introduction to the world communication of businesses and profiles. Technical text
understanding focused to the individual professional necessity. The human areas of publicity, trade
resources, and systems. The conversation and oral skills. Pronunciation and the idiomatic expressions.
(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ENG 424 English IV                             Pre: (ENG 342)
Oral Communication. Public Speaking. Interviewing. Research Projects. Scripture of texts of opinion and
technicians. Each one of the four levels has specific areas. These are Grammar Skills, Reading and
Writing, Listening and Conversational Skills and Oral Presentations. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)


                                    English as a Second Language

ESL 101 Grammar I
Introduction to basic and key grammar structures to assure that the student acquires a good foundation of
the language. Introduction to idiomatic expressions. Construction of basic sentences for everyday
communication. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 103 Reading and Composition I
Introduction to basic composition structures. Practice of short compositions. Focus on spelling and
punctuation. The student will practice reading and acquire new vocabulary. (4/40 quarter credit/clock
hours)

ESL 105 Listening I
This course will introduce students to the American sound system and quickly expand their working oral
vocabulary. Focus of pronunciation of vowels and consonants. It will also equip students to understand
and participate in basic conversations with English Speakers. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 107 Conversation I
Development of basic speaking skills and new vocabulary. Practice of everyday conversations and
common topics. This curse will help students to gain confidence when speaking the language and
starting conversations with native speakers. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 111* Language Lab I
Practice in the laboratory for the first level of study. Grammar, Reading, Composition and Listening
exercises. (1/20 quarter credit/clock hours)




                                                   41
ESL 201 Grammar II
Designed for low intermediate students, this course focuses on sentence formation and combining
informal writing with simple paragraph development. Students practice grammatical structures in guided
activities. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 203 Reading and Composition II
Paragraph organization and simple writing techniques
Extensive reading and writing practice to strengthen basic written communication skills in English. (4/40
quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 205 Listening II
Listening practice of simple TV programs, short stories, simple conversations. Practice on pronunciation
and intonation Students become much more aware of their pronunciation and speech problems and
therefore learn to be better speakers. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 207 Conversation II
Students will work on American style conversation techniques learning about small talk, topic
preferences, argument, depth of involvement, nonverbal styles, and active listening. (4/40 quarter
credit/clock hours)

ESL 211* Language Lab II
Practice in the laboratory for the second level of study. Grammar, Reading, Composition and Listening
exercises. (1/20 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 301 Grammar III
Students continue to practice and perfect their use of English grammatical structures, vocabulary, and
sentence and paragraph structure.The course is designed to increase students' knowledge and usage of
complex verb tenses and sentence structures. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 303 Reading and Composition III
Practice on composition In this advanced course students continue to refine their writing skills through
writing journals, formal and informal letters, short compositions and essays. The course also emphasizes
grammatical elements that give the most difficulty to ESL students at this level. (4/40 quarter
credit/clock hours)

ESL 305 Listening III
The course is designed to develop intermediate pronunciation skills, to structure more style in oral
language, and to build confidence in basic oral expression. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 307 Conversation III
The course is designed to improve advanced students' comprehension and oral communication in English
on a broad range of academic and current subjects. Techniques and practice on public speaking, and oral
presentations. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 311*Language Lab III
Practice in the laboratory for the third level of study. Grammar, Reading, Composition and Listening
exercises. (1/20 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 401 Grammar IV
The course is designed to increase students' knowledge and usage of advanced English grammar, to
improve grammatical accuracy in writing, and to develop strong editing skills. (4/40     quarter
credit/clock hours)


                                                   42
ESL 403 Reading and Composition IV
This is a writing project class. International students put their
creative energy together to write an international student newspaper for each term of class. They create
their own art work, write their own articles, design the paper, collect information, interview other students
and teachers, and put it all together and print copies for everyone to read. The teacher helps guide the
creation process and correct students’ writings. The teacher helps the students with ideas for the
newspaper and sees that the paper meets its publishing deadline. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 405 Listening IV
The course is designed to refine pronunciation, to reduce foreign accent, and to build confidence in
complex oral expression. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ESL 407 Conversation-American Culture
This class focuses on the many kinds of American idiomatic and slang vocabulary and expressions that
students hear in conversations, TV programs, movies, and read in American books, magazines, and
newspapers. We study regional vocabulary differences, generational differences, and subculture slang
and expressions such as come from African American and Hispanic subcultures (4/40           quarter
credit/clock hours)

ESL 411* Language Lab IV
Practice in the laboratory for the fourth level of study. Grammar, Reading, Composition and Listening
exercises. (1/20 quarter credit/clock hours)

                                                   Ethics

ETH 207 Introduction to Business Ethics
This course provides an approach to making ethical decisions in the business environment. Students will
be able to analyze real life case studies related to ethical dilemmas, human behavior in the workplace, and
decision making in different departments of an organization. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

ETH 234 Ethics and Mass Media
By combining real-life and hypothetical cases with a succinct introduction to ethical theory, this class
helps students prepare for the ethical situations they will encounter in the media professions. (4/40 Credit
Hours)

                                                  History

HIS 221 Western Civilization
A historical examination of Western culture from its beginnings in the Near East to the launch of the
modern period in the 17th century. This course examines history as a cultural force including the concepts
of the political, economic, social, religious, intellectual, cultural, and military aspects of history. (4/40
quarter credit/clock hours)

HIS 224 History of Art
This course explores the traditions of music, painting, sculpture and architecture of the Western world. It
is an introduction to many individual works from important art periods, dating from the Greeks and their
predecessors to the present time. (4/40 Credit Hours)




                                                     43
                                                 Humanities

HUM 325 Critical Thinking
This course focuses on a systematic evaluation of arguments based upon explicit rational criteria. Basic
fundamentals along with simplified explanations help the student to develop greater confidence within
social issues. Course assignments are group orientated including a series of question-asking critical
thinking topics. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

HUM 334 Holistic Human Development
class is designed to encourage students to explore how they relate to their inner being and the cosmos
without involving religious conceptions. Some of the ideas discussed include: levels of being, ability to
accurately perceive the world, and convergent and divergent problems. Moral values will be strengthened.
(4/40 Credit Hours)

                                   International Business Management

IBM 108 Introduction to International Business
This course provides an overview of the international business industry. Students are introduced to the
concept of a global economy with attention given to economic, cultural, and political factors affecting
international business. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

IBM 114 International Finance and Law
This course is designed to introduce students to the laws and regulations governing international trade
including knowledge of import-export activities, banking, treaties, and currency exchange rates. (4/40
quarter credit/clock hours)

IBM 210 Global Marketing (PRE: MKT 106)
The student will be able to discuss entry strategies, global communications, marketing mix, public
relations and sales promotions based on the facts affecting international industry. (4/40 quarter
credit/clock hours)

IBM 211 International Trade
This course is designed to examine the current dilemmas of trade based on the roles of the GATT, WTO,
and NAFTA among others. The student will be able to identify and discuss its functions. (4/40 quarter
credit/clock hours)

IBM 315 Logistics Management (PRE: IBM 211)
The student will be able to understand basic terms, concepts and principles of the logistics business,
affecting today’s international environment. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

IBM 324 Import and Export
The student will be able to identify and simulate the import and export process including export and
import business associations and resources. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

IBM 423* Enterprise Fair
In the enterprise fair, the students will present or display their prototype of a new company or the
company in operation. For the project the students will display the objectives of their participation in the
fair, their goals, logistics, prepare an organized logical presentation and a self-evaluation of their project.
(2/40 quarter credit/clock hours)




                                                      44
                                                  Italian


ITA 101 Introduction to Italian
Introduction to Italian offers a four-skills and communicative introduction to Italian language and culture.
The text combines communicative activities and streamlined vocabulary and grammar exercises coupled
with revised and expanded cultural material. (4/40 Credit Hours)

                                      Integral Human Development

IHD 136 Emotional Intelligence
Self-knowledge. Dynamic Intuition. Techniques of Super-Learning. The Control of the Emotions. The
Affective Climate Relations. Influence with Integrity. Creation of the Organizational Future. Auto-
Conscience. Development of the Holistic Conscience. The Holistic Conscience in Action. Yoga and
Meditation. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

IHD 138 Personality Enneagram
The Enneagram is an ancient Sufi teaching that describes nine different personality types and their
interrelationships. The teaching help us to recognize our own type and how to cope with our issues;
understand our work associates, lovers, family, and friends; and to appreciate the predisposition that each
type has for a higher human capacities such as empathy, omniscience, and love. (1/10 quarter
credit/clock hours)

                                               Management

MAN 104 General Administration
Definition, importance, characteristics, functions and levels of administration. The school of
administrative thought. The surroundings of the organization. Planning, organizing, directing, and control.
(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MAN 114 Business Law
The companies, the retailers and the organisms of the mercantile activity. Society contributions, utilities,
direction and control, representation, fiscal overhaul, liquidation and classes. Title values; nominative
case, at your service, to the carrier, letters, you will pay, checks, bonds, certificates, invoices. Straight
individual. The labor law. The contract of work, the wage, the day, the benefits. The tributary obligations.
Taxes. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MAN 207 Financial Administration               Pre: (MAN 104)
Countable Principles. The accounts. The financial books. Balance of Accounts. Worksheets. Profit Loss
and Gains. General Balance Sheet. Inventories. Fixed, tangible, intangible assets, depreciation.
Importance of cost accounting as a system of administrative control. Elements of the cost. The systems of
costs. The costs in the decision making. Financial statements, analysis of systems, financial reasons,
stages of the analysis, state and origin of application of bottoms. Sources of financing. Positioning of
profits(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MAN 211Human Resource Management               Pre: (MAN 104)
Nature and concepts of the personnel administration. Administration of personnel in the organization.
Entailment of personnel. Development of personnel. Administrative management and evaluation of
personnel. Remuneration. Social welfare. Labor relations. Process for the evaluation of the design of the
wage structure. Analysis and description of the jobs. The evaluation systems. The structure of wages. The
administration of wages. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)



                                                     45
MAN 215 Production Administration             Pre: (MAN 104)
Development, function and organization of the production department. Relation of the production
department with other areas. The company productivity. Planning of the production. Production by lots.
Point of balance. Allocation and sequencing. Programming for several products. Industrial security.
Quality control. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MAN 324 Enterprises Planning                   Pre: (MAN 215)
Preparation of a project of investment in agreement with the parameters of the Bank. Consolidation of the
"enterprise work": Structure of market, production, administration, and finances. Evaluation of business.
Introduction to Strategic Planning. Corporate Principles, Vision and Mission. Strategic Diagnosis,
Options and Formulation. Development plan. Fixation of goals, time keeping, monitoring and controls.
(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MAN 326 Organizational Behavior
Organizational behavior as it relates to the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and
controlling is the focus of this course. Examination is made of the individual’s role within the
organization, of interpersonal influence and group behavior, and of organizational processes. The course
will provide the tools necessary for the development of a personal management philosophy. (4/40 Credit
clock quarter hours).

MAN 414 Organizational Leadership
This course is designed to help develop the “social intelligence” critical to success in any career. Personal
effectiveness in most of the organizations requires the ability to mobilize vital support from a diverse set
of interdependent members in order to achieve the objectives desired. This highly interactive course is
designed to develop the student’s skills in recognizing and analyzing situations requiring social
intelligence, developing adequate power bases, and influencing others. (4/40 Credit clock quarter
hours)

MAN 416 Internship in Business
As part of the diploma of Small Business Management, the student is required to participate in a 60 hour
internship at an organization acceptable to the institution. The instructor, student and employer will
coordinate the assignment of hours and duties satisfactory to all the parties. (4/40 quarter credit/clock
hours)

MAN 418 Management Theories
This course is intended to help develop basic and practical knowledge about Management. It introduces
students to the fundamental elements of business management. Topics include history, planning and
organizing. Students learn to apply these concepts to real business situations through actual case studies.
(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MAN 423* Enterprise Fair PRE: (MAN 211)
In the enterprise fair, the students will present or display their prototype of a new company or the
company in operation. For the project the students will display the objectives of their participation in the
fair, their goals, logistics, prepare an organized logical presentation and a self-evaluation of their project.
(2/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MAN 425* Preparation of Enterprise PRE(MAN 423)
Final Project. Preparation of a written report of an enterprise case study, or an owned enterprise.
Deliverance of the report to the academic instructors and students. Show professionalism and articulation
throughout the presentation. The project developed is extensively familiar to the student. (1/20 quarter
credit/clock hours)



                                                      46
                                                 Marketing

MKT 106 Principles of Marketing
Identify the needs of the market. Understand the concepts of macroeconomics, microeconomics, product,
price, promotion, publicity. In addition, the student will conduct marketing cases that include market
studies, marketing administration, promotion, distribution, and sales logistic. (4/40 quarter credit/clock
hours)

MKT 210 Creation and Development Products PRE:(MKT 106)
Development of a new product, sources for its creation. Analysis of the product: packing, labeling and
quality of the product or service. Determine characteristics product and target market. (4/40 quarter
credit/clock hours)

MKT 312 Distribution Channels
Nature of distribution channels. Intermediaries in distribution channels. Functions of each one of them,
types of channels, decision of selection depending of the type of product. Administrative and dynamic
decisions on the selected channel or channels. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MKT 316 Psychology and Strategy of Sales
Strategies for the selling process. Identification of demand, and costs. Analysis of prices of competition,
selection sales policy, discounts by volume, terms of payment, lines of credit. The force of sales, strategy
used to promote products, development of promotion and strategies of sales, development of techniques
for the closing of a sale. Knowledge of the pros and cons of the sale, how to be audacious with the client.
(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MKT 413 Sales Promotion                      PRE: (MKT 210)
Promotion strategies for the sales force. The sales promotion for wholesalers, retailers, promotion in
distribution channels, promotion for buyers. Identification of strategies to establish a long-term
relationship with the customer. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

MKT 416 Internship in Marketing
As part of the diploma of Marketing and Sales Management, the student is required to participate in a 60
hour internship at an organization acceptable to the institution. The instructor, student and employer will
coordinate the assignment of hours and duties satisfactory to all the parties. (2/60 quarter credit/clock
hours)

MKT 423 Enterprise Fair*                        PRE: (MKT 106)
In the enterprise fair, the students will present or display their prototype of a new company or the
company in operation. For the project the students will display the objectives of their participation in the
fair, their goals, logistics, prepare an organized logical presentation and a self-evaluation of their project.
(2/40 quarter credit/clock hours)


MKT 424 Marketing Enterprises Planning PRE: (MKT 316)
Preparation of a project of investment in agreement with the parameters of the Bank. Consolidation of the
enterprise work: Structure of market, production, administrative, and financial. Evaluation. Introduction
to the Strategic Planning: Corporate Principles. Vision. Mission. Strategic Diagnosis. Strategic Options.
Strategic Formulation. Development plan: Fixation of goals, time keeping, monitoring, and control. (4/40
quarter credit/clock hours)




                                                      47
                                                Mathematics

MAT 115 Introduction to Algebra
A basic level college algebra course including topics such as solving, applying and graphing linear and
quadratic equations and inequalities, as well as exponential and logarithmic properties; linear quadratic,
rational, absolute value and square root functions; functions operations, compositions and inverses; and
systems of equations and inequalities, all among applications taught and used throughout this course
level. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

                                                 Psychology

PSY 201 Introduction to Psychology
This course is designed to introduce students to the basics of psychology theory. Concepts of latest
research will be applied to personal experiences of students. Topics covered include memory, cognition,
development, and personality. (4/40 Credit Hours)

                                            Physical Education

PHE 231 Stress Management & Yoga I
This course provides a physical and theoretical application of yoga studies and practices aiming for
spiritual and mental wellness. Students will be able to reduce stress and experience peace of mind,
combined with a responsible and healthy nutritious plan. (1.5/15 quarter credit/clock hours)

PHE 323 Balanced Life with Thai Chi
This course consists of an experiential workshop. Through the practice of tai chi, student will
aim to achieve physical, emotional and mental balance. (2/20 quarter credit/clock hours)

PHE 233 Aerobics for Health
Students will learn and use basic movements of aerobics and its variations. Guidance will be given to
master difficult movements and avoid injury. Important issues about a healthy life style will be discussed.
Students will improve cardio-respiratory fitness through activities that combine exercise and rhythmical
movement and increase wellness knowledge. (2/20 quarter credit/clock hours)

PHE 235 Weight Training
This course teaches basic weight training principles. Applied learning through lecture and physical
fitness will help students to apply themselves in a well organized weight training program leading to
increased strength and overall fitness. Students will also learn basic dieting and health benefits while
learning more about the human body and its fitness components. Proper gear and attire is required. (2/20
quarter credit/clock hours)

PHE 321 Stress Management and Yoga II
This course provides a deeper physical and theoretical application of yoga studies and practices aiming
for physical, spiritual and mental wellness. (2/20 quarter credit/clock hours)

                                                  Sociology

SOC 201 Introduction to Sociology
Students will learn to apply critical analytical thinking to society and their lives. A variety of sociological
theories and concepts will be used to understand the roots and emergence of society and its application.
(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)




                                                      48
                                                 Spanish

SPN 125 Spanish I
Basic and elementary foundations of the Spanish language. Emphasis in it grammar structures, the
elementary phonetics and in the simple text understanding to implement the vocabulary and conversation.
(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

SPN 223 Spanish II                           PRE: (SPN 125)
The vocabulary is increased. The writing of tests intensifies so that the student practices each type of
communication. Grammar structures of greater complexity study, simultaneously with texts with
extended vocabulary are translated as the newspaper content of Hispanic speech. (4/40 quarter
credit/clock hours)

SPN 341 Spanish III                            PRE: (SPN 223)
Specific introduction to the world of the businesses and profiles. Technical text understanding focused to
the professional necessity of each one of the individuals. The human areas of publicity, trade resources,
and systems. The conversation and oral skills. Pronunciation and idiomatic expressions. (4/40 quarter
credit/clock hours)

SPN 423 Spanish IV                              PRE: (SPN 341)
Communication of the oral language. Public speaking, decision-making, interview, and other.
Investigative works. Scripture of texts of opinion and technicians. Each one of the four levels has specific
areas. These are Grammar Skills, Reading and Writing, Listening and Conversational skills. The courses
have emphasis in this last one. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)


                                   Travel and Tourism Management

TTM 104 Introduction to Travel and Tourism Industry
This course provides an overview of the travel and tourism industry. Areas of study include
transportation, accommodation, business travel, and local tourism. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

TTM 106 Travel and Tourism Geography
This course provides the student with world wide knowledge on travel and tourism. Including tourism in
different continents and its relation to international travel. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

TTM 203 Process Reservations
Agency terms and travel vendors, product lines, and commissions. Airline Reporting Corporation (ARC)
and International Air Transport Network (IATN). Information required to sell airline space, hotel space,
tours, cruise, and ground transportation. Booking procedures and auxiliary product lines. International
travel requirements. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

TTM 205 Marketing in Travel and Tourism
The student will be able to determine the characteristics of a product and its commercialization within the
travel and tourism industry. In addition this course will focus on sales promotions, promotion, strategies
for the sales force and strategies to develop costumer’s relationships. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

TTM 308 Process Reservations and Technology
This course is designed to learn and identify the different software systems to conduct reservations. The
student will also understand the importance of the Internet in the travel and tourism industry as a research
tool. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)


                                                    49
TTM 310 Travel and Tourism laws
The student will identify and use the current rules and regulations within the travel and tourism industry.
In addition, the participant will be able to compare custom regulations involving articles free of U.S. Duty
Tax, personal exemption, forbidden and restricted items, and duty-free ports. (4/40 quarter credit/clock
hours)

TTM 316 Travel Agency Management
Characteristics of a travel agency. Licensing and regulations. Relationship between the travel agency and
other subcontractors. Group travel promotions. (4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)

TTM 423 Enterprise Fair*
In the enterprise fair, the students will present or display their prototype of a new company or the
company in operation. For the project the students will display the objectives of their participation in the
fair, their goals, logistics, prepare an organized logical presentation and a self-evaluation of their project.
(4/40 quarter credit/clock hours)




                                     “Student Entrepreneurship Fair”




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                                    Thoughts from our founder
                               JULIO ALBERTO MOYANO-FERRER
                                          1940 - 2004




The student is a complex being that has a physical body, an emotional body, an intellectual body, an astral
body, an intuitive body, and a cosmic body. This totality is qualified as holistic. Therefore, an education
that focuses only on the intellectual body is very partial since it disregards the truly important bodies of
the individual, which are the emotional and cosmic bodies. In the knowledge field, we find that holistic
education should also attend to the needs of intuitive knowledge learning, which is known as emotional
intelligence. This is our philosophy at UNILATINA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE.




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