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					             Toronto
aT T r a c T i o n s p a s s p o r T ™




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aT T r a c T i o n s pa s s p o r T ® i s a r E g i s T E r E D T r a D E m a r k o f
                  Va n n aT T E r H o s p i Ta l i T y g r o u p i n c .
         D b a , c i T y pa s s p o r T ®. u s E D b y p E r m i s s i o n .
for more tourist information on Toronto contact:
Toronto Convention & Visitors Association
P.O. Box 126, 207 Queens Quay West
Toronto, Ontario
M5J 1A7
Canada
Tel: (416) 203-2600
Toll-Free: 1 (800) 499-2514
Email Inquiries: toronto@torcvb.com
All photos in the About the City and What to See sections
of both Niagara Falls and Toronto, unless otherwise
indicated, are copyright of Tourism Toronto.

i m p o r Ta n T n oT E s
1. This edition expires May 31, 2009.
2. Savings are in Canadian dollars.
3. Offers are subject to availability, and are limited to the
   locations, times, terms and conditions indicated.
4. Offers are not redeemable for cash.
5. Offers cannot be combined with any other discount or
   promotion.
6. Offers do not include tax unless otherwise indicated.
7. Applicable taxes must be paid by the bearer.
8. Redemption is the responsibility of the merchant.
9. Restaurant offers exclude tax, alcohol, and gratuity.


s u g g E s T E D r E Ta i l p r i c E o f c $24. 9 5
contents
To r o n To 5
           5 about the city
           5 An Introduction to Toronto
           6 History of Toronto
          13 Feature Story: St. Lawrence Market tells the
             Saga of Toronto
           19    What to see
           33    Feature Story:
                 Explore Toronto Neighbourhoods
           41    Feature Story:
                 The Gooderham Building
           45    Feature Story:
                 The Fairmont Royal York Hotel
           49    Calender of Events
           54    offer Descriptions
           54    Attractions
           62    Sightseeing
           76    Entertainment
           80    Restaurants

n i a g a r a fa l l s   93
           93    about the city
           93    An Introduction to Niagara Falls
           96    History of Niagara Falls
         101     What to see
         109     Calender of Events
         117     offer Descriptions
         117     Entertainment
         117     Attractions

offErs        125
    This page: Toronto’s Streetcar System.
    Opposite page: The view from the CN Tower


4
                                                              abouT THE ciTy
Toronto
a n i n T r o D u c T i o n To To r o n To
Situated 566 feet above sea level on the northern shore
of Lake Ontario (part of the Great Lakes system), Toronto
is one of the southernmost cities in Canada. In fact, it
has nearly the same latitude as northern California.
•   Home to more than 100 cultures, Toronto truly is the
    world within a city™
•   With a population of 4.2 million, Toronto is Canada’s
    largest city
•   Toronto is the 5th-largest city in North America, after
    Mexico City, New York, Los Angeles and Chicago
•   One quarter of Canada’s population is located within
    160 km (100 mi) of the city
                                                              Toronto




•   More than 60% of the population of the United States
    is within a 90 minute flight



                                                               5
    As the capital of Ontario, Toronto is the seat of govern-
    ment for Canada’s most populous province and is the
    industrial and business centre for the country.

    H i s To r y o f To r o n To
    The history of the modern City of Toronto began in
    1793 when Lieutenant-Governor John Graves Simcoe
    ordered the construction of a garrison on the present
    site of Fort York and then moved the provincial capital to
    Toronto from Niagara. Civilian settlement followed and a
    community named “York” began to grow two kilometres
    east of the fort. Although the founding of this city dates
    to Simcoe’s time, human activity in the Toronto area
    extended back thousands of years.
    At the beginning of the eighteenth century, the people
    who lived in the area were the Mississaugas, a branch
    of the Algonkian Ojibways from central Ontario who had
    pushed the Iroquoian Senecas out of the region at the
    end of the previous century. (Seneca occupation itself
    was relatively short, beginning about the mid-1600s,
    following the Iroquois dispersal of the Hurons.) Unlike the
    sedentary and agricultural Senecas, the Mississaugas
    did not live in permanent villages, but moved between
    seasonal hunting and fishing camps within their territory.
    In 1700, one of the more significant features of the
    region was the “Toronto Passage”, a water and portage
    route connecting Lake Ontario to Georgian Bay and
    then on to the northern interior of the continent. The
    French established a fur trade post near the Humber
    River in 1720 to exploit the passage. They left in 1730,
    but returned twenty-one years later, building Fort Rouille
    (near today’s CNE Bandshell) as a small out-station of
    Fort Niagara. When the British captured the larger fort in
    1759, the garrison in Fort Rouille burned their post and
    withdrew to Cataraqui (now Kingston). British rule of the


     Yonge and Dundas Square




                                                             abouT THE ciTy
Toronto region followed the end of the Seven Years’ War
in 1763.
The next thirty years were a quiet time for Toronto. The
Mississaugas continued to hunt and fish through the
region, and a handful of French-Canadian fur traders
took advantage of the Toronto Passage as they sought a
replacement for the hinterland lost to the new American
republic south of the Great Lakes. In the mid 1780s,
a number of traders and their dependents asked for
land on the Toronto Passage in hopes of profiting from
                                                             Toronto




what they thought would become an important com-
mercial route. Their names reflected the diversity of late
eighteenth century Ontario’s population. For example,

                                                              7
         Crowds at a MuchMusic event on Queen St. West




    some of the petitioners were Phillipe Francois de Rastel
    de Rocheblave (a European soldier who served the
    British in the Illinois country), Benjamin Frobisher (a
    Montreal fur trader), French-Canadians Francois and
    Louis Marchetere, Jacob Weimer (a German), the “Widow
    Orillat”, Elizabeth Lord, plus United Empire Loyalists
    Richard Beasley and Peter Smyth.
8
In response to this interest in Toronto, the government
paid the Mississaugas £1,700 in cash and goods for the
area in 1787. Gother Mann of the Royal Engineers subse-
quently surveyed a town site, but, in the end, the petition-




                                                               abouT THE ciTy
ers did not get their land and the promise of substantial
fur trade prosperity was never realized.
Agriculture ultimately generated more wealth than
the fur trade in late eighteenth century Toronto. Even
before Simcoe’s arrival, a few Loyalists began to farm
the region. Little is known about these people except
for occasional passing references, such as a remark by
Elizabeth Simcoe rowing “6 miles up the Donn” about a
month after her arrival in 1793, “o Coons, a farm under
a hill covered with Pine.” The number of such people was
small. Governor Simcoe thought only fifteen families
between Burlington and the Bay of Quinte before he
moved here in 1793.
In the spring of 1793, it seemed likely that hostilities
would break out with the United States. The Americans
and the Western Tribes were at war, and the British,
allied to the Aboriginal peoples, expected the conflict
to spread to Upper Canada. Therefore, Simcoe decided
to establish a naval base at Toronto and build Fort York
to protect it. He also encouraged civilian settlement to
ensure an adequate supply of food and other goods and
services to meet the military’s needs. In Simcoe’s mind,
Toronto’s defensible harbour would allow the British to
control Lake Ontario, while the Toronto Passage would
enable troops and supplies to move to the upper lakes
should the Americans cut the Lake Erie-Detroit River
route to the northwest.
The first arrivals in the new settlement were the Queen’s
                                                               Toronto




Rangers, a regiment whose officers were a mix of
American Loyalists and Britons, and whose lower ranks


                                                                9
     Canadian Geese sculptures in the Eaton Centre




           consisted mainly of soldiers recruited in the United King-
           dom. The civilian population of York in the 1790s was a
           diverse group which included immigrants from Germany
           who arrived via New York under the leadership of William
           Berczy, Loyalists with British, Dutch and German back-
           grounds, French royalists fleeing the troubles in Europe,
           some French-Canadians, Pennsylvanian Mennonites, a
           few Black people, plus individuals from all over England,
           Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Meanwhile, the Missis-
           saugas continued to live in the region and interacted
           extensively with the new arrivals.
           The Simcoe Years were a difficult time for the people
           of York. Although the war scare with the United States

10
               passed in 1794, poor relations with
               the Mississaugas produced the fear of
               violent confrontation for both Natives and
               newcomers in the middle 1790s. York’s




                                                              abouT THE ciTy
               isolation shut the town off from the rest
               of the province for most of the winter, and
               food shortages were so severe that the
               government had to issue army rations to
               the civilian population. When the Simcoes
               left York for the last time in 1796, Toronto
               was a backwoods government and mil-
               itary settlement, with about 300 people
               in the town, 175 in the garrison, 450 on
               the surrounding farms, plus a few hundred
               Mississaugas who lived along the north
               shore of Lake Ontario.
               York continued to grow slowly as the
               eighteenth century closed. Immigration
               did not accelerate until after the War of
               1812 and the start of the massive migra-
               tion to Canada from the United Kingdom
               – migration that changed Toronto’s
               character significantly.
There are some reminders of eighteenth century Toronto
for people to see today. Within the city, Fort York pre-
serves the site of the founding of Toronto and displays
cannon and other artifacts from the Simcoe years. In the
CNE grounds, a monument marks the site of Fort Rouille,
and Scadding Cabin, a stone’s throw away, recalls
the first years of civilian settlement. Various artifacts
associated with these early days are displayed in other
museums and institutions elsewhere in the greater
                                                              Toronto




Toronto region. Below ground, particularly at Fort York,
but elsewhere in the city, archaeological resources await
exploration to fill in some of the gaps about the shadowy
history of eighteenth century Toronto.
                                                              11
     a WorlD WiTHin a ciT y
     The world within a city™ doesn’t just refer to the wealth
     of dining, shopping and theatre experiences Toronto has
     to offer; the personality of the city is reflected in this
     slogan as well.
     Toronto is known as one of the most culturally diverse
     cities in the world, and Torontonians take pride in the
     knowledge that Toronto’s citizens do not have to be
     homogenous to have a peaceful, thriving city.
     Toronto’s personality is an expression of its people.
     Rather than a melting pot, Toronto is represented by a
     mosaic of colourful cultures from around the world. Indi-
     viduals often retain their cultural identities – complete
     with traditions, languages and customs – while extending
     a united hand of friendship, openness and pride to the
     world as Torontonians.
     You’ll see this personality in the vibrant, quirky neigh-
     bourhoods. You’ll experience it in the diversity of
     Toronto’s art, theatre, and dining. And you’ll find it in the
     smiles on the faces of Torontonians as they welcome and
     converse with you.




12
f E aT u r E s To r y




                                                               abouT THE ciTy
st. lawrence market
Tells The saga of Toronto

“The story of the St. Lawrence Market is the story of
Toronto, once Canada’s imperial city”, Bruce Bell, actor,
history columnist, author and guide extraordinaire,
commented as we began our tour of Toronto’s historic
Nutcracker Neighbourhood – the renovated old section
of the city which includes the famous St Lawrence
Market. It is Toronto’s most colourful, friendly and most
historic quarter, full of nostalgia and warmth. Every place
a visitor turns to in this area, once edging the waterfront,
there are relics from the past, reborn in the present.
“What are you going to see is only a minuscule part of
this once magnificent part of our city. Most buildings
had crumpled into dust before our city fathers began to
save the remaining gems.” Our guide seemed to snicker
as he led us up the stairs to the Grand Ballroom of the
                                                               Toronto




renovated St. Lawrence Town Hall, built in the 1850s – a
part of the St. Lawrence Market complex which holds
court over a revitalized section of old Toronto. In the
ensuing years, the Hall became the throbbing heart of
                                                               13
     high society in York, which was later to become Toronto.
     The centre for the elite of the day, it witnessed in its Ball-
     room many concerts and society balls and for near half a
     century, it served as Toronto’s second city hall.
     All the fathers of Confederation spoke inside its walls and
     for half a century it was to Canada what the White House
     is to the Americans and what Buckingham Palace is to
     the British. The Town Hall later went into ruin, then after
     renovation, this ornate Victorian structure was, in 1967,
     declared a National Historic Site and opened for special
     functions such as weddings and other celebrations.
      As we moved out onto the street, a farmer in our group
     shyly commented to our guide, “You know! I sold my farm

14
               products in the adjoining St. Lawrence
               Market for fifty years and I did not know
               this Town Hall existed.” Bell smiled, “I
               know! Our historic societies do not seem




                                                             abouT THE ciTy
               to be able to expose our history to the
               general public.”
               He continued as we turned the corner on
               what was in the past known as Market
               Street, “Do you see the street name
               anywhere? Yet, here was once the heart
               of the original Toronto.” Pointing across
               the street, he went on, “See that corner?
               In the 1800s, in place of that ugly modern
               building, there was a popular inn humming
               with activity. A little further down, there
               used to stand the Franks Hotel in front of
               which, hangings, watched by the public,
               often took place. In those days, this type
               of execution was frequent. A person or
               even a child could be hung for stealing a
               loaf of bread.”
                 “Look around! You will not see any plaque
or sign telling the visitor about these important events
or places in our city’s history”, Bell continued, “You now
know what I mean when I say that this most important
part of Toronto is now virtually forgotten.”
A few feet further on and we were standing in Market
Square watching Morris dancers perform. With black-
ened faces and strange clothing, they performed to a
medieval-like beat. There are many theories as to the
origin of this English dance, but, to me, their perfor-
mance left no doubt that the name Morris is a corruption
                                                             Toronto




of the word ‘Moorish’, originating with the black captives
brought back to England from Moorish Spain by English


                                                             15
     Crusaders helping the Spaniards fight
     the Muslims.
     From the Square, we moved into the
     northern part of the bustling St. Lawrence
     Market, built of wood in 1803 when the
     land bound by Front, King, Jarvis and
     Church Street was designated the ‘Market
     Block’ where local farmers came to sell
     their produce. It has continued until our
     day as being ‘the place’ for the sale by
     farmers of their fruits, vegetables, meat
     and cheese.
     The Market was also once the home
     of Toronto’s City Hall, police station,
     jailhouse and a fisherman’s wharf. Over
     the years, the original Market has been
     rebuilt or revitalized and new additions
     have been added – the last in 1967 as
     Toronto’s Centennial project. Today, now
     made up of three separate buildings, this
     historic Toronto showplace stands as a
     living reminder of the city’s history.
     The North Market is well known for its extensive Saturday
     offerings. Farmers from all over southern Ontario bring
     their fresh seasonal produce to sell to customers who
     often arrive at early dawn. While being tantalized by
     seductive food aromas, shoppers experience a world
     from the past enshrined in the 21st century. Tourists
     and other visitors often come just to experience the
     atmosphere of a modern soul whose history goes back
     some 200 years.
     For many, the most interesting building is the South
     Market which contains many eating places and countless
     specialty vendors who sell fruit, vegetables, meat, fish,

1
                                                              abouT THE ciTy
grain, baked goods, dairy products, as well as non-food
items, such as housewares and plants. Shoppers have a
wide choice of excellent fine foods and home
knick-knacks.
Upstairs, the second floor of the South Market houses
the Market Gallery – the official exhibition center for the
City of Toronto Archives. Here are exhibited paintings,
artifacts, photographs, maps, and other documents from
the City’s extensive archival collections. A complimen-
tary Children’s Activity Center is located in the South
                                                              Toronto




Market on Saturday, where children are watched and can
play, leaving parents free to browse on their own.


                                                              17
     Like most visitors, we ended our tour at the neo-Gothic
     St. James Cathedral, almost edging the Market. Built
     in 1807 and incorporating the highest church towers in
     Canada, it was the first cathedral church built in York. Its
     Gothic-medieval architecture is considered to be the best
     in Canada and it is the only church in North America with
     twelve bells.
     At this historic church we ended our tour of Toronto’s
     historic Nutcracker Neighborhood. It was a charming
     journey back to where the foundation stone of the city
     was set. Narrated by our guide, Bruce Bell, a lover of
     Toronto’s history, the story of the city came alive.
     —Habeeb Salloum




                              Habeeb Salloum, a member of Travel Media
                              Association of Canada (TMAC), lived his youth in
                              Saskatchewan, western Canada, then after serving
                              in the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943-45, he
                              moved to Toronto where he now resides. After
                              retirement, he became a full-time freelance writer
                              and author.

                               Mr. Salloum has travelled extensively to most parts
                               of the world and has written hundreds of articles
                               about the countries through which he travelled and
     about their cuisines. Currently, Habeeb Salloum spends his time traveling
     and writing about his travels.

     His writings are published in a series of newspapers and magazines in North
     America, Europe and the Middle East. He lives in Toronto, Canada with his
     wife and one of his daughters, who is kept busy proof-reading his works.




18
What to see in
Toronto




                                                                   W H aT T o s E E
The cn Tower                          rogers centre
The CN Tower is recog-                (see city passport offer)
nized by the Guinness                 Toronto is home to the
Book of World Records                 world’s only retractable
as the World’s Tallest                domed stadium, the
Building and Free-Standing            Rogers Centre, formerly
Structure. The Tower holds            known as the “SkyDome”.
a number of other world               The Rogers Centre is an
records including World’s             all-season venue where
Longest Metal Staircase               events and conferences
and World’s Highest Wine              requiring a portion of the
Cellar. In 1995, the CN               full stadium capacity of
Tower was classified as               over 60,000 guests can
one of the Seven Wonders              be staged in a climate
of the Modern World by the            controlled environment or
American Society of Civil             open-air stadium. From
Engineers. The CN Tower is            May to late October, this
also home to Marketplace              stadium is a versatile
at the Tower (a 12,500 sq.            venue suitable for staging
ft. shopping experience),             sports or entertainment
Observation Levels, The               spectacles in an open-air
                                                                   Toronto




360 Restaurant and other              stadium. Toronto Blue
special events.                       Jays baseball, Toronto
(416) 601-4741 • 301 Front St. West   Argonauts football, motor-
(Beside the Rogers Centre)
                                                                   19
     cross, and Les Misérables           ian financier and military
     in concert, to name just a          officer Sir Henry Pellatt
     few previously successful           was built between 1911
     events.                             and 1914. The castle has
     (416) 341-2222 • 1 Blue Jays Way    secret passageways, a
     (Front and Peter St., west of the   treasure-trove of Pellatt
     CN Tower)

     Harbourfront centre
     Toronto’s most exciting
     and innovative venue for
     the arts, recreation and
     entertainment. Every year
     Harbourfront produces
     almost 4,000 events, from
     craft workshops and sail-
     ing lessons to jazz festivals
     and food fairs. In summer,
     enjoy the outdoor concerts
     and weekend festivals or
                                         heirlooms, real castle
     spend a few hours strolling
                                         charm, and two hectares
     beside the water. In winter,
                                         (five acres) of stunning
     check out the galleries,
                                         gardens with roses,
     dance season and theatre
                                         rare native wildflowers,
     productions, or skate
                                         colourful rhododendrons,
     by the lake on Canada’s
                                         azaleas, and old-fashioned
     largest artificial ice rink.
                                         perennial borders.
     (416) 973-4000 • 235 Queens
     Quay West                           (416) 923-1171 • 1 Austin Terrace


     casa loma                           Exhibition place
     (see city passport offer)           Exhibition Place is a 192
     Casa Loma is a medieval-            acre site located next to
     style castle perched just           Lake Ontario. With twenty
     north of the northern               five historic buildings
     extreme of the Annex. This          and structures and The
     former home of Canad-               National Trade Centre,
                                         Exhibition Place welcomes
20
                              The Hockey Hall of Fame
                              was founded in Septem-
                              ber 1943 to establish a
                              memorial to those who
                              have developed Canada’s
                              great winter sport – ice




                                                                   W H aT T o s E E
over 5 million visitors to    hockey. More than just
the grounds throughout        your typical sports
the year including during     museum, the Hall features
the annual CNE. The           over 57,000 square feet
park areas at Exhibition      of interactivity, hands-
Place have over 2,430         on games, theatres, the
trees, rose gardens and       finest collection of hockey
flowerbeds all maintained     artifacts from around the
by a lake water irrigation    world and is home to the
system.                       coveted Stanley Cup! New
(416) 263-3600                this year is the NHL Zone,
                              an elaborate tribute to the
Hockey Hall of fame           world’s most renowned
(see city passport offer)     hockey league.
                                                                   Toronto




Toronto is a hockey town,
                              (416) 360-7765 • BCE Place • 30
so what better place to put   Yonge Street (Yonge & Front St.) •
the Hockey Hall of Fame.      www.hhof.com


                                                                   21
     centreville                     permanent galleries,
     amusement park                  special exhibitions and
     (see city passport offer)       public programs celebrate
     Just a short ferry ride         cultural diversity, history
     across the harbour from         and the natural world.
     the city, Centreville Amuse-    (416) 586-5549 • 100 Queen’s Park
     ment Park has over thirty
     rides and attractions. It’s a   The bata shoe museum
     fun place to hang out for a     Shoes have always
     day with the family.            reflected something of the
     Toronto Island
                                     wearer’s culture, social
                                     status, age, affiliation and
     H i s To r i c m u s E u m s    needs. This collection,
                                     housed in an architec-
     royal ontario museum
                                     turally-unique building,
     The Royal Ontario Museum
                                     includes more than 10,000
     (ROM) is Canada’s largest
                                     shoes, boots and sandals




     museum of natural history
                                     spanning 4,500 years
     and world cultures, with
                                     and thousands of stories
     more than six million
                                     – stories of vanity, practi-
     objects showcasing art,
                                     cality, and a touch of
     archaeology and natural
                                     mad vision.
     science. The ROM’s
                                     (416) 979-7799 • 327 Bloor St. West
                                     (Bloor and St. George St.)
22
9 th annual                      portation hubs, architects’
Doors open Toronto               offices and more. Many of
The City of Toronto Culture      these buildings are not nor-
Division is proud to present     mally open to the public.
the 9th Annual Doors Open        No tickets or pre-registra-
Toronto – one weekend,           tion required – admission
once a year – when over          is free to all buildings.
100 buildings with archi-        Doors Open Toronto invites
tectural, historic or cultural   you to get to know the city.
significance open their          See Toronto like you’ve
doors to the public for a        never seen it before!
city-wide celebration.           Free Admission Saturday, May 24
                                 & Sunday, May 25 2008 • Various




                                                                   W H aT T o s E E
Toronto was the first city
                                 Locations.
in North America to launch
this prestigious event,          colborne lodge
based on a success-              This rare Regency
ful European program             picturesque cottage is a
dedicated to built heritage,     graceful monument to John
architecture and design.         and Jemima Howard, the
Developed as a millennium        couple who founded High
project in 2000 by the City      Park. John Howard, one of
of Toronto Culture Division,     Toronto’s first architects as
Doors Open Toronto has           well as a City Engineer and
since attracted over half a      Surveyor, built Colborne
million visitors to hundreds     Lodge in 1837 which still
of buildings throughout          contains many original
the city. (185,000 visitors      furnishings, artifacts, and
enjoyed the program              some of his own water-
in 2007.)                        colours depicting images
                                 of early Toronto. Col-
Step inside national
                                 borne Lodge’s extensive
historic sites, hidden
                                 ornamental and kitchen
gems, modern landmarks,
                                 gardens are now being
                                                                   Toronto




places of worship, banking
                                 restored. Tour the Lodge
halls, mansions, museums,
                                 or come and enjoy the Har-
theatres, historic trans-

                                                                   23
     vest Festival, Christmas                Day to Labour Day: Open every
                                             day 10 a.m.−5 p.m. Labour Day to
     celebrations or celebrate
                                             Victoria Day: Open weekdays from
     Doors Open Toronto.                     10 a.m.−4 p.m. / Open weekends
     (416) 392-6916 • Colborne Lodge         from 10 a.m.−5 p.m.
     Dr., south end of High Park • Adults:
     $4 Regular/$5.50 Holidays, Seniors      gibson House
     (60 +): $2.75 Regular/$4 Holidays,      Step back in time and visit
     Youth (13-18): $2.75 Regular/$4         Gibson House Museum, an
     Holidays, Children (12 -): $2.50
                                             elegant farmhouse built
     Regular/$3.50 Holidays • Hours of
     Operation: Winter: Noon–4:00 p.m.,      by the Gibson family in
     Summer: Noon–5:00 p.m. Closed           1851. Its serene Geor-
     on Mondays, New Year’s Day, Good        gian exterior belies the
     Friday, Christmas Day, Boxing Day.
                                             dramatic lives members
     Historic fort york                      of the household pursued
     (see city passport offer)               long ago. Scottish immi-
     Historic Fort York, the loca-           grant David Gibson, a land
     tion of the Battle of York              surveyor, mapped early
     during the War of 1812                  Toronto and helped pre-
     is the 1793 birthplace of               pare Ontario’s wilderness
     modern Toronto. It is home              for settlement. A partici-
     to Canada’s largest collec-             pant in the Upper Canada
     tion of original War of 1812            Rebellion of 1837, Gibson
     buildings and is designated             was forced to flee to the
     as a National Historic site.            United States where he
     Open year-round, Historic               and his family remained for
     Fort York offers seasonal               11 years. On their return to
     guided tours, musket, drill             York County the Gibsons
     and music demonstrations.               built a beautiful new home
     Explore the fort, learn                 and were once again active
     about its military history              members of their
     and celebrate our history.              rural community.
     (416) 392-6907 • 100 Garrison           (416) 395-7432 • 5172 Yonge St., at
     Rd. (off Fleet St., east of Strachan    Park Home Ave. (Between Sheppard
     Ave., west of Bathurst St.) • Adults:   and Finch Ave.) • Holiday Admission
     $6.00, Senior (65+): $3.25, Youths      Prices from Mid-November to
     (13–18 yrs.): $3.25, Children (12 -):   December. Adults: $3.75 Regu-
     $3 • Hours of operation: Victoria       lar/$4.25 Holidays, Seniors (65


24
                                                      mackenzie
                                                      House
                                                      (see city
                                                      passport
                                                      offer)
                                                      Situated in
                                                      downtown
                                                      Toronto,
                                                      Mackenzie
                                                      House is
                                                      a Greek
                                                      Revival
                                                      row-house,




                                                                           W H aT T o s E E
                                                      which was
                                                      purchased
                                                      by the com-
                                                      munity for
                                                      Mackenzie
                                                      who was
                                                      the first
                                                      Mayor of
                                                      Toronto, an
+): $2.25 Regular/$2.75 Holidays,
                                                      outspoken
Youth (13–18): $2.25 Regular/$2.75    newspaper editor and
Holidays, Children (2–12): $1.75      leader of the 1837
Regular/$2.25 Holidays • Hours of     Upper Canada Rebellion.
Operation: January to August: Tues-
day to Sunday, Noon–5 p.m. Closed
                                      Explore the museum, the
September. October–December:          recreated printshop and
Tuesday to Sunday, Noon–5 p.m.        gallery featuring changing
Winter: Noon to 4 p.m., Summer:       exhibitions. Enjoy several
Noon to 5 p.m. • Closed on Mon-
days, New Year’s Day, Good Friday,
                                      celebrations of Toronto’s
Christmas Eve, Christmas Day,         Scottish heritage including
Boxing Day.                           Hogmanay, scotch tasting,
                                                                           Toronto




                                      and Robbie Burns Day.
                                      (416) 392-6915 • 82 Bond St. (two
                                      blocks east of Yonge St., south of


                                                                           25
     Elgin Winter Garden Theatre




           Dundas St. East) • Adults: $4.00     walking trails, the Inn tells
           Regular/$5.50 Holiday, Seniors (60
                                                the story of the people
           +): $2.75 Regular/$4.00 Holiday,
           Youth (13–18): $2.75 Regular/$4.00   of Etobicoke – from the
           Holiday, Children (12 -): $2.50      Irish immigrants such as
           Regular/$3.50 Holiday                the Montgomery family, to
                                                recent immigrants such as
           montgomery’s inn
                                                the Somali of Dixon.
           Restored to its heyday
           of 1847, Montgomery’s                (416) 394-8113 • 4709 Dundas St.
                                                West (at Islington Ave.) • Adult: $4,
           Inn remains a meeting
                                                Senior (65 +): $2, Youth (13–18):
           place where visitors share           $2, Child (12 -): $1, Family Pass (2
           stories of immigration,              Adults and up to 4 Children): $10
           travel, neighbourhoods and           • Hours of Operation: Tuesday to
                                                Sunday, 1 p.m.–4:30 p.m. • Closed
           culture. Convenient to local

2
                on Mondays and     tools and is a reminder of
                Statutory Holi-
                                   the vital role local trades
                days, except
                Valentine’s Day,   played in sustaining the
                Victoria Day       community. Take advan-
                and Canada         tage of the pay-as-you-can
                Day when the
                                   weekend events through-
                museum is
                open for special   out the summer.
                event celebra-     (416) 338-8807 • 1007 Brimley Rd.
                tions.             (in Thomson Memorial Park on the
                                   east side of Brimley, just north of
                  scarbor-         Lawrence Ave., about 30 km from
                  ough             Downtown). • Hours of Operation:
                  Historical       Mid March to Mid May (Mon. to
                                   Fri.): 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Victoria Day




                                                                         W H aT T o s E E
                  museum
                                   to Labour Day (Wed. to Sun.):
                  Set along        Noon–4 p.m. September to Mid
                  the walking      December (Mon. to Fri.): 10 a.m.–4
                  trails of        p.m. • Closed Mondays, New Year’s
                                   Day, Good Friday, Boxing Day, and
                  beautiful
                                   Remembrance Day.
                  Thomson
                  Memorial         spadina museum: Historic
                  Park, the        House & garden
                  Scar-            (see city passport offer)
                  borough          Evolving from a Victor-
                  Historical       ian country estate to an
Museum traces the story            Edwardian city mansion,
of this community’s rural          Spadina Museum: Historic
roots and two centuries            House & Gardens chron-
of immigration. Witness            icles four generations of
the transition from early          the wealthy Austin family.
settler life in the McCowan        Enjoy a guided tour high-
Log House to the exciting          lighting the exquisite furni-
innovations of the early           ture and decors reflecting
20th century in the Cornell        Toronto art scene of the
House. In addition, the            late 19th and early 20th
                                                                         Toronto




Hough Carriage Works               centuries. Explore one of
stores wagon-making                Toronto’s finest, restored


                                                                         27
                                          Regular/$5.75 Holiday, Child (6-12):
                                          $4.00 Regular/$4.75 Holiday, Child
                                          (5 -): FREE! • Hours of Operation:
                                          April to August (Tue. to Sun.):
                                          Noon–5 p.m. September to January
                                          Tue. to Fri. Noon–4 p.m., Saturday
                                          & Sunday: Noon–5 p.m. January to
                                          March (Sat. & Sun.): Noon–5 p.m.

                                          Todmorden mills Heritage
                                          museum & arts centre
                                          Drop in at Todmorden
                                          Mills Museum and learn
                                          about the early days of
                                          industry in Toronto, its role
                                          in Toronto’s development
                                          and the cultural impact of
                                          the city’s growth on the
                                          natural environment. The
                                          mills were vital to Toronto’s
                                          development more than a
                                          century ago by providing
                                          lumber, flour, paper, whis-
                                          key and beer to residents.
                                          Visit this scenic Don River
     Victorian gardens and par-
                                          Valley location to explore
     ticipate in Spadina’s spe-
                                          millers’ homes, the Brew-
     cial events including Doors
                                          ery Gallery, the Paper Mill
     Open Toronto, Strawberry
                                          Gallery and Theatre and
     Festival and Music in the
                                          the relocated Don Train
     Orchard. Take a guided
                                          station. Also on this site is
     tour and be introduced to
                                          a wildflower preserve.
     the life of the Austin family
     and its domestic staff.              (416) 396-2819 • 67 Pottery Rd.
                                          (east of the Bayview Ave. exten-
     (416) 392-6910 • 285 Spadina Rd.     sion, just west of Broadview Ave.)
     • Adult: $6 Regular/$6.75 Holiday,   • Adults: $3.50 Regular/$5.00
     Senior (65 +): $5.00 Regular/$5.75   Holiday, Senior (60 +): $2.25
     Holiday, Youth (13-18): $5.00        Regular/$4.00 Holiday, Youth (13-
                                          18): $2.25 Regular/$4.00 Holiday,


28
Child (6-12): $1.50 Regular/$2.50        Mondays, New Year’s Day, Good
Holiday, Child (5 -): FREE! • Hours of   Friday, Christmas Day, and
Operation: January to March: Times       Boxing Day.
change due to galleries. April to
May: Wed. to Fri.: Noon–4:30 p.m.,       arT cEnTrEs &
Weekends: Noon–5 p.m. June to            gallEriEs
August: Tue. to Fri.: 10 a.m.–4:30
p.m., Weekends: Noon–5 p.m. Sept.        art gallery of ontario
to Dec: Wed. to Fri.: Noon–4:30
                                         Located in the heart of
p.m. Weekends: Noon–4 p.m.
                                         downtown Toronto, the Art
york museum                              Gallery of Ontario is the
York Museum preserves                    eighth largest art museum
and tells the stories of the             in North America.
former City of York – now                (416) 979-6648 • 317 Dundas St.




                                                                           W H aT T o s E E
part of the new City of                  West
Toronto. The Museum col-
lects and displays photo-                museum of contemporary
graphs and objects which                 canadian art (mocca)
represent the economic,                  The Museum of Con-
political and social history             temporary Canadian Art
of the former city from its              (MOCCA) was officially
early beginnings up to the               founded from the former
present day.                             Art Gallery of North York
                                         in 1999 with a mandate to
(416) 394-2759 • 2694 Eglinton
                                         exhibit, research, collect,
Ave. West in the Centennial Recrea-
tion Centre,
northwest cor-
ner of Eglinton
Ave. West and
Keele St. •
Admission is
free • Hours of
Operation: Tues-
day to Friday,
1 p.m.–3 p.m.
Other times by
appointment
                                                                           Toronto




• Closed on




                                                                           29
     and promote innovative art
     by Canadian artists whose
     works engage and reflect
     the relevant stories of our
     times. MOCCA currently
     exists as a not-for-profit,
     arms-length agency of the
     City of Toronto’s
     Culture Division.
     MOCCA’s exhibition pro-
     gram reflects a dynamic
     yet balanced approach to
     presenting the wide range
     of ideas and media being
     explored by established
     artists at advanced
     stages of practice, and
     emerging artists who
                                   works by some of Canada’s
     have demonstrated strong
                                   most important artists.
     promise and exceptional
     commitment. In addition,      (416) 395-7430 • 952 Queen St.
                                   West
     MOCCA includes work by
     non-Canadian artists in       The market gallery
     group exhibitions, thereby    The Market Gallery offers
     creating a global context     changing exhibitions dedi-
     for the Canadian              cated to Toronto’s history,
     cultural voice.               art and culture. Located
     MOCCA maintains and           inside the south St. Law-
     builds upon its perma-        rence Market, in Toronto’s
     nent collection, currently    oldest neighbourhood, the
     holding approximately         main gallery occupies the
     400 works of art by more      19th century city council
     than 150 Canadian artists,    chamber which is all that
     acquired through purchase     remains from the City Hall
     and donation. The col-        that stood on this site from
     lection includes seminal      1845 to 1899.
30
                 At the time    and put to a dignified use
                 of this City   as a City display space.
                 Hall’s con-
                                The Market Gallery
                 struction in
                                opened in 1979 as the
                 1844 (ten
                                official exhibition space
                 years after
                                and storage of the City’s
                 the City was
                                permanent art collection.
                 incorpor-
                                Since its opening the
                 ated from
                                Gallery has displayed over
                 the Town
                                90 exhibitions revealing
                 of York),
                                the cultural, physical, and
                 Toronto’s
                                social development of
                 population




                                                                      W H aT T o s E E
                                Toronto through paint-
                 was around
                                ings, photographs, fine
                 24,000. By
                                art, maps, documents and
                 the end of
                                other items, some
                 the century,
                                dating back to the
                 Toronto’s
                                19th century.
                 popula-
tion had grown to over          (416) 392-7604 • South St.
                                Lawrence Market, 95 Front St. East,
200,000, resulting in           second Floor • Hours of Operation:
the civic offices being         Wednesday to Friday, 10 a.m.–4
transferred to what is now      p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m.–4 p.m.
known as Old City Hall at       Sunday, noon–4 p.m.

Bay and Queen streets.          The Toronto centre
In 1902 the south market        for the arts
building opened, and the        The Toronto Centre for the
front centre section of         Arts, owned by the City
the 19th century city hall      of Toronto, and located
which had been enclosed         at 5040 Yonge Street
but boarded up, was soon        opened in 1993. Its current
forgotten. It wasn’t until      mandate is to function as
the 1970s with the renova-      a first class venue for a full
                                                                      Toronto




tions to the south market       range of performing arts
building, that the council      to enliven and enrich the
chamber was rediscovered

                                                                      31
     Roy Thomson Hall at Night




           cultural life of the citizens   Proverbs From Hell, multi-
           of Toronto. In a two-storey,    component installation;
           5,000 square-foot gallery       Ed Pien: The Garden of
           space inside the Toronto        Earthly Delights, wall-size
           Centre for the Performing       ink drawings on rice paper.
           Arts, find photographs,         (416) 395-0067 • 952 Queen St.
           paintings, prints, installa-    West • Free admission • Hours of
           tions and more. Continu-        Operation: Tues. to Sun.: Noon–5
                                           p.m.
           ing: Gathering Shades,
           convergence of two solo
           exhibits; Catherine Heard:




32
f E aT u r E s To r y




Explore Toronto neighbourhoods




                                                              W H aT T o s E E
Several hundred years ago, the Huron Indians used a
word meaning “meeting place” to describe the area, and
their take on it is still accurate. Toronto has developed
into one of the most multicultural cities in the world, and
this is reflected in a wonderful mosaic of
distinctive neighbourhoods.



k E n s i n g To n m a r k E T   clothing shops, tucked in
During the 1920s, it was         among eclectic restau-
known as the Jewish Mar-         rants and cafés.
ket. Today, you can sense
the city’s rich, multicultural   c H i n aTo W n
mix, obvious in the shops        This ever-expanding
packed with goods from           area is home to ethnic
Europe, the Caribbean,           Chinese from Hong
the Middle East, South           Kong, Singapore, Taiwan,
America and Asia. A visit        Vietnam, and elsewhere.
to Kensington is like a sen-     A wealth of oriental shops
sory trip around the world!
                                                              Toronto




                                 and fruit markets spill
It’s also a treasure trove of    out onto the street, and a
vintage and second hand          vast selection of authen-

                                                              33
     tic Chinese restaurants       Town, also has numer-
     feature such delicacies as    ous old warehouses that
     dim sum. Toronto’s second     have been converted into
     Chinatown is located in the   residences, stores, restau-
     Broadview/Gerrard area,       rants and pubs.
     and three other distinctive
     Chinatowns are located in     unDErgrounD ciT y
     the suburbs.                  The Underground City
                                   is eleven kilometres (six
     s T. l aW r E n c E           miles) of interconnecting
     markET                        passageways under the
     The area is the site of       streets that feature more
     the city’s original market.   than 1,200 retail stores
     Though popular most           and services. Street
     of the week, the market       entrances to the subterran-
     comes to life on Saturdays    ean walkway are indicated
     with local farmers, artists   with “PATH” signage.
     and artisans plying their
     wares. This historic area,
     affectionately called Old


34
E n T E r Ta i n m E n T      back into the area. The
DisTricT                      final catalyst for rejuvena-
You’ll find some of the       tion was the 1989 opening
city’s best theatres,         of the SkyDome stadium
bars and dance clubs in       (now Rogers Centre), which
this area of town. The        brought crowds of up to
undisputed entertainment      55,000 people into the
capital of Canada, the        area for baseball games
Entertainment District        and other events. Restau-
is a lively concentration     rants and entertainment
of theatres, restaurants,     spots began springing up
nightspots, retail shops,     overnight – and the pace
and visitor attractions       hasn’t stopped!




                                                              W H aT T o s E E
– located in the vibrant
                              Each of the streets in the
city core.
                              Entertainment District has
Since the mid-19th Cen-       its own flavour, and its own
tury, the area now known      specialty. For example,
as the “Entertainment Dis-    Queen St. West is a funky
trict” has been animated      retail street; King St. West
with music halls, theatres,   is lined with theatres, a
and entertainment palaces.    concert hall, and dozens
However, by the 1950s,        of restaurants. Front St.
many of these venues had      West features the Rogers
closed, deteriorated, or      Centre, the CN Tower, and
been transformed into         large, lively eateries, while
warehouses or office          Richmond and Adelaide
space. While the city core    Streets are home to mas-
was developing, this area     sive, 3-storey nightclubs
– just west – remained as a   and smaller, high-
bit of a backwater.           end restaurants.
With the 1977 opening of
the Eaton Centre shopping     places & Events
                                                              Toronto




galleria and the renovation   of interest
of the Royal Alexandra        • Theatres – the area is
Theatre, life was breathed      home to lavish Broadway


                                                              35
      musicals, traveling road     THE DisTillEry
      shows, homegrown             H i s To r i c D i s T r i c T
      productions, and clas-       North America’s best
      sical concerts. Theatres     preserved collection
      include the Pantages, the    of Victorian industrial
      Royal Alexandra, the Prin-   architecture is located
      cess of Wales, the Elgin     in this historic enclave in
      & Winter Garden Theatre
      Centre, Roy Thomson
      Hall, and Massey Hall.
     • Rogers Centre – the first
       stadium in the world
       with a fully-retractable
       roof, the Rogers Centre
       is home to the Toronto
       Blue Jays, the Toronto
       Argonauts football club,
       and an exciting roster
       of big-name concerts,
       sporting events, and
       trade shows.
     • CN Tower – the world’s      downtown Toronto known
       tallest building. The       as Old Town. Formerly
       view is nothing short of    the Gooderham & Worts
       fabulous. Need we           Distillery founded in 1832,
       say more?                   The Distillery has been
                                   developed as a centre for
     • CBC Broadcasting
                                   arts, culture and enter-
       Centre – the home of
                                   tainment. It is filled with
       Canada’s national TV and
                                   galleries, artist studios
       radio networks. Regular
                                   and workshops, boutiques,
       tours are offered in this
                                   retail stores, restaurants,
       state-of-the-art broad-
                                   bars and cafés.
       casting facility, as are
       concerts at the Glenn
       Gould Studio.
3
fa s H i o n D i s T r i c T   ferry ride from the docks
Toronto’s garment district     located at the foot of
has terrific bargains on       Bay Street.
local fashions, fabric,
leathers and furs. If you’re   b l o o r/ yo r k V i l l E
looking for a custom-made      This Toronto hotspot is
original design, this is the   strictly upper crust. One
place to shop.                 of Toronto’s more elegant
                               shopping and dining
HarbourfronT                   areas, Yorkville’s designer
High-priced condos dot         boutiques, antique shops
the waterfront, where          and galleries are abso-
highlights include special-    lutely first-class. The area




                                                              W H aT T o s E E
ity shops at Queen’s Quay      features a gallery of small
Terminal, art, theatre
and cultural facilities at
Harbourfront Centre and
a terrific lakeside walking
trail. Cruises of the har-
bour and ferry services run
from here.

To r o n To i s l a n D s
Toronto’s own island
community offers a quaint
summer amusement park,
paddleboats and bikes for
rent, in-line skating paths,
and grass and beaches for
picnics. Best of all, there    courtyards and alleyways,
are no cars! Summer cot-       including a contemporary
tages from the 1920s are       park located in the very
home to some 250 fam-          heart of the neighbour-
                                                              Toronto




ilies, and feature charming    hood. (Make sure you visit
English-style gardens. The     the “Rock”, a huge piece of
Islands are a ten minute       granite trucked hundreds

                                                              37
     of miles from the             now a gracious neigh-
     Canadian Shield!)             bourhood of renovated
                                   Victorian homes and lovely
     T H E g ay V i l l a g E      parks. Highlights include
     Dubbed “The Village” by       the turn-of-the-century
     locals, this predominantly    Riverdale Farm (site of the
                                   original Toronto Zoo) and
                                   Allan Gardens, with its
                                   botanical collection in a
                                   beautiful Victorian-
                                   style greenhouse.

                                   rosEDalE &
                                   forEsT Hill
                                   Home to many of Toronto’s
                                   most established (and
                                   monied) citizens, these
                                   parklike districts feature
                                   winding streets lined
                                   with magnificent homes,
                                   well-tended gardens, and
                                   secluded parks.

     gay neighbourhood in the      l i T T l E i Ta ly
     heart of downtown is host     This lively neighbourhood
     to Canada’s largest annual    (now more Portuguese
     gay and lesbian Pride         than Italian) is the spiritual
     celebrations. Check out       home of Toronto’s Italian
     the many bars, shops and      community, which has for
     restaurants, walk the strip   the most part migrated
     or simply enjoy a beverage    further north. It’s packed
     on one of the many open-      with trattorias, trendy
     air patios.                   restaurants and cafés,
                                   and a few more traditional
     c a b b a g E To W n          poolhalls. Like Greektown,
     Once a working-class          Little Italy’s sidewalks
     enclave, Cabbagetown is       are jammed on weekends
38
– especially in the summer,    in traditional clothing like
with locals and visitors       saris and brightly




                                                              W H aT T o s E E
alike sipping espressos on     coloured scarves.
outdoor patios. (See also
Corso Italia.)                 THE bE acHEs
                               Antique shops, clapboard
g r E E k To W n               cottages and quirky stores
A large collection of res-     and restaurants typify
taurants feature authentic     the Beach. The beachside
Greek cuisine in this lively   boardwalk is crowded
area, which also features a    with joggers, dog-walk-
fascinating mix of special-    ers and picnickers, and
ity shops. “The Danforth”      the beach itself is packed
(its local nickname) is also   in the summer. Home to
a night owl’s haven with       students, professors and
clubs and cafés open into      media types, the Beach
the wee hours.                 is upscale and laid-back
                               at once, with a relaxed
liT TlE inDia                  attitude unlike anywhere
Toronto’s Indian commun-       else in the city.
ity congregate here in a
festival-like atmosphere,      c o r s o i Ta l i a
                                                              Toronto




where you’ll find Indian-      This part of town is known
food restaurants, grocers,     for its fashionable shops
and shops that specialize      that reflect what’s hot in

                                                              39
     Europe.
     Top-of-the-
     line Italian
     fashion
     shops draw
     crowds,
     as do a
     multitude of
     cafés and
     restaurants
     offering the
     cuisines of
     various Ital-
     ian regions.

     liTTlE
     pol anD
     An enclave
     of Eastern
     European
     and Russian
     residents,
     this area
                                  College St. West. The
     specializes in traditional
                                  community is also well
     cuisine, bakeries, cafés,
                                  represented in
     and special events from
                                  Kensington Market.
     the “old country”.
                                  ko r E aTo W n
     porTugal Vill agE
                                  Shops stocking exotic
     Toronto’s large Portuguese
                                  herbs, acupuncture
     community is centred in
                                  centres, and Korean
     this neighbourhood, with
                                  restaurants abound here,
     dozens of bake shops, res-
                                  although few Koreans
     taurants, cheese stores,
                                  actually live in the area.
     and fish markets – espe-
     cially along Dundas and

40
 f E aT u r E s To r y




                                                                             abouT THE ciTy
The gooderham building
By Bruce Bell (brucebelltours.com)




The historic Gooderham Building framed within the
stunning skyline of a modern day Toronto is arguably
it’s the most photographed building in Toronto. Built by
George Gooderham in 1891 (it pre-dates New York’s
more famous Flatiron building by 10 years) it has come
to symbolize the defiance of 1960’s Urban Renewal by its
very existence standing proudly at the apex of Church,
Wellington and Front like the bow of some great ship.

In 1832 George’s father William Gooderham arriving
from Yorkshire and brought with him money and 54
family members to help his brother-in-law James Worts
who arrived a year earlier expand his milling business. In
1837 the company now known as Gooderham and Worts
began distilling the wheat by-products into whiskey and
                                                                             Toronto




beer for a thirsty city. The family who were becoming
experts at making good tasting beer and alcohol
became extremely wealthy and in 1859 they undertook

                                     Photo courtesy Toronto Public Library   41
     a massive building project. Under the supervision of
     architect David Roberts Sr., five hundred men worked on
     the construction of what are today the oldest standing
     sections of the Gooderham and Worts Distillery at
     Parliament and Cherry Streets. Using four massive
     lake schooners to move stone from Kingston quarries
     the factory’s main building, the still standing gristmill,
     was finished in 1860 at a cost of a then staggering
     sum of 25,000 dollars, making it the most expensive
     building project in Toronto at the time. In 1882 George
     Gooderham, son of William, who had now taken over
     the family business, became the president of the Bank
     of Toronto (forerunner to the present TD Canada Trust)
     and built as the head office the grand Bank of Toronto
     building on the corner of Front and Church where a
     Pizza-Pizza fast food chain now stands. In 1891 he
     commissioned David Roberts Jr., the son of the architect
     who had built the distillery, to erect the Gooderham
     Building at a cost of an astonishing $18,000. There, on
     the fifth floor, underneath the green cone-shaped cupola,
     George set himself up in an office that overlooked not
     only the busy intersection below but also everything and
     everyone he held command of.

     From his ships in the harbour to his trains on the
     Esplanade to his distillery in the distance to his
     employees at the bank and the still standing King Edward
     Hotel all were within his sightline from his office high
     about the city. When he died on May 1st 1905 his funeral
     at St. James Cathedral, against his last wishes for a
     small affair, was one of the largest the city had seen.
     He was a great benefactor, builder and much loved man
     to the people of Toronto who lined the streets to show
     their respect as his cortege made its way to St. James
     Cemetery.


42
After his death the Bank of Toronto began to plan a               abouT THE ciTy
move into what is regarded the most beautiful building
Toronto ever knew, its new headquarters on the corner
of King and Bay in 1913 itself demolished in 1960 and
replaced with the equally stunning Toronto Dominion
Centre. Today a scale model of that monumental
building complete with its 21 Corinthian columns can
be seen under glass in the TD Centre main banking hall
at King and Bay Streets and out at the Guildwood Inn in
                                                                  Toronto




Scarborough standing like an ancient Greek theater its
impressive King Street entrance has been preserved.
In 1920 the distillery founded by Gooderham and Worts

                                        Photo credit: Elan Penn   43
     was bought by the Hiram Walker Company and continued
     to operate up until the 1990’s. In 1957 the Gooderham
     estate sold their namesake Flatiron Building to Velco
     investments who in turn sold it to David and Thomas
     Walsh for 600,000 dollars in 1973. It was they who
     saved the Flatiron from demolition as everything else
     around it was being eradicated off the face of the earth
     by giving it a much needed half a million dollar overhaul.
     In November of 1975 the Gooderham building was finally
     designated a Historic Site and in 1998 when Michael
     and Anne Tippin took control they once again gave the
     Gooderham Building a painstaking restoration and in
     2006 they sold it to the real estate giant Ashelron Ltd.
     who today are committed in keeping the Gooderham
     Building’s heritage intact.

     The Gooderham Building looks best when fog has
     blanketed the modern gleaming city built behind it. Its
     then you get a glimpse of what it once must have looked
     like when first built, standing magnificently alone its
     stature fully appreciated.

     By Bruce Bell
     brucebelltours.com




44
f E aT u r E s To r y




                                                                             abouT THE ciTy
The fairmont royal york Hotel
By Bruce Bell (brucebelltours.com)




The most famous hotel in Toronto’s early years was
Jordan’s York Hotel first built in 1805 and stood near
where the Toronto Sun newspaper office is today on
King Street near Sherbourne. If still standing (it was
gone by 1820) it would probably be best described as
a boutique hotel with under 10 rooms but it did have a
large ballroom where after the Americans had burnt the
Parliament Buildings during the War of 1812, parliament
sat for a time in Jordan’s spacious ballroom. Toronto’s
next great hotel was the American Hotel first built in
1840 (demolished 1889) and once stood on Front Street
just east of Yonge where Shopsy’s Deli now stands.
It was there that famed 19th century writer Charles
Dickens stayed when visiting Toronto in May of 1842.
However the greatest hotel of 19th century Toronto was
                                                                             Toronto




arguably the Queen’s Hotel that at one time stood on
Front Street just west of Bay Street.


                                     Photo courtesy Toronto Public Library   45
     There have been various hotels on that site ever since
     1842 when a row of town houses first built for Captain
     Dick the operator of the Greats Lakes Passenger and
     Freight Steam Ship Co. In 1856 Dick partnered with
     Patrick Sword and the houses were then converted into
     Sword’s Hotel and in 1862 it was expanded, updated
     and renamed The Queen’s and a legend was born. The
     Queen’s was the most fashionable hotel in Toronto for
     almost sixty years and its guest list encompassed the
     movers and shakers of world history during the late
     19th century. The four story hotel had one of the finest
     dinning rooms in the city, 210 guest rooms, 17 private
     parlours for gentlemen and ladies to entertain at their
     leisure, a garden and an observation tower in the cupola
     that was the Queen’s signature architectural feature. The
     hotel had been the first in Canada to use hot air furnaces
     for heating and to have running water in all the guests’
     rooms and the first hotel in Toronto to use passenger
     elevators. It was gracious, restful, dripping with old world
     charm and probably like most other well heeled hotels of
     the time extremely restrictive and prejudiced as to whom
     was allowed entrance. With its umpteenth course dinners
     served at a red velvet pace the Queen’s became the
     preferred local address for traveling European royalty,
     actors, statesmen and the favorite hotel Canada’s first
     Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald when in Toronto.
     As the Great Fire of 1904 was sweeping its way through
     the downtown core decimating much of lower Bay and
     Front Streets the Queen’s was spared partly due to the
     soaking wet bed sheets hung out the windows by guests
     to stop the fire from consuming the hotel. But its days
     were numbered all the same.

     During the first part of the 20th century the Canadian
     Pacific Railway chose Toronto as the location to build
     the largest hotel in the entire British Empire, to be called

4
the Royal York. In 1927
the site selected to build
this massive castle-like
hotel was the Queen’s as it




                                                              abouT THE ciTy
was just across the street
from Toronto’s new Union
Station then and still the
busiest train station in
Canada.

So, in 1928 without any
fanfare the Queen’s Hotel,
once the jewel in the crown
of Toronto’s hotels was
purchased by the CPR
and unceremoniously torn
down. As work began on
                               worlds largest Masonic
the new Royal York hotel
                               symbol). When the Royal
it soon became apparent
                               York opened on June 11,
just how massive this
                               1929 much was made of
behemoth was to be with
                               the fact that there were as
a thousand guest rooms,
                               many employees in the new
a lobby and mezzanine
                               hotel as there were citizens
bigger than the entire
                               (a thousand) in York when
Queen’s Hotel, a concert
                               Jordan’s York hotel first
hall second only to Massey
                               opened in 1805.
Hall and a supper club to
seat 500 the new hotel
                               The Great Depression of
rose like a great pyramid
                               the 1930’s however put
out of the desert (the hotel
                               an end to the Royal York’s
comes a few feet short of
                               ambition of being a haunt
the Egypt’s Great Pyramid
                               for the very rich with hotel
of Giza and because of
                               employees instead going
                                                              Toronto




its massive triangle like
                               out onto the street in
shape the rumour is the
                               search of potential guests.
Royal York is in fact the

                                                              47
     A brief return to the limelight occurred when King George
     VI and Queen Elizabeth (later the Queen Mother) arrived
     for a stay during their now legendary cross country trip
     in 1938.

     During the Second World War the Royal York came into
     its own as the hot spot playing host to the great big
     bands with couples dancing the night away high above
     the city in the famed Roof Garden Ballroom to the sounds
     of Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey and Glenn Miller’s
     Orchestra.

     The early 1950’s saw Canadians once again hitting
     the road with Toronto thanks in part to the annual
     summertime Canadian National Exhibition becoming a
     major tourist destination. In 1956 the Royal York was
     getting cramped so a 164 room addition was added to
     the back and in 1959 a more ambitious renovation was
     called for, one that would once again make the Canadian
     Pacific’s Royal York the largest hotel in the British
     Commonwealth, (a claim that was given up to the Queen
     Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal) with a new 400 room, 17
     story addition which increased the Royal York’s capacity
     to 1600 rooms.

     When Canadian Pacific Hotels & Resorts acquired the
     Fairmont Hotel chain in 1999 controversy arose when it
     was declared that the Toronto landmark would be known
     simply as The Fairmont. Local newspapers, TV news
     and even City Hall got into the debate that the new name
     at the very least should retain the Royal York moniker
     somewhere in its title. In the end the great red neon
     sign that for the last 70 plus years has blazed across
     Toronto’s skyline was reconfigured to read Fairmont
     Royal York.

     By Bruce Bell (brucebelltours.com)

48
calEnDar of EVEnTs


may 1, 2008 to                 in Toronto into a hotbed
september 28, 2008             of rhythm, harmony and
Dirty Dancing                  sophistication. Art of Jazz
royal alexandra Theatre        Celebration offers 5 days
260 King St. West              of major concerts, themed
Phone - (416) 872-1212         programs, and workshops.
                               55 Mill Street, Distillery Historic

may 5 to may 10, 2008          District -Parliament Street and

Toronto international          King Street.

Wine festival                  Phone: 416.840.7663




                                                                     W H aT T o s E E
Sante in the City:
Decade of Decandence-          June 4, 2008 -
Phone: 416-928-3553 (ext 27)   october 15, 2008
                               nathan phillips square
may 24 & 25, 2008              farmers’ market
Doors open Toronto             All Spring, Summer and
A city-wide celebration        Fall, visit Nathan Phillips
of Toronto’s architectural     Square for the best farm-
heritage. Visit buildings      fresh produce around.
of architectural and/or        100 Queen Street West

historic significance, many    Nathan Phillips Square

which are not normally         Queen Street West and Bay Street-

open to the public.            Phone: 416-338-0338

Phone: 416-338-0338

                               June -15, 2008
June 4 to June 8, 2008         luminato
art of Jazz celebration        For ten extraordinary days
                                                                     Toronto




3rd Annual Art of Jazz Cel-    in June, the vibrant city of
ebration will transform the    Toronto’s stages, streets,
Distillery Historic District   and public spaces are

                                                                     49
     illuminated with arts and     birthday with live musical
     creativity.                   performances and a daz-
     Phone: 416-368-3100           zling fireworks show.
                                   Mel Lastman Square

     June 20 to June 29, 2008      Yonge Street and

     pride Toronto                 Sheppard Avenue

     A week of cultural events     Phone: 416-338-0338

     that celebrates, empowers
     and supports the diverse      July 2, 2008 to July 13,
     community of lesbian,         2008
     gay, bisexual, transsexual,   Toronto fringe festival
     transgender, intersex and     Toronto’s largest theatre
     queer people.                 festival will host over
     Phone: 416-927-7433           800 artists from Ontario,
                                   Canada and around the
     June 20 to June 29, 2008      world in 2008, with over
     TD canada Trust               135 unique productions
     Toronto Jazz festival         in more than 25 venues.
     Voted Canada’s Best Jazz      Productions range from
     Festival in 2007, more        dramas to musical extrava-
     than 1,500 musicians          ganzas to improv.
     will entertain as the TD      Phone: 416-966-1062

     Canada Trust Toronto Jazz
     Festival gets underway this   June  to July 25, 2008
     summer.                       scotiabank caribana
     Phone: 416.870.8000           2008
                                   Join in the largest cultural
     July 1, 2008                  festival of its kind in North
     canada Day                    America and watch Toronto
     Celebrate Canada’s 141st      come alive as the city

50
explodes with pulsating       august 13 to august 24,
rhythms and melodies.         2008
Phone: 416-391-5608           cirque saltimbanco/
                              cirque Du soleil
July 24 to July 2, 2008      A signature Cirque du
Just for laughs festival-     Soleil show with a style
Come celebrate 25 years       that borrows from theatre,
of laughter in Toronto this   dance and music and
summer when Just For          where spectacular cos-
Laughs takes over the         tumes, lighting and make-




                                                              W H aT T o s E E
T-dot for an unforgettable    up take pride of place. The
3-day comedy extrava-         current cast of 49 artists,
ganza destined to become      15 of whom were part of
an international event.       the show’s original big top
Phone: 416-979-3824           tour, hail from Canada and
                              20 other countries.
august 7 to august 10,        Phone: 416-870-8000

2008
Toronto’s festival            august 15 to
of beer 2008                  september 1, 2008
A celebration of Canada’s     canadian national Exhibi-
rich brewing history,         tion & air show
hosted by experts of the      Situated on Toronto’s beau-
brewing craft from around     tiful waterfront and one of
the country.                  the largest annual fairs in
Historic Fort York -          North America, the Cana-
100 Garrison Road             dian National Exhibition
                                                              Toronto




Phone: 647-724-1130           (CNE) offers an unparal-
                              leled diversity of entertain-
                              ment with more than 500

                                                              51
     attractions, a large carnival   of the ROM’s Fall 2007 A
     midway, international           Season of Canada.
     entertainment, shopping         Royal Ontario Museum

     & cuisine, and agricultural     100 Queen’s Park (Bloor and

     exhibits. Exhibition Place.     Avenue Rd.)

     Phone: 416-393-6300

                                     october 17 to
     september 4 to                  october 19, 2008
     september 13, 2008              Toronto marathon
     Toronto international           To Over 12,000 people
     film festival                   from 50+ countries are
     The Toronto International       expected to participate
     Film Festival is widely         in the Marathon, Half
     considered to be one of         Marathon, 5K or Relay.
     the top film festivals in the   Toronto’s favourite race is
     world and is the premiere       downhill, scenic and fast!
     film festival in North          Phone: 416-972-1062

     America from which the
     Oscars race begins.             november 7 to
     Phone: 416-968-FILM             november 1, 2008
                                     The royal agriculture
     october , 2007 to              Winter fair
     December 31, 2010               The largest indoor com-
     sigmund samuel                  bined agricultural, horticul-
     gallery                         tural, canine and eques-
     of canada                       trian event in the world.
     The Sigmund Samuel              Witness exciting competi-
     Gallery of Canada opens         tions, shows and learn
     to the public on Saturday,      more about agriculture,
     October 6, 2007 as part         horticulture and animals in

52
a fun, interactive setting.    regional patterns, and
Direct Energy Centre,          beautiful decoration. The
Exhibition Place               exhibition features rarely
Phone: 416-263-3400            seen artifacts chosen
                               entirely from the Bata Shoe
november 19 to                 Museum’s foremost and
november 23, 2008              comprehensive collection
The Distillery                 of Native footwear.
christmas craft show           Bata Shoe Museum

The Distillery Christmas       327 Bloor St. West




                                                                   W H aT T o s E E
Craft Show is an indoor
event comprising the           December 31, 2008
finest Canadian artisans       Toronto Zoo’s th
and craftspeople exhibit-      annual new year’s Eve
ing handmade jewellery,        family countdown
pottery, painting, clothing,   Join some true party
photography, wooden            animals this New Year’s
bowls, childrens toys, fur-    Eve at the Toronto Zoo!
niture, soaps, perfumes,       This family fun event starts
quilts, leather, etc.          2009 off right with lots
Phone: 416 461-5306            of great music, entertain-
                               ment, animals visitors and
nov ember 2, 2007 to          more. The fun begins at
february 1, 2009               6pm and runs until 9pm
beauty, identity, pride        when we have our very own
From diverse regions of        Kid’s Countdown.
North America, ninety          Meadowvale Rd north of Hwy 401 in
                                                                   Toronto




pairs of shoes, boots and      Scarborough (exit 389)

moccasins will showcase        Phone: 416-392-5929

exquisite craftsmanship,

                                                                   53
         ò
        attraction
                                 casa loma castle
                                 1 Austin Terrace • (416) 923-1171

                     125
offEr DEscripTions




                             Enjoy a 25% admission
                                    discount




                           Experience the elegance and splendour of the Edward-
                           ian era at Toronto’s majestic castle estate – Casa Loma!
                           Explore the former home of Sir Henry Pellatt featuring
                           unique architecture, beautifully furnished rooms, secret
                           passages, towers, and an 800 foot tunnel to luxurious
                           stables. Self-guided digital audio tours in eight languages
                           and a documentary film on the life of Sir Henry Pellatt
                           are included. May through October, enjoy our magnificent
                           gardens. Druxy’s Famous Deli, gift shop and parking
                           available. Casa Loma is open daily 9:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
                           Valid for 1 adults, 2 youth/children. Last admission 4:00 p.m.




    54
casa loma castle
1 Austin Terrace • (416) 923-1171
                                                                     ò
                                                                     attraction


                                                                       125




                                                                             offEr DEscripTions
                                         Enjoy a 15% discount in
                                        our gift shop on purchases
                                        over $20.00 before taxes.



Experience the elegance and splendour of the Edward-
ian era at Toronto’s majestic castle estate – Casa Loma!
Explore the former home of Sir Henry Pellatt featuring
unique architecture, beautifully furnished rooms, secret
passages, towers, and an 800 foot tunnel to luxurious
stables. Self-guided digital audio tours in eight languages
and a documentary film on the life of Sir Henry Pellatt
are included. May through October enjoy our magnificent
gardens. Druxy’s Famous Deli, gift shop and parking
available. Casa Loma is open daily 9:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
                                                                             Toronto




Valid for 1 adults, 2 youth/children. Last admission 4:00 p.m.




                                                                             55
         ò
        attraction
                                  rogers centre Tour Experience
                                  One Blue Jay Way (located between Gates 1 & 2) •
                                  (416) 341-2770 • www.rogerscentre.com
                     125
offEr DEscripTions




                                 2 for 1 admission




                           Rogers Centre Tour Experience is the best way to
                           appreciate the wonders of the Rogers Centre, one of
                           Toronto’s most popular attractions. The tour offers a
                           newly renovated museum area featuring a model of the
                           Rogers Centre, memorabilia from past events, concerts
                           and much more! See the multi-screen video wall featuring
                           the many exciting sports and events that have been held
                           at the facility. Public tours in French are available during
                           July and August.
                           Rogers Centre Tour Experience is one hour in length,
                           fully guided behind the scenes.
                           Pricing: Adults $13.50, Youth (12–17 years) $9.50,
                           Children (5–11 years) $8.00
                           Valid for 2 adults, 2 youth/children.
    5
spadina museum: Historic
House and gardens
                                                                     ò
                                                                     attraction


(416) 392-6910 • Event Hotline: (416) 338-3888 •                       125
285 Spadina Rd. • www.toronto.ca/museums




                                                                             offEr DEscripTions
                                            Save 25% off Admission




Evolving from a Victorian country estate to an Edwardian
city mansion, the museum chronicles four generations of
the Austin family.
Your tour highlights the exquisite furniture and decor
reflecting the Toronto art scene of the late 19th and
early 20th centuries.
Also explore the museum’s six acres of parkland includ-
ing one of Toronto’s finest restored Victorian Gardens.
Valid for up to 2 adults. Not valid with special event pricing.
                                                                             Toronto




Museum hours vary, please call to confirm.




                                                                             57
         ò
        attraction
                                  mackenzie House
                                  82 Bond St. (2 blocks east of Yonge St., south of
                                  Dundas St. East) • (416) 392-6915 • Event Hotline:
                     127          (416) 338-3888 • www.toronto.ca/museums
offEr DEscripTions




                             Save 25% off Admission




                           Situated in downtown Toronto, Mackenzie House is a
                           Greek Revival row-house, which was purchased by the
                           community for Mackenzie who was the first Mayor of
                           Toronto, an outspoken newspaper editor and leader of
                           the 1837 Upper Canada Rebellion. Explore the museum,
                           the recreated printshop and gallery featuring changing
                           exhibitions. Enjoy several celebrations of Toronto’s
                           Scottish heritage including Hogmanay, scotch tasting,
                           and Robbie Burns Day. Open Toronto weekend,
                           Saturday, May 24th and Sunday, May 25th.



                           Valid for up to 2 adults.


    58
Historic fort york
100 Garrison Rd. (off Fleet St., east of Strachan Ave.,
                                                                     ò
                                                                     attraction

west of Bathurst St.) • (416) 392-6907 • Event Hotline:
(416) 338-3888 • www.toronto.ca/museums                                127




                                                                             offEr DEscripTions
                                            Save 25% off Admission




Historic Fort York, the location of the Battle of York
during the war of 1812 is the 1793 birthplace of modern
Toronto. It is home to Canada’s largest collection of
original War of 1812 buildings and is designated as a
National Historic Site. Open year-round, Historic Fort
York offers seasonal tours, musket, drill and music
demonstrations. Explore the fort, learn about it’s military
history and celebrate Canada, Victoria Day, and Doors
Open Toronto with friendly and knowledgeable staff.
Valid for up to 2 Adults. Not valid with special event pricing.
                                                                             Toronto




Museum hours vary, please call to confirm.




                                                                             59
         ò
        attraction
                                  centreville amusement park
                                  (416) 203-0405 • www.centreisland.ca •
                                  Centreville opens daily at 10:30 am from June 1st
                     127          to September 3rd and all weekends in May and Sep-
                                  tember, weather permitting.
offEr DEscripTions




                              Buy 10 Individual Ride
                               Tickets, Get 10 Free




                           Centreville is a turn-of-the-century themed family Amuse-
                           ment Park, nestled in over 600 acres of parkland just
                           across the harbour from the city. We have over 30 rides,
                           games and attractions, two licensed restaurants and
                           more than 14 food outlets. There’s great fun for every-
                           one at Centreville.
                           Centreville opens daily at 10:30 am from June 1st
                           to September 3rd and all weekends in May and Septem-
                           ber, weather permitting.

                           Hours subject to change without notice.


                           Valid for up to 1 Adult and 2 children/youth.

    0
Hockey Hall of fame
Brookfield Place, 30 Yonge St. (Yonge & Front St.) •
                                                                 ò
                                                                 attraction

(416) 360-7765 • www.hhof.com
                                                                   127




                                                                         offEr DEscripTions
                                               Save 25% OFF
                                             Regular Admission




Hockey Hall of Fame
The world’s one and only! Voted Toronto’s Top Appeal
Attraction by Zagat Survey. Experience the game that
defines Canada and a sport that has been adopted by
over 80 countries. Home of the STANLEY CUP, the
Hockey Hall of Fame has something for everyone: state-
of-the-art games, interactive exhibits, larger-than-life
statues, a replica dressing room and rink zone, theatres,
extraordinary gift shop, and hockey’s most precious
artifacts.
                                                                         Toronto




Valid for up to 2 Adults and 2 Children/Youth admission.




                                                                         1
          
sightseeing
                                  The Helicopter company
                                  Toronto Island Airport • (416) 203-3280 •
                                  www.helitours.ca
                     129
offEr DEscripTions




                                The Romantic Jewel


                                     $ 35 off
                                 (Canadian dollars)                          TORONTO   by
                                                                            HELICOPTER!
                                                                            www.HeliTours.ca


                           A private helicopter flight for two high over Toronto. Hold
                           hands high over the city as you are gently lifted to an ele-
                           vation as high as the tip of the world’s tallest freestand-
                           ing building, the famous CN Tower. Bring your cameras
                           and take photographs of a lifetime. This tour features a
                           15km route over the downtown centre and harbourfront.
                           After your flight, you will receive souvenir gifts plus two
                           complimentary high quality personal photographs. So
                           romantic. So exciting!
                           Operating year-round.
                           Please call or check website for more information.
                           Reservation required.
                           Policy in effect. Discount is only valid off regular priced ‘Romantic Jewel’.
                           Valid for 1 adult., 2 children/youth.
     2
The Helicopter company
Toronto Island Airport • (416) 203-3280 •
                                                                           
                                                                         sightseeing

www.helitours.ca
                                                                          129




                                                                                offEr DEscripTions
                                                       20 % off
                                              all regular priced items
                                                   in our gift shop.
       TORONTO    by
       HELICOPTER!
       www.HeliTours.ca


Experience Toronto like never before! Take a helicopter
tour over Canada’s largest city. Tour tickets start at $95
each (Canadian dollars). When your flight is over, browse
through our unique Gift Shop for collectable souvenirs,
clothing and photographs. We feature print-on-site photo-
graphs of your flight experience, embroidered clothing,
helicopter toys, books and more.
Operating year-round.
Please call or check website for more information.
                                                                                Toronto




Discount is only valid off regular price items.
May only be used on the date of your flight.
Valid for 1 adult., 2 children/youth.



                                                                                3
          
sightseeing
                                  segway of ontario and Distillery
                                  Visitor centre
                     129
                                  55 Mill Street • The Distillery Historic District •
                                  Visitor Centre – Building No. 9 • (416) 642-0008
offEr DEscripTions




                              Distillery Walking Tour
                                 Save 20% off Tour




                           Step into the past with a guided tour! Once home to
                           the largest distillery in the British Empire, the Distillery
                           District has the largest collection of industrial Victorian
                           buildings in Canada. Discover where Toronto’s tallest
                           structure once stood and where many Hollywood mov-
                           ies were filmed. Then, visit Mill St. Brewery, the area’s
                           first brewery to open in over 100 years. After, its off to
                           Soma Chocolate, where you’ll get to see this world class
                           chocolate-maker in action.

                           Rates: $15 per person (plus tax)
                           Length: 60 minutes (approx)
                           Times*: Daily (except Mondays) 11:30am / 3:30pm
                           Where: Distillery Visitor Centre
                           Valid for up to 1 adult, and 2 children/youth.
                           Valid for guided tour (depending on availability) or self-guided tour.
    4
The Distillery District: The
segway spin
                                                                   
                                                                 sightseeing

55 Mill Street • The Distillery Historic District •
Visitor Centre – Building No. 9 • (416) 642-0008                  129




                                                                        offEr DEscripTions
                                        Distillery Segway Spin
                                          Save 20% off Tour




Take the Segway PT for a glide around the Distillery Dis-
trict with one of our guides and pick up a few interesting
facts along the way. You will spend about 5-10 minutes
training on the Segway followed by a cool spin around
the block. By the end of the experience, you’ll have a
taste of the past and a feel for the future.

Rates: $30 per person (plus tax)
Length: 30 minutes (approx)
Times*: Daily (except Mondays) 11:00 am / 12:00 pm /
1:00 pm / 2:00 pm / 3:00pm / 4:00pm / 5:00pm
Where: Distillery Visitor Centre
                                                                        Toronto




Valid for up to 1 adult, and 2 children/youth.




                                                                        5
          
sightseeing
                                 The Distillery District:
                                 The segway Tour
                                 55 Mill Street • The Distillery Historic District •
                     131         Visitor Centre – Building No. 9 • (416) 642-0008
offEr DEscripTions




                                Save 20% off Tour



                           An in-depth tour of the historic scenery of the Distillery
                           and its past, while using space age technology. Spend
                           about 30 minutes learning various techniques for riding
                           a Segway. Then for the next hour, explore the history
                           and architecture of the site as the timeline from past to
                           present is revealed. Ride the future...today!

                           Rates: $59 per person (plus tax)
                           Length: 90 minutes (approx)
                           Times*: Daily (except Mondays) 12:00pm / 4:00pm
                           Where: Distillery Visitor Centre
                           Valid for up to 1 adult, and 2 children/youth.




    
Hop-on Hop-off city Tour
1.800.594.3310
                                                                           
                                                                         sightseeing


                                                                          131




                                                                                offEr DEscripTions
                                        Save 15% off per person



Experience Toronto aboard one of our London-style
Open-Top Double Deckers, Trolley Bus or Coach, Gray
Line has designed this tour to allow you, our valued
customer, complete flexibility to explore Toronto on their
own terms. Your Ticket allows you access to both our
North/South (Operates year round) and East/West loops
(June 01 to September 30), Hop-on-Hop-off privileges,
and our tickets are valid for three touring days. Our Hop-
on-Hop-off Tour runs on a continuous circle from 9:00
a.m. until 4:00 p.m., with most stops at or near all major
Hotels in the downtown area. Come join us and let our
over 90 years of experience introduce you to the history,
                                                                                Toronto




and excitement that is Toronto!
Operates year round except December 25.
*All discount coupons must be redeemed through our toll free number at
1-800-594-3310. Valid for up to 1 adult and 2 children/youth.
Tour must be booked direct with Gray Line.                                      7
          
sightseeing
                                 miss midland Tour
                                 1.800.594.3310

                     131
offEr DEscripTions




                            Save 15% off per person



                           Start your morning aboard a first-class motorcoach and depart
                           our coach terminal for your full-day excursion. You’ll enjoy your
                           two-and-a-half hour drive to the community of Midland while
                           viewing some of Ontario’s beautiful landscapes. In Midland, you’ll
                           enjoy some free time to explore the downtown and do some
                           country shopping, or perhaps choose to visit one of the local
                           Huronia attractions.

                           Next, you will board the Miss Midland for your two-and-a-half
                           hour cruise. Relax in comfort as you enjoy the scenic wonders
                           of the world-famous Georgian Bay, and the 30,000 Islands of
                           Muskoka. Afterwards our motor coach will take you back to
                           Toronto, where you arrive downtown at approximately 7:30 p.m.
                           *All discount coupons must be redeemed through our toll
                           free number at 1-800-594-3310.
                           Valid for up to 1 adult and 2 children/youth.
                           Tour must be booked direct with Gray Line.

    8
Toronto Executive Van Tour
Bill Genova, Genova Tours • 230 Rose Park Drive
                                                                       
                                                                     sightseeing

Toronto, Ontario M4T 1R5• (416) 367-0380
• billgenova@rogers.com • www.genovatours.com                         131




                                                                            offEr DEscripTions
                                         genova Tours
                                               Toronto City Tour
                                            15% discount on tour


Tours are highly personalized. Your guide is a storyteller and
historian with intimate knowledge of the past and present of
each area. Each tour consists of one to six people made
up of your private party. Tours are staged any day of the
week lasting from a half day to a full day. You’ll travel the main
and back roads of each area in comfort. You’ll not only visit the
highlights of each area but also places that are not on the usual
tourist maps.
*WE DO NOT ASSEMBLE PEOPLE FOR THESE TOURS.
IT IS YOUR GROUP OF 1 TO 6 PEOPLE THAT COVER THE FLAT RATE.

FLAT RATE FOR 1 TO 6 PEOPLE $300
                                                                            Toronto




LEAVES AT 9 A.M. RETURN AT 1 P.M. OR
LEAVES AT 1 P.M. RETURNS AT 5 P.M.

Reservations required for all tours, reserve by phone.
                                                                            9
          
sightseeing
                                 niagara falls & Wine country
                                 Executive Van Tour
                                 Bill Genova, Genova Tours • 230 Rose Park Drive
                     133         Toronto, Ontario M4T 1R5• (416) 367-0380
                                 • billgenova@rogers.com • www.genovatours.com
offEr DEscripTions




                            genova Tours
                              15% discount on tour


                           We will visit the majestic Niagara Falls and then travel down the
                           Niagara Parkway following the Niagara River past the Whirlpool
                           Rapids, the Floral Clock, and Queenston heights to the historic
                           village of Niagara-on-the-Lake with its historic sites, wineries,
                           restaurants, and Heritage shopping district. In the surrounding
                           area we will visit some of the over fifty famous wineries in the
                           area.
                           *WE DO NOT ASSEMBLE PEOPLE FOR THESE TOURS. IT IS YOUR GROUP
                           OF 1 TO 6 PEOPLE THAT COVER THE FLAT FATE. (WE CAN ALSO HANDLE
                           LARGER TOURS ON REQUEST.)


                           FLAT RATE FOR 1 TO 6 PEOPLE $510

                           LEAVES AT 9 A.M. RETURNS AT 6 P.M.

                           Reservations can by made by contacting:
                           Bill Genova at Genova Tours 416-367-0380
                           Reservations required for all tours.
     70
                                                                        
kitchener-Waterloo
Executive Van Tour                                                    sightseeing
Bill Genova, Genova Tours • 230 Rose Park Drive
Toronto, Ontario M4T 1R5• (416) 367-0380
• billgenova@rogers.com • www.genovatours.com                          133




                                                                             offEr DEscripTions
                                     genova Tours
                                           15% discount on tour


Right in the heart of Southern Ontario we will tour Kitchener and
its sister city Waterloo that share a common German heritage.
This area is the home of the largest Oktoberfest outside of
Munich. Many Mennonites live in the surrounding countryside,
and horse-drawn carriages are a fairly common sight in the area.
In addition we will visit the historic towns of St. Jacobs, Elmira,
Elora and Fergus. We will also cross over Ontario’s only covered
bridge and experience the countryside along the Grand River.
*WE DO NOT ASSEMBLE PEOPLE FOR THESE TOURS. IT IS YOUR GROUP
OF 1 TO 6 PEOPLE THAT COVER THE FLAT FATE. (WE CAN ALSO HANDLE
LARGER TOURS ON REQUEST.)
                                                                             Toronto




FLAT RATE FOR 1 TO 6 PEOPLE $510

LEAVES AT 9 A.M. RETURNS AT 6 P.M.

Reservations can by made by contacting:
Bill Genova at Genova Tours 416-367-0380
Reservations required for all tours.                                         71
          
sightseeing
                                 mariposa cruise lines
                                 207 Queen’s Quay West, Queen’s Quay Terminal •
                                 (416) 203-0178 • Reservations Required
                     133
offEr DEscripTions




                            Toronto Harbour Tour
                                       Buy 1
                                     Get 1 Free



                           TORONTO HARBOUR TOURS Enjoy a One-Hour Sightsee-
                           ing Cruise through Toronto’s Scenic Harbour front and
                           Island Parklands! The Number One Choice for a Toronto
                           Harbour Tour!

                           Experience a narrated tour aboard one of Mariposa’s
                           classic vessels. Thrill to Toronto’s breathtaking skyline
                           and take in the sights and sounds of the Toronto Islands,
                           Island Airport, Harbourfront, CN Tower, Rogers Centre,
                           Air Canada Centre and the fabled Gibraltar Point Light-
                           house. Enjoy the insightful commentary into Toronto’s
                           past and present.

                           Daily Departure Times:11:00 am, 12:15pm, 1:30 pm, 2:45 pm, 4:00 pm
                           Operating Season: May 15th, 2008 – September 30th, 2008
                           Maximum 2 adults and 2 children.

     72
mariposa cruise lines
207 Queen’s Quay West, Queen’s Quay Terminal •
                                                                           
                                                                         sightseeing

(416) 203-0178 • Reservations Required
                                                                          133




                                                                                offEr DEscripTions
                                              Mariposa Sunset
                                               Dinner Cruise
                                               Save 15% on
                                            Regular Ticket Price


Mariposa Cruises ~ Toronto Harbourfront

Step aboard Mariposa Cruises at Toronto Harbourfront
for an evening of unparalleled cruising fun on the lake-
front in Toronto. Enjoy this luxurious Toronto cruise ship
while you dine, dance, enjoy breathtaking skyline views

Quite simply, a Mariposa sunset dinner cruise is the per-
fect night out. A magical setting enhanced by dazzling
city sights. An evening filled to the brim with wonderful
cuisine, music and dancing under a canopy of stars, all
for one price. For two, ten, or 600 guests, a Mariposa
                                                                                Toronto




cruise will blow you away.

Dinner Cruise: Valid up to four adults.Sunday Brunch: Maximum 2 adults
and 2 children.
                                                                                73
          
sightseeing
                                  Toronto Hippo Tours
                                  Departure location: 151 Front St West (At the
                                  southeast corner of Front and Simcoe St) •
                     135          (416) 703-4476 • www.torontohippotours.com
                                  • Toll-free: 1 (877) 635-5510
offEr DEscripTions




                                     Save 25% off
                                      Per Person




                           The Hippest Way to See Toronto! Come ride ‘the Hippos’
                           and discover the fun of Toronto’s must-see sightsee-
                           ing experience. Our 90 minute fully narrated tour is a
                           continuous journey on both land and water, highlighting
                           the city’s major landmarks and attractions including the
                           CN Tower, Hockey Hall of Fame, Rogers Centre, City Hall,
                           Eaton Centre, Queen’s Park, trendy Queen St. West, Har-
                           borfront, and more. Experience the thrill of ‘the splash’
                           into Lake Ontario and tour the waterways of Ontario
                           Place. Capture the spirit of Toronto in the comfort of a
                           modern 40 passenger amphibious bus ‘The Hippo’. Tour
                           commentary is also available in French, German, Span-
                           ish, Japanese and Mandarin.
                           Departure times: 11:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. every day,
                           every hour on the hour.
     74
                           Valid for 1 adult, 2 children.
bruce bell Walking Tours
CALL AHEAD FOR RESERVATIONS • (647) 393-8687
                                                                               
                                                                             sightseeing


                                                                              135




                                                                                    offEr DEscripTions
                                            St. Lawrence Market
                                            Food & History Tour

                                                Save 20% off
                                                    Tour


A thoroughly unique two hour tour of St Lawrence Market
in the heart of Old Town Toronto includes sampling food
from various vendors, usually 6 stops both vegetarian
and meat. Includes stops at: The Farmers Market, St
Lawrence Hall, Toronto’s First Post Office (1834) St.
James Cathedral as well as various historical sites along
the way. Tickets purchased in advance or on the same
day at the Souvenir Shop just inside main entrance of St
Lawrence Market 92 Front Street East at Jarvis Street,
two blocks east of Yonge Street.
                                                                                    Toronto




Year round every Wednesday - Friday 10am & 2pm.
Saturday at 10am only.
$25 per person (includes food samples)

CALL AHEAD FOR RESERVATIONS (647) 393-8687

Reservations Required. Must be Booked Direct. Offer based on availability.          75
                     ≠             museum of contemporary
                     galleries
                                   canadian art (mocca)
                     135
                                   952 Queen St. West • (416) 395-0067 •
                                   www.mocca.toronto.on.ca
offEr DEscripTions




                                    Free Admission




                             The Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA),
                             was officially founded from the former Art Gallery of
                             North York in 1999 with a mandate to exhibit, research,
                             collect, and promote innovative art by Canadian artists
                             whose works engage and reflect the relevant stories of
                             our times.
                             MOCCA’s exhibition program reflects a dynamic yet
                             balanced approach to presenting the wide range of
                             ideas and media being explored by established artists at
                             advanced stages of practice, and emerging artists who
                             have demonstrated strong promise and exceptional com-
                             mitment. The collection includes seminal works by some
                             of Canada’s most important artists.
                             Tuesday through Sunday, from 11am to 6 pm. Closed Mondays
     7                      Admission to the gallery is FREE.
                                                                                 Ø
                                                                                 Ø
The fringe of Toronto
Theatre festival                                                            entertainment


(416) 966-1062 • www.fringetoronto.com                                        135




                                                                                     offEr DEscripTions
                                           Buy one $10 advance
                                         ticket, get second ticket
                                               for half price.



The Fringe is Toronto’s largest theatre festival, featuring
over 150 productions ranging from dramas to musical
extravaganzas to kids shows. Productions take place
in theatres and unusual locations such as playgrounds,
parking lots and more. Unjuried, unexpected, unforget-
table.

*Must be purchased in person at the Advance Ticket Box
Office, 292 Brunswick Ave.
*Good for any of the productions in the Fringe,
July 2-13, 2008.
                                                                                    Toronto




Photo by Greg Tjepkema. Show Title: Welcome to Vaudeville (Fringe 2005)
Company: Ditties & Frocks Theatricals. L to R: Geoff Whynot, Steve Morel,
Jenny Parsons, Scott White.
One coupon per person allowed over course of festival.
Only 6 coupons redeemable per show. Valid for 2 adults.                              77
                     Ø
                     Ø            Toronto symphony orchestra
      entertainment
                                  Roy Thomson Hall Box Office • 60 Simcoe St.
                                  (southwest corner of King and Simcoe St.)
                     137          • (416) 593-4828
offEr DEscripTions




                             Save 20% on Admission




                           The Toronto Symphony Orchestra (TSO), Canada’s
                           foremost symphonic ensemble, will celebrate its 86th
                           season in 2008/2009. Several world-renowned artists
                           will be performing with the TSO on the Roy Thomson Hall
                           stage this season, artists such as Yo Yo Ma, Lang Lang,
                           Evelyn Glennie, Jean-Yves Thibaudet, and Itzhak Perlman.
                           The TSO welcomes 400,000 patrons each year and an
                           additional 5 million Canadians tune in to frequent concert
                           broadcasts on CBC Radio. The Orchestra maintains a
                           strong international presence by touring and recording.

                           Valid for up to 1 adult, 2 children. Must be booked direct.
                           Some concerts are restricted from this offer.

                           Call Box Office for details.

     78
                                                                                    Ø
                                                                                    Ø
The second city
                                                                               entertainment
51 Mercer St. • (416) 343-0011 • www.secondcity.com

                                                                                 137




                                                                                        offEr DEscripTions
                                          Save 20% off on Regular
                                                Ticket Price




The Second City is the undisputed leader in sketch comedy
producing generations of North American Talent.

Enjoy the latest performance of cutting edge comedy combined
with songs & improv that’s sure to keep you laughing all the way
home. Every night is topped off with a free on-the-spot improv
set open to the public. The intimate and fully licensed theatre is
located in the heart of the Entertainment District and offers a
Dinner & Show package with the neighboring Wayne Gretzky’s
Restaurant.

Best entertainment value in Toronto!
                                                                                       Toronto




Offer valid for current Main stage performances only. Call for reservations.
Not valid for Saturday performances. Black out dates may apply. Coupon
must be presented at the box office upon ticket pick-up.
Valid for 1 Adult.
                                                                                        79
     ‰
     restaurant
                                  mysteriously yours...
                                  mystery Dinner Theatre
                                  2026 Yonge Street • (4 blocks south of Eglinton
                     143          Avenue, 2 blocks north of Davisville Subway
                                  Station) • 416-486-7469 • 1-800-(668-3323
offEr DEscripTions




                           Save 25% off show tickets




                           Come and join the Fun! Enjoy a fabulous meal and partici-
                           pate in the solving of a hilarious, interactive Whodunit.
                           Every Friday and Saturday (and select Thursdays), plus
                           Wednesday Matinees. Also: Private, Customized Mysteries
                           for groups.

                           Tickets: $40 to $45
                           Dinner: $25

                           Prices subject to taxes and gratuities.
                           Subject to limited availability of discounted seats.
                           Must specify at time of booking.
                           Not valid in December.
                           Valid for 2 adults, 2 children/youth.



    80
carousel cafe
(416) 203-0405 • www.centreisland.ca
                                                                  ‰
                                                                  restaurant


                                                                   137




                                                                         offEr DEscripTions
                                                 Save 20% off
                                                 your Food Bill




With a beautiful lakeside setting, the Carousel is the per-
fect family restaurant, capturing the spirit of Centreville.
Sit back on our patio over looking the Long Pond and
enjoy a cold drink. Bright and breezy, the Carousel Cafe
is sure to please the entire family. Dishes include fresh
salads, delicious soups, grilled chicken and burgers,
fresh tortilla wraps and a kids menu.

Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.
                                                                         Toronto




                                                                         81
     ‰
     restaurant
                                  Joe badali’s italian restaurant bar
                                  156 Front St. West • Mon.–Fri. 11:30 a.m.–
                                  Midnight, Sat.–Sun. Noon–Midnight • (416) 977-3064
                     139
offEr DEscripTions




                                Save 20% off the
                             Purchase of any Entrée
                           “Passionate Italian Food at
                               Delicious Prices”

                           A stone’s throw from the Metro Convention Centre and
                           Roger’s Centre, and in the heart of the entertainment district,
                           Joe Badali’s is the ideal place to get together over drinks, appe-
                           tizers or a meal. Discover 17,000 square feet dedicated to your
                           enjoyment - from the Piazza with its sparkling fountain, to afford-
                           able authentic Italian dining in an atmosphere that will transport
                           you to the sunny hillsides and villas of Italy.


                           Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children.
                           Discount not applicable for tax, alcohol or gratuity.
                           No split cheques, dine-in only. Not valid with any other offer.




     82
sasi gourmet Thai
(416) 993-3556 • 323 Jarvis St • www.sasithai.com
                                                                    ‰
                                                                    restaurant


                                                                     139




                                                                           offEr DEscripTions
                                                  Save 20% off
                                                  Restaurant Bill
                                                 Excluding Taxes.


There will be a moment while eating endive leaves piled
with chunks of herbed tiger shrimp in sweet pepper-
tamarind coulis, lemongrass shrimp soup, fresh lichee
fruits stuffed with savory chicken, or roast duck braised
with green grapes and tiny tomatoes in coconut curry
sauce woven together with white wine top notes that
you will think this is the best Thai food you’ve ever eaten
outside of Chiang Mai. Chef Sasi and husband Allan, an
affable host, run this immaculate place like it’s their own
private party, chatting to all. Reservations essential.
Visa and Mastercard accepted. No weekend lunch.
                                                                           Toronto




Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.




                                                                           83
     ‰
     restaurant
                                  mengrai Thai by sasi
                                  (416) 546-0331 • 82 Ontario St • www.mengraithai.com

                     139
offEr DEscripTions




                                   Save 20% off
                                   Restaurant Bill
                                  Excluding Taxes.


                           “The best Thai food outside of Thailand – Fodors.com.”
                           TV Chef Sasi is the best Thai chef in Toronto according
                           to Sara Waxman of the Toronto Sun. In a beautifully
                           restored 1911 brewery, Mengrai’s elegant interior-warm
                           & inviting ambience rewards guests with the most
                           romantic dining experience. Vegetarian choices.

                           Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.




    84
montana
(416) 595-5949 • 145 John St • www.montanaonline.ca
                                                         ‰
                                                         restaurant


                                                          139




                                                                offEr DEscripTions
                                    Free Entrée
                              With a food purchase of
                              equal or greater value.



We invite you to explore a new menu fashioned by David
Adjey, California Chef of the Year, and our passionate
Chef David Araya.

Enjoy our mouth-watering signature Roasted Chicken,
award winning Ribs, Wood Oven Pizzas, sensational
Steaks, and decadent desserts!

Hours of Operation:
Open Monday - Sunday at 11:30am
                                                                Toronto




Valid for up to 2 adults.




                                                                85
     ‰
     restaurant
                                  montana
                                  (416) 595-5949 • 145 John St • www.montanaonline.ca

                     141
offEr DEscripTions




                                   Free Admission
                                   into Night Club




                           Come in for Dinner on Friday’s and Saturday’s and
                           receive free admission into our nightclub.

                           Montana-The Last Best Place is an all around great place
                           to start your evening and finish your evening with us!

                           Valid for up to 2 adults.




    8
la maquette restaurant
lamaquette@lamaquette.com • (416) 366-8191
                                                                   ‰
                                                                   restaurant

www.lamaquette.com
                                                                    141




                                                                          offEr DEscripTions
                                             20% discount on our
                                               Regular Menu




Welcome to La Maquette, a restaurant renowned for its
romantic atmosphere and sumptuous culinary delights.
Artistic vision, a picturesque backdrop fit for a fairy tale,
and exquisite attention to detail are three key factors
that enhance the existence of this deceptively sedate
restaurant. Spread across two beautifully decorated
floors, La Maquette is instantly appealing, making you
feel like you’ve entered someone’s guest house, rather
than a typical restaurant. Flawless presentation, gener-
ous portions, and perfectly cooked food create another
delectable reason to fall in love with the La Maquette
                                                                          Toronto




experience. During the summer months one can enjoy
the beautiful sculpture garden and waterfall while listen-
ing to the chimes of the St. James Cathedral.
Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.                            87
     ‰
     restaurant
                                  The island paradise restaurant
                                  (416) 203-0405 • www.centreisland.ca

                     137
offEr DEscripTions




                                    Save 20% off
                                    your Food Bill




                           Located on the shore of Centre Island, the “Paradise”
                           offers a breathtaking view of the Toronto skyline, out-
                           standing cuisine and a dining experience to remember.
                           Come let your senses experience the tropical sounds,
                           smells and tastes. Also available for private special
                           events, weddings and group functions. Seating capacity
                           of up to 1,500, fully licensed. Call to find out more.
                           Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.




    88
The overDraught irish pub
156 Front St. West (below Joe Badali’s) •
                                                             ‰
                                                             restaurant

(416) 408-3925
                                                              141




                                                                    offEr DEscripTions
                                    Save 20% off the
                                 Purchase of any Entrée




Visit one of the great Irish Pubs in Toronto, located just
below Joe Badali’s Restaurant.
We’re proud of our Irish heritage and we’re proud that
beer is such an important part of the Overdraught
Irish Pub.
We’re passionate about beer. We love to serve it to you,
properly, with respect, and watch you enjoy the perfect
pint. Our knowledgeable, well-trained staff and our fine
selection of beers will enhance your experience at our
pub while you enjoy our delicious food and Irish
                                                                    Toronto




hospitality.
Whatever your choice of beer, we look forward to
serving you.
Valid for up to 2 adults.                                           89
     ‰
     restaurant
                                 southern accent restaurant
                                 595 Markham St. (Bathurst and Bloor) • (416) 536-3211 •
                                 www.southernaccent.com • Reservations recommended
                     143
offEr DEscripTions




                                    Save 15% off
                                    your Food Bill
                                                                           u 416.536.3211
                                                                         www.southernaccent.com



                           Southern Accent is situated in a Victorian house in
                           Mirvish village, with cozy corners, private rooms and
                           a swooping 1940s bar serving happy customers since
                           1984. Over the years we have perfected the sights,
                           sounds and tastes of New Orleans with our spicy blend
                           of Cajun/Creole and Soul cuisine, Zydeco and Louisiana
                           music and funky decor. Our warm hospitality, inviting
                           staff and unique atmosphere have established us as a
                           destination restaurant and favorite location for parties of
                           all kinds. Open nightly from Tuesday to Sunday at 5:00
                           p.m. Closed Mondays. Enjoy our covered Summer Patio.
                           Regular menu items only. Excludes alcohol, tax, or gratuity.
                           Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.



    90
bright pearl seafood
346 Spadina Ave. • (416) 979-3988 •
                                                                  ‰
                                                                  restaurant

www.brightpearlseafood.com
                                                                   137




                                                                         offEr DEscripTions
                                                 Save 25% off
                                                 your Food Bill




Situated right on Spadina Avenue in the heart of
Toronto’s Chinatown beside Kensington Market, Bright
Pearl Seafood Restaurant offers exciting and exotic
cuisine that is sure to please.
The fish tank at the front, home to live lobster, Vancouver
crabs and bass, is a true testament to the freshness
of our seafood offerings. This is truly a seafood lover’s
haven.
Best food in Toronto Chinatown, Dim Sum all day. Casual
Dining, famous Peking Duck, General George’s Chicken,
                                                                         Toronto




Steamed Fresh Fish. Featured on Emeril Live, CNN, BBC,
WTN… 9 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily.
Regular menu items only. Excludes alcohol, tax, or gratuity.
Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.
                                                                         91
     ‰
     restaurant
                                  crocodile rock Toronto
                                  240 Adelaide St. West • (416) 599-9751
                                  • www.crocrock.ca
                     141
offEr DEscripTions




                                   Save 25% off
                                   Entree items.
                                 Excludes alcohol.



                           With a capacity for over 800 people to party on three
                           floors including Toronto’s most popular rooftop patio
                           the 25+ crowd can enjoy delicious food from our great
                           new menu.
                           There is a DJ and dancing nightly to Classic Rock, Retro,
                           Top 40, Disco and Dance music. Voted “Toronto’s Best Party
                           Bar” each visit is guaranteed to be exciting and entertaining.
                           Crocodile Rock is located in the heart of the Entertainment
                           District and is ideal for the after work get together or late
                           night party.

                           *Valid for up to 2 adults. *One coupon per visit. *Must be of legal drinking age.
                           * Offer valid Wednesday to Friday from 5pm to 11pm and Saturdays from 7pm
                           to 11pm

    92
                                                            abouT THE ciTy
niagara falls
To u r i s m i n f o r m aT i o n c E n T r E s
Ontario Tourism Information Centre –
5355 Stanley Ave., Niagara Falls, Ontario
Gateway Niagara Information Centre –
424 South Service Road, Grimsby, Ontario
(905) 945-5444

a n i n T r o D u c T i o n To
n i a g a r a fa l l s
Begin your sightseeing adventure at the Falls. Leave
yourself at least a half-day to wander around the brink
and the magnificent parklands, gardens and viewing
platforms that surround the horseshoe.
                                                           Niagara Falls




There’s magic in the mist that will lure and relax you.
You’ll be inspired by the overwhelming enormity of the
falls, the power and energy of the water flow as it cas-
cades downward, and you’ll be entranced by the sheer
beauty of nature.

                                                           93
     At night, the Falls are               The Falls in Winter
     bathed in spectacular
     lights in a shimmering
     rainbow of colour. You’ll
     want to spend some time
     in the evening at the Falls,
     or choose one of the fine
     dining restaurants that
     offer spectacular Falls
     views both day and night.
     Shaped like a gigantic,
     675-metre-long horseshoe,
     these magnificent water-
     falls are 54 metres high.
     Their incredible power and
     the flow of water of up to
     six million litres per second
     make them one of the
     most enduringly popular
     vacation destinations
     in Canada.
     Niagara Falls is without
     question a highly developed tourist centre. With boat
     cruises to the foot of the falls, helicopter fly-overs, under-
     ground tunnels, and dinner overlooking the top, visitors
     can put together a package to see the falls from every
     angle. Illuminated by night, they are a magical sight, and
     when crowned with fireworks, the show is awesome!
     Niagara is much more than the falls, with many tours
     and side trips to enchant the senses of every traveller!
     This fertile region, its climate tempered by Lake Ontario,
     is home to many vineyards. Take the time to travel the
     picturesque wine to discover different grape varieties
     and the celebrated “ice wine” of this region. Above all if


94
                                                                abouT THE ciTy
you are traveling in September, don’t miss the Niagara
Grape and Wine Festival, one of the year’s main cultural
events in Ontario. For a blaze of colour, the Butterfly Con-
servatory in the Niagara Parks Botanical Gardens houses
more than 2,000 free-flying butterflies.
While driving through, don’t miss the many fascinating
museums and historical sites, among them the Brock
                                                               Niagara Falls




Monument, the Laura Secord House and Fort George.
The pretty village of Niagara on the Lake, with its
restored houses, its English atmosphere and its parks, is
worth the detour.




                                                               95
            H i s To r y o f n i a g a r a fa l l s
            When the European explorers and missionaries arrived at
            the beginning of the 17th Century, the Iroquoian villages
            were under the direction of various chiefs elected from
            the major clans. In turn, these villages were allied within
            powerful tribal confederacies.




     Illumination of the Falls at Night




9
Unfortunately, inter-tribal warfare with the Five Nations
Iroquois of New York State, made worse by the intrusion
of the Europeans, dispersed the three Ontario confed-
eracies, the Huron, the Petun and the Neutral. Since




                                                              abouT THE ciTy
human settlement requires drinking water, sites within
150 metres of rivers and lakeshores have the greatest
                archaeological potential. Palaeo-Indian
                sites in Niagara would most likely be
                associated with the series of relic beach
                ridges that once formed the shore of early
                Lake Erie.
               In May 1535, Jacques Cartier left France
               to explore the New World. Although he
               never saw Niagara Falls, the Indians he
               met along the St. Lawrence River told
               him about it. Samuel de Champlain visited
               Canada in 1608. He, too, heard stories of
               the mighty cataract, but never visited it.
               Etienne Brule, the first European to see
               Lakes Ontario, Erie Huron and Superior,
               may also have been the first to behold the
               Falls, in 1615.
               That same year, the Recollet missionary
               explorers arrived in Ontario. They were
               followed a decade later by the Jesuits. It
               was a Jesuit father, Gabriel Lalemant, who
               first recorded the Iroquois name for the
               river Onguiaahra, meaning “the Strait”.
               “Niagara” is a simplification of
                                                             Niagara Falls




               the original.
               In 1651, during the fur-trade rivalry
               between the Huron and Iroquois that
               was first precipitated by the French, the
               Iroquois wiped out the Neutrals. Until the


                                                             97
     American Revolution, they          View from the Water
     managed to keep white
     settlers out of Niagara
     almost completely.
     In 1812, United States
     President James Madison
     declared war on Canada.
     Artifacts from that war
     dot the riverside, as do
     monuments erected later,
     such as the one to Sir
     Isaac Brock. Recently, the
     skeletons of members of
     the U.S. Army were found
     near Old Fort Erie.
     Following the War of 1812,
     the region began the slow
     process of rebuilding
     itself. Queenston became
     a bustling community,
     but Chippawa was the big
     centre, with distilleries
     and factories.
     In the 1820s, a stairway
     was built down the bank
     at Table Rock and the
     first ferry service across
     the lower River began. By
     1827, a paved road had
     been built up from the ferry landing to the top of the
     bank on the Canadian side. This site became the prime
     location for hotel development and the Clifton was built
     there, after which the Clifton Hill is named.
     By the 1820s there were three hotels catering to the vis-
     itors of Niagara Falls. The hotel owners were responsible
98
                            for the first stunt over the
                            Falls in order to attract
                            attention of members of
                            the public and to boost the




                                                            abouT THE ciTy
                            tourist trade.
                            The hotel owners acquired
                            a condemned Lake Erie
                            schooner named the “Mich-
                            igan”. The hotel owners
                            then advertised in advance
                            that they would send the
                            schooner over the Horse-
                            shoe Falls on September
                            8th, 1827.
                            Most of the animals placed
                            aboard were able to safely
                            escape before the ship
                            broke apart on the shoals
                            and was swept over the
                            Horseshoe Falls. This
                            daredevil event took place
                            as advertised before an
                            estimated crowd of
                            10,000 people.
                             The roadway between
                             Niagara-on-the-Lake and
                             Chippawa was the first
                             designated King’s Highway.
                             The first stage coach in
                                                           Niagara Falls




Upper Canada operated on this roadway between the
late 1700s and 1896. The first railroad in Upper Canada
opened in 1841 with horse-drawn carriages running
between Chippawa and Queenston. In 1854 it was
converted to steam and relocated to serve what was to
become the Town of Niagara Falls.

                                                           99
      In 1855, John August Roebling, the designer of the
      Brooklyn Bridge, built the Niagara Railway Suspension
      Bridge, the first bridge of its type in the world. Between
      the late 1700s and the middle 1800s, boats were the
      main way to get to Niagara Falls. By 1896, three boats
      plied the route between Toronto and Queenston.
      One of the first electrified street car services was pro-
      vided in Niagara, and in 1893 the Queenston/Chippawa
      Railway carried boat passengers from Queenston to
      Table Rock and beyond. In 1902, a railway was con-
      structed across the Queenston Suspension Bridge. Later
      it was extended along the lower Gorge on the American
      side of the River, connecting back into Canada at the
      Upper Arch Bridge. This transit line, the Great Gorge
      Route, continued in service until the Depression. The use
      of boats declined as tourists increasingly chose to visit
      Niagara by automobile, bus or train.
      In extremely cold winters, falling water and mist can ice
      up to fifty feet to form the “ice bridge”. Until 1912, vis-
      itors were allowed to actually walk out on the ice bridge
      but on February 4th, that year, the ice bridge collapsed
      and three tourists died.
      The flow of water was halted over both falls on March
      30th 1848 due to an ice jam in the upper river and the
      American Falls was stopped completely for several
      months in 1969 to examine the large amount of loose
      rock at its base.
      A sixty-three-year-old female schoolteacher was the first
      person to go over the Falls in a barrel and survive. In the
      past ten years, two daredevils have lost their lives trying
      to do the same thing.




100
What to see in
niagara falls




                                                                       W H aT T o s E E
maid of the mist                A fee is charged.
Docks are located at the        Wheelchair accessible.
foot of Clifton Hill in Queen   (905) 356-5781 • 5920 River Rd., at
Victoria Park. The Maid of      Clifton Hill.
the Mist tour boats take
visitors on a passage up        niagara falls
the Niagara River to within     Niagara Falls (the Horse-
several hundred yards           shoe Falls, the American
(182 m) of the thundering       Falls and the Bridal
American Falls, Bridal Veil     Veil/Luna Falls) is located
Falls and the Horseshoe         in Queen Victoria Park in
Falls. Each boat carries        Niagara Falls, Ontario and
150–300 persons on each         Niagara Reservation State
trip. Raincoats are issued      Park in Niagara Falls, New
but be prepared to get          York and is the reason 12
soaked. This is the premier     million visitors come to
ride to view the Falls and a    Niagara Falls each year.
must for the serious tour-      Unequalled in beauty and
                                                                      Niagara Falls




ist. Open Seasonal (first       majesty. All year round.
week of April to last week      The Illumination Lights of
of October, river               the Falls at night is located
conditions permitting).         in Queen Victoria Park.
                                Lights are turned on nightly


                                                                      101
      and a rainbow of colours      Park. The carriage rides
      illuminate the Horseshoe      are available in front of
      Falls, American Falls and     the Queen Victoria Park
      the Bridal Veil/Luna Falls.   Restaurant (Refectory Res-
      Summer hours are 9 p.m.       taurant). A fee is charged.
      to midnight. Winter hours
      vary. All year round.         Journey behind the falls
                                    Journey Behind the Falls
      Cost is FREE.
                                    is located within Queen
      Wheelchair accessible.
                                    Victoria Park at the Table
                                    Rock complex at the crest
      niagara parks
                                    of the Horseshoe Falls.
      The Niagara Parks – includ-
                                    Can be viewed during day
      ing Queen Victoria Park
                                    or night. Elevators take
      – was established in 1887
                                    the visitors over a 46 m
      and is located along the
                                    (150 ft) underground to
      Niagara River between
                                    several tunnels which lead
      Fort Erie and Niagara on
                                    to a viewing areas near
      the Lake. The Niagara
                                    the edge of the Horseshoe
      Parks system consisting
                                    Falls. Raincoats are issued
      of 2,792 acres stretching
                                    but be prepared to be
      56 km (35 mi) is free to
                                    soaked by the thundering
      see and visit, and is one
                                    cataracts. A must for the
      of the premier park lands
                                    serious tourist. All year
      in North America. The
                                    round. A fee is charged.
      jewels in the Niagara Parks
                                    Wheelchair accessible.
      system are Queen Victoria
      Park, Queenston Heights
                                    The White Water Walk
      Park, Niagara Glen Park
                                    The White Water Walk
      and Kings Bridge Park.
                                    (formerly The Great Gorge
      Cost is FREE.                 Adventure) is located along
      Wheelchair accessible.        the Niagara Parkway two
                                    miles North of the Falls
      Take a romantic horse-
                                    just North of the Whirlpool
      drawn carriage ride
                                    International Bridge. An
      through Queen Victoria
                                    elevator takes the visitor

102
approximately 46 m (150       meters (775 ft), Two great
ft) to a waters edge board-   dining rooms both over-
walk beside the World fam-    looking the Falls.
ous Whirlpool Rapids. See     (905) 356-2651 • 5200 Robinson
waves the size of houses      St. • Adults: $10.95, Children:
as you look at one of the     $6.00
wildest rapids in North
                              Falls Tower – 56 m (184 ft)
America. Open Seasonal. A
fee is charged.               (905) 357-5911 • 4950 Clifton Hill •
                              $3.99 per person + tax
Wheelchair accessible.
                              Minolta Tower (Indoor
Whirlpool aero car            observation only) –
Whirlpool Aero Car is         99 m (325 ft)




                                                                      W H aT T o s E E
located along the Niagara
                              1 (800) 461-2492 • 6732 Oakes
Parkway 5.3 km (3.2 miles)    Drive. • Adults: $6.95, Children:
North of the Falls. Take a    $4.95.
ride on this Spanish Aero
                              niagara falls aviary
car (cable car) over the
                              The World’s Largest Indoor
entire Whirlpool, approxi-
                              Aviary! An adventure for
mately 76 m (250 ft) above
                              the whole family! Experi-
the water. The Aero Cable
                              ence 50,000 sq. ft of
car attracts approximately
                              tropical rainforest with
250,000 people each year.
                              over 500 free flying birds.
Open Seasonal. A fee
is charged.                   (905) 356-8888 • 5651 River Rd.,
                              Niagara Falls

observation Towers            niagara parks butterfly
Skylon Tower –                conservatory
158.2 m (520 ft)              The Butterfly Conserv-
(See City Passport offer)     atory features 600 ft. of
                                                                     Niagara Falls




Skylon Tower is Niagara’s     pathways that provide
tallest total entertain-      access for the physically
ment complex. It includes     challenged throughout the
indoor/outdoor observa-       1,022 sq. metre (11,000
tion of the Falls from 233    sq. ft.)


                                                                     103
      conservatory, allowing          Rain or shine all “Wet
      visitors a rare opportunity     Jet” guests receive a
      to watch numerous spe-          splash suit that insures
      cies of butterflies floating    comfort for what has been
      majestically among nectar       called “Niagara’s most
      producing flowers such as       unforgettable attraction”.
      lantanas, pentas, and           Departures available from
      passion flowers.                Niagara-On-The-Lake,
      (905) 356-8119 • 2656 Niagara   Ontario (one hour tour)
      River Parkway                   1 (888) 438-4444 • Niagara-on-
                                      the-Lake • Directions: The Niagara
      clifton Hill –                  Parkway brings you directly from
      Entertainment District          Niagara Falls to Niagara-on-the-Lake
      Attractions, Shows, Res-        on to Queen Street Turn right on
                                      King Street follow to Lake Ontario.
      taurants, Casinos Clifton
                                      At the lake, King Street veers right
      Hill offers “Big Time”          on to Delater Street and continue to
      excitement in the most          the end of the road. King George lll
      preferred Niagara               is located at the corner of Delater
                                      and Melville Street.
      Falls location!
      (905) 358-3676                  north america’s largest
                                      Totem pole and Woodcarv-
      children’s Discovery
                                      ing park
      centre of niagara
                                      Look for the largest Totem
      Located on 5 acres of land
                                      Pole in North America at
      that includes an arbor-
                                      the Niagara Glen, on the
      etum and Walker’s Creek,
                                      Niagara Parkway near the
      the Discovery Centre
                                      Whirlpool Golf Course. The
      is a hands-on children’s
                                      new Niagara Totem Pole
      museum with interactive
                                      and Woodcarving Park will
      galleries & exhibits.
                                      be North America’s largest
      360 Niagara Street              collection of hand-carved,
      Whirlpool Jet Tours             one-of-a-kind totem poles,
      The “Wet Jet” tour has          and will feature regular on-
      delighted Niagara’s visitors    site carving and interactive
      for the past several years.     demonstrations, all in the
                                      peaceful environment over-
                                      looking the Great Gorge.
104
niagara skywheel             Wheel!, *Dinosaur
Niagara SkyWheel is a        Park Miniature Golf or
giant all season Ferris      Galaxy Golf ,Movieland
Wheel with Gondola From      Wax Museum of Stars
the Bright Lights of the     ,Ghostblasters Dark Ride
City, to the Thundering      , Cosmic Coaster Ride ,15
Waters of Niagara Falls,     Midway Tokens
you’ll see it all!
                             cirque niagara
Admission: Adult $9.99       Address: Celestial Palace Tent,
Child $5.99, Location:       Rapids view Park (across from
4946 Clifton Hill, Gondola   Marineland), Niagara Falls
Info:                        Tel: 1-877-247-7831




                                                                  W H aT T o s E E
                             Hours: Runs May to end of October
Number of enclosed Gon-
dolas - 42, Max passengers   For a spectacular enter-
per Gondola - six            tainment experience that
                             the whole family will enjoy,
SkyWheel Info: Height: 53    go to see Cirque Niagaras
meters tall (over 175’),     breathtaking performance.
Ride duration: 10 minutes.   After a successful start in
Wheelchair Accessible:       2006, this highly antici-
Yes ,Winter Hours: Please    pated production features
Call For more information    dance and acrobatic acts
please call: 905-358-4793    performed by 55 highly
                             talented cirque stars,
clifton Hill - fun pass      combined with equestrian
(Adult) only $24.95/per-     theatrical performances
son + tax .                  using some of the rarest
(Child - 10 yrs.& under      breeds of horses from Rus-
- only $18.95 + tax)         sia and Europe. For more
                             information or to purchase
                                                                 Niagara Falls




Save $20.00 Off Regular      tickets to this amazing
Adult Price, or $16.00 off   show call 1-877-247-7831.
Child Admissions!
Niagara SkyWheel -
Canada’s Largest Giant

                                                                 105
      HisTorical                     Willoughby Historical
      aTTracTions                    museum 9935 Niagara
                                     Parkway Niagara Falls ON
      mackenzie Heritage             Phone: 905 295-4036
      printery & newspaper
      museum                         chippawa battlefield
      Niagara Parkway,               Niagara River Parkway
      Niagara on the Lake            Niagara Falls ON
      ON L0S 1J0                     Phone: 905 371-0254
      Toll-Free: 1-877-642-7275
                                     fort george
      mcfarland House                26 Queen Street
      Niagara Parkway                Niagara on the Lake ON
      Niagara on the Lake            Phone: 905 468-4257
      ON L0S 1J0                     laura secord Homestead
      Toll-Free: 1-877-642-7275      29 Queenston Street
                                     Queenston ON
      old fort Erie                  Toll-Free: 1-877-642-7275
      Fort Erie ON
      Phone: 905 871-0540            lundy’s lane
                                     Historical museum
      old fort niagara               5810 Ferry Street Niagara
      Youngstown NY 14174-           Falls ON
      0169                           Phone: 905 358-5082
      Phone: 716 745-7611
      Old Fort Niagara features      Jay cocHranE rETurns
      a new Visitor Center           To niagara falls in
      with museum exhibits,          2008
      an orientation video, a        High-wire walker, Jay
      Museum Shop, and large         Cochrane is expected to
      public washrooms. During       return to Niagara Falls dur-
      the warmer months, the         ing the summer of 2008.
      fortress itself also has a     He will be performing daily
      Trading Post and snack         skywalks from the top of
      bar. Parking in the Old Fort   the Sheraton-on-the-Falls
      Niagara lot is free.           Hotel located on the north


10
side of Clifton Hill at Falls   fallsview indoor
Avenue to a tower to be         Waterpark
erected on the south side       The cornerstone of North
near the top of Clifton Hill.   America’s Largest Water-
                                park, and Hotel complex
Jay’s walk will take
                                brings you 125,000 square
between 20 and 30 min-
                                feet of waterfun!
utes to
complete.
                                imax Theatre - niagara
                                falls
bird kingdom at the             6170 Fallsview Blvd.
niagara falls aviary            Niagara Falls ON
3x winner of Niagara’s          Phone: 905 358-3611




                                                                W H aT T o s E E
Attraction of the Year
award. Experience the           legends of niagara falls
worlds largest, indoor, free    3D/4D Movie
flying Aviary featuring over    5200 Robinson Street,
400 exotic birds!               Niagara Falls ON
                                Phone: 905 356-2651
5651 River Road
Niagara Falls, ON
905 356-8888
                                Zooz
                                Set on 110 acres, visit
                                the Zooz featuring over
greg frewin Theatre
                                500 Exotic and Domestic
GREG FREWIN THEATRE
                                Animals, Live Shows,
presents `Beyond Belief
                                Educational Tours, Giraffe
MAGIC!` A Las Vegas
                                and Hippo feedings, Tram
Magical Review featuring
                                System, Splash Pad,
majestic tigers and exotic
                                Fishing, Kite Flying, Paddle
birds.
                                boats, Picnic areas, Out-
5781 Ellen Avenue               door Amphitheatre with live
                                                               Niagara Falls




Niagara Falls, ON
905 356-0777
                                entertainment. Located 10
                                Minutes from the Falls.
                                NOTE: Open May-October
                                2821 Stevensville
                                Stevensville, ON
                                905 382-9669


                                                               107
      marineland of canada             The Wine rack
      Marvel at killer whales as       Tasting centre
      they jump and splash to          4887 Dorchester Road
                                       Niagara Falls ON
      amazing heights. Feed
                                       Phone: 905 357-1022
      and touch a beluga whale.
      There are land animal dis-
                                       chateau des charmes
      plays and thrilling amuse-       1025 York Rd,
      ment rides for all ages.         P.O. Box 280 St. David’s ON
      Don’t miss this popular          Toll-Free: 1-800-263-2541
      Niagara, family attraction!
      Parking is free.                 Hillebrand Estates Winery
      7657 Portage Road                1249 Niagara Stone Road
      Niagara Falls, ON                Niagara on the Lake ON
      Info: 905 356-9565               Toll-Free: 1-800-582-8412


      niagara WinEriEs                 inniskillin Wines
                                       1499 Line 3 at the Niagara Parkway
                                       Niagara on the Lake ON
      magnotta Winery
      4701 Ontario Street              Toll-Free: 1-888-466-4754
      Beamsville ON                    ext. 311
      Toll-Free: 1-800-461-9463
                                       Jackson-Triggs
                                       niagara Estate Winery
      peller Estates Winery            2145 R. R. #55
                                       Niagara on the Lake ON
      290 John Street
                                       Toll-Free: 1-866-589-4637
      Niagara on the Lake ON
      Toll-Free: 1-888-673-5537


      reif Estate Winery
      R.R. #1, 15608 Niagara Parkway
      Niagara on the Lake ON
      Phone: 905 468-9463


      stonechurch Estate
      Winery
      1242 Irvine Road
      Niagara on the Lake ON
      Toll-Free: 1-866-935-3500



108
calEnDar of EVEnTs

                               beer event featuring the
fireworks & illumination
                               fine restaurants, award
schedule                       winning wineries and great
The whole family will be       tasting breweries from the
thrilled by Free Fireworks     Niagara Area and Ontario.
                               Queen Street
over the Falls, every Friday
                               Phone: 905 -353-9555
and Sunday from May 18
until September 2, as well     July 01, 2008
as Wednesdays in July and      2008 canada Day
August and Fridays from        celebration
September 7 to October 5.      Canada Day Celebrations




                                                                W H aT T o s E E
Special displays are also      include a pancake break-
held on these U.S. and         fast hosted by Mayor Ted
Canadian holidays: Victoria    Salci, followed by a parade
Day May 21, Memorial Day       starting at 10:00 a.m.,
May 28, Canada Day July
                               Optimist Youth Park
1, U.S. Independence Day
July 4, Canadian Civic Holi-
day August 6. All displays     september 19 – 28, 2008
are scheduled for 10:00        niagara Wine festival
p.m. and are weather           Enjoy more than 100
dependent.
                               events including winery
From May 18 to September       tours and tastings, con-
2, free concerts are held      certs, Niagara cuisine, arti-
on Fridays and Sundays at
                               san shows, wine seminars,
Queen Victoria Place, from
8 p.m. until the Fireworks     family entertainment and
start at 10 p.m.               one of Canada’s largest
                                                               Niagara Falls




                               street parades during the
may 30, 2008 - Jun 01,         57th Niagara Wine Festival.
2008
springlicious                  Be sure you join us for the
Springlicious will be a        57th Annual Pen Centre
culinary food, wine and        Grande Parade on Satur-

                                                               109
      day September 27, 2008 in
                                      Friday. November 8th to
      downtown St. Catharines.
      Info: 905 688-0212              December 20th. at 9 p.m.
                                      During Christmas week,
      november , 2008 to             displays are held every
      January 5, 2009                 evening. Wednesday,
      Winter festival of lights       December 24, 2008 to
      The Winter Festival of          Sunday, January 4, 2009
      Lights is Canada’s fore-
                                      at 9 p.m. Don’t miss the
      most illumination festival in
      its most famous address         special New Year’s
      - Niagara Falls. Join us as     Eve display at midnight on
      we capture the magic of         December 31.
      the holiday season from
      November 8, 2008 to Janu-
      ary 5, 2009. The Winter
      Festival of Lights includes
      over 125 animated lighting
      displays and 3 million
      tree and ground lights
      which can be seen within
      the Niagara Parks Winter
      Wonderland, a 5 km route
      along the Niagara Parkway
      Phone 905 374-1616



      november 3, 2008
      WinTEr fEsTiVal of
      ligHTs firEWork
      Displays
      Opening Ceremonies are
      on Saturday, November 3
      with displays at 6:15 and
      8 p.m., as well as on every

110
f E aT u r E s To r y




canada’s Honeymoon capital




                                                            W H aT T o s E E
features its falls

Without fail, the first thing friends, especially from
foreign countries, ask when visiting Toronto, Canada’s
throbbing heart, is “Can you take us to see Niagara
Falls?” Yet, despite the countless times Torontonians
make the 130 km (81 mi) journey, they themselves are
always thrilled to view one of nature’s greatest marvels
- the unmatched lure of newlyweds.

Standing with other visitors atop the Table Rock Lookout
on the edge of the mighty Canadian Horseshoe Falls,
drenched with spray, most love to hear, above the
deafening roar of the cascading waters, their friends’
conversations, laced with words of amazement and
disbelief.
                                                           Niagara Falls




Well should first-time viewers have a feeling of
astonishment, for this waterfall, located on the 56 km
(35 mi) long Niagara River which flows From Lake Erie to
Lake Ontario, is one of the universe’s greatest wonders.


                                                           111
      It is a gigantic mass of cascading waters, 675 m (2,200
      ft) wide, making the second largest and most impressive
      waterfall in the world.

      170 million liters (37.4 million gallons) of water per
      minute, 90% of the Niagara River’s volume tumble
      down a 56 m (185 ft) drop, creating noises like endless
      thunder and a misty turbulent world below. Its rushing
      and roaring waters dwarf by far the nearby American,
      or Rainbow Falls over which the remaining 10% of the
      Niagara River flows.

      The Canadian Horseshoe Falls is a great source of
      electrical power, generating four million kilowatts of
      energy. However, they are noted, above all, for their
      tourist appeal. Every year, about 14 million visitors
      from the four corners of the globe stand in awe and
      experience an unforgettable thrill as they gaze at this
      leading tourist attraction in Canada - some say in the
      whole of North America.



112
For decades they have been a mecca for newlyweds.
Yet, no one knows exactly why. Legend has it that
Napoleon’s brother came to the Falls for his honeymoon
and so set the trend. Today, hotels cater to the starry-
eyed newlyweds, offering everything from rooms with
heart-shaped beds to heart-shaped whirlpools. They,
then end their honeymoon with an authentic ‘Niagara
Falls Honeymoon’ certificate signed by the mayor.

Here, honeymooners looking for the exotic can tie the
knot in the sky, or on the edge of the cascading waters
aboard the ‘Maid of the Mist’ tour ship. No matter how
they wed, a good number of ‘just married couples’ would




                                                                W H aT T o s E E
rather spend their days of bliss near these cascades
than any place else on earth, making the town of Niagara
Falls with its over 80,000 inhabitants the ‘Honeymoon
Capital of the World’.

The enormity and grandeur of these Falls with their
plunging waters, creating an awesome weltering froth
below, give thousands of tourist’s hours of pleasure.
A system of illumination all through the four seasons
makes them a great attraction during the hours of
darkness. The coloured lights playing on the tumbling
waters create a bewitching scene of beauty and
romance. Equally spectacular at any time of the year,
with their piles of ice, they are especially picturesque in
winter.

Ideal for the camera, the stunning Canadian Horseshoe
                                                               Niagara Falls




Falls can be felt and seen in numerous ways. Daredevils
have been going over these cascades in barrels or
rubber balls for years - some surviving; some meeting
their end. A good number of visitors enjoy an overview
of the Falls while dining in the revolving restaurant of the
nearby Skylon Towers, 223 m (775 ft) above the Falls.

                                                               113
      Others prefer to survey them from a helicopter or
      take a boat tour in one of the three vessels that go by
      the name ‘Maid of the Mist’. The boat sails past the
      churning and foaming waters of the American Falls,
      then into the perpetual thundering and boiling white
      clouds of the Horseshoe abyss. The spray of the water,
      silver and snow-like in appearance, if it were not for the
      hooded raincoats, would, like a tropical rain, soak every
      passenger to the skin.

      For many, the favoured way to see the Horseshoe Falls
      is from rock-cut passageways behind the mighty wall
      of water. After donning raincoats, visitors, appearing
      like a bizarre monastic order, take an elevator down to
      scenic tunnels. Here, the effect of the Falls’ power and
      magnificence, as the water plunges directly in front, is
      fascinating and breath-taking - for some, a scene which
      will last a lifetime.

      Besides Canada’s massive cascades, the town of
      Niagara Falls, which gets its name from the Iroquois
      Indian word onguiaahra (the straits), has a tremendous
      range of man-made attractions. It is teeming with
      restaurants, excellent accommodations, souvenir shops,
      museums and parks.

      There are shrubs, trees and flowers everywhere.
      Parklands, extending along the whole length of the
      Niagara River, are a panorama of scenic beauty. The
      heart of this man-made greenery is Queen Victoria Park
      opposite the American Falls. Offering a magnificent
      view of both the Rainbow and Canadian Horseshoe, it is
      a haven for strollers and picnickers. From spring to late
      autumn its daffodils, magnolias, roses, tulips and well-
      trimmed ornamental trees make it a fascinating world of
      bright colours.

114
When tourists tire of nature, the town offers an infinite
array of things to see and do such as souvenir shops,
shopping malls, fine dining, a half dozen wax museums,
providing chills, thrills and shivers of terror with their
horror themes, and much more. To enjoy these
attributes, crowned in an aura of enchantment, one
should visit Niagara Falls from mid-April to mid- May
when the Blossom Festival, featuring ethnic dances,
parades, sport events and the crowning of the blossom
Queen, takes place.

Yet, no matter when travellers visit this world-famous
tourist Shangri-la with its surrounding parklands, their




                                                                                 W H aT T o s E E
trip will be worthwhile. They will be charmed by its
vibrant eating- places, spirited nightlife, and the town’s
peaceful and well-ordered atmosphere. Children,
honeymooners, lovers of nature and ordinary travellers
all are magnetically drawn by one or another of these
appeals - topped by the Canadian Horseshoe Falls, one
of the grandest natural wonders of the world.

For Further Information. Contact:
Niagara Falls Tourism, 5400 Robinson Street, Niagara
Falls, Ontario, Canada L2G 2A6. Tel: 905-356-6061 or
Toll-Free 1-800-56-FALLS (563-2557). Fax: 905-356-
5567. Website: www.niagarafallstourism.com

Habeeb Salloum, a member of Travel Media Association of Canada (TMAC),
lived his youth in Saskatchewan, western Canada, then after serving in the
Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943-45, he moved to Toronto where he now
resides. After retirement, he became a full-time freelance writer and author.
                                                                                Niagara Falls




Mr. Salloum has travelled extensively to most parts of the world and has
written hundreds of articles about the countries through which he travelled
and about their cuisines. Currently, Habeeb Salloum spends his time travel-
ing and writing about his travels.

His writings are published in a series of newspapers and magazines in North
America, Europe and the Middle East. He lives in Toronto, Canada with his
wife and one of his daughters, who is kept busy proof-reading his works.

                                                                                115
11
                                                                   Ø
                                                                   Ø
greg frewin Theatre                                           entertainment


5781 Ellen Ave • Niagara Falls, ON
• 905-356-0777 • www.gregfrewintheatre.com                      147
• tickets@gregfrewintheatre.com




                                                                       offEr DEscripTions
                                    Save 20% off
                                    Show Tickets.
                                 Some conditions apply.
                                     Mention PROMO
                                     CODE: CityPass

Experience the mystery and art of illusion with Greg
Frewin, International Grand Champion of Magic. His Las
Vegas Style Magical Review features spectacular appear-
ances by our rare and majestic tigers and exotic birds.
Your imagination will be captivated and you will
be AMAZED “Beyond Belief!”
After the show, come face to face with one of our stars
as we offer the rare and unique opportunity to have your
                                                                      Niagara Falls




photo taken with a Tiger! The 600 seat theatre is located
in the heart of Niagara Falls near the Top of Clifton Hill.
For BEST availability call 1-866-779-8778 in advance for
tickets.



                                                                      117
                     Ø
                     Ø            oH canada Eh?
     entertainment
                                  8585 Lundy’s Lane • Niagara Falls, Ontario
                                  • (905) 374-1995 • 1 (800) 467-2071
                     143
offEr DEscripTions




                           Save $20.00 per couple or
                              $10.00 per person



                           The award winning Oh Canada Eh? Dinner Show is a musi-
                           cal celebration of Canada that provides an unforgettable
                           Canadian experience. Multi-talented singers perform
                           Canadian songs in a rustic log cabin and wilderness
                           setting. Meet singing Mounties, lumberjacks and even a
                           hockey player as our performers serve a delicious family
                           style dinner.


                           Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children (6 –12 yrs.)
                           Offer not valid on New Year’s Eve.




 118
skylon Tower
5200 Robinson Street • (905) 356-2651
                                                                     ò
                                                                     attraction

• www.skylon.com
                                                                      143




                                                                             offEr DEscripTions
                                            Save $2.00 off regular
                                               adult escalation



Skylon Tower is Niagara’s tallest total entertainment
complex. “Ride to the Top” in our glass enclosed “Yellow
Bug” elevators to the indoor/outdoor observation of the
Falls from 233 meters (775’). Also at the top, the world
famous Revolving Dining Room seating 280 and the
Summit Suite Buffet dining room which seats 180 both
overlooking the Falls. At the base, the indoor 18,000
square foot SkyQuest amusement area, plus new 4D
                                                                            Niagara Falls




theatre; and 12 specialty shops.
Valid for up to 4 adults. Regular price $10.95 plus tax.




                                                                            119
                                 niagara falls and Wine
         ò
        attraction               country Van Tours
                                 Bill Genova, Genova Tours • 134 Sackville St., Suite 100
                     145         • (416) 367-0380 • www.genovatours.com
offEr DEscripTions




                                                                   genova Tours
                              Save 15% off on Tour



                           Tours are highly personalized. Your guide is a storyteller
                           and historian with intimate knowledge of the past and
                           present of each area. Each tour consists of one to six
                           people made up of your private party. Tours are staged
                           any day of the week lasting from a half day to a full
                           day. You’ll travel the main and back roads of each area
                           in comfort. You’ll not only visit the highlights of each
                           area but also places that are not on the usual tourist
                           maps. We will visit the majestic Niagara Falls and then
                           travel down the Niagara Parkway following the Niagara
                           River past the Whirlpool Rapids, the Floral Clock, and
                           Queenston heights to the historic village of Niagara-on-
                           the-Lake.
                           Base cost of $430.00 per couple. Add $20.00 per person to a maximum of
                           6 persons. Reservations required for all tours, reserve by phone.
                           Offer valid for 2 adults only.
 120
niagara falls Day Tour/
niagara falls Evening light Tour                            ò
                                                            attraction
Metropolitan Toronto Coach Terminal (Bay & Dundas St.)
• Hotel Pickup available • 1 - (800) 594-3310                145




                                                                    offEr DEscripTions
    Save 15% off on Tour



Travel on our First-class, washroom equipped motor-
coach for a breathtaking full-day excursion through the
orchard-laden Niagara Penninsula to Niagara Falls. Both
the day tour (departing 10:00 a.m.) and the evening tour
(departing 1:00 p.m.) includes: an exhilarating boat ride
to the base of the majestic Horseshoe Falls on the Maid
of the Mist (IMAX Theatre or Journey Behind the Falls is
substituted when Maid of the Mist boat is not operating);
a buffet lunch/dinner with breathtaking views from the
                                                                   Niagara Falls




Fallsview Dining Room; and time for souvenir shopping at
the Table Rock Complex.
Must be booked direct with Gray Line.
Offer valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children.




                                                                   121
                                  niagara falls freedom Tour
        ò
        attraction
                                  Metropolitan Toronto Coach Terminal (Bay & Dundas St.)
                                  • Hotel Pickup available • 1 - (800) 594-3310

                     145
offEr DEscripTions




                               Save 15% off on Tour



                           You will start your day with our professional Driver /
                           Guide, introducing you to the sights and sounds of
                           the Niagara Region, while enroute to the mighty Falls.
                           Upon arriving at the Falls, you are off to the Maid of
                           the Mist (IMAX Theatre or Journey Behind the Falls is
                           substituted when Maid of the Mist boat is not operating)
                           for an exhilarating boat ride to the base of the majestic
                           Horseshoe Falls. In the afternoon, you will have hours of
                           free time allowing for you to enjoy the Falls at your own
                           leisure. On your return journey, there will be photo stops
                           at the Floral Clock, the mighty Whirlpool and Rapids, and
                           a drive through the historic, picturesque community of
                           Niagara-on-the-Falls. You will finish your tour experience
                           with a visit to a local winery.
                           Must be booked direct with Gray Line.

 122                       Offer valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children.
niagara Helicopters limited
3731 Victoria Ave. Niagara Falls, ON L2E 6V5                                    ò
                                                                                attraction
• www.niagarahelicopters
                                                                                 145




                                                                                        offEr DEscripTions
                                         Save $25.00 per adult and
                                                $10 per child
                                         (3-11 years), infants 2 and
                                           under complimentary.



The tour follows the Niagara River from the Whirlpool area (look
for the Spanish Aero Car crossing the gorge), over the Whirlpool
Rapids and the Rainbow Bridge. The green grass and floral
beauty of Queen Victoria Park stretches below as the helicopter
passes by the American Falls and the Skylon Tower. As you
reach the Minolta Tower, the helicopter follows the curve of the
Canadian Horseshoe Falls! Rainbows appear and disappear from
all directions.
                                                                                       Niagara Falls




On-site services include professional photography service, gift
shop, gourmet cafe and FREE parking. On-board commentary
available in 12 languages, multi-lingual service.

Daily, year-round, 9:00 a.m. until sunset, weather permitting. Closed Christ-
mas Day. No reservations required! Discount cannot be combined with any
other offer. No cash value. Must be booked direct.
Offer valid for up to 2 adults, 2 children (12yrs.& under)
                                                                                       123
 Enjoy a 25% admission
        discount



                    see over for details




 Enjoy a 15% discount in
our gift shop on purchases
over $20.00 before taxes.



                    see over for details




    2 for 1 admission




                    see over for details




                                     Spadina Museum:
                                                          offErs




                                     Historic House and
                                          Gardens
 Save 25% off Admission



                                                          125
                    see over for details
      Valid for 1 adults, 2 youth/children.
      Last admission 4:00 p.m.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for 1 adults, 2 youth/children.
      Last admission 4:00 p.m.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Pricing: Adults $13.50, Youth
      (12–17 years) $9.50,
      Children (5–11 years) $8.00
      Valid for 2 adults, 2 youth/children.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults.
      Not valid with special event pricing.
      Museum hours vary, please call to
      confirm.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
12   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
                                     Mackenzie House



Save 25% off Admission




                   see over for details




                                     Historic Fort York



Save 25% off Admission




                   see over for details




 Buy 10 Individual Ride
  Tickets, Get 10 Free



                   see over for details
                                                          offErs




    Save 25% OFF
  Regular Admission


                                                          127
                   see over for details
      Valid for up to 2 adults.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults.
      Not valid with special event pricing.
      Museum hours vary, please call to
      confirm.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 1 Adult and 2
      children/youth.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 Adults and
      2 Children/Youth admission.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
128   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
 The Romantic Jewel


      $ 35 off
  (Canadian dollars)                   TORONTOby
                                       HELICOPTER!
                                       www.HeliTours.ca

                    see over for details




         20 % off
all regular priced items
     in our gift shop.
                                       TORONTOby
                                       HELICOPTER!
                                       www.HeliTours.ca

                    see over for details




Distillery Walking Tour
  Save 20% off Tour




                    see over for details
                                                          offErs




Distillery Segway Spin
  Save 20% off Tour



                                                          129
                    see over for details
      Reservation required.
      Policy in effect.
      Discount is only valid off regular
      priced ‘Romantic Jewel’.
      Valid for 1 adult., 2 children/youth.


      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Discount is only valid off regular
      price items. May only be used on
      the date of your flight.
      Valid for 1 adult., 2 children/youth.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.



      Rates: $15 per person (plus tax)
      Length: 60 minutes (approx)
      Times*: Daily (except Mondays) 11:30am /
      3:30pm. Where: Distillery Visitor Centre
      Valid for guided tour (depending on availability)
      or self-guided tour.
      Valid for up to 1 adult, and 2 children/youth.

      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.



      Rates: $30 per person (plus tax)
      Length: 30 minutes (approx)
      Times*: Daily (except Mondays) 11:00 am /
      12:00 pm / 1:00 pm / 2:00 pm / 3:00pm /
      4:00pm / 5:00pm. Where: Distillery Visitor
      Centre.
      Valid for up to 1 adult, and 2 children/youth.

      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
130   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
  Save 20% off Tour




                   see over for details




Save 15% off per person




                   see over for details




Save 15% off per person




                   see over for details
                                          offErs




genova Tours
   Toronto City Tour
 15% discount on tour

                                          131
                   see over for details
      Rates: $59 per person (plus tax)
      Length: 90 minutes (approx)
      Times*: Daily (except Mondays) 12:00pm /
      4:00pm. Where: Distillery Visitor Centre
      Valid for up to 1 adult, and 2 children/youth.


      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Year round except December 25.
      *All discount coupons must be redeemed
      through our toll free number at:
      1-800-594-3310.
      Valid for up to 1 adult and 2 children/youth.
      Tour must be booked direct with Gray Line.


      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.



      *All discount coupons must be redeemed
      through our toll free number at:
      1-800-594-3310.
      Valid for up to 1 adult and 2 children/youth.
      Tour must be booked direct with Gray Line.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.



      Base cost of $260.00 per couple.
      Add $10.00 per person to a maximum of 6
      persons. Reservations required for all tours,
      reserve by phone.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
132   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
genova Tours
 15% discount on tour




                   see over for details




genova Tours
 15% discount on tour




                   see over for details




Toronto Harbour Tour
        Buy 1
      Get 1 Free



                   see over for details




    Mariposa Sunset
                                          offErs




     Dinner Cruise
     Save 15% on
  Regular Ticket Price


                                          133
                   see over for details
      FLAT RATE FOR 1 TO 6 PEOPLE $510
      LEAVES AT 9 A.M. RETURNS AT 6 P.M.

      Reservations required for all tours.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      FLAT RATE FOR 1 TO 6 PEOPLE $510
      LEAVES AT 9 A.M. RETURNS AT 6 P.M.

      Reservations required for all tours.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Daily Departure Times: 11:00 am, 12:15 pm,
      1:30 pm, 2:45 pm, 4:00 pm
      Operating Season:
      May 15th, 2008 – September 30th, 2008
      Maximum 2 adults and 2 children.


      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.




      Dinner Cruise: Valid up to four adults.
      Sunday Brunch: Maximum 2 adults and 2 children.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
134   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
     Save 25% off
      Per Person



                     see over for details




 St. Lawrence Market
 Food & History Tour

     Save 20% off
         Tour


                     see over for details




    Free Admission




                     see over for details
                                            offErs




  Buy one $10 advance
ticket, get second ticket
      for half price.

                                            135
                     see over for details
      Departure times: 11:00 a.m. until 6:00
      p.m. every day, every hour on the hour.

      Valid for 1 adult, 2 children.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Reservations Required. Must be Booked
      Direct. Offer based on availability.

      Valid for 1 adult, 2 children.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Free Admission.
      Tuesday through Sunday,
      from 11am to 6 pm.
      Closed Mondays



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      One coupon per person allowed
      over course of festival.
      Offer subject to availability.
      Only 6 coupons redeemable per show.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
13   Valid July 2-13, 2008.
Save 20% on Admission




                      see over for details




Save 20% off on Regular
      Ticket Price



                      see over for details




     Save 25% off
     your Food Bill



                      see over for details
                                             offErs




     Save 20% off
     your Food Bill


                                             137
                      see over for details
      Valid for up to 1 adult, 2 children.
      Must be booked direct. Some concerts
      are restricted from this offer.
      Call Box Office for details.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Offer valid for current Main stage
      performances only. Call for reservations.
      Not valid for Saturday performances.
      Black out dates may apply. Coupon must be
      presented at the box office upon ticket pick-up.
      Valid for 1 Adult.
      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Regular menu items only.
      Excludes alcohol, tax, or gratuity.
      Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
138   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
    Save 20% off the
 Purchase of any Entrée
“Passionate Italian Food at
    Delicious Prices”


                     see over for details




      Save 20% off
      Restaurant Bill
     Excluding Taxes.



                     see over for details




      Save 20% off
      Restaurant Bill
     Excluding Taxes.



                     see over for details
                                            offErs




       Free Entrée
 With a food purchase of
 equal or greater value.

                                            139
                     see over for details
      Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children.
      Discount not applicable for tax,
      alcohol or gratuity.
      No split cheques, dine-in only.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
140   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
   Free Admission
   into Night Club



                     see over for details




 20% discount on our
   Regular Menu



                     see over for details




   Save 20% off the
Purchase of any Entrée



                     see over for details
                                            offErs




    Save 25% off
    Entree items.
  Excludes alcohol.

                                            141
                     see over for details
      Valid for up to 2 adults.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      *Valid for up to 2 adults.
      *One coupon per visit.
      *Must be of legal drinking age.
      *Offer valid Tuesday through Friday
      from 5pm to 11pm and
      Saturdays from 7pm to 11pm.
      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
142   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
Save 25% Off show tickets




                       see over for details




      Save 15% off
      your Food Bill
                                          u 416.536.3211
                                         www.southernaccent.com


                       see over for details




Save $20.00 per couple or
   $10.00 per person



                       see over for details
                                                                  offErs




 Save $2.00 off regular
    adult escalation



     
          3128                                                    143
                       see over for details
      Prices subject to taxes and gratuities.
      Subject to limited availability of discounted seats.
      Must specify at time of booking.
      Not valid in December.
      Valid for 2 adults, 2 children/youth.

      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Regular menu items only. Excludes alcohol,
      tax,
      or gratuity.
      Valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children/youth.



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 2 adults and
      2 children (6 –12 yrs.)
      Offer not valid on New Year’s Eve.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Valid for up to 4 adults.
      Regular price $10.95 plus tax.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
144   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
                                    genova Tours
  Save 15% off on Tour




                     see over for details




  Save 15% off on Tour




                     see over for details




  Save 15% off on Tour




                     see over for details
                                                   offErs




Save $25.00 per adult and
       $10 per child
(3-11 years), infants 2 and
  under complimentary.


                                                   145
                     see over for details
      Base cost of $430.00 per couple. Add
      $20.00 per person to a maximum of 6
      persons. Reservations required for all tours,
      reserve by phone.
      Offer valid for 2 adults only.


      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Must be booked direct with Gray Line.
      Offer valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Must be booked direct with Gray Line.
      Offer valid for up to 2 adults and 2 children.




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




      Must be booked direct.
      Offer valid for up to 2 adults,
      2 children (12yrs.& under)



      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
14   Valid to May 31st, 2009.
   Save 20% off
   Show Tickets.
Some conditions apply.
   Mention PROMO
   CODE: CityPass

                  see over for details




                                         offErs




                                         147
      Some conditions apply.

      Mention PROMO CODE: CityPass




      Based on availability. Not valid with
      any other promotion.
      Valid to May 31st, 2009.




148
Peter Fidler monument in Elk Point, Alberta




Explore canada ® with city passport
In 1788, as a young man, Peter Fidler joined the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC)
and came to York Factory in Manitoba.

Peter Fidler was one of Canada’s greatest exploratory surveyors, and one of the
few men who laid the framework for all maps of Western Canada. Having been
trained by the Hudson’s Bay Company, together with his famous contemporary,
David Thompson, Fidler arrived in the prairies in 1792. His task - to help build the
first Hudson’s Bay Company posts in Alberta. Over the length and breadth of
Western Canada, 48,000 miles in all, Peter Fidler carried his sextant and his “artifi-
cial horizon of quicksilver.” Fidler has much to tell us of the Indian tribes, the effect
of the coming of the white man, the rivalry between the Hudson’s Bay and North-
West companies, and the establishment of the Red River settlement in Manitoba in
1812.


Excerpt from Alberta’s Survey History. More Information concerning Peter Fidler,
read J.G.MacGregor’s book, Peter Fidler, Canada’s Forgotten Surveyor.


Peter Fidler was my mother; Marie Fiddler’s great, great grandfather. Learning the
story of our family history caused me to embrace the adventure of exploring and
pass on this book to you, in the hopes it will encourage you to continue exploring.
We visit, explore, discover and learn, embracing our heritage every step of the
way.

Just as Peter Fidler did before us, enjoy exploring the places you come upon.


Randy Vannatter
President - City Passports


                                                                                            149
      m y T r aV E l n oT E s




150
m y T r aV E l n oT E s




                          151
      m y T r aV E l n oT E s




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