Docstoc

Contents Shepherd University

Document Sample
Contents Shepherd University Powered By Docstoc
					                                                 Contents

Section 1: How to Become Recognized                                       3

    Student Affairs Statement of Organizational Diversity
    To Be Or Not to Be . . . a Club or an Organization?
    How to Become a Recognized Club or Organization (overview)
         Find an Advisor
                Role of the Advisor
                Advisors and Advisees: Healthy Partnerships
                The Search Is On: How to Find an Advisor
               Top Ten Qualities of the Great Advisor
         Hold an Interest Meeting
         Create a Constitution
         Complete the Paperwork
    Student Life Council Recognition
    Student Government Association Recognition

Section 2: Maintaining Recognition                                         11 

    Annual Responsibilities of Clubs and Organization

Section 3: Finances and Fundraisers                                        14 
    Managing Finances
    Holding Fundraisers

Section 4: General Information                                             17 

 Changes in Advisors
 Use of Facilities
 Making Copies/Xeroxing
 Media Services
 Security for Events
 Catering
 Off-Campus Events
 Membership Requirements
 Grade Request Forms
 Community Service

Section 5: Code of Conduct                                               20 
    Recognition
    Alcohol Use by Student Groups
    Anti-Hazing Policy
    Planning and Scheduling a Campus Activity
   Section On e:
  How to Become
   a Recognized
Club or Organization
                            STUDENT AFFAIRS AT SHEPHERD
                                  Student Affairs Mission Statement:
The Division of Student Affairs is committed to the holistic education and development of all students.
The Division is dedicated to creating inclusive learning communities inside and outside the classroom
where the development of independent and creative thinking among students is honored and nurtured.
Focusing on the goals of student learning, social justice and assessment, the Division continuously
improves the quality and scope of programs and services to enable our students to be successful citizens
in the global community.



                  STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATIONAL DIVERSITY

As an institution of higher learning, Shepherd University believes in education and personal
development both inside and outside of the classroom. Student learning is central to the culture of our
institution, and finding ways to improve student learning is a continuing process. Recognized
organizations and clubs are an important part of this education since they allow students to gain
leadership skills, to explore their values, and to begin laying the foundation for their professional
careers. Adding to the richness of our campus culture, these groups give students the opportunity to
explore their own interests. Understanding the importance of diversity, we continue to work to engage
and support a wide range of multi-cultural, academic, professional, social, philanthropic, political,
cultural, recreational, spiritual, and athletic organizations.

Shepherd acknowledges the importance student groups have on campus. As such, recognized clubs and
organizations are permitted to use University facilities and services to assist them in meeting their goals
and objectives. Along with those benefits come responsibilities to the club or organization, to the
University, and to the campus community. It is the responsibility of each registered student organization
to adhere to the mission of the University and its supporting bylaws, statues, and policies. Clubs and
organizations are student run and their continuity from year to year depends on student initiative.

This handbook is designed to serve as a resource for student groups as well as advisors. If you have
questions or need further support, please feel free to contact Rachael Meads, Director of Student
Activities and Leadership/Asst. Director of the Student Center, in the Program Board/Student Activities
Office, 304-876-5113.
                      To Be or Not to Be . . . a Club or an Organization?
The two types of recognized groups on campus are clubs and organizations. There are different membership
requirements, responsibilities, and benefits associated with each. Many groups find that it is best to begin
organizing as a club and then move to organization status later once they have built a solid foundation for the
group. Check out the information below and then decide which one will suit your mission best.

CLUBS
STATUS:
● Clubs are recognized through Student Life Council but not Student Government Association (unless the club wishes to go
on to be recognized by SGA)
● Are not required to attend Student Government Association meetings (unless they have chosen to have representation in
the Senate)
● May have less than 15 members and still be recognized

RESPONSIBILITIES:
● Are responsible for abiding by Shepherd University policies for students and student groups
● Must have a faculty or staff advisor
● Must have a current Registration form on file in the Student Affairs Office (due in September each year)
● Are required to send one representative to all sessions of the annual Leadership Conference (unless the group receives an
exception from the Student Life Council before the date of the Conference)

PRIVILEGES:
● May request use of the Student Center and many other University facilities/services for meetings and activities
● May publicize events on campus
● May request a campus mailbox through SGA

RESTRICTIONS:
● Cannot receive money allocations from the Student Government Association

ORGANIZATIONS
STATUS:
● Are recognized through BOTH Student Life Council and the Student Government Association
● Must have at least 15 members and meet at least once a month

RESPONSIBILITIES:
● Are responsible for abiding by Shepherd University policies for students and student groups
● Must have a faculty or staff advisor
● Must have a current Registration form on file in the Student Affairs Office (due in September each year)
● Are required to send two representatives to all sessions of the annual Leadership Conference (unless the group receives
prior approval to send fewer members through the Student Life Council before the date of the Conference)
● Are required to send a representative to all Student Government Association Meetings (held every Tuesday at 5:00 pm in
the Jefferson Room of White Hall)— 2 absences permitted per semester, or they return to Club Status

PRIVILEGES:
●   May request use of the Student Center and many other University facilities/services for meeting and activities
●   May publicize events on campus
●   May conduct fund-raisers with the approval of the Student Government Association
●   May request financial support (up to $500) for projects through Student Government Association
●   May request a campus mailbox through SGA, located on the ground floor of the Student Center.

                          Once you decide which type of group you would like to form,
                           you are ready to learn how to become a recognized group.
      How to Become a Recognized Campus Club or Organization
Anyone interested in starting a club or organization should see the Director of Student Activities and
Leadership/Asst. Director Student Center in the Program Board/Student Activities Office. She can help you to
plan an organizing meeting as well as walk you through the recognition process. While you are in Student Affairs,
you will need to fill out an Intent to Organize form explaining your purpose and is signed off on by your staff or
faculty advisor. After you complete this form and return it to Student Affairs, a copy will be sent to the Student
Life Council—the group that grants recognition on campus.

Registration will be valid from the date of registration until the second Friday of the Fall Semester in the
next academic year. Student organizations must update their organizational information each year.

There are two types of recognized student groups at Shepherd University: clubs and organizations. Each has
specific privileges and responsibilities. In order to determine what type of group would work best for you, see the
privileges and responsibilities list on the previous page.

After you have decided what type of group you would like to be, you should follow the steps outlined in the
sections that follow. Here’s a quick overview:


1)      Contact the Director of Student Activities and Leadership in the Program Board/Student
        Activities Office of the Student Center to review the recognition process and receive permission
        to reserve rooms in the Student Center for interest meetings.

2)      Find a faculty or staff member willing to serve as an advisor to the group.

3)      Hold an interest meeting to see if enough people are interested in creating/being part of this
        group.

4)      Develop a constitution.

5)      Complete the “Intent to Organize” form.

6)      Return the completed “Intent to Organize” form along with your constitution and the list of
        signatures of prospective members to the Director of Student Activities and Leadership/Assistant
        Director of the Student Center in the Student Affairs Office. She will then forward this packet to
        the Student Life Council.

7)      Go before the Student Life Council to request recognition. (Student Life Council meets the 2nd
        and 4th Thursdays of each month at 5:00 pm in the Student Center.)

8)      Once you have been granted recognition by the Student Life Council, you may also want to go
        before the Student Government Association to request full organizational recognition. Just
        complete and return the “Request to Join the Student Senate” form at the SGA Office on the
        ground floor of the Student Center.
                                              Find an Advisor
In order to become a recognized student organization or club, you will need an advisor. This person must be a
Shepherd faculty or staff member unless an exception is granted by the Student Life Council. You might wonder
why a student organization needs an advisor. After all, you were elected because you are a competent and capable
leader, right? Right! But . . .

         Do you sometimes have trouble with administrative red tape?

         Do you sometimes wish your group had more support from related academic or service departments?

         Could your organization benefit from some ―connections‖ on campus?

         And even though you are doing a great job now, will your group have to start again from scratch
        again         next year?

A faculty or staff advisor could help alleviate these and other problems without taking over the leadership of your
organization.

ROLE OF THE ADVISOR:
► Serve as a sounding board for ideas

►    Assist officers in understanding their duties, administering programs and plans, organizing
             projects and making appropriate transitions

►    Encourage use of parliamentary procedures so that meetings are run in an orderly, efficient manner

►    Mediate conflicts between group members and/or officers

►    Provide continuity and stability as student leadership changes

►    Provide an ―outside‖ point of view or perspective

►    Act as a resource person to students by being knowledgeable about Shepherd’s policies, regulations
            and services regarding student life

►    Advise students about effective risk management and event planning

►    Give honest feedback to group members

►    Attend as many of the group’s meetings and events as possible

►    Consult with other departments when problems arise with the student group

►    Facilitate leadership development in the group

►    Be familiar with national structure and services, if relevant
Why be an advisor? Let potential advisors know that there are benefits to being an advisor on
campus. Here are a few:

       A unique opportunity to get to know and mentor students outside the classroom or office
      
       An opportunity to feel satisfaction and accomplishment through making a special
        contribution to campus as well as to a particular group of students
      
       The chance to see students develop their individual skills and talents
      
       The opportunity to informally share knowledge and expertise on relevant topics
                   Advisors and Advisees: A Lesson in Healthy Partnerships
Remember that not only is the advisor responsible for assisting the club or organization. The
student group also must willingly accept responsibilities to its advisor. Here are hints for a
mutually beneficial relationship with your advisor:

1. Discuss your expectations of the advisor’s role and your obligations to him/her from the beginning. Make
   sure you are in agreement about the role each party will play in the relationship.

2. Set meeting times with the advisor so she/he may also attend. Notify the advisor of all meetings and events
   that the group sponsors.

3. Send the advisor a copy of all minutes.

4. The President or Executive Officer should meet regularly with the advisor to discuss organizational matters
   and to relay and update information.

5. Consult him/her before any changes in the structure or policies of the organization or committee are made and
   before major projects are undertaken.

6. Understand that although the advisor has no vote, he/she should have speaking privileges.

7. Remember that the responsibility for the success or failure of a group project rests ultimately with the group,
   not the advisor.

8. Periodically, evaluate your advisor and give appropriate feedback to let him/her know how he/she may better
   advise you.

                            The Search Is On: How to Find an Advisor
Now that you know how much your organization and its potential advisor can gain from one another, you
probably want to know how to find this advisor. There are at least two things your organization should do first: 1)
develop a clear statement of group goals and 2) create a clear statement of expectations of the advisor, both in
terms of role and time commitment. It would also be helpful to outline what the advisor could fairly expect from
the group. With this information in hand, you will be ready to approach potential advisors.

The most suitable advisor is one who shares a common interest with your organization. Poll your group members
for the names of faculty or staff members who they have found helpful and interested in student life. Approach
potential advisors confidently and positively. Be clear about the purpose and activities of your organization, your
expectations of the advisor, and all benefits the advisor will enjoy.

Once your advisor begins to serve, keep him or her well-informed, clarify expectations and roles when needed,
and draw on the advisor’s expertise. Remember that like you, your advisor has multiple demands placed on
his/her time. Be sensitive to this fact. Occasional thank yous and acknowledgments are a good idea— if you have
organization t-shirts, for example, make sure you advisor has one too! Enjoy what can be an extremely rewarding
and mutually beneficial relationship.
                       TOP TEN QUALITIES OF THE TRULY GREAT ADVISOR
   Is personally and professionally interested in being a good advisor.
   Listens constructively, attempting to hear all aspects of students’ expressed problems objectively and fairly.
   Is available to students and follows up on commitments made to advisees.
   Knows University policy and practice in sufficient detail to provide students with accurate, usable
     information; when in doubt, refers to the University Catalog, Advisor’s Handbook, Student Handbook, or
     other available resources for clarification.
   Knows how and when to make referrals and is familiar with referral sources available to students on the
     campus.
   Does not make decisions for students, but helps students make their own decisions.
   Is a positive role model and respected by students.
   Communicates honestly with the group in a respectful manner.
   Continually tries to improve both the style and substance of the advising role by evaluating the effectiveness
     of his/her advising practices and willingly participating in advisor-training programs offered by the University
     for this purpose.
   Tries to establish a warm and open relationship with advisees by being genuine and allowing advisees to be
     themselves.

                                       Hold an Interest Meeting
Hold an interest meeting or open house to determine interest and create a list of students willing to become
members. To qualify to be an organization, you must have at least fifteen active members; clubs may have fewer
members. If you would like to use a room in the Student Center to do this, see the Director of Student Activities
and Leadership/Asst. Director Student Center in the Program Board/Student Activities Office who will help you
reserve a space and plan your event.


                                         Create a Constitution
An important part of the process becoming a recognized group is creating a constitution or organizational bylaws.
This document should define who you are, what you do, why you exist, how the group is governed, how officers
are elected and removed, and the duties of both members and officers. Constitutions range from the very complex
to the very simple. Decide what will work best for your group. (There are two examples included in the appendix
of this document to assist you.) Feel free to consult the folks in Student Affairs or in the Student Government
Office for assistance as you prepare this important document. NOTE: A group’s Constitution/bylaws may not be
in conflict with the SGA Constitution or Shepherd University policies.

                               Complete the Required Paperwork
In order to become recognized on campus, you will need to complete an ―Intent to Organize‖ form, available
through the Student Affairs Office in the Student Center. This form explains your purposes and lists important
contacts including your advisor and two executive members.

Return the completed Intent to Organize form along with your constitution and the list of signatures of
prospective members to the Student Affairs Office. They will then forward this packet to the Student Life
Council and the Student Government Association.
                                            Tax ID Number
A Tax ID number will be required in order for your group to be eligible to open a local bank account, to receive
reimbursement checks from SGA, to be paid for working concessions on campus, etc. Student organizations are
not automatically tax exempt, however. It is the responsibility of each organization to file the appropriate
paperwork to receive tax exempt status. Organizations with national affiliation may check with their national
organization to see if they fall under their national Tax ID number. Otherwise, groups must register for a tax
identification number online at https://sa1.www4.irs.gov/sa_vign/newFormSS4.do



                               Student Life Council Recognition
Now you are ready to go before the Student Life Council to request campus recognition. Contact the Director of
Student Activities and Leadership/Asst. Director Student Center or the Chairperson of the Student Life Council
and ask to be placed on the agenda for the next SLC meeting. (SLC meets the 1st and 3rd Thursdays of each
month at 5:00 pm in the Student Center.) Attend the Student Life Council meeting on behalf of your group. Be
prepared to answer questions about your group’s purpose, goals, plans, etc. Once the Student Life Council votes
to grant recognition to your group, you earn all the privileges and responsibilities of a club. Congratulations!


                     Student Government Association Recognition
Once you have been granted recognition by the Student Life Council, you may also want to go before the Student
Government Association to become an SGA recognized club or organization.

If you would like to continue on to become an SGA recognized club or organization, you may contact the Student
Government Association (304-876-5301) and pick up a ―Request to Join the Senate‖ form. Once this is returned
to the SGA Office on the Ground Floor of the Student Center, your request will be placed on the agenda for the
next SGA meeting. Once you are recognized by the SGA, you will have provisional SGA recognition for one
academic semester. During this period, your group may vote at Senate meetings but is not eligible to receive
funding from SGA and is expected to meet the following requirements:

        A. Turn in a copy of all meeting minutes to the Director of Student Activities and Leadership/Asst.
                 Director Student Center in the Student Affairs Office (101 Student Center) by the 1st of each
                 month.
        B. Attend ALL regularly scheduled Student Government Association meetings (no absences).
        C. Fulfill the minimum requirements for attendance at the annual Leadership Conference at Shepherd
                 held in the fall semester – Sat., Sept. 25, 2010.



                       Congratulations on
                       gaining recognition!
Section Two:
Maintaining
Recognition
                                    Maintaining Recognition
Once you have become a recognized club or organization on campus, you can begin to hold meetings,
plan activities, and have fun. Maintaining recognition on campus is not hard. If your group is
responsible and follows the policies for clubs and organizations outlined in the Student Handbook,
meets the requirements for attendance set by the Student Government Association, and works to
continue developing membership, you should have few problems.

There are four responsibilities that all groups on campus must fulfill each year. These are also the top
four reasons that groups lose recognition: 1) renewal of registration information through the Student
Affairs Office, 2) regular attendance at SGA (organizations only), 3) attendance at the annual
Leadership Conference at Shepherd, and 4) adherence to University policies. Take a few minutes to
review the information below and plan ahead to keep your organization on track.

                  Annual Responsibilities of Clubs and Organizations
1. Renewal of Registration
All recognized groups on campus must complete a Recognition Renewal Form (see Appendix of this handbook)
by the second week of school each year. The form includes current information about officers and your advisor.
These forms must be completed and returned to the Student Affairs Office by the second Friday of the Fall
Semester. The information on these forms will be shared with the Student Life Council and the Student
Government Association.

2. Attend SGA meetings weekly (required for organizations).
Student Government Association meetings give your group a chance to share concerns, make announcements, and
be a voice in the campus community. All recognized groups are eligible to hold a seat in the Senate of the SGA.
Senators vote on student fee allocations, approve fundraisers, and have an opportunity to vote on
recommendations to the President’s Executive Staff about important policy and fee issues.

In order to maintain organizational status, organizations must maintain regular attendance at SGA
meetings. Meetings are held every Tuesday at 4:30 pm in the Student Center Storer Ballroom. For fully
recognized groups, two absences are permitted each semester without penalty. While they are encouraged to
become members of SGA, clubs are not required to join or attend SGA in order to maintain recognition on
campus.

3. Attend the annual Leadership Conference at Shepherd – SEPT. 25, 2010
The annual Leadership Conference at Shepherd sponsored by the Student Life Council is the one time a year that
all campus organizations get together for leadership training. The Conference is Shepherd's leadership tradition.
It brings special guest speakers, performers, community leaders, and folks from all walks of life together with
representatives from every campus organization and the student body at large to share ideas on topics ranging
from creativity to social justice.

In order to maintain recognition on campus, all organizations are required to send at least two representatives
to all sessions of the Leadership Conference while clubs are required to send at least one representative to all
sessions of the Leadership Conference. Social Greek organizations are required to send at least three executive
officers and two active/associate members to the Leadership Conference. Exceptions to this policy may be
granted by the Student Life Council prior to the date of the conference.

CONSEQUENCES for NON-COMPLIANCE with Leadership Conference Attendance Requirements:
First Time Non-Compliance — Student groups that fail to meet the required attendance standards as outlined
above will not immediately lose recognition. They will still be allowed to Shepherd University facilities and the
Student Center for meetings and activities. However, they will be placed on provisional status with the Student
Government Association. In order to maintain recognition, groups must comply with the following
restrictions/responsibilities:

    1) Must submit the minutes of all meetings to the Director of Student Activities and Leadership/Asst.
        Director Student Center (101 Student Center) by the 1st of each month.
    2) Must attend ALL SGA meetings (no absences allowed) during the period of provisional status. (Groups on
        provisional status may still vote in SGA)
    3) May NOT request/receive money from SGA during the period of provisional status.
    5) May NOT participate in the SGA lottery for Shepherd sporting concessions (football, basketball, baseball,
        etc.) during the provisional period.

Groups that fulfill the obligations as outlined above will be returned to full group privileges in January of the
spring semester.

2-Year Non-Compliance: Student groups or organizations who do not meet the attendance requirements for the
Leadership Conference for two consecutive years may have their campus recognition revoked entirely by the
Student Life Council.

4. Follow University policies for student groups.
Groups on campus reflect the values and attitudes of our academic community. Therefore, all student groups are
expected to be familiar with and conduct themselves in accordance with the ―Student Code of Conduct‖ and the
―Code of Conduct for Clubs and Organizations‖ and ―Code of Conduct for Social Greek Organizations‖ as
outlined in the Student Handbook and this manual. Groups that violate policies run the risk of losing recognition
on campus and may face charges/sanctions under the Campus Judicial system.
Section Three:
Finances and
 Fundraising
                                          Managing Finances
The constitution for each student group should identify the officer with the responsibility of maintaining financial
records, usually the treasurer or secretary. Each treasurer should develop a clear system that provides accurate and
detailed records of all deposits and expenditures. A filing system should also be developed to retain copies of all
financial paperwork.

Responsibility for managing and dispersing the funds of student clubs and organizations lies with the student
members and elected officers of each student group. However, because they have agreed to oversee, advise, and
hold their advisees accountable to the policies outlined in the Student Code of Conduct, faculty or staff members
acting as advisors to student groups shall have the right to review/audit the financial records and transactions of
the clubs and organizations they advise.

If you plan to handle money within your group, you may choose one of the following options for banking:

        1) Open an organizational account with the Shepherd University Foundation Office located in McMurran
        Hall. The Foundation will place your money in an account that you may easily access through withdrawal
        or deposit request forms. There are no restrictions placed upon purchases made from the Foundation
        account. Using the Foundation simplifies bookkeeping for groups since they always keep your account
        information up-to-date. Checks are typically cut on Tuesdays and Thursdays. For more information, call
        x. 5391 or stop by the Foundation Office.

        2) Open an account for your group at a local bank. If you choose this option, your group must have a Tax
        Exempt ID number in order to open an account. You will need to designate two officers with authority to
        sign off on group checks. (NOTE: Checkwriting authority may only lie with student members. Advisors
        may not sign off on checks for groups.) If you choose this option, your group must keep track of its own
        expeditures and balances. You will also be responsible for updating this information as officers change.

Regardless of which option you choose, the use of student group funds must comply with the policies outlined in
the Student Code of Conduct for Organizations.

A Note on Dormant Accounts: If a club or organization has not held recognized status or meetings for one
academic year, funds from that group’s bank accounts will transfer to the control of the Division of Student
Affairs and will be deposited into the Student Organization Development fund. Monies will be deemed
abandoned if the group is inactive for a period of 12 months and no authorized organization officer notifies the
department of Student Affairs in writing of the club or organization’s desire to reactivate. All clubs and
organizations authorize the University to transfer any abandoned monies to the Division of Student Affairs.

                                         Holding Fundraisers
Sometimes groups need to hold fundraisers in order to attend conferences, conduct community service projects, or
finance other activities. All on-campus fundraisers conducted by clubs or organizations receive prior approval
from the Student Government Association and the Vice President for Student Affairs. Sale/Raffle/Fundraiser
Request Forms are available at the SGA Office on the ground floor of the Student Center and at the Student
Center Information Center.

Recognized clubs and organizations are eligible to hold fundraisers on campus if they have been approved by the
SGA. Clubs may not hold fundraisers on campus without special approval from the SGA Executive Board.

Since student groups represent the University, off-campus fundraisers must be approved in advance by Student
Affairs. NOTE: Student groups may not approach businesses for cash donations without the approval of the
Shepherd University Advancement Office. To request permission, contact Julie Siler at jsiler@shepherd.edu
304-876-5526. Groups that do not follow these policies may be sanctioned or have their group privileges
restricted.
   Section Four:
General Information
                                          Changes in Advisors
If the advisor for your group changes during the semester, notification must be submitted in writing to the Student
Affairs Office immediately. Be sure to include the name of your group, the name of the new advisor and his/her
contact information (phone number and mailing address).


                                              Use of Facilities

Recognized, registered student organizations may reserve University facilities if the activity is consistent with the
purpose stated in their constitution and if the activity occurs during fall and spring semesters while classes are in
session. (Summer requests may be honored on a case by case basis.) Student groups are not charged for the use of
most University facilities. However, groups may be charged for support services such as cleaning or staff
coverage.

Meeting rooms in the Student Center are heavily used so it is a good idea to reserve your space early. To reserve a
room in the Student Center, you will need to complete a Room Request Form (available at the Student Center
Information Desk). The Student Center staff will make every effort to honor all requests as space is available.

The list of building managers whom you should contact in order to reserve space is listed in the Student
Handbook. http://www.shepherd.edu/students/studenthandbook.pdf

                                      Making Copies/Xeroxing
Shepherd University does not pay for copying or printing of materials for Shepherd groups. However, there is a
Service Center located in the basement of Ikenberry Hall (x5252) where recognized clubs and organizations may
have copies of flyers, brochures, minutes, and other materials made. Copies are far less expensive than at many
other private businesses. Here are the steps to follow:

1) Deposit money from your club/organization into the Service Center account at the Cashier’s Window
       on the 2nd floor of Ikenberry Hall.
2) Take the receipt showing this deposit downstairs to the Service Center and the staff there will set up an
       account for your group and take care of your copying needs.


                                              Media Services

Audio-visual equipment, including VCRs and monitors, cassette tape players, microphones, slide and overhead
projectors is available to student organizations through the Office of Media Services. Have your advisor call
x.5174 directly. Equipment is provided as available with priority given to academic programs. You should contact
Media Services well in advance to reserve needed equipment.


                                           Security for Events

Security may be required or desired for some events on campus. In such cases, your group should contact the
University Police Office well in advance to discuss plans and request support. The number of officers assigned to
an event will be determined by Shepherd’s Police Department. If the coverage for the group’s event will require
overtime or additional officers to be on duty, the group may be billed for the actual time worked. For more
information, call x5374.
                                                   Catering
Shepherd’s Dining Services provide high quality catering for a variety of events and budgets: from sit-down
dinners to simple coffee and cookies catering. To see a list of items and services, visit their website:
http://www.shepherd.edu/dineweb. Groups that would like to have on-campus events catered should contact
Shepherd’s Catering Department x5145 to discuss the event and your food needs at least three full working days
ahead of time.

                                           Off-Campus Events
The liability and responsibility of the University does not extend to off-campus locations; therefore, officers of
student groups should realize that the student group stands alone in its assumption of risk at these programs.

Officers must take "reasonable care" to insure that local, state and federal laws are upheld. Officers must make
every effort to care for the safety and security of guests. Whether held off-campus or on-campus, officers,
members and guests may be held liable for violations of the Student Conduct Code or local, state, and federal
laws.

Since student groups represent the University, off-campus fundraisers must be approved in advance by Student
Affairs.

                                     Membership Requirements
Shepherd University does not have a minimum cumulative grade point average required for membership in
student clubs or organizations, but does encourage groups to establish their own requirements. The University has
established a 2.00 cumulative grade point average for individuals who wish to hold an elected office, serve on
campus committees, or represent the University in any public appearance.

                                         Grade Request Forms
Groups may wish to check the academic status of current or potential members to satisfy organizational GPA
requirements. A request for grades may be made by obtaining a ―Grade Release Form‖ from the Student Affairs
Office. In order to obtain a student’s GPA, each student whose grades are being requested must sign the form and
include their social security number to grant permission for the release of the information. After this form is
completed, deliver it to the Student Affairs Office. Within two working days, eligibility information may be
picked up by the designated representative of that club or organization.

                          Community Service and Student Groups
Shepherd University believes that community service and service learning are an integral part of the educational
process. All student groups are encouraged to reach out to the surrounding community and beyond by taking on
service projects. In addition to gaining new skills and marketable experiences, students may find their lives
transformed through helping others.

All campus community service efforts should be coordinated through Shepherd’s Student Community Services
and Service Learning Office in Suite 201 of the Student Center. The staff here is networked with all of the
agencies in our area which coordinate outreach and service efforts and can make sure that you find a project that
will fit the interests of your group. Since they know what other groups are doing, Holly Morgan Frye in the
Student Community Services and Service Learning Office can also let you know if your project will be competing
with others so overlap is prevented. A staff member would also be happy to come to your group’s meetings to
speak or to help you select and implement a project. Call 304-876-5402.

                        Suggestions for Developing Community Service Projects

    Introduce community service early on in your meetings, get your members interested and thinking about
             different possibilities.

    Check out the needs in the community listed on Shepherd’s Community Services website for volunteer
     opportunities.

    Work together to develop projects that all your members will support.

    Be realistic. Think in terms of finances (does it take money to do this project? do we have money for a
     project? how can we raise money to fund the project?).

    Register your project with the Student Community Service and Service Learning Office.

   Be positive! You will get out of this experience what you and your members put into it.
  Section Five:
   APPENDIX
Resources to Assist
  Student Clubs
and Organizations
                    INTENT TO ORGANIZE A CLUB/ORGANIZATION
PLEASE FILL IN BOTH SIDES OF FORM COMPLETELY.

FULL NAME OF GROUP: (no initials)____________________________________________________

Brief description of group’s purpose: _____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________

MEETING TIME and DAY: ____________________________________________________________

STUDENT OFFICER CONTACT #1:

Name: ____________________________________           Phone #________________________________

Rambler ID #: ____________________         Shepherd Email: __________________________________

Address:_____________________________________________________________________________

STUDENT OFFICER CONTACT #2:

Name: ____________________________________           Phone #________________________________

Rambler ID #: ___________________        Shepherd Email: _________________________________

Address:____________________________________________________________________________

ADVISOR INFORMATION:

Name: ______________________________          Shepherd Email: ________________________________

Phone #____________________       Campus Address:__________________________________________

CATEGORY: Please indicate the one category which best describes your student group:

_____ ACADEMIC/PROFESSIONAL ( _____ Nationally Affiliated _____ Local)
_____ AGENCY (groups that are subsets of Student Life Council, etc.)
_____ FINE OR CREATIVE ARTS
_____ HONORARY (membership by invitation based on specific standards)
_____ MEDIA (i.e., print, radio, T.V.)
_____ MULTICULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL
_____ SPORTS/RECREATION
_____ SPECIAL INTEREST
_____ RELIGIOUS/SPIRITUAL

Group’s Website Address: ________________________________________________________
GROUP STATUS:

_____ CLUB (recognized by Student Life Council, but not SGA: can use University facilities, must send one representative
to annual Leadership Conference at Shepherd on Sept. 25, 2010, cannot receive money allocations from SGA, cannot vote in
SGA/not required to attend SGA)
_____ ORGANIZATION (recognized by BOTH Student Life Council and SGA: must have at least 15 members, must meet
at least once a month, must send a representative to SGA meetings weekly, can use University facilities, can vote in SGA
meetings, can request money allocations through SGA, can request on campus fundraising through SGA, must send at least
two representatives to the annual Leadership Conference at Shepherd on Sept. 25, 2010)
                                                                                                  Continue on back
                                              PLEASE NOTE:
                                   A LIST OF CURRENT GROUP MEMBERS
                                                  AND
                           A COPY OF YOUR GROUP’S CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS
                           MUST BE ATTACHED TO COMPLETE THIS APPLICATION.

IMPORTANT: Statements below require advisor and student officer initials beside each:
The above organization agrees to adhere to the following statements in order to be considered for recognition:
 ADV        ST
_____ _____ 1. The advisor to the group is a current employee of Shepherd University.
_____ _____ 2. No discrimination on the basis of race, sex, age, color, national origin, height, weight, marital status, sexual
orientation, religion, ability/disability, or veteran status shall exist.
_____ _____ 3. Only students enrolled at Shepherd University may be officers and must carry at least a 2.0 cumulative
overall grade point average.
_____ _____ 4. No organizational rules, constitution, or by-laws may be in conflict with the regulations or written policies
of the Student Government Association OR those of Shepherd University.
_____ _____ 5. The organization agrees to adhere to all applicable federal, state, and local laws as well as the policies of
Shepherd University outlined in the Shepherd University Student Handbook (copies available in the Office of Student
Affairs, 101 Student Center) and other University publications.
_____ _____ 6. The advisor and student leaders agree to communicate regularly to clarify goals, expectations, and progress.
_____ _____ 7. I understand that the advisor is a non-voting member acting as a mentor to the student group.
_____ _____ 8. I acknowledge and support Shepherd University’s prohibition of hazing as defined in the Student Code of
Conduct and Student Handbook.
_____ _____ 9. I agree to report immediately to the Director of Student Activities (Rachael Meads/rmeads@shepherd.edu)
or the Assistant Dean/Judicial Manager (Dave Cole/dcole@shepherd.edu) any activities that may or will violate University
policies.
_____ _____ 10. I will notify the Director of Student Activities (Rachael Meads) immediately if there is a change in advisor
status.


Student Officer Signature:________________________________________ Date: ______________

Advisor Signature:_______________________________________________ Date: ______________

                                                       Office Use Only

FRONT OFFICE: Date Received: _______________________________ By Whom?
_________________________________

STUDENT LIFE COUNCIL DECISION: _______________________________ TAX ID #:________________________
STATUS/TYPE of GROUP________________________________________________________________

   Please return to: Office of Student Affairs; 101 Student Center, PO Box 5000, Shepherdstown, WV 25443-3210.
  Questions? Please contact Rachael Meads at (304) 876-5113 or rmeads@shepherd.edu
           2010-11 SHEPHERD STUDENT CLUB/ORGANIZATION
                           RECOGNITION RENEWAL FORM
PLEASE FILL IN BOTH SIDES OF FORM COMPLETEL
YFULL NAME OF GROUP: (no initials)___________________________________________________

Brief description of group’s purpose: _____________________________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

MEETING TIME and DAY: ____________________________________________________________

STUDENT OFFICER CONTACT #1:

Name: ____________________________________      Phone #________________________________

Rambler ID #: ____________________     Shepherd Email:_________________________________

Address:___________________________________________________________________________

STUDENT OFFICER CONTACT #2:

Name: ____________________________________      Phone #________________________________

Rambler ID #: ___________________     Shepherd Email: _________________________________

Address:____________________________________________________________________________

ADVISOR INFORMATION:

Name: ______________________________      Shepherd Email:______________________________

Phone #____________________    Campus Address:______________________________________

CATEGORY: Please indicate the one category which best describes your student group:
_____ ACADEMIC/PROFESSIONAL ( _____ Nationally Affiliated            _____ Local)
_____ AGENCY (groups that are subsets of Student Life Council, etc.)
_____ FINE OR CREATIVE ARTS
_____ HONORARY (membership by invitation based on specific standards)
_____ MEDIA (i.e., print, radio, T.V.)
_____ MULTICULTURAL/INTERNATIONAL
_____ SPORTS/RECREATION                                ____ CLUB SPORT (must see Keith
Worrell for approval,
_____ SPECIAL INTEREST                                 304-876-5076; kworrell@shepherd.edu)
_____ RELIGIOUS/SPIRITUAL

Group’s Website Address: ________________________________________________________




                                                                            Continue on back
GROUP STATUS:
_____ CLUB (recognized by Student Life Council, but not SGA: can use University facilities, must send one representative
to annual Leadership Conference at Shepherd on Sept. 25, 2010, cannot receive money allocations from SGA, cannot vote in
SGA/not required to attend SGA)
_____ ORGANIZATION (recognized by BOTH Student Life Council and SGA: must have at least 15 members, must meet
at least once a month, must send a representative to SGA meetings weekly, can use University facilities, can vote in SGA
meetings, can request money allocations through SGA, can request on campus fundraising through SGA, must send at least
two representatives to the annual Leadership Conference at Shepherd on Sept. 25, 2010)

                                   PLEASE NOTE:
               A LIST OF CURRENT GROUP MEMBERS with EMAIL ADDRESSES
                                        AND
                  A COPY OF YOUR GROUP’S CONSTITUTION AND BYLAWS
                  MUST BE ATTACHED TO COMPLETE THIS APPLICATION.

IMPORTANT: Statements below require advisor and student officer initials beside each:
The above organization agrees to adhere to the following statements in order to be considered for
recognition:
 ADV      ST
_____ _____ 1. The advisor to the group is a current employee of Shepherd University.
_____ _____ 2. No discrimination on the basis of race, sex, age, color, national origin, height, weight,
marital status, sexual orientation, religion, ability/disability, or veteran status shall exist.
_____ _____ 3. Only students enrolled at Shepherd University may be officers and must carry at least a
2.0 cumulative overall grade point average.
_____ _____ 4. No organizational rules, constitution, or by-laws may be in conflict with the
regulations or written policies of the Student Government Association OR those of Shepherd University.
_____ _____ 5. The organization agrees to adhere to all applicable federal, state, and local laws as well
as the policies of Shepherd University outlined in the Shepherd University Student Handbook (copies
available in the Office of Student Affairs, 101 Student Center) and other University publications.
_____ _____ 6. The advisor and student leaders agree to communicate regularly to clarify goals,
expectations, and progress.
_____ _____ 7. I understand that the advisor is a non-voting member acting as a mentor to the student
group.
_____ _____ 8. I acknowledge and support Shepherd University’s prohibition of hazing as defined in
the Student Code of Conduct and Student Handbook.
_____ _____ 9. I agree to report immediately to the Director of Student Activities (Rachael Meads/
rmeads@shepherd.edu) or the Assistant Dean/Judicial Manager (Dave Cole/dcole@shepherd.edu) any
activities that may or will violate University policies.
_____ _____ 10. I will notify the Director of Student Activities (Rachael Meads) immediately if there is
a change in advisor status.

Student Officer Signature:______________________________________ Date: ______________

Advisor Signature:_____________________________________________ Date: ______________
   Please return to: Office of Student Affairs; 101 Student Center, PO Box 5000, Shepherdstown, WV 25443-5000.
                  Questions? Please contact Rachael Meads at (304) 876-5113 or rmeads@shepherd.edu
                                       SAMPLE CONSTITUTIONS
SAMPLE CONSTITUTION A

       CONSTITUTION OF THE _______________________________ OF SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY
                               (Note Date of Draft or Approval)

Article I: Purpose
The purpose of this organization shall be . . . . .

Article II: Membership
Membership shall be open to all Shepherd University students regardless of race, color, national origin, handicap,
gender or sexual orientation. (This organization is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Organization in
compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and all
other applicable state and federal laws and regulations.)

Article III: Officers and Advisor
3.01 The officers of this organization shall be:
      a. President
      b. Vice President
      c. Secretary/Treasurer
      d. (List other officer titles)

3.02 The faculty/staff advisor of this organization shall be . . .

Article IV: Duties of Officers
4.01 The duties of the President shall include:
      a. calling and presiding over all meetings of the organization
      b. appointing standing and special committees
      c. supervising officer elections
      d. representing the organization at official functions or as appropriate.

4.02 The duties of the Vice President shall include:
      a. performing the President’s duties in the absence of the President
      b. promoting the purposes of the organization

4.03 The duties of the Secretary/Treasurer shall include:
      a. maintaining accurate minutes, records, and correspondence for the organization
      b. handling all publicity and other communications as necessary
      c. developing a budget, receiving all money, paying all debts and keeping an accurate record of all
               revenues and expenditures.

Article V: Meetings
5.01 Regular meetings of the organization shall be held . . .

5.02 Special meetings may be called by . . .

Article VI: Amendments
6.01 Proposals for amendments to the constitution or by-laws shall be announced at a regular meeting and
       posted two weeks prior to consideration.
6.02   A two-thirds(2/3) favorable vote of those members of the organization present at a regular meeting shall
       be required to ratify an amendment to the constitution or by-laws.

        CONSTITUTION OF THE SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY TIDDLYWINK ASSOCIATION
                               Adopted January 1, 1991
Article I — NAME

The name of this organization shall be the Shepherd University Tiddlywink Association.

Article II — PURPOSE

The purposes of this organization are to develop opportunities for experience in playing tiddlywinks and to
promote interest in the history and development of tiddlywinks.

Article III — MEMBERSHIP

Section 1. Active members shall be enrolled students at Shepherd University having attended two
            consecutive meetings and having paid the required dues.
Section 2. The Shepherd University Tiddlywink Association will not discriminate on the basis of
            age, gender, race, religion, color, country of origin, sexual orientation or handicap.*
Section 3. Annual dues of $5.00 shall be paid by September 30 of each year, after which a member
            will be dropped for nonpayment of dues.
Section 4. Associate members shall be faculty or staff interested in tiddlywinks. They shall not be
            eligible to hold office or vote.

*This statement on nondiscrimination must be included in every organizational constitution.

Article IV — OFFICERS

Section 1. The officers of the association shall be President, Vice-President, Secretary, and Treasurer.
           These officers shall perform duties prescribed by this constitution and by the parliamentary
           authority adopted by the Association.
Section 2. Officers shall be nominated at the annual meeting in April of each year. Election shall be by
            secret ballot and the candidates receiving the most votes shall be named to their respective
            offices.
Section 3. Officers shall be elected to serve for one year or until their successors are elected, and their
           term of office shall begin at the close of the meeting at which they are elected.
Section 4. Vacancies in offices shall be filled by nomination and voting of a quorum of active
            members.
Section 5. Officers shall be removed from office by a vote of two-thirds of the active membership of
           the Association.

ARTICLE V — DUTIES OF OFFICERS

Section 1. The President of the Association shall preside over all business meetings, and represent the
           Association whenever the membership decides it is proper. The President has the power to
           appoint all committees.
Section 2. The Vice-President of the Association shall be a member of all committees appointed by the
           President. The Vice-President shall preside over meetings in absence of the President.
Section 3. The Secretary shall keep minutes at all meetings. The Secretary shall perform any other
           duties delegated by the President.
Section 4. The Treasurer shall be in charge of the treasury of the Association, and shall make reports to the
            Association at each meeting. The Treasurer shall perform any other duties delegated by the President.

ARTICLE VI — MEETINGS

Section 1. The regular meetings of the Association shall be held on the first and third Wednesday of
           each month from September to May unless otherwise ordered by the Association or by the
           Executive Committee.
Section 2. The regular meeting on the third Wednesday in April shall be known as the Annual Meeting
            and shall be for the purpose of electing officer, receiving reports of officers and committees, and for
            any other business that may arise.
Section 3. Special meetings may be called by the President or the Executive Committee and shall be
            called upon the written request of ten members of the Association. The purpose of the
            meeting shall be stated in the notice and three day’s notice shall be given, except in cases of
            emergency.
Section 4. One more than one-half of the active membership of the Association shall constitute a
            quorum.

ARTICLE VII — RELATIONSHIP

Section 1. The Shepherd University Tiddlywink Association shall have no relationship and shall not be
            controlled by any other local, state, or national organization.

ARTICLE VIII — ACTIVITIES

Section 1. The Association shall hold regular business meetings with invited speakers on topics of
            interest. Demonstrations of tiddlywinks will be planned.
Section 2. The Association shall hold an annual banquet in the Spring semester to honor the officers,
            and to have a celebration of tiddlywinks.

ARTICLE IX — COMMITTEES

Section 1. The Executive Committee shall include the officers of the Association. They shall
            supervise the affairs of the Association between its business meetings, make
            recommendation to the Association, and perform other duties as specified in this
            constitution. The Executive Committee shall be subject to the orders of the Association and
            none of its acts shall conflict with actions taken by the Association.

ARTICLE X — ADVISOR

Section 1. One or more advisors shall be elected each year in the same manner as the officers of the
            Association. Responsibilities shall be those assigned by the Shepherd University Student Life
            Council and published in the Student Organization Handbook and Advisor Handbook.

ARTICLE XI — PARLIAMENTARY AUTHORITY

Section 1. The rules contained in the current edition of Robert’s Rules of Order (Newly Revised) shall
            govern the Association in all cases to which they are applicable and in where they are
            consistent with this constitution and any special rules of order the Association may adopt.

ARTICLE XII — AMENDMENTS

Section 1. This constitution may be amended at any regular meeting of the Association by two-thirds
            (2/3) vote, provided that the amendment was submitted in writing at the previous regular
            meeting.
           Laying the Foundation for a Healthy Club or Organization
Involve your advisor in the group and its activities.

Encourage others' input and include your members' ideas, thoughts, and opinions in plans. Always allow
everyone’s voice to be heard.

Be open-minded.

Strive to build a diverse membership.

Value each member, not only in their individual efforts, but also in the team structure as well.

Remember that conflict can be productive. When you encourage people to think for themselves, you are
bound to have some clashes. Collegial debate keeps fresh ideas coming.

Recognize what people do right and they will do more of it.

Share responsibilities (and the credit!) for projects.

Treat everyone in the group with respect.

Create an environment where all members feel comfortable sharing or voicing concerns.

Get to know each other well and strive to build trust within the team.

Involve all members in defining group goals.

Commit to group decision-making.

Identify your members’ strengths, skills, resources, and limitations.

Work to effectively communicate your group’s mission, identity, and projects to others.

Take time to do self-evaluation and assessment.
                                  Running Effective Meetings
Before the Meeting
1) Define the purpose of the meeting. 
       ► Why is the group meeting?
        ► What needs to be accomplished?

2) Prepare an agenda.
        ► Written agendas help members prepare and guide them through the discussion.
        ► In writing an agenda, keep each item clear and specific.
        ► Attach background information when necessary.
        ► The following sample agenda can be used as a guideline:

                        Order of Business
                        1. Call to Order & Roll Call
                        2. Officer Reports
                        3. Committee Reports
                        4. Unfinished Business followed by New Business

3) Publicize the Meeting
        ►Inform all members of the time and place of the meeting. If possible notify them at least a week in
                 advance.
        ► If possible, distribute the agenda in advance.
        ►Try and hold regular group meetings on the same day, at the same time, and in the same
            location whenever possible.
        ► Utilize e-mail to send reminders to group members before meetings/events.

During the Meeting
4) Conducting the Meeting
       ►  Always start a meeting on time. Those who have a tendency to arrive late will soon get the
           message about when the meeting starts.
       ►  Follow the agenda. Introduce agenda items with a brief background statement and let members know
           what action is needed.
           Get
       ► members involved in discussions, reports, and projects. To maintain enthusiasm, each
           member needs to be actively involved in some aspect of the organization.
       ►Clarify the issues. Ask questions of members if their ideas are not understood.
        Try to get input from a variety of members. Ask the quieter people for their thoughts and
           suggestions.
       ►Before moving to a different agenda item, summarize the results of the discussion, the
           action needed, and the name of the person responsible for any action. Record this information in the
           minutes.
       ►End the meeting on time and on a positive note. Announce the time and location of the next
            meeting.

After the Meeting
5) Follow Up
        ►Minutes should be distributed to each member or posted in a permanent, visible location.
        ►Make a special effort to contact officers and committee chairpersons between meetings.
           They need your support and interest if their committees are to be effective.
        ►Contact members between meetings to remind them of tasks needing completion before the
           next meeting.
        ►If someone has volunteered to take on a task, be sure to show your appreciation by thanking
           her/him.
                                         Preparing for the First Meeting
►Greet/welcome new and returning members at the door. Provide name tags for everyone.
►Prepare a sign-up list for names, addresses and phone numbers.
►Be prepared to collect dues and issue membership cards if necessary for your group.
►Allow time for members to be introduced and get acquainted with one another. You may want to use an
icebreaker or another organized activity. (See the Director of Student Activities and Leadership/Asst. Director
Student Center for help in this area.)
►Provide an objective history of the organization.
        1. Briefly review the purpose of the organization.
        2. Explain the structure of the group: when you meet, committees, work groups., etc.
        3. Introduce officers and committee chairs. Explain the roles and responsibilities of each position.
        4. Review major accomplishments.
        5. Inform members of future goals and events.

                                   Meeting Planning Checklist
        ___   Reserve room for the meeting. (See the list below for help.)
        ___   Arrange for refreshments to be served if desired.
        ___   Contact any individuals who you might like to make a presentation.
        ___   Prepare agenda.
        ___   Make enough copies of the agenda for all members.
        ___   Arrange for resource materials, paper, and pens.
        ___   Prepare a personal copy of the agenda.
        ___   Contact members giving presentations to determine special equipment needs.
        ___   Confirm reservations.
        ___   Send out e-mail reminders to members and guests.
                                     Inviting a Guest Speaker
Guest speakers are a good way to add interest to your meetings and help your members get the most out
of your organization. Often, for a minimal cost, your group can benefit from the knowledge and
expertise of an accomplished professional or a respected authority in his or her field. You can ensure
that your event comes off smoothly and to the satisfaction of both you and your guest if you follow the
steps described below.

About Honoraria
There is no absolute rule about honoraria (speaker’s fees), but generally, most local people, alumni, health
professionals, staff members, and others who don’t make their living by speaking to groups will be willing to
speak without a fee. Others—for example, a person whose job is to present training seminars, or members of
certain professions (attorneys, psychologists, etc.) who usually charge an hourly rate for sharing their expertise—
may want some kind of honorarium. If you aren’t sure, ask. It is OK to say that your group has budgeted $X for
this event or that you have no budget for this event. After explaining your financial situation, ask your speaker if
he/she would be able to speak to your group within those parameters.

Most speakers would like you to pay the expenses they incur by coming to speak to your group. If your guest is
driving from outside the area, you should offer to reimburse them for travel (you might want to use the University
rate, which is $0.40/mile). If your guest is coming from far away, you may need to pay for meals, overnight
accommodations, and/or air fare. Don’t be afraid of these costs, however. Most people are willing to negotiate and
make arrangements affordable for your group.

Inviting Speakers
Try to narrow down the focus or topic that you’re asking the speaker to address. It’s difficult for a speaker to
know what to do with a topic that’s too global; be as specific as you can about what aspects of the subject you
would like to see addressed.

Call, email, or write your speaker, giving him/her adequate notice of when you’d like her/him to speak. Calling at
least a month in advance gives you the best chance of getting the person and date you want, and gives you plenty
of time to prepare and publicize your event.

Confirm your agreement in writing. Include the time, date, and location of your event, and any fees or expenses
to be paid by your group. Enclose a campus map with driving directions and directions to the room where he/she
will be speaking. This simple step can save you immeasurable trouble because it serves several purposes: it makes
sure that everyone has the same understanding about when, where, and how much and it ensures that your speaker
can find you.

In your letter of confirmation you may also want to include some information that would be helpful to your guest:
the kind of group he/she will be speaking to; how many people to expect and their majors, interests, or other
background information; the specific topic(s) you want him/her to address; the amount of time allotted for the
speech; and anything else the speaker could use to plan a presentation to best meet your needs. A University map
and Student Handbook are nice too!

If you will be describing the presentation on a poster, flyer, or program, it’s best to ask your speaker for a title and
description of what they will cover. They may ask you to go ahead and write it, but always offer them the option
first— the speaker’s understanding of what he/she has to say may be very different from yours! You should also
double-check that you have the speaker’s full, correct name and title.

Ask your speaker if he/she will be using any handouts or materials which you need to have duplicated, or if he/she
will need any audiovisual equipment. Be sure to allow time to get copies made or to order media equipment from
Audio/Visual Services.
Call the speaker the day before to confirm and remind him/her.

At the meeting, someone from your group should introduce your speaker (give their name, title, and a brief bio—
University degree(s) s/he has and where s/he got them, jobs, community activities, publications, awards or other
accomplishments that are relevant to the presentation).

After the presentation, don’t forget to write a thank you letter! You might enclose copies of evaluation forms if
you used them, or mention any comments or feedback from those who attended. This lets the speaker know that
someone was really listening and it helps them improve their future presentations.

A sample evaluation form can be found on the next page.
                                  GENERAL MARKETING ADVICE
A. Advertise creatively in advance. Plan interesting ads that cannot be missed.

B. Make sure all of your advertisements are neat and legible.

C. Use color to draw attention.

D. Don’t forget to advertise in the Dining Hall and Ram’s Den using table tents

E. Use humor! People remember the things that make them smile.

F. Don’t hesitate to use gimmicks, door prizes, food or other forms of positive reinforcement to draw
   your audience!

G. Don’t forget the free advertising you can get from the PICKET, WSHC, the campus website, etc.

H. Use teasers. A few weeks before the event, start advertising by giving hints of what is to come.
   This alerts residents to look for more advertisements and often excites curiosity.

SOME BASIC PUBLICITY DON’TS:

        Don’t post over others’ events before they are over.

        Don’t post a number of the same flyers in one place.

        Don’t post on trees, buildings, windows, bike racks, lamp posts or on top of other signs.

        Don’t leaflet classrooms, residence halls, or other areas where the material will simply create litter for
                someone else to pick up.

        Don’t EVER use strapping, gaff, duct, or Scotch tape to hang things. They will take the paint off sur-
               faces. Masking tape is your friend!
                           PROGRAM EVALUATION
(PLEASE PRINT)

NAME of PERSON EVALUATING PROGRAM:________________________________________

TITLE OF PROGRAM: ____________________________________________________________

DATE OF PROGRAM: ________________     TIME OF PROGRAM: ______________________

LOCATION OF PROGRAM: ________________________________________________________

ATTENDANCE: _____________

PRESENTER(s): ___________________________________________________________________

PRESENTER CONTACT INFORMATION (phone #, address, etc.):
_________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

EQUIPMENT OR SUPPLIES NEEDED:________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

TYPE OF PUBLICITY USED: ________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

COSTS OF PROGRAM (categorize):____________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

TIME REQUIRED TO PLAN AND IMPLEMENT: ______________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

GOAL OF PROGRAM/OBJECTIVES: _________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

                      —PLEASE CONTINUE ON THE BACK —
(Program Evaluation cont.)

DESCRIPTION /SUMMARY OF PROGRAM: (Please write a paragraph describing what happened
at the program: topics covered? guidelines? activities?)

__________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

STRENGTHS OF THE PROGRAM:
___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

WEAKNESSES OF THE PROGRAM:
___________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________

WOULD YOU RECOMMEND THAT THIS PROGRAM BE REPEATED IN THE FUTURE?:

___________________________________________________________________________________

                 Remember to send thank you notes to your presenters. Thank you!
                                 PUBLICITY ON CAMPUS
The key to a successful event is making sure that people know about it. No matter how terrific your program or
speaker, people won’t come if they aren’t informed about it.

Recognized campus groups are permitted to advertise on campus. However, no matter what form of publicity you
choose, make sure that it complies with the guidelines and standards outlined in the Code of Conduct for Student
Organizations located in the policy section of the Student Handbook.

FLYERS:
Recognized campus organizations are welcome to post flyers on campus advertising their events after they have
been approved. Approval requires and stamp and signature so you need to have approval BEFORE
copying your flyers. The most popular way to advertise is typically through flyers placed across campus.

► Non-social Greek clubs and organizations may have flyers approved by Rachael Meads, the Director of
Student Activities and Leadership/Asst. Director Student Center, in the Office of Student Affairs, 101 Student
Center.
► Social Greek organization flyers should be approved by the Director of Greek Life/Asst. Director Student
Center in the Office of Student Affairs, 101.

See the Publicity Policy in the Student Code of Conduct in the Student Handbook to help you save time, money,
and energy as you post flyers, check out the suggestions below.

        Organizational Mailboxes
        All SGA recognized organizations have a mailbox on the group floor of the Student Center (across from
        the Rambler Card Office and just before the SGA Office). You are welcome to place a flyer in each
        mailbox there.

        SGA
        Flyers for campus events may be distributed at the weekly SGA meeting. One flyer should be available
        for each organizational senator/representative. These can be placed beside the SGA agenda and picked up
        as senators enter the room. The SGA executive board provides a time at the end of each meeting for
        announcements. Be sure to promote your event at that time.

        Postings
        Distributing flyers in student gathering places increases the likelihood that students will know about your
        events. Be creative, but also be sure that you follow the policies regarding publicity for events sponsored
        by recognized campus organizations as outlined in the Code of Conduct for Clubs and Organizations
        found in the Student Handbook.

        The Residence Life Office
        The Residence Life Office will distribute approved flyers to Resident Assistants. If flyers are delivered to
        RLO in advance, the R.A.s will post them in the halls for you!

        Targeted Mailings
        Blanket mailings to all residence halls must be approved by the staff in the Residence Life Office since
        they create litter and are often considered a nuisance by boxholders. A more effective means of advertis-
        ing through the campus mail is through targeted mailings. Collect addresses at events/ meetings to
        develop mailing lists for future events. Send flyers directly to these individuals.
WORD OF MOUTH

The most effective way to promote your event is through word of mouth. Peers respond to the opinions of their
friends. Students respect the suggestions of their professors. Here are a few suggestions:

        Ask everyone in your organization to tell 10 friends about the event.
        Announce the event in SGA meetings.
        Go to the office hours of faculty and ask if you or he/she can announce an event in a class.
        Provide information at a table in the Ram’s Den/Dining Hall.
        Contact the presidents of organizations which may be interested in your event and ask if they
                can announce the event at a meeting.
        Collect phone numbers at events / meetings to develop phone tree lists for future events.

ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS

Email is a great way to remind people about your event at no cost to your group. To prevent ―junk mail overload,‖
the University and the SGA do not permit blanket emails to all students or faculty without permission from SGA.
Student Affairs sends two weekly emails listing upcoming events of interest to all students on Tuesdays and
Thursdays. Emails may be submitted in simple text format to Mary Beth Walling at mwalling@shepherd.edu

You may also ask members and other interested individuals to sign up to receive bulletins or reminders about
events through your own listserve. Just make sure that you allow members to unsubscribe if they wish.

Create a webpage with information about your organization and its activities.

CAMPUS PUBLICATIONS

A few weeks prior to the event, prepare a press release or article about the event. Leave a copy at the student
newspaper (The Picket) office located in Sara Cree Hall. Everyone reads the Picket, so it is a great mode of
advertisement.

Also be sure to drop off a press release to the staff in the Office of External Affairs (Ikenberry, main floor), so
that your event may also be listed in the calendar of The Record, the campus newsletter, and on Shepherd’s web
calendar.

Be sure that you check deadlines ahead of time so you get the information in on time.

WSHC

Write a Public Service Announcement (PSA) and a Press Release about the event. Leave a copy of each at the
Campus Radio Station (WSHC) on the ground floor of Knutti Hall. WSHC DJs will gladly announce events
during their broadcasts or include it in the Campus Calendar.
                           ALCOHOL AND CAMPUS GROUPS
Philosophy

Shepherd University supports students and employees in demonstrating responsible conduct in the best interest of
their personal health and well-being, the community’s general welfare, and the rights of others. Students and
employees are responsible for their own behavior and must understand that being under the influence of alcohol
or drugs in no way lessens their accountability; moreover, students are responsible for and will be held
accountable for the behavior of their guests. The University campus is subject to state and federal laws concerning
use and possession of alcohol and drugs. Individuals must be aware of and abide by these laws.

Included in this section you will find information about campus, state, and federal regulations to follow should
you choose to include alcohol in your activities, but we would encourage you to think beyond just what the law
says and make wise decisions for your organization. Think about what is best for your members and organization.
Since the majority of students involved in Shepherd’s campus organizations are under the legal drinking age, how
might you be excluding people if you choose to sponsor an event with alcohol? Take some time to think about
how you might be able to accomplish the same goals at your events without involving alcohol.

Benefits Of Non-Alcoholic Alternatives

        1. No one is left out of any of your activities.
        2. Non-alcoholic parties reduce risks and provide safer environments for your guests.
        3. Your organization will maintain a positive reputation.
        4. Non-alcoholic beverages are less expensive.
        5. Everyone remembers how much fun they had at your event!

The Law

Whether off-campus or on-campus, the decision to drink or not to drink rests with you. As you are confronted
with situations where you are asked to choose, keep in mind that the laws dictating the legal drinking age are the
same on-campus as they are in the community. If it’s illegal for you to drink off-campus, it’s illegal in your
residence hall or anywhere else on campus. At no time should alcohol become the primary focus of an event.

In order to make informed decisions about alcohol and other drug use, students should educate themselves about
the health and safety risks associated with their use, as well as about state and local laws on possessing, serving
and consuming alcohol. The misuse and abuse of drugs and alcohol are major contributors to serious health
problems, as well as social and civic concerns. Among health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the
abuse of alcohol are various deleterious physical and mental consequences including dependency, severe
disability— even death. In addition, the risk of unprotected sex, sexual assault, and/or rape increases dramatically
when drugs and alcohol are involved.

The goal of Shepherd University’s alcohol and drug policies are to reduce the abuse and illegal use of alcohol and
other drugs as well as the human and material costs associated with these abuses. The University, as an
educational institution, approaches student conduct issues from a perspective that places emphasis on individual
responsibility and development. Education about and prevention of alcohol and other drug-related problems will
continue to be the primary emphasis and goal. Shepherd University will hold students, as individuals and as
members of groups, to conduct themselves in accordance with the University’s alcohol policies.

No Shepherd University funds or funds collected by the University (through Student Activity Fees,
House Council funds, SGA allocations, etc.) may be used in a way that violates the University
alcohol or drug policies. Students may not be required to contribute to a student-collected fund for
the purpose of purchasing alcohol or controlled substances. Organizations planning events are
responsible for planning and carrying out events in compliance with Shepherd University policies.

Shepherd is not a sanctuary from the enforcement of state and local laws. Students and their guests who violate
the law may be and have been arrested and prosecuted. Primary responsibility for law enforcement, including that
related to alcohol and illegal drugs, rests with law enforcement agencies, primarily the Shepherd University Police
Department. Uniformed officers who patrol the campus and respond to calls are deputized by the sheriff of
Jefferson County and are fully empowered and authorized to enforce all laws. As of September 2000, it is a
criminal offense:

        To provide any alcoholic beverage to a person under 21.
        To provide any alcoholic beverage to an obviously intoxicated person.
        For any person under age 21 to purchase or be in possession of alcohol.
        To be under the influence of alcohol in a public place and unable to exercise care for one’s
            own safety or that of others.
        For persons under age 21 to have any container of alcohol in any public place or any place
            open to the public.
        To operate a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or other intoxicants or with
a                   blood alcohol level of .10% or higher.
        To have an open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle.
        To have in one’s possession or to use false evidence of age and identity to purchase
alcohol.
        To unlawfully possess or possess for sale controlled substances specified in West
Virginia’s                 Health and Safety Code.
        To charge admission or solicit donations where alcohol is served unless a liquor license is
            obtained from the State Alcohol Beverage Control.

IF you choose to have alcohol at your event:
When planning a party, the organization planning the event must remember that a successful event means more
than providing a fun atmosphere. It means providing a safe one, too. As social hosts, your organization is
responsible for implementing a party plan designed to promote the health and safety of your guests and to
minimize risk and potential liability to you and your organization. Follow the party planning guidelines listed on
the next pages to help you plan safer events.

As a party planner, you are asked to consult with the Director of Student Activities and Leadership/Asst. Director
Student Center (Program Board/Student Activities Office) or the Director of Fraternity and Sorority Life/Asst.
Director Student Center (101 Student Center) prior to your event. Early consultation allows us to most effectively
assist you in anticipating potential problems and making contingency plans to avoid them.

Student Affairs staff members are available to provide information, advice and support to individuals or groups
regarding alcohol issues. They can provide help in planning a program that limits the role of alcohol at the event
or provide suggestions for alcohol-free programming. The staff also can meet with you to discuss your own
personal experience with alcohol or how to approach a friend or family member who is having difficulty with
their alcohol use. If a student or student organization is interested in group discussions, projects or activities
concerning alcohol and other health-related issues, they may contact the Health Center or the Director of
Counseling by calling 876-5161. A certified addictions counselor is on staff. Brochures, videos, and books are
also available.
       Risk Management: Protecting Your Organization and Its Members
The information provided here is intendied to help you minimize the risks associated with sponsoring a party and
to help you and your organization plan and execute safe, healthy, problem-free and fun events.

While the laws regarding civil liability are complex, it is important to know that under some circumstances party
hosts, sponsors, bartenders or organizations may be held legally liable for the consequences of serving alcohol to
underage drinkers or to obviously intoxicated persons. As a social host or party planner, you could be sued and
potentially found personally liable for damages to the injured party(ies) in three ways:

        Specific damages: These are damages that are measurable (for example, when bodily injury results in
                medical expenses or lost wages).

        General damages: These are damages that cannot be specifically measured in terms of dollar amounts (for
                      example, pain and suffering resulting from bodily injury).

        Punitive damages: These are damages intended to serve as an example to others and to discourage
                behavior that is deemed highly undesirable to society.

Courts are increasingly holding groups responsible for events they plan. Keep in mind that courts do not
recognize ―official‖ or ―unofficial‖ events. Recent court cases have determined that an event can be considered
the responsibility of the organization if any of the following occurs:

        1) the organization pays for any part of the event (alcohol, hall rental, hall cleaning, or transportation);

        2) the event is advertised in any way (flyers/posters, formal announcements at meetings, handouts);

        3) a significant number/percentage of organizational members are present.

The presence of alcohol at events creates a need to manage the activity with care and to be concerned with the
conduct of those present. Those who plan or choose to attend events where alcoholic beverages will be present
and consumed must assume full legal responsibility and liability for the consequences of their actions. The
University holds officers of student organizations specifically responsible for the activities of their organization,
members, and guests.

NOTE: Shepherd University assumes no responsibility for any liability incurred as a result of an
organization’s or individual’s violation of these regulations or any applicable laws governing the use and
consumption of alcoholic beverages.

If your organization is affiliated with a national, remember that your liability insurance only covers events that are
in compliance with your particular organization’s national policies.
                      PARTY PLANNING GUIDELINES FOR CAMPUS
                        CLUBS, GROUPS, AND ORGANIZATIONS
Below you will find recommendations for planning parties involving alcohol that comply with campus policies as
well as state and federal laws. These guidelines will help you plan safer events for your organizations.

Why should you follow the guidelines? If a problem occurs at your party that would be cause for disciplinary
action, the University will take into account whether or not your organization complied with these guidelines. If
you have done everything you can to follow Shepherd’s Alcohol Policy for Campus Clubs and Organizations as
well as the recommendations below, you reduce the likelihood that you or your organization will be subject to
sanctions.

                           PLANNING A CLOSED PARTY WITH ALCOHOL

Now that you’ve read over Shepherd’s alcohol policy for organizations, you should be ready to go over some
party-planning guidelines. This section is designed to help organizations understand how they may plan closed
parties that comply with the guidelines established by the University. In all cases, the host (defined as an
individual or sponsoring group) must comply with all Shepherd University policies (including those on alcohol
and other drugs, firearms, hazing, etc.) and should know and understand the University’s party planning
recommendations.

WHAT KIND OF PARTY?
Decide as a group what type of party you want. What is the purpose of your event? How will this activity impact
the image of your organization? What is your budget? These decisions should be made by the entire group, not
just one or two select individuals. (Remember that if alcohol is present, your event must comply with the
guidelines for a closed party.)

You may want to consider setting a theme for your event since that may help your group determine the types of
music, food, activities, and beverages you might choose. If you are planning a party with a cultural theme, it is
important that it be respectful of that culture.

Under no circumstances should the focus of any event be alcohol.

CONSULT YOUR ADVISOR AND MAKE A PLAN:
Create a plan detailing how you will manage the party and create a safe environment for guests. Be sure to include
your advisor in this process. Advisors are there to help you plan successful events and to manage your risks.
(Also you will need the signature of your advisor later on to complete the Student Affairs Party Registration
Form.)

Make sure you have the support of your membership and commitment from others who will help manage the
event. Here are some tasks you may want to consider: security, food service, door monitors, non-drinking party
monitors, decorations, clean-up crew, etc.

Consider important factors including how you will identify those who are of legal drinking age. The host should
implement plans, or arrange for a responsible establishment to make plans, so that all attendees consuming
alcohol are 21 years or older.

SET A DATE:
Select a date that does not conflict with holidays, major campus events, or other major student activities (i.e.
Homecoming, Family Weekend, Student Recognition Day). Remember to leave plenty of time for planning,
notifying guests, and recruiting volunteers.
Set an explicit start and end time for the party. Alcohol service must be halted one hour before the designated end
of the party.

Set firm deadlines for your planning such as reserving space, completing paperwork, compiling a guest list,
distributing invitations, etc.

CREATE A BUDGET:
Be realistic about how much you can spend and where expenses might arise. Include both income and expenses,
the costs of the facility (deposit, rental and cleaning), entertainment, security services, decorations, food and
beverages, and a contingency fund (10% for damages, lost deposit, etc.).

Don’t forget that if alcohol is served, you must also provide food and non-alcoholic beverages for your guests.

CHOOSE A LOCATION:
Think carefully about the location that would best suit the event planned. Make sure the facility is large enough to
accommodate the number of guests you have invited. Events held in restaurants, hotels, or other such facilities
may lower your liability since all licensed facilities carry insurance of their own. Also, many of these facilities
will provide a professional bartender at little to no charge to your organization if you choose to rent or use their
facilities.

MEET WITH THE BARTENDER IN ADVANCE:
Alcohol must be served on a cash bar basis by a professional bartender who is not an active member of the
sponsoring organization, and who is fully covered by liability insurance. (No open bar service is permitted.) In
order to assure that the bartender understands your organization’s needs and expectations, take time to meet with
this person ahead of time. Share the Shepherd University policy with him/her so the guidelines are clearly
understood.

Here are the key items that your bartender should understand:
       Reasonable precautions must be taken by the bartender to prevent the excessive consump-
       tion of alcoholic beverages and to prevent the service of alcohol to those under 21.
       Access to supplies of alcohol is to be controlled to prevent guests from serving themselves.
       Only professional bartenders are to serve alcohol.
       Bartenders are not to drink or be under the influence of alcohol.
       The content of alcoholic drinks is to be standardized to a consistent amount.
       Guests may be served only one drink at a time.
       Bartenders are to stop serving anyone who appears to be intoxicated.
       Service in 12 oz. cups is preferred.
       A variety of non-alcoholic beverages must also be provided.
       Service of alcoholic beverages must be cut off at least one hour before the designated end of
       the party.
       Intoxicated persons will not be served.

RECRUIT AND ORGANIZE VOLUNTEERS:
Don’t forget that you will need volunteers to sign up to help decorate, monitor the event, work the entrance/exit,
take care of special needs (technical set up, food service, etc.), as well as to clean up afterward. It is essential that
non-drinking members be designated to help work the event.

Choose responsible, non-drinking members to be your party monitors; a good rule of thumb is one monitor for
every 30 guests. They should make sure that underage persons are not drinking and watch for intoxicated
persons.

MONITOR THE DOOR:
Many problems at parties arise when uninvited guests gate-crash. Make sure that you are prepared to turn away
intoxicated or uninvited individuals. Create a list of invited guests that can be used by the people working the
door. Select assertive, non-drinking individuals to work the door.

        Remember:
        o Attendance is limited to those appearing on an advance invitation list. No ―open‖ events
                with alcohol are permitted.
        o A sober party monitor should be stationed at each entrance to monitor guests who
                 are arriving or leaving the event.
        o Persons who appear to be intoxicated cannot be admitted to the event.
        o Guests may not bring their own alcohol into the event.
        o I.D.s should be checked at the door. Party-goers over 21 should be visibly identified.
                The use of wristbands is highly recommended. The use of an ink pen, magic marker, or other
                method whose mark could be readily forged by guests is not permitted.

DURING THE EVENT:
Offer Non-Alcoholic Beverages: Be creative! Keep in mind that many of your guests will choose NOT to drink
alcohol, so you must plan ahead. Have some truly Equally Attractive Non-Alcoholic Beverages (EANABs). Be
creative when planning on what EANABs to serve. This will allow guests to have a variety of drinks to choose
from at your party. Keep them within the theme of your party and have them served by the same person who is
serving the alcohol and in the same glasses that you would serve alcohol. The amount of EANABs should be
proportionate to the number of guests and amount of alcohol served. Make sure that there is ample supply to last
throughout the event.

        Examples of Creative EANABs:
                Fruit Smoothies
                Non-Alcoholic ―Mocktails‖ (cocktails without alcohol)
                Shakes/malts
                Hot chocolate and coffee lattes
                Root Beer Floats

Serve Food: Good food can make your party great! Encourage guests to eat, especially if they are drinking
alcohol. Offer high protein foods that retard the rate of alcohol absorption into the blood. Avoid salty foods that
encourage beverage consumption. Place the food near the beverages and make sure there is an ample supply to
last throughout the event.

Promote Responsibility in Regard to Drinking: Do not allow drinking games or contests.

Comply with Laws and Regulations: Every organization member and guest is assumed to be aware of all
applicable University, local, state and federal laws and regulations regarding the possession, use, sale,
consumption and service of alcoholic beverages and controlled substances. You are encouraged to post signs
stating that it is illegal for those under 21 to possess or consume alcoholic beverages throughout the party site.

Limit Alcohol Amounts: Bartenders should only serve one alcoholic beverage at a time. To monitor quantity, use
8-12 ounce rather than 16-ounce cups for service and do not allow attendees to bring their own cups. Do not allow
individuals to bring their own alcohol. Attendees may not be allowed to serve themselves. Stop serving one hour
before the party is officially over and continue serving tasty EANABs.

Prevent Service to Minors: Check for valid identification of age and mark in a clear and unambiguous manner
that cannot be reproduced (wristbands are ideal!) those attendees who are of legal drinking age. Don’t use ink
pens, magic markers, or other marks that could be readily forged by guests.
Identify Intoxicated Individuals: Immediately stop serving them alcohol! Make sure intoxicated individuals have
a safe, sober ride home. NEVER allow an intoxicated person to drive. If a person passes out due to intoxication,
more serious medical attention may be necessary. If breathing is labored or if the person can’t be roused,
immediately call 911. (See the information about Blood Alcohol Levels and Alcohol Emergencies on the
following pages for specifics.)

Injuries and Emergencies: For minor injuries, immediately take the individual to the hospital. If the injury
appears to be more serious, such as neck or back injuries, immediately call 911. If in doubt, call 911!

ENDING THE EVENT:
Be sure to stick with the times you originally set for starting and ending the event. Service of alcoholic beverages
should stop at least one hour before the event ends.

Do not allow guests to leave the event with alcoholic beverages.

Do not allow guests who have consumed alcohol to leave the event without verification that they have safe
transportation home.

Do not allow guests who are walking to leave alone.

AFTER THE PARTY:

Clean-up: Make sure you have an adequate crew for clean-up. (Plan for greater numbers than you need.) Clean
the areas inside and outside the party area immediately after it’s over.

Check for Facility Damages: Do a walk-through of the party area immediately after the event (both inside and
outside) and note any possible damages. Notify the renting agency of problems immediately and resolve any
potential damages within 48 hours of the event.

Evaluate and Revise Your Party Plan: After the party, do an evaluation of your party and make any notes on
changes you wish to incorporate in planning future events. Document and pass on to future social chairs or other
organization leadership.
                                   HINTS FOR PARTY MONITORS

                                        Managing High Risk Guests
DO . . .
          Be friendly, considerate and firm.
          Be assertive and nonjudgmental.
          Make sure you have others close by for support.
          Refer to your organization’s social policy.
          Use the guest’s friends as your allies.
          Offer guests an alternative to drinking alcohol. Be aware of possible aggression.
          Call police or authorities for back up when needed.

DON’T . . .
          Be authoritarian, angry or obnoxious.
          Back down or change your mind.
          Hesitate to call the police for help. (They can remove disruptive guests.)
          Take statements personally or get into a shouting match.
          Touch anyone without good reason.
          Try to be a hero or ―wanna-be‖ cop.
          Confront someone if you have been drinking.

                           MEDICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROTOCOL

A medical emergency is defined as any situation in which a person’s life, physical well-being or safety can be
reasonably perceived to be in immediate danger. This includes suicide attempts and alcohol or other drug
overdoses. If you believe a medical emergency is taking place, do the following immediately:

1.        Call 911 for emergency transport services. Provide your name, phone number, and exact location.
          Describe the victim’s symptoms as thoroughly as possible.
                  For liability reasons, DO NOT attempt to move the victim or provide transportation to
          medical                        services yourself.
                  Arrange for emergency transport services even if the individual indicates s/he does not want
                          medical treatment. For liability reasons, refusal of care should only be negotiated with the
                                  paramedics who respond to the call.

2.        If you are on-campus, call the Shepherd University Police at 876-5202. The responding officer is
          responsible for:
                  Serving as back-up in case paramedics do not arrive in a timely manner.
                  Directing traffic and controlling crowds to ensure that the ambulance crew has ready access to
                                 the victim.
                  Notifying the designated on-call staff member from Student Affairs.
                  Recording the incident on the Shepherd University Police incident log.

     3. Remain with the victim until the ambulance arrives. Do not leave a seriously injured or unconscious
        person alone unless you must do so in order to get assistance.

     4. Shepherd University is not responsible for any costs of emergency transport services or medical care
     incurred by a student.
                       ALCOHOL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROTOCOL

As one type of medical emergency, an alcohol emergency (or acute intoxication, alcohol poisoning) is
defined as any situation in which a student has consumed enough alcohol – usually .30-.40 blood alcohol
content (BAC) to result in cardiac arrest. Warning signs of alcohol poisoning include: total
unresponsiveness; severe disorientation; cold, clammy skin; weak or no pulse; shallow or no breathing;
lack of pain response; dilated pupils; or blue or gray pallor. What follows are recommended guidelines
for responding to alcohol intoxication or poisoning. If you suspect that a student has consumed other
substances (GHB, depressants or ―downers,‖ etc.) in addition to alcohol, treat the situation as an alcohol
emergency.

IF THE PERSON IS DRUNK BUT NOT UNCONSCIOUS . . .

       Do be aware of the potential risk for alcohol poisoning.
       Do remain with the person if s/he is vomiting.
       Do be aware that mixing alcohol with other substances (illicit or licit) may have
              serious adverse effects.
       Do call the police for assistance if the person is belligerent or violent.
       Don’t let the person leave the social event alone, even on foot.
       Don’t allow the individual to operate a motor vehicle or machinery.
       Don’t administer anything orally (food, liquid, or drug) to sober up the person.
       Don’t give the person a cold shower. The shock may cause unconsciousness
              and/or result in injury.

IF THE PERSON IS UNCONSCIOUS . . .

       Do keep the person still.
       Do lay the person down with his/her head to the side to keep it from falling back.
       Do monitor the person’s vital signs.
       Don’t leave the person lying face-up which could allow him/her to choke on vomit.
       Don’t leave the person alone.

IF YOU SUSPECT ALCOHOL POISONING . . .

       Do call 911 immediately if the person’s breathing or pulse is weak.
       Do check the person’s breathing regularly. (A good way to remember what to do
              is ―ABC‖: Check the Airway; see that the person’s air passage is clear of
              debris. Check to see that the person is Breathing regularly. Check
              Circulation: feel regularly for a discernible pulse.)
       Don’t refrain from seeking medical attention for a drinker under 21. The
              individual’s life is more important than legal repercussions for underage
              drinking.
       Don’t leave the person alone. The alcohol ingested could be absorbed to toxic
              levels while the person is passed out.

                                                             Shepherd University Crisis Team, Fall 2000
                     BLOOD ALCOHOL LEVEL & EFFECTS ON BEHAVIOR

The following information can assist in determining a student’s level of intoxication and risk for alcohol
poisoning. Below you will find some general descriptions of the behavioral cues associated with Blood Alcohol
Content (BAC) levels listed below. NOTE: These figures have been calculated for a typical 150 pound white
male. Actual drink amounts vary according to sex, race/ethnicity, and weight. In general, women require less
alcohol then men to achieve the same BAC.

Depending on the type of alcohol consumed, one drink equals: 12 oz. of beer (5% ethanol content); 4-6 oz. of
table wine (12-15% ethanol content); OR 1-1.5 oz. shot of hard liquor (25-40% ethanol content).

Blood Alcohol Content of .05 (1-2 DRINKS)
       Usually a feeling of well-being
       Some release of inhibitions
       Judgment and decision-making abilities impaired
       Level of alertness and reaction time lowered
       Hand-eye coordination depressed
       Increased risk of collision while operating motor vehicles

Blood Alcohol Content of .10 (3-5 DRINKS)
       Reaction times significantly lowered
       Fine motor abilities and technical skills impaired
       Limited night vision and side vision
       Loss of self-control
       Risk of collision significantly increased

Blood Alcohol Content of .15 (6-7 DRINKS)
       Consistent and major decreases in reaction time
       Increased aggression and belligerence

Blood Alcohol Content of .20 (8-10 DRINKS)
       Loss of equilibrium and speech impairment
       Sensory and gross motor capabilities depressed
       Double vision and legal blindness (20/200)
       Unable to operate a motor vehicle for up to 10 hours

Blood Alcohol Content of .25 (10-14 DRINKS)
       Staggering and severe motor disturbances
       Loss of control over semi-voluntary reflexes

Blood Alcohol Content of .30 (10-14 DRINKS)
       Not aware of surroundings
       Loss of consciousness

Blood Alcohol Content of .40 (14-20 DRINKS)
       Surgical anesthesia
       Lethal dosage for a small percentage of individuals

Blood Alcohol Content above .40 (14-20+ DRINKS)
       Lethal dosage for about 50% of individuals
       Severe circulatory and respiratory depression
                           Adapted from the Shepherd Crisis Management Team’s Alcohol Emergency Response Protocol

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:7
posted:7/3/2011
language:English
pages:47