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'Of Dolls _ Murder' Press Kit

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                 Contact
 Inf orma tion
for
 Of
Dolls
and
Murder 

                                          

                    Susan
Marks
doll.documentary@gmail.com



                                           Links

                  Official
Website
–
http://www.ofdollsandmurder.com

                  Facebook
–
http://www.facebook.com/deaddollmovie

                     Twitter
–
http://www.twitter.com/deaddollmovie

              YouTube
–
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vuWU0Lefwzs

                     Flickr
–
http://www.flickr.com/ofdollsandmurder

                                              

                                              

                          Synopsis
for
 Of
Dolls
and
Murder 

                                              

Feature‐length
documentary
film
Of
Dolls
and
Murder,
narrated
by
iconic
filmmaker

John
Waters,
exposes
an
unimaginable
world
of
miniatures
homicides.
Lurking
inside

this
surreal
collection
of
dollhouse
dioramas
thrives
a
criminal
element
that
is
all
too

real.
Rather
than
reflecting
an
idealized
version
of
domestic
life,
these
“Nutshell

Studies
of
Unexplained
Death”
reveal
a
dystopic
side.
Created
as
a
teaching
tool
by
an

unlikely
grandmother
Frances
Glessner
Lee,
these
dioramas
are
home
to
violent

murder,
prostitution,
mental
illness,
adultery
and
alcoholism.



But
the
story
does
not
end
with
the
dollhouses
of
death.
Rather,
the
dollhouses
mirror

our
ongoing
and
insatiable
fascination
with
murder
–
true
crime
or
otherwise.
Popular

television
shows
like
CSI
help
us
escape
into
a
safe
haven
where
crime
solving
easily

wraps
up
in
under
one
hour.



From
criminally
minded
college
students
and
a
visit
to
the
“The
Body
Farm,”
to
CSI
and

real‐life
detectives,
Of
Dolls
and
Murder
illuminates
the
tiny
world
of
big
time
murder.




                                          

                     Short
 Synopsis
for
 Of
Dolls
and
Murder 




The
documentary,
Of
Dolls
and
Murder
explores
a
haunting
collection
of
dollhouse

crime
scenes
and
our
universal
fascination
with
murder.
From
criminally
minded

college
students,
and
real‐life
detectives,
to
CSI
and
a
visit
to
the
“The
Body
Farm.”

John
Waters
narrates
the
tiny
world
of
big
time
murder.




                                            


                                 Filming
Loca tions


Of
Dolls
and
Murder
was
filmed
in
Baltimore
and
Bethesda,
Maryland,
Knoxville,

Tennessee,
St.
Paul
and
Minneapolis,
Minnesota,
Chicago,
Illinois,
and
Los
Angles,

California.





                                     Filmmakers

                                          

Director,
 Writer,
Producer



First
time
feature
documentary
filmmaker,
Susan
 Marks
combines
her
life–long

fascination
with
the
darker
side
of
kitsch
into
a
documentary
film
about
dollhouse

crime
scenes
and
real‐life
homicide
investigation.
Marks
is
a
Jerome
grant
recipient

and
award‐winning
filmmaker,
screenwriter,
and
author.




Producer,
Editor,
Composer



John
K urtis
Dehn
is
a
prolific
independent
director,
producer
and
editor.
He

partners
with
Susan
Marks
on
many
productions,
including
the
documentary
films,
The

Betty
Mystique
and
Of
Dolls
and
Murder.
He
is
also
an
accomplished
musician
and

songwriter,
and
serves
as
the
primary
composer
for
the
Of
Dolls
and
Murder

soundtrack.


                                              

                                        Narrator

                                              

Legendary
filmmaker
and
true
crime
aficionado,
John
 Waters
serves
as
narrator
for

Of
Dolls
and
Murder.
Both
Waters
and
the
Nutshell
Studies
of
Unexplained
Death
are

Baltimore,
Maryland
icons.



Waters
is
a
renowned
author,
actor,
artist
and
art
collector,
but
he
is
best
known
for

his
films,
Hairspray,
Pink
Flamingos,
Serial
Mom,
Polyester,
Cry‐Baby,
Pecker
and
Cecil

B.
Demented.



                                              

                   The
Nutshe ll
 Studies
of
Unex plaine d
Death

Created
in
the
1930s
and
1940s,
The
Nutshell
Studies
of
Unexplaine d
Death

are
a
series
of
eighteen
intricately
designed
dollhouse‐style
dioramas.
The
creator,

Frances
Glessner
Lee,
was
a
millionaire
heiress
who
is
affectionately
known
as
the

“Patron
Saint
of
Forensic
Science.”



Lee
designed
these
detailed
scenarios,
based
on
composites
of
actual
cases,
to
help

train
detectives
sharpen
their
investigative
skills.
Each
Nutshell
contains
a
doll
corpse

(or
several)
in
a
death
scene
that
could
be
easily
misinterpreted.




The
dioramas
first
were
used
in
the
1940s
for
a
law
enforcement
lecture
series
known

as
the
Harvard
Associates
of
Police
Science
(HAPS)
through
the
Harvard
Legal
Medicine

department.
In
1966,
when
the
department
dissolved,
the
Nutshells
went
to
the

Maryland
Office
of
the
Chief
Medical
Examiner
(OCME),
where
they
are
on
permanent

loan.
The
Nutshells
are
still
used
today
as
teaching
tools
in
the
HAPS
seminar
series

that
Lee
founded.




Originally,
Lee
and
her
carpenters
created
20
Nutshells.
One
was
destroyed
in
transit

to
the
Maryland
OCME
and
another
is
missing.
The
Nutshells
are
not
open
to
the

general
public,
nor
are
the
solutions
available
in
order
to
preserve
their
integrity
as
a

teaching
tool.




The
scale
of
the
Nutshells
is
1:12
inches.


                                             

                                             

                                Frances
Glessner
 Lee

                                     (1878
–
 1962)

                                             

By
all
accounts
Captain
Frances
Glessner
Lee
was
a
genius,
an
artist,
a
scientist,
and

light
years
ahead
of
her
time.
As
the
heiress
to
the
International
Harvester
fortune,
Lee

spent
much
of
her
life
stymied
by
societal
pressures
and
family
expectations.
Yet
she

was
able
to
contribute
greatly
to
the
scientific
and
criminal
justice
realms
in
an

extremely
captivating
and
eloquent
way.




Born
in
Chicago
in
1878,
Lee
grew
up
on
1800
South
Prairie
Avenue.
Her
house
is
now

a
historic
house
museum.
Lee’s
parents,
John
and
Frances
Glessner,
forbade
their
only

daughter
from
attending
college.
Lee’s
brother,
George,
however,
attended
Harvard.

This
injustice
didn’t
waylay
Lee’s
ambitions,
it
just
postponed
them.

    

George
introduced
Lee
to
his
Harvard
classmate,
George
MaGrath,
who
became
close

with
the
Glessner
family.
MaGrath,
in
turn,
introduced
Lee
to
the
concept
that
police

detectives
weren’t
properly
trained
to
process
crime
scenes
for
medical
evidence.
At

the
time,
in
the
1890s,
forensics
was
called
Legal
Medicine
and
it
was
a
very
new

concept.
Lee
and
MaGrath
would
eventually
join
forces
to
popularize
forensics
in
the

United
States.



At
age
20,
Lee
married
Blewett
Lee
–
an
attorney.
The
marriage
was
an
unhappy
one.

While
three
children
resulted
from
their
union,
the
couple
separated
for
many
years

and
ultimately
divorced.




While
raising
her
children,
Lee
also
nurtured
an
interest
in
creating
miniatures,
which

was
considered
an
acceptable
pastime
for
socialites.
By
the
time
Lee
was
a

grandmother,
she
had
combined
her
pastime
with
her
passion
for
murder
mystery
into

creating
the
Nutshells
Studies
of
Unexplained
Death.
She
also
donated
$250,000
to

establish
a
Legal
Medicine
program
at
Harvard
in
1932.
She
literally
paid
for
her
friend

George
MaGrath’s
salary
as
department
chair.
Her
continued
interest
led
to
a
donation

of
over
1,000
books
and
manuscripts,
which
became
the
MaGrath
Library
of
Legal

Medicine.




The
Nutshells
were
used
in
a
popular
seminar
series
Lee
founded,
the
Harvard

Associates
of
Police
Science
(HAPS),
to
help
train
detectives
to
sharpen
their

investigative
skills.




For
her
contributions
to
forensics,
Lee
was
appointed
State
Police
Captain
in
New

Hampshire
in
1943.
She
was
an
honorary
captain
at
first,
but
then
she
went
on
to
get

all
the
rights
and
privileges
of
a
police
captain.
Lee
was
the
first
female
member
of
the

American
Academy
of
Forensic
Sciences,
which
is
the
leading
forensic
science

organization
in
the
world.
She
was
also
the
first
woman
invited
into
the
International

Chiefs
of
Police
Association.



Throughout
the
1940
and
1950s,
Lee
continued
with
her
well‐attended
HAPS
seminars

where
she
earned
the
respect
of
the
attendees
for
her
dedication
to
the
pursuit
of

justice.




Author
Erle
Stanley
Gardner
attended
Lee’s
HAPS
seminars
for
research
with
his
Perry

Mason
novels.
To
show
his
appreciation,
he
dedicated
his
novel
The
Case
of
the

Dubious
Bridegroom,
to
Lee.




When
Lee
died
in
1962,
hundreds
of
mourners,
including
several
hundred
police

officers
and
members
of
the
Royal
Canadian
Mounted
Police,
attended
her
funeral.




The
film
Of
Dolls
and
Murder
is
dedicated
to
her
memory.

                          Quotes
from
 Of
Dolls
and
Murder

                                              

The
dead
are
talking;
we
just
don’t
like
what
they
have
to
say.
–John
Waters



Convict
the
guilty,
clear
the
innocent,
and
find
the
truth
in
a
nutshell.
–
Old
Detective

Saying



The
question
is
not
whether
or
not
murder
is
entertainment.
It
is
entertainment.
–
Dr.

John
Erik
Troyer,
Centre
for
Death
and
Society,
University
of
Bath,
England



I
do
know
of
a
case
where
the
jury
acquitted
because
the
detectives
didn’t
fingerprint

the
grass.
That’s
just
stupid.
–
Dr.
Katherine
Ramsland,
Author,
The
CSI
Effect



There's
a
darkness
to
it.

You're
looking
into
the
soul
of
a
crime
scene.
–
Detective

Inspector
Kevin
Corcoran
Ontario
Provincial
Police,
Canada



This
whole
body
of
science
is
only
as
good
as
the
lowliest
body
who’s
doing
it.
Ether

collecting
the
evidence
from
the
field,
the
lab
bench
workers,
processing
it.
–
Jerry

Dziecichowicz,
Office
of
the
Chief
Medical
Examiner
Maryland



Attorneys
are
asking
for
more
testing
then
they
even
need
because
the
juries
demand

it.
And
juries
think
that
DNA
is
in
every
crime
scene.
It’s
in
about
10‐15%
usable
DNA
is

in
about
10‐15%
of
crime
scenes.
–
Dr.
Katherine
Ramsland,
Author,
The
CSI
Effect



                      Of
Dolls
and
Murder 
Quotes
spe cifically


                             about
 Frances
Glessner
Lee





What
Frances
Glessner
Lee
successfully
did
was,
in
fact,
expose
what
is
the
supposed

domestic
tranquility
for
what
it
really
is,
which
is
fraught
with
scenes
of
violence
and

death
and
suicide.
–
Dr.
John
Erik
Troyer,
Centre
for
Death
and
Society,
University
of

Bath,
England



She
should
be
known
as
the
Patron
Saint
of
Forensic
Medicine.
–
Jerry
Dziecichowicz,

Office
of
the
Chief
Medical
Examiner
Maryland



Here
is
a
woman
who
today,
in
my
mind,
unquestionably
would
have
been
a
detective,

who
wasn't
allowed
to
go
to
college,
who
wasn't
allowed
to
get
a
degree…it
wasn't

seemly
work
for
a
woman
to
be
involved
with
crime
and
bodies
and
everything.
So

maybe
in
that
kind
of
classic
Chicago
Midwestern
buck‐up
kind
of
an
attitude,
she

sucked
all
that
frustration
down
into
nasty
little
ball
and
made
these
horrifying

miniatures.
–Naren
Shankar,
Executive
Producer,
CSI:
Crime
Scene
Investigation



I
think
it’s
very
sad
that
her
history
has
been
lost,
and
I
think
in
part
it
is
because
she

was
female
and
she
wasn’t
taken
as
seriously.
She’s
creating
dollhouses–that’s
a
little

girls
thing.
Not
really.
But
I
think
she
was
easily
dismissed
for
that
reason.
–
Dr.

Katherine
Ramsland

Author,
The
CSI
Effect

                                               

                                               

                                      Filmmaker
 Notes

                                   Director
 Susan
 Marks

                                               

                                               

From
the
moment
I
first
saw
the
Nutshells
of
Unexplained
Death
I
was
hooked,
for
life.

These
intricate,
and
dare
I
say
beautiful,
dollhouse
crime
scenes
were
like
nothing
I’d

ever
seen.
I
wanted
to
chase
down
the
brilliance
behind
these
miniature
crime
scenes,

tell
that
story
and
share
it
with
audiences
that
would
fully
appreciate
the
Nutshells
for

their
art,
creepy
quotient,
and
deeper
connection
to
the
pursuit
of
justice.



Making
a
motion
picture
film
about
dollhouses
that
are
anything
but
in
motion
was

problematic.
But
through
the
immense
talent
and
skill
of
cinematographer
Matt
Ehling,

co‐producer
John
Kurtis
Dehn,
who
also
serves
as
sound
recordist,
editor
and

composer,
and
finally,
post‐sound
engineer
Carly
Zuckweiler,
I
knew
I
had
the
perfect

filmmaking
team
to
put
a
little
bit
of
life
back
in
these
dioramas
of
death.



Early
on
we
realized
that
the
Nutshells,
small
as
they
are,
reflect
real‐life
scenarios
that

play
out
again
and
again,
every
day.
So,
we
took
our
cues
from
the
miniatures
and

expanded
the
scope
of
the
film
to
include
true
crime.




Our
three‐year
filmmaking
journey
was
fascinating.
Every
encounter
at
the
morgue,

medical
examiners
office,
police
station,
museum,
college,
crime
lab,
crime
scene,
and

yes,
the
Body
Farm,
left
us
in
awe.
The
people
we
met
along
the
way
showed
such

generous
and
fierce
devoted
to
the
pursuit
of
justice
that
it
was
an
honor
to
be
in
their

presence
and
to
learn
from
them.
In
particular,
we
are
deeply
indebted
to
Jerry

Dziecichowicz,
Dr.
David
Fowler
and
Eleanor
Thomas
of
the
Maryland
Office
of
the

Chief
Medical
Examiner,
as
well
as
Detectives
Rob
Ross,
Bob
Dohony
and
Sean
Jones

from
the
Baltimore
Police
Department.




One
of
the
things
that
impressed
us
the
most
was
the
deep
respect
everyone
has
for

Frances
Glessner
Lee,
the
creator
of
the
Nutshells.
We,
in
turn,
were
captivated
by
her

story
and
chased
it
down
to
the
best
of
our
ability,
yet
she
remains
somewhat
of
an

enigma
to
us.
We
have
more
questions
about
her
than
answers.
But
this
hasn’t

deterred
us;
we
are
still
chasing
her
genius.



I’m
often
asked
how
we
got
John
Waters
as
our
narrator,
and
I
can’t
help
but
think
luck

had
a
little
something
to
do
with
it.
Both
John
and
the
Nutshells
reside
in
Baltimore

where
he
was
introduced
to
them
a
number
of
years
ago
by
Judge
Elsbeth
Bothe.
John

became
an
instant
fan
and
this
eventually
led
him
to
answering
our
call,
so
to
speak.

Needless
to
say,
we
were
thrilled
that
he
agreed
to
be
in
our
film.
He
is
simply
perfect

for
the
part.
Again,
lucky
for
us
because
we
never
considered
anyone
else.




Throughout
this
whole
process
of
making
Of
Dolls
and
Murder,
John
has
been
so

supportive
and
wonderful.
And
at
the
risk
of
sounding
like
a
schoolgirl
with
a
crush,
I

think
he
may
be
the
most
brilliant
person
I’ve
ever
met.
Imagine
if
he
and
Frances

could
have
met.
It
would
have
been
nothing
short
of
extraordinary.



While
we
were
in
the
early
phases
of
production
on
Of
Dolls
and
Murder
many
fans
of

the
television
show
CSI
asked
me
if
I
was
aware
that
the
seventh
season
of
CSI
had
a

story
arc
about
a
miniature
serial
killer.
Indeed
I
was
aware
and
I
knew
the
inspiration

came
from
the
Nutshells
Studies
of
Unexplained
Death.
The
producer
and
showrunner

of
CSI,
Naren
Shankar
happily
sat
down
with
us
to
talk
about
the
7th
season,
the
CSI

effect,
Nutshells,
Frances
Glessner
Lee,
and
forensics.
Besides
being
eloquent
and

charming,
we
were
so
impressed
with
Naren’s
background.
While
he
played
it
down,

we
were
aware
that
he
is
a
true
scientist
with
several
degrees
in
science
including
a
Ph.

D.
in
applied
physics
from
Cornell.
After
our
interview
with
him,
my
co‐producer
and
I

joked
that
Naren
was
some
sort
of
science
superhero
and
then
we
realized
that
the

crime
scene
investigators
portrayed
on
CSI
are
precisely
that.




Deep
in
the
edit
process
we
found
that
we
were
missing
something,
some
voice
to
help

us
link
together
various
organic
topics
within
the
film,
and
that’s
when
we
looked
to

Dr.
Katherine
Ramsland.
Not
only
is
she
a
Frances
Glessner
Lee
and
Nutshell
scholar,

but
she’s
also
written
numerous
books
on
forensics
and
crime
scene
investigation,

including
The
CSI
Effect.
She
teaches
criminal
justice
classes
at
DeSales
University
and

was
gracious
enough
to
invite
us
to
film
her
student
processing
a
mock
crime
scene.

But
this
wasn’t
any
ordinary
mock
crime
scene!
It
was
a
life‐sized
replica
of
one
of
the

Nutshell
Studies
cases,
“Attic.”
The
similarities
were
uncanny
and
Katherine’s
interview

proved
invaluable
to
us.



And
finally,
I
have
to
say
a
few
words
about
the
music
in
our
film.
The
soundtrack
was

far
from
an
afterthought;
my
co‐producer,
John
Kurtis
Dehn
and
I
talked
about
it

constantly.
We
are
both
inspired
by
Angelo
Badalamenti’s
soundtrack
for
Twin
Peaks,

and
we
hoped
that
our
soundtrack
could
resonate
in
a
similar
way.
Fortunately,
John
is

also
a
talented
musician
and
songwriter,
creating
much
of
the
Of
Dolls
and
Murder

soundtrack.



We
also
worked
with
other
musicians
and
singers
such
as
Grant
Dawson
and
Joseph

Carl
to
create
haunting
melodies
for
the
score.

When
we
happened
upon
a
haunting

song
by
Jefferson
Rabb
from
the
website
for
the
book,
Strange
Piece
of
Paradise
(Terri

Jentz,
author)
we
thought
it
was
perfect
for
our
film.
Both
Jefferson
and
Terri

graciously
granted
us
permission
to
use
song.
Once
again,
we
considered
ourselves

lucky
and
awed
by
the
generosity
of
the
individuals
we’ve
met
encountered
while

working
on
this
film.



If
it
sounds
like
working
on
Of
Dolls
and
Murder
was
too
good
to
be
true,
it
might
be.

Maybe
I’ll
wake
up
and
find
out
it
was
all
just
a
wonderfully
creepy
dream.


                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              

                                              

                                   Filmmaker
 Notes

                              Producer
John
Kurtis
Dehn

                                              

When
Susan
Marks
first
approached
me
to
co‐produce
a
documentary
about
antique

dollhouses
and
bloody
doll
corpses,
I
have
to
admit
I
had
some
reservations.
Part
of
my

hesitancy
may
have
been
that
as
a
boy,
I
was
never
really
raised
to
appreciate
dolls
and

dollhouses.
When
I
would
play
with
dolls
(or
action
figures
as
I
called
them)
it
usually

involved
some
kind
of
warfare,
but
I
never
went
so
far
as
to
decorate
them
in
fake

blood.
Also,
I
was
concerned
that
these
miniature
dioramas
and
the
woman
who

created
them
might
not
be
strong
enough
to
sustain
an
entire
film.
I
eventually
agreed

to
be
part
of
the
project,
mostly
on
faith
in
Susan’s
instincts,
and
it
wasn’t
until
I
saw

the
dollhouses
for
myself,
that
I
came
to
appreciate
their
power.
I
also
had
no
idea

where
these
miniatures
would
lead
us.



I
can’t
imagine
beginning
a
documentary
project
and
knowing
how
it’s
going
to
end.

The
things
you
learn
along
the
way
are
bound
to
determine
where
your
film
goes,
and

that
was
certainly
the
case
with
Of
Dolls
and
Murder.
Seeing
the
Nutshells
for
the
first

time,
I
was
taken
in
by
their
sublime
beauty
and
intricacy.
The
detail
and
construction

inspires
awe
and
the
dolls
themselves,
curiosity.
We
knew
right
away,
that
we
had
to

try
to
make
a
beautiful
looking
film.
Susan
brought
Matt
Ehling
into
the
project
as

Director
of
Photography
and
he
did
an
amazing
job,
capturing
some
truly
beautiful

images.
Matt’s
experience
as
a
documentary
filmmaker
was
also
a
huge
help
to
us
and

he
chimed
in
as
cheerleader
whenever
Susan
and
I
showed
any
hint
of
doubt
about

what
we
were
doing.




Susan’s
beautiful
photography
of
the
Nutshells
played
a
crucial
role
in
our
film
as
well.

Because
of
the
tiny
scale
of
the
dioramas,
and
the
cramped
quarters
where
they
were

displayed,
we
were
limited
as
to
the
angles
we
could
get
at
with
our
large
video

camera.
Many
of
the
detail
shots
that
are
used
in
the
film
are
actually
still
photos
that

Susan
was
able
capture.



The
2nd
big
discovery
that
ultimately
shaped
Of
Dolls
and
Murder,
was
the
men
and

women
who
work
at
the
Office
of
the
Chief
Medical
Examiner
in
Baltimore
and

homicide
detectives,
Rob
Ross,
Bob
Dohony
and
Sean
Jones.
We
were
profoundly

moved
by
their
dedication
to
their
work,
their
respect
for
Frances
Glessner
Lee,
and

their
generosity
towards
us.




The
time
we
spend
with
these
people,
taught
us
that
our
film
needed
to
be
empathetic

as
opposed
to
sensationalistic,
and
that
instead
of
going
for
gore
or
shock
value,
it

needed
to
be
a
human
film.
Chief
Medical
Examiner,
Dr.
David
Fowler
says
in
the
film

that,
“behind
every
single
person
that
comes
in
here
there
is
usually
a
group
of
friends,

family,
who
have
now
suffered
a
significant
loss.

And
so
it’s
not
just
one
victim,
the

victim
is
in
fact
a
group
of
people.”




The
doctors,
the
autopsy
technicians,
the
lab
techs
and
the
detectives
that
we
came
to

know,
have
that
sense
of
purpose
of
giving
voice
to
all
of
the
victims–all
of
them.
As

filmmakers
we
started
to
feel
a
responsibility
as
well,
that
we
couldn’t
be
careless,
and

that
we
had
an
obligation
to
treat
our
film
with
the
same
seriousness
and
sense
of

purpose.



Lastly,
having
the
chance
to
shape
the
soundtrack
of
the
film
was
a
big
thrill.
Susan
had

a
strong
sense
of
what
she
was
looking
for,
which
also
matched
my
sensibilities.
Again,

empathy
for
the
victims
and
the
haunting
beauty
of
the
Nutshells
were
guideposts.



I’m
very
proud
of
our
film.
I
feel
extremely
fortunate
to
have
made
many
friends
along

the
way
and
to
have
worked
with
such
wonderful
and
talented
people
in
the
process.

    Of
Dolls
and
Murder

              



           Credits

                

           Narrator

         John
Waters


                

          Directed
by

         Susan
Marks

                

         Produced
by

       John
Kurtis
Dehn

         Susan
Marks

                

      Executive
Producer

        Suzy
Greenberg

                

       Cinematographer

          Matt
Ehling

                

          Written
by

         Susan
Marks



          Edited
by

      John
Kurtis
Dehn

               

      Original
Score
by

      John
Kurtis
Dehn

               

     Additional
Music
By

       Jefferson
Rabb

         Joseph
Carl

       Grant
Dawson

         Bernie
King

               

     Additional
Camera

        Andy
Bethke

      John
Kurtis
Dehn

               

                          Still
Photographer

                             Susan
Marks

                                    

                                 Sound

                           John
Kurtis
Dehn

                                    

              Sound
Engineer
and
Re‐recording
Mixer

                           Carly
Zuckweiler

                                    

                                  Grips

                              Kiera
Dugan


                              Robin
Harris

                             Kathi
Overton

                              Nolan
Pratt

                                    

                               Consultant

                      Sergeant
Anita
Muldoon

                                    

                         Research
Assistant

                             Deborah
Bull

                                    

                                 Casting


                             Bab’s
Casting

                                    

                 Laura
Bull
as
Frances
Glessner
Lee

               Randy
Grubba
as
Corpse
and
Gunman

                                    

                      Post
Production
Facilities

                               Blue
Moon

                            Broad
Daylight

                                    

John
Waters’
narration
recorded
at
Producer’s
Video
in
Baltimore,
MD

                                    

                        Final
Post
Production

                                 HDMG

                                    

                       Animator
and
Designer

                               Adam
Tow


				
DOCUMENT INFO