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The Supervisor

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The Supervisor Powered By Docstoc
					Entry Management Position
      Functional Organization
         Representation

             Department
              Manager




Supervisor    Supervisor   Supervisor
       Supervisor’s Personnel




              Upper Management
          Responsibility

                                 Supervisor




                                    Communication



                                                    Open Communication
Stock Clerk                       Cashier                                Customer Returns
  Supervisory Responsibilities
• Keeping the workplace safe -



             Bureau of
             Labor
             Statistics
             Washington,
             D.C. 20212
Percent of nonfatal workplace injuries
by industry division, 2002
  Safety Rules – Only Winners
• Set a personal example by obeying all the
  safety rules and use safety equipment.
• Never sacrifice safety for speed.
• Plan each job with safety in mind.
• Teach safety first to every employee.
• Enforce Safety Rules.
What are The Safety Rules Where
          You Work?
• Lifting?
• Using Equipment?
• Where to keep you hands, legs, feet, when
  …?
• Eye and ear wear?
• Rest periods such a breaks and lunch?
• ?
• Model safety for your employees

• Never Sacrifice Safety for Speed
 – it is just too costly for the employee and
 employer.
Entry Management Position
 Safety and the Law-Protecting the
             Customer
• K.C. the supervisor/owner of a snowmobile
  business, rented snowmobiles to vacationers at
  a mountain resort. One particular unit had a
  defective steering mechanism. The mechanism
  sometimes locked in a fast turn and could flip the
  machine over on its side. K.C. failed to mention
  this defect to his employee Jay prior to Jay
  renting the snowmobile to a customer.
  Unfortunately the steering mechanism did lock in
  use, injuring the customer. Is K.C. liable for
  damages?
        What Area of Law?
Bailment Law

A Bailment arises in many situations
when personal property is transferred.
Whenever one party gives possession
of personal property to another under
an agreement by which identical
property must be returned or disposed
of as agreed, a bailment is created.
         The Snowmobile Case
Is there personal property involved?
Is property being transferred?
Is there the intent to return the identical property?
• K.C. the supervisor/owner of a snowmobile
  business, rented snowmobiles to vacationers at
             rented
  a mountain resort. One particular unit had a
  defective steering mechanism. The mechanism
  sometimes locked in a fast turn and could flip the
  machine over on its side. K.C. failed to mention
  this defect to his employee Jay prior to Jay
  renting the snowmobile. Unfortunately the
  steering mechanism did lock in use, injuring the
  customer. Is K.C. liable for damages?
              Who Gets Hurt?
• Employee – there is an injury

• Employer – Bailment law make the employer
  liable and will have to pay for the injury
  What should K.C. have done to avoid the
  injury and financial loss?
  If Jay knew the law what could he have done to
  avoid these losses?
       Supervisor’s Personnel




              Upper Management
          Responsibility

                                 Supervisor




                                    Communication



                                                    Open Communication
Stock Clerk                       Cashier                                Customer Returns
  Other Bailment Law Situation
• Inspection – level of expertise -
  – Tool Rental
  – Neighbor borrowing equipment
  – Bus transportation
  – Hotel and the safety of property.
  – Your car being left over night for repair.
  – Taking care of someone else property – dog
    or fish tank.
Entry Management Position
         Building Teamwork
• What is it and why is it needed?
• How is it achieved?
What does teamwork accomplish in
        the workplace?
• Write down 1 to 3 reasons to build
  teamwork and pass them to the teacher.
             Team Work
• Builds high morale
  – Employees will like to come to work and work
    more effectively.
  – They cooperate with one another & other
    groups to reach the company’s goals.
  – Each group feels they are making a
    contribution to the team.

• Satisfying Employee Needs & the
  business’s needs too.
  Satisfying Employee Needs
• Needs – Where do they come
  from and what can be demanded
  of you as the supervisor?
  – Human Behavior – Abraham
    Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs
Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
      Maslow’s Assumptions
• People have latent needs.
• A Satisfied need is not a motivator
• Peoples needs are arranged in a hierarchy
  of importance Once one need has been at
  least partially satisfied, another emerges
  and demands satisfaction.
Any hidden Needs Here?
Maslow’s hierarchy of needs
PHYSIOLOGICAL NEEDS
SAFETY
Social Needs
Ego – Does not mean
Egotistical or Hubris
Self-Actualization
   Maslow in the Work Place
1) An employee is not working very fast and you
want to motivate this person what would you say to
determine his/her needs?

2) An employee has been very quiet lately, almost
shy, what would you say to determine his/her
needs?

3) An employee has been working hard, making
certain everything is in place, and is even staying
over time; not requesting any overtime pay. What
would you say to determine his/her needs?
 Maslow in the Work Place -cont

4) One of your long time employees has been a little
“distant lately”, what would you say to determine
his/her needs?


5) Several employees are not getting along: their past
sincere teamwork effort has not been seen lately, there
are very few smiles on their faces. What would you say
to determine their needs?
   Boss verses Manager/Supervisor?
• What is the difference?
The Words and Actions of a
          Boss
                Authority
• Boss- lets his/her importance go to his/her
  head.
• Supervisor – gets work done through
  others and builds a team.
How Do People React to Pin Head
          Bosses?
• Laugh behind their backs. – No respect
  because none is given.
• Most people stay out of their way – What
  is the problem with this happening?
                 Communication




                                 pen Communication
             Buddy Boss
        Balancing the Fine Line
• Who you were before being promoted and
  the responsibilities of being the boss.
  – Authority and responsibility – you are not just
    another worker.
              Authority
• To make decisions. To make awards and
  consequences
• Delegating authority but not
  responsibility.
             Responsibility
•   Quality of work
•   Quantity of work
•   Motivating employees
•   Training of employees
•   Handling employee/customer disputes.
•   Employee and Customer Safety
•   Protection of company property
               Responsibility
•   Hiring and firing.
•   Who works how long and when.
•   Hourly rates
•   Jobs to be done
•   Ordering product, supplies, etc



    Internet
    Manager
Check one or more boxes or write and explanation when required.

                                        Situation                                        Responsibility    Authority

   The employee parks cars safely for the restaurant’s customers.


   The employee at the end of his/her work shift counts the money in the cash
   register till (draw) to make certain a mistake in ringing up the merchandise was
   not made.

   The manager told the stock clerk Sam to go get Susan to help with setting up the
   dog food display. Sam is

   The manager told Sam that the all the stock must be put on the shelves by 9PM        Why               Why
   today, and to get the four other stock clerks on the job immediately. Later that
   evening around 7PM Sam tells John he is goofing off too much. John tells Sam he
   is not his boss and to bug off. Is John right?

   The delivery truck pulls up to the back door of the store, the driver unloads the
   truck and calls a clerk over to sign for the goods. When should the clerk sign for
   deliveries?

   Frank has worked in the store for 10 years and is a good friend of the boss. Kathy
   works closely with Frank, her one year anniversary is coming up, this is the time
   when she was promised an evaluation and possible hourly raise. Franks tells
   Kathy she is going to get a 50 cents per hour raise. Kathy only gets a 35 cents
   raise, what happened and does she have a right to make a formal complaint?
Customer Safety
       How Can You Protect The
             Customer?
•   Negligent Falls
•   Negligent staking of product or materials.
•   Placement of tools, skids, and machinery.
•   Warning sign placement.
•   Education of customers.
•   Training employees to be observant and
    take responsibility.
   Negligent Law – A type of Tort

• A Tort – An offence against an individual.
  – An injured person can sue and obtain a judgment for
    money damages from the person committing the tort.




                                            To Prove
                                            Liability
                     Case1
• Mrs. Carol entered the supermarket with her two
  children and observed a young man mopping
  the floor where a “Slippery When Wet Sign” was
  placed. The clerk cautioned the mom with the
  comment, “Be careful the floor is wet.” Her
  young boy slips and falls against an Isle display.
  A can from the display hits the boy, injuring him.
  In a legal action claiming negligence would
  Carol win? Why?
Negligent Falls
     Warning sign placement.
• Minimizes Negligence but does not
  absolve you of the responsibility to safety.
                Negligence
• Is the most common tort.
  – Intent is not required.
                    Case 2
• Mr. Grogin is exiting the store with three bags
  in his arms. He can barely see over the bags
  as he steps on the “mud carpet” that lays in
  front of his exit. The mud carpet is not laying
  flat and Mr. Grogin trips, drops his bags
  causing some items to break and sprains his
  back. In a legal action claiming negligence is
  the store liable? Why?
                        Case 3
• John’s boss wants to get as much merchandise as
  possible out of the backroom and onto the selling floor’s
  shelves. The big holiday rush is about to begin and he
  wants to maximize sales. John brings a case of beans
  to the backroom because the shelf is full. His boss tells
  him in a disappointed tone to find room. John piles the
  cans up too high and one later falls and hits a customer
  sending her to the hospital for treatment. In a legal
  action for negligence would the customer win and who
  is liable? Why?
                    Case 4
• David Allen, age two, was attacked and
  severely bitten in the face and ear by a dog
  brought into the store by a customer Mr.
  Tweed. Mr. Tweed admitted the dog barked
  frequently, chased cars, & looked mean. On the
  other hand no one ever complained about the
  dog, it never bit anyone and it frequently played
  with children. Is there liability and would it be
  Mr. Tweed or the store? Why?
 What Must be Proved to Establish
            Liability?
1. A duty owed by one person to another to
   do or not do something.
2. Violation or breach of the duty.
3. Injury recognized by the law
4. Proximate causation of the injury by the
   breach.


 Back Case1   Back Case2   Back Case3   Back Case4
    Training Employees to be
 observant and take responsibility.
• Using an understanding of the Law to train
  Employees.
   Supervisor Review
What Have You Learned?
And
A Case Study
 Up from the Ranks – The new supervisor.
          Make a printed handout
John had recently been promoted to a first- line supervisory position
for within the ranks of his own department. He was twenty-one years
old, had worked for the department for approximately three years, and
was extremely popular with his co-workers. Among the supervisor he
was known as a good worker but one who was inclined to “cut
corners” if he was given the opportunity.
As a result of a consultant’s report, the department had built a new
men’s washroom for its employees. This facility included lockers and a
dressing room.
About three weeks after assuming his new position, John happened
by the washroom about thirty minutes before quitting time. Hearing
noises in the shower, he stuck his head in and saw two old buddies
from his days as a worker in the department. Although they did not
work on his crew, John felt he had to say something.
“You guys are sure pushing it, aren’t you? It is almost a half hour to
quitting time.”
   Up from the Ranks – The new
         supervisor –cont.
“Aw, come on, John,” said one of the men, “you used to
knock off a little early too when there was a ballgame.
Anyway, we don’t work for you.”
Unfortunately, both statements were true. John had on
occasion, taken an early shower when he had had a
date- and the men in the shower were not on his crew.
But didn't he have some responsibility to the business?

Should he report his friends to the supervisor? Should
he try to counsel with the two workers? Or should he
just ignore the entire incident?
     Good Management Skills
• Be a leader, not a boss
• Ask your workers to help plan what to do and
  how to do it.
• Ask your workers for advice and help in getting
  the job done.
• Let your workers help decide how to organize
  their work.
     Good Management Skills
• Show confidence in your employees’ judgment
  by letting them make some of the decisions, but
  remember you are still responsible for the work
  they do.
• Be sure that everyone knows the what, how,
  and when of every major task.
• Get to know your workers; what they need what
  they can contribute.
 Good Management Skills
• Build teamwork among all the persons
  in your business.
• Teach and enforce health and safety
  rules and set a good personal example.
• Keep accurate records and reports.
• Try to be a teacher, a helper, and a
  leader not a tough boss or a lenient
  buddy.
     Good Management Skills
• Do not allow your personal beliefs to interfere
  with your treatment of employees or your job
  decisions.
• Do not interfere in the private lives of your
  employees.
• Remember that your job is get work done
  through others.
 Up from the Ranks – The new supervisor.

Here are the questions to answer:
1. Should he report his friends to the
   supervisor?
2. Should he try to counsel with the two
   workers?
3. Or should he just ignore the entire
   incident?
  Two Case Studies to Test Your
        Understanding
• Go to Word File Case Studies
• Go to Analysis form

 Case Study 1 “Reframing” Anger to Build
 Positive Relationships

 Case Study 2 “Going First” to Discover
 His Power and Influence
Employee
               Rights                            Duties
                                                 Duties
•   Rest, Food, Bathroom            • Break Time within contract
    (Physiological Needs)
•   Safe working conditions         • Keep work area safe for all
•   Paid-to earn a living wage        Quality & Quantity of work
•   Collective Bargaining             for a full days pay.

• Freedom to speak                  • Proper speech, communicate
• Socialization                       to build, teamwork keep to
                                      tasks.
• No Discrimination –Civil Rights   • Respect others

• Benefits                          • Don’t take advantage of sick
                                      Days.

				
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