Docstoc

Verbs_

Document Sample
Verbs_ Powered By Docstoc
					Just like nouns, there are 2 main types of
                    verbs:

           Action and Linking

Both types of verbs can be accompanied
             by auxiliary verbs.
   An action word expresses an action.

  The action may be physical or mental.

Ex. of Physical Action Verbs: run, jump, play

  Ex. of Mental Action Verbs: want, wish,
                    desire
A linking verb links a word in the predicate
  (tells what the subject is or does or what
     happens to subject) to the subject.

 We were happy to see the sign for
  Wrightsville Beach. (“were” links happy
  to we)
 The ocean appeared rough next to the
  calm reeds. (“appeared” links rough to
  ocean)
There are two groups of linking verbs: forms
  of be and verbs that express conditions.

   Forms of Be: is, am, are, was, were, been,
                       being

   Verbs that express conditions: look, smell,
        feel, sound, taste, grow, appear,
              become, seem, remain
**TIP**: If you can substitute a form of be
         for a verb, it is a linking verb.

**Ex: Dad tasted the salty water. It tasted
  bad. (The first tasted is an action verb.
 The second tasted can be replaced with
   “was” and is therefore a linking verb.)
Auxiliary verbs (also called “helping verbs”)
  are combined with other verbs to form
                 verb phrases.

 A verb phrase may be used to express a
 particular tense of a verb (the time being
  referred to) or to indicate that an action
          is directed at the subject.
Ex: Small scraps of birch bark are crackling
     in the fire. (“Are” is the auxiliary verb,
           crackling is the main verb)
  Our muscles will be sore from chopping
    wood. (“Will” is the auxiliary verb, be is
                  the main verb)
 At last all the wood has been chopped.
        (“Has been” is the auxiliary verb,
          “Chopped” is the main verb)
be, am, is, are, was, were, being, been, have,
    has, had, do, does, did, can, could, will,
     would, shall, should, may, might, must

  Some of these verbs can also function as
  main verbs. For example, notice how had
   stands alone in the first example, and is a
     helping (auxiliary) verb in the second
                    example.

 At the end of the evening, we had no more
                 energy. (Main)
   We had exhausted ourselves. (Auxiliary)
We drove to the store.
We drove to the store.

       He ran.
We drove to the store.

       He ran.

   She looks tired.
We drove to the store.

       He ran.

   She looks tired.

     He is smart.
We drove to the store.

       He ran.

   She looks tired.

     He is smart.
We are going to the play.
      We are going to the play.

She smelled the flower. It smelled bad.
      We are going to the play.

She smelled the flower. It smelled bad.

       That movie is my favorite.
      We are going to the play.

She smelled the flower. It smelled bad.

      That movie is my favorite.

             I am happy.
      We are going to the play.

She smelled the flower. It smelled bad.

      That movie is my favorite.

             I am happy.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:23
posted:7/1/2011
language:English
pages:19