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					Meade School District




      PASS Training
     October 26, 2005
           Agenda
8:00 AM    Welcome, Handouts, Reflection

           Graphic Organizers

           Break

           Questioning

11:30 AM   Lunch on Your Own

12:30 PM   Examining Student Work

           Break

           Team Planning

3:15 PM    Closure
                  Outcomes
 To build an understanding of which graphic organizers are
  most effective in addressing the reading and math areas
  of need.

 To build an understanding of how planning the use of a
  graphic organizer impacts student learning.

 To build foundational knowledge of how verbs affect the
  level of questioning using Bloom‟s Taxonomy.

 To gain an understanding of what an Essential Question is
  and how to use that knowledge prior to instruction.

 To understand the difference between assessment for and
  assessment of learning.
What You Told Us . . .
Confused about where the information should
be placed in the binders:
  Added tabs to PowerPoint

Need more planning time:
  Will be given time to plan after each section
   and at the end of the day
  Create a specific planning handout for each
   section

Feeling tired in the afternoon:
  Present Graphic Organizer and Questioning
   in the morning
Reflection
     Reflection on the October 7
     Professional Development

1.    What did you find exciting?
2.    What factors made it possible for a
      successful in-service?
3.    What obstacles did you incur?
4.    What were the Ahas?
5.    What is your advice for the next in-service?
            Directions

1. Discuss at your table for 3
   minutes.
2. Choose one area on which you
   wish to comment.
3. Write your comment on the
   appropriate colored card.
 Kinesthetic Descriptive
Pattern Graphic Organizer
Or better known as

   The Cloud
                     Directions
4.       Without talking, form the small clouds
         around the large cloud in 1 minute.

5.       Within your cloud,
     –     Verbally share your comments
     –     Categorize
     –     Choose 3 to share with all the clouds

6.       Share one comment from each cloud until all
         15 have been shared.

7.       At your table, record as much as you learned
         in 2 minutes.

8.       Discussion? Questions? From whom do you
         need more information?
Graphic Organizers




Binder Tab 4
         Purpose

To build an understanding of…

   Which graphic organizers are most
    effective in addressing the reading and
    math areas of need.

   How planning the use of a graphic
    organizer impacts student learning.
                                         MEADE DISTRICT

   All students will                                                    All students will
   improve reading                          NCA Goals                 improve math skills
    skills across the                                                      across the
      curriculum                                                          curriculum.

                                                              K-12 Math Needs
K-4 Reading Needs
                                                              •Math procedures
•Cause & effect
•Fact and opinion                            Marzano’s        •Algebraic concepts (solving problems)
                                                              •Geometric figures
•Fiction and non-fiction
•Fairy tales                               Cues, Questions,   •Measurement
                                                              •Problem solving
•Word study skills
•Reference materials                             And          K-4 Math Needs
•Comprehension
                                                              •Analyze and describe properties and
                                              Graphic         behaviors of relations, functions, and
5-8 Reading Needs                                             inverses.
•Literary elements and devices – other
text
                                             Organizers
                                                              5-8 (see K-12 Areas of Need)
•Literary elements and devices – n
stories
•Compare/contrast word choice,                                9-12 Math Needs
dialogue, rhyme, rhythm, and voice                            •Analyze and describe properties and
•Figurative language                                          behaviors of relations, functions, and
•Comprehension                                                inverses
•Vocabulary                                                   •Apply relations and functions to complex
                                             Improved         problem solving situations
                                                              •Use various statistical models to gather
9-12 Reading Needs
                                                              data, study problems, and draw conclusions
•Sound devices
                                                              •Apply the laws of probability to predict
•Supporting the subject and mood
•Genre
                                          Student Learning    averts/outcomes, and solve problems.
                                                              •Analyze and describe situations that
•vocabulary
                                                              involve one or more variables
                                          And Achievement     •Use units of measure within a system of
                                                              measurement
Fishbone Graphic Organizer
                    Reading Strategy: Cues, Questions, and Organizers
    Goal: All students will improve
 reading skills across the curriculum.
  Meade District K-4: Areas of Need
Cause and Effect                             X
Fact and Opinion                             X
Fiction and Non-Fiction                      X
Fairy Tales
Word Study Skills
Reference Materials
Comprehension                                X
   Meade District 5-8: Areas of Need
Literary elements and devices - other text
Literary elements and devices - in stories
Compare and contrast word choice,
dialogue, rhyme, rhythm and voice
Figurative language
Reading comprehension                        X
Vocabulary                                   X
  Meade District 9-12: Areas of Need
Sound devices
Supporting the subject and mood (ex:
rhyme, rhythm, and onomatopoeia)
Genre                                        X
Vocabulary                                   X
                         Math Strategy: Cues, Questions, and Organizers
 Goal: All students will improve math
    skills across the curriculum.
  Meade District K-12: Areas of Need
Math procedures

Algebraic concepts (solving problems)
Geometric Figures                                  X
Measurement                                        X
Problem Solving
   Meade District K-4: Areas of Need
Analyze and describe properties and behaviors of
relations functions, and inverses

   Meade District 5-8: Areas of Need
See K-12
  Meade District 9-12: Areas of Need
Analyze and describe properties and behaviors
of relations functions, and inverses
Apply relations and functions to complex
problem solving situations
Use various statistical models to gather data,
study problems, and draw conclusions
Apply the laws of probability to predict
events/outcomes and solve problems
Analyze and describe situations that involve one
or more variables
Use units of measure within a system of
         Research Says…
 Graphic organizers
  provide students with a
  prompt – a framework –
  for using information.

 Learning is increased
  when teaching is
  presented in a manner
  that assists students in
  organizing, storing, and
  retrieving knowledge.
Pages 156 – 157



Planning &
Assessing
  Myself
Graphic Organizer Planning Process

        Skills:          Scaffold:
        Areas of Need    Demonstration, Guided
                         Practice, Independent



       Type:             Group:
       Marzano, other    Large, small, pairs


                         • How do you teach
       Information:      independence?
       All, some, none   • How do you assess
                         student learning?
Graphic Organizer Goal Sheet
 Take it slow!!!!

 Individually, fill out the Graphic
  Organizer goal sheet.

 When you are planning, discuss how
  you can make sure your staff will
  continue to incorporate graphic
  organizer into their classrooms.

 Take it slow!!!!
Graphic Organizer
 Planning Time
  Questioning



Binder Tab 3
       Questioning Goals
 Find the note card on which you wrote
  your questioning goal.

 Two Minutes: on the back of the note
  card, journal about your experience.
   Did you meet your goal?
   How did the students react?
   Do you need to change anything?

 Share with a partner.
   Purpose of Questioning
 Important to build knowledge rather than
  mere chronological facts.

 Important to broaden student
  perspectives – need to make
  connections to real world.

 We need to help students answer:
   – So what?
   – What does it matter?
   – What does it all mean?
      The Seven Practices of
      Questioning Revisited
1.   Never ask negative questions. Be positive
     or neutral in tone and inquiry.

2.   In general, avoid Yes/No questions.

3.   Have students justify all responses.

4.   If a student says, “I don‟t know,” follow-up
     immediately with one to three additional
     questions.
       The Seven Practices of
       Questioning Revisited


5. Questioning each and every student every day.

6. When beginning, student questions should be at
   the same degree of difficulty, and all students
   should be asked the same number of questions.

7. Practice asking questions during ¼ of
   instructional time. During this focus, refrain from
   explaining, telling, hinting and using other non-
   questioning strategies.
  Bloom’s Taxonomy

     Today’s Focus:
During Student Learning
    Bloom’s Taxonomy


 Knowledge
 Comprehension
 Application
 Analysis
 Synthesis
 Evaluation
Bloom’s Taxonomy of Questioning

Teachers tend to ask questions in the
“knowledge” category of Bloom‟s
Taxonomy 80-90 percent of the time.

What impact could this have on
student learning?
Using Verbs to Create Questions

 The verbs in each category indicate a
  kind of thinking skill needed to complete
  an assignment.

 As you move up the scale the level of
  thinking increases.

 Is important to remember that you have
  to begin at the level of learning
  required.
  Using Verbs to Create Questions

 Level and     Example Outcomes        Example Question   Practice Writing
 Definition     - Verb Handout                              Questions –
                                                          Questioning Stem
                                                             Handout
Knowledge –      define, fill in the     What is the
  Recalling       blank, identify,       formula for
 Information    label, list, locate,   determining the
               match, memorize,           area of a
               name, recall, spell,      rectangle?
                    state, tell,
                     underline
 Using Verbs to Create Questions

As a group:
 Determine a topic you would like use to practice
  writing questions.
 Pick one topic you will “be teaching” this week.
 Write one question at each level of Bloom‟s,
  starting with level one.


You will have 10 minutes to complete this activity.
Using Verbs to Create Questions

What questions were the easiest to write?


What questions were more difficult to
write?


Is it important to compose questions prior
to teaching a lesson?
Essential Questions

  Today’s Focus:
 Prior to Learning
      Essential Questions

Essential questions let the students
know what we want them to learn
prior to them learning the content.
      Essential Questions
 Should target higher-level thinking.

 What is the big idea you want students to carry
  with them over the time?

 The best way students remember things is to
  hook it to something they already know.
   – How will this connect to something else they
     already learned?
   – How can the students have a broader perspective
     over their world?
   – Dates are not as important as why it happened or
     what they learned.
       Essential Questions
How are essential questions used?

 Write two or three essential questions for each unit of
  study.

 Examine at the beginning of the unit. Bring in
  vocabulary at this time.

 Post the questions in your classroom so students can
  see them every day.

 Bring them back over and over again. Example: Does
  this information help you to understand where we are
  headed?

 Make continuous connections over and over again.

 Connect every activity in the unit to the essential
  questions.
Essential Question Practice
Two 6th grade Nutrition Unit Standards
   6.2.3: Analyze how media influences the
    selection of health information, products, and
    services.

   6.1.2: Explain the relationships between
    personal health behaviors and the prevention
    of injury, illness, disease, and premature
    death.

As a group
   Determine three controversial issues

   Determine three areas of student interest
Essential Question Practice
     Example Essential Question:
How do outside influences affect our
eating habits/nutritional choices?

             Your Turn:
As a group, write 1-2 essential
questions using issues and interests
of students.
   Questioning Goal Sheet
 Take it slow!!!!

 Individually, fill out the questioning goal
  sheet.

 When you are planning, discuss how you
  can make sure your staff will continue to
  incorporate questioning into their
  classrooms.

 Take it slow!!!!
 Questioning
Planning Time
   Why is Examining
Student Work Important?




We may want to assess
 where a student is.
     Why is Examining
  Student Work Important?



We may want
to assess
where a
student is…
going.
    Why is Examining
 Student Work Important?


We may
want to
assess what
a student
has learned.
   Why is Examining
Student Work Important?


           But ultimately we
           want to know
           what to do next
           for that student’s
           learning.
              Human Histogram
                    Survey Statement                               Score
1. Before teaching begins, I articulate the unit/lesson learning
   targets (essential questions) my students will be studying.
2. My students can describe the learning targets they will hit
   and what will come next in their learning.
3. I transform these learning targets into dependable
   assessments that yield accurate information.
4. I consistently use classroom assessment information to revise
   and guide both teaching and learning.
5. My feedback to students is frequent, descriptive,
   constructive, and immediate, helping students to plan and
   improve their work.
6. I post the unit learning targets (essential questions) in my
   classroom where students can refer to them daily.
    Student Involvement
When students are involved in the
assessment process they are
required to think about their own
learning, articulate what they
understand and what they still need
to learn – and achievement
improves.

               (Black and William, 1998; Young, 2000)
Thinking About Assessment
80 percent of assessments given in
classrooms are geared toward low level
thinking.

Decisions about assessment happen
about every three to four minutes.

What do assessments tell us?

How are we using assessments?
     Summative and Formative
         Assessment

 Assessment of Learning (Summative Assessment):
 How much have students learned up to a
 particular point in time?




Assessment for Learning (Formative Assessment):
How can we use assessments to help
students learn more?
    Our Assessment Goal

To create and maintain a balanced
assessment system that includes
high quality assessments of and for
student learning.
       Assessment Activity
           Of and For
Directions:
    You will work in pairs.
     Each pair needs an envelope and
      T-Chart
     Work for five minutes to determine
      which category each definition fits
      into.
     If you get stuck, place the definition
      in the middle of the column.
Using Descriptive Feedback
 to Examine Student Work
Research on Descriptive Feedback

 It‟s the quality of the feedback rather than its
  existence or absence that determines its
  power.

 Specifically what makes the difference is the
  use of descriptive feedback as opposed to
  numerical scoring or letter grades.

 Descriptive feedback can focus on strengths or
  weaknesses; feedback is most effective when it
  points out strengths in the work as well as
  areas needing improvement.
     Seven Strategies of
   Assessment for Learning
Where am I going?
  1. Provide a clear and understandable vision
     of the learning target (essential questions).
  2. Use examples and models of strong and
     weak work.


Where am I now?
  3. Offer regular descriptive feedback.
  4. Teach students to self-assess and set
     goals.
 Seven Strategies (Continued)

How can I close the gap?
  5. Design lessons to focus on one aspect of
      quality at a time.
  6. Teach students focused revision.
  7. Engage students in self-reflection, and let
      them keep track of and share their
      learning.
     Descriptive Feedback
Assessment for learning requires
teachers to provide descriptive
rather than evaluative feedback
to students.

Effective descriptive feedback
   Describes features of work or performance;
   Relates directly to learning targets; and
   Points out strengths and gives specific
    information about how to improve.
     Use Descriptive             Use Evaluative
      Feedback . . .             Feedback . . .
 Instead of giving a grade on    To give a grade
  work that is for practice.

 To reflect student strengths    To judge student
  and weaknesses with              work
  respect to the specific
  learning target.

 To identify what students
  are doing right, as well as
  what they need to work on
  next.

 To point out “where am I
  now” and lead them to
  “where do I need to go?”
         Descriptive or Evaluative
               Feedback?
Mark each example of descriptive feedback with a „D‟ and each
  example of evaluative feedback with an „E‟.

_____   Try harder next time.

_____   70 %

_____   You maintained eye contact with the audience throughout
        your presentation.

_____   Good job of getting ready for lunch.

_____   Students at Table 3 are ready for lunch. Their desks are
        clear, they are sitting down, and they are quiet.

_____   

_____   +

_____   Your group worked great together today. You assigned
        each person a role, and the time keeper made sure to keep
        the group on task.
          Descriptive or Evaluative
                Feedback?
_____   B+. Good work.

_____   Your writing is a „5‟ for Ideas and Content, but a „2‟ for
        Conventions.

_____   You have maintained a tight focus throughout your paper.

_____   Some of your details don‟t seem to fit where they‟re placed.

_____   You made some simple mistakes with multiplying three-digit
         numbers. Next time, take a few minutes when you‟ve finished
        to check your work.

_____   Emerging

_____   Your work is consistently above average.

_____   Meets standard in mathematics.

_____   You are so close to the standard. With a little more work, you‟ll
        be there.
 Descriptive Feedback

Always discuss what works
        and why,
          then
   give suggestions for
   fine-tuning and why.
      Descriptive Feedback
 Individually, select the first piece of student work
  you would like to examine.
 Each person at your table should have two large
  sticky notes.
 Tear the sticky notes in half.
 Looking at the piece of student work, write a
  descriptive feedback note (what works and why)
  and a suggestion or question using each sticky
  note.
 Each person should write two descriptive and two
  suggestions.
 Post on 11X14 handout.
What Works and Why   Suggestions for Fine-Tuning
                              and Why
         Descriptive Feedback
 As a team, categorize the descriptive feedback
  statements. For example: Do several of the
  statements focus on writing?


 Are there any evaluative statements on the chart? If
  so, change them to a descriptive statement.


 As a team, categorize the suggestion statements.


 Does each statement give the student a suggestion
  so they can go back and correct, or move forward
  with, their assignment? If not, rewrite the statement
  so the student has a specific area they can work on.
       Summative/Formative
          Discussion
At your table, discuss and record the
following:

    How graphic organizers could be used as a
     summative assessment.

    How questioning could be used as a
     summative assessment.

    How graphic organizers could be used as a
     formative assessment.

    How questioning could be used as a
     formative assessment.
Training Tips . . .
  Barb Rowenhorst
Professional Learning
    Communities
    MaryLou McGirr
Planning    Back at
 Guide      the
            campsite
Section 7   we are
            going to…
         PASS Team School
           Assignments
  What is the best time for us to be in
   your building on November 10?

Barb Rowenhorst
             Rural/Whitewood
             Sturgis Elementary
Pam Lange
             Stagebarn/Piedmont
             Sturgis Middle School
MaryLou McGirr
              Sturgis High School
Roll up the sleeves…
  Apply the learning…

  Discuss

    Consolidate

     Map Out

       Present

				
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