Docstoc

FAQ

Document Sample
FAQ Powered By Docstoc
					FOR INTERNAL INFORMATION ONLY  NOT FOR PUBLIC CIRCULATION                                   PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL 


                         FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQs) 
 

    OFFERING OF UP TO 100,000,000 EUROPEAN STYLE CASH SETTLED ZERO STRIKE CALL WARRANTS 
                              OVER CLASS B ORDINARY SHARES OF  
                                   BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY INC.  
                                                 (the “BERKSHIRE CW”)
 

Contents 

     1. General Information about Structured/Call warrants 

     2. Zero Strike Warrants 

     3.    Berkshire Hathaway Inc.  

GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT STRUCTURED CALL WARRANTS 
      
     Q1. What is a structured call warrant? 
         A call warrant is a listed investment product that gives investors the right to receive the difference between the 
         underlying stock price and a fixed exercise price. For example, if exercise price is $100 and final stock price is 
         $150 then the call warrant pays out = (150 – 100) = $50. However, if the final stock price is less than the exercise 
         price then the final payout is zero. Call warrants are listed and traded on the warrants board of Bursa Malaysia.  
          
     Q2. What do you mean by ‘underlying share’? 
         This means the share whose price is referenced to calculate the payout of the call warrant.  
          
     Q3. What is the difference between a European and American call warrant? 
         A European call warrant can only payout at the end i.e. maturity date. An American call warrant can payout at 
         any time when the investor chooses.  
          
     Q4. What is the difference between cash settlement and physical settlement? 
         Physical settlement means the call warrant pays out in the actual underlying shares. Cash settlement means the 
         call warrant pays out in cash rather than shares.  

     Q5. Who is the issuer of call warrants? 
         In our case the issuer is AmInvestment Bank. This is backed up by a guarantee from AmBank to support 
         AmInvestment Bank’s ability to payout on the warrant.  
          
     Q6. Are call warrants capital protected? 
         No.  

     Q7. How long maturity are most call warrants?  
         Most call warrants are between six to eighteen months maturity.  

     Q8. What happens when the call warrant expires? 
                                                              1 

                                                                
FOR INTERNAL INFORMATION ONLY  NOT FOR PUBLIC CIRCULATION                                    PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL 
        At maturity, the call warrant expires. If the stock price is more than the exercise price, this means the call 
        warrant is ‘in‐the‐money’, meaning there is a payout for the investor. If the stock price is less than the exercise 
        price the warrant is ‘out‐of‐the‐money’ meaning it has no payout. Once expired, the call warrant no longer has 
        any value.  

    Q9. Why do investors buy call warrants?  
        Most investors buy call warrants rather than the underlying shares because they want leverage. Leverage means 
        the return on the call warrants can be several times the return on the underlying shares. For example, a 
        leverage ratio of five times means if the stock price goes up say 5% then the warrants goes up about 5 x 5% = 
        25%. However, the risk of leverage is that the value can also go down much faster than the underlying share. So 
        if the share price goes down 5% in this example then the call warrant goes down 5 x ‐ 5% = ‐ 25%. Hence 
        leverage can result in greater losses as well as greater gains when compared to owning the underlying share.  
 

        ZERO STRIKE WARRANTS 
 
    Q1. How are Zero Strike warrants different from normal call warrants? 

        Normal call warrants are : 
        (a) Relatively short time to expiry e.g. six to eighteen months 
        (b) Exercise price is relatively high (e.g. 105% of starting stock price) 
        (c) Once expired, have no value if out‐of‐the‐money 
        (d) Are leveraged – e.g. if leverage ratio is five times then call warrant price goes up or down five times as much 
            as the underlying share 
        (e) Suffer from time decay (see following question) 

        Zero Strike warrants are very different from normal call warrants : 
        (a) Long time to maturity (up to five years) 
        (b) Exercise price is zero 
        (c) At expiry, the value equals the value of the underlying share, after adjustment for currency movements and 
            the Exercise Ratio (see following question) 
        (d) Are not leveraged – percentage return at maturity matches the underlying share performance one for one 
            (after adjustment for currency) 
        (e) Do not suffer from time decay 
 
    Q2. What is the meaning of time decay? 

        A normal call warrant suffers from time decay. This means that over time, as the warrant goes closer to expiry 
        date, the warrant will tend to fall in price. If the stock price has not gone up by maturity (i.e. call warrant is out‐
        of‐the‐money) then the warrant price will fall completely to zero by expiry.  

        Zero Strike warrants on the other hand do not have time decay. At maturity, the value of the Zero Strike will 
        match the underlying share (after adjustment for currency and the exercise ratio) regardless of what the final 
        value of the underlying share price will be.  
         
    Q3. What is the Exercise Ratio?  

        For a Zero Strike warrant, the Exercise Ratio represents the number of Zero Strike warrants that represents one 
        share of the underlying. For example, an Exercise Ratio of 9000 means each warrant represents 1/9000th of one 
        underlying share.  

                                                               2 

                                                                
FOR INTERNAL INFORMATION ONLY  NOT FOR PUBLIC CIRCULATION                                PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL 
        The Exercise Ratio is set at price determination date, after the closing date of the Zero Strike offer period. The 
        calculation of the Exercise Ratio is simply the closing price of the underlying share at price determination date 
        multiplied by the exchange rate (USD/MYR) at that date. Once fixed, the Exercise Ratio remains the same for the 
        entire life of the Zero Strike warrant.  
 
    Q4. Is the Zero Strike capital protected? 

        No. At maturity investors will get back an amount equal to the final price of the underlying share after 
        adjustment for currency and the Exercise Ratio. This may result in a profit or loss which directly depends on how 
        well the underlying share performs over the time to maturity.  
         
    Q5. European exercise means payout is only at maturity. How do I take profit before then? 

        Zero Strike warrants are listed on Bursa Malaysia and investors can offer their warrants for sale through a 
        broker.  
         
    Q6. What if I want to sell and there are no buyers? 
        AmInvestment Bank acts as market maker for the Zero Strikes that it issues. This means it will provide both a 
        buying and selling price throughout the life of the Zero Strike.  
         
    Q7. Why such a long maturity i.e. five years?  

        Zero Strikes are meant to give investors an opportunity to get a medium term investment referenced to the 
        underlying share. The long maturity allows investors who want to take a longer term view on market recovery 
        to have more time for the market to recover and give the underlying share more opportunity to go back up in 
        price during the time. In any case, investors do not need to wait for the full time to maturity, but can sell 
        whenever they see a market price reaches a level that they are willing to sell at.  
         
    Q8. The issue price is RM1.00 per warrant. Are there any additional fees and costs? 

        Unlike say a unit trust, there are no entry fees, exit fees or annual management fees charged by the issuer of 
        the Zero Strikes. This means if investors hold to maturity then the payout will be based on the entire amount 
        that they invested. However, like other warrants there may be exercise costs if held to maturity. If investors 
        choose to sell before maturity, they will incur the usual costs of trading warrants including brokerage fees, 
        bid/ask spreads and stamp duty.  
         
    Q9. Do Zero Strikes pay dividends? 

        No, the payout of a Zero Strike is only by reference to the share price. However, note that the underlying share 
        itself may not pay dividends. For example, Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (the issuer of the Class B shares which are 
        the underlying for the Zero Strikes on Berkshire Hathaway) has not paid a dividend since 1967 (source: company 
        annual report 2008).  

       Also note that in Malaysia, dividends are taxable, whereas capital gains (i.e. profit from the difference between 
       buying and selling price) are not.  
        
    Q10.        What happens if there is a share split, rights or bonus issue? 
        
       If the underlying company goes through such a change in its shares then the Zero Strike will also be adjusted to 
       reflect the change.  
        
    Q11.        If the underlying share is listed overseas, is there any currency exposure?  

                                                            3 

                                                              
FOR INTERNAL INFORMATION ONLY  NOT FOR PUBLIC CIRCULATION                                      PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL 
        Yes, the value of the Zero Strike in Ringgit will depend on the exchange rate between Ringgit and the overseas 
        currency. This is similar to the currency exposure when buying the underlying share that is listed overseas.  

        
    Q12.        I have heard that warrants can expire worthless.  

       As explained in the previous section on call warrants, normal call warrants have the risk of expiring out‐of‐the‐
       money and end up being worthless. However, for Zero Strikes the value at maturity will directly reflect the 
       underlying share value at that time. The only way that the Zero Strike can end up worthless at maturity is if the 
       underlying share price goes to zero (i.e. the underlying company is bankrupt).  
        
    Q13.         I heard that warrants are very expensive now because of high volatility. 
        
       The price of normal call warrants depends heavily on market volatility (implied volatility). This means if volatility 
       is high (i.e. the market expects shares to move up and down a great deal) then normal call warrants will also be 
       very expensive to buy. However, Zero Strikes are different from normal call warrants because the price does not 
       depend on volatility. Hence, a high level of volatility does not necessarily mean the Zero Strike price will also be 
       very high.  

 

    BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY INC.  

 
    Q1. What is the relationship between Warren Buffett and Berkshire Hathaway Inc.  

        The  CEO  and  Chairman  of  Berkshire  is  Warren  E.  Buffett,  who  has  been  in  charge  of  managing  the  company 
        since  1964.  Investment  decisions  and  all  other  capital  allocation  decisions  are  made  for  Berkshire  and  its 
        subsidiaries by Mr. Buffett in consultation with Charles T. Munger, who is Vice Chairman (source: Annual Report 
        2008). 

         
    Q2. What does Berkshire Hathaway Inc. do? 

        Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (“Berkshire”) is an investment holding company owning subsidiaries that engage in a 
        number  of  diverse  business  activities  including  property  and  casualty  insurance  and  reinsurance,  utilities  and 
        energy, finance, manufacturing, services and retailing (source: Annual Report 2008).  

         
    Q3. Is Warren Buffett or Berkshire Hathaway Inc endorsing this Zero Strike?  

        This  Zero  Strike  is  issued  by  AmInvestment  Bank  Berhad  and  is  referenced  to  Berkshire  Hathaway  Inc  Class  B 
        Shares. Other than that, however, neither Warren Buffett, Berkshire Hathaway Inc. nor any of their subsidiaries, 
        employees or associates has reviewed the terms of this warrant or was involved in the preparation thereof, or 
        makes any recommendations whatsoever as to its suitability for any persons whatsoever. 

         
    Q4. What is the difference between Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Class A and Class B shares? 

        The  Zero  Strikes  on  Berkshire  Hathaway  are  referenced  to  the  company’s  Class  B  shares.  The  difference 
        between Class A and Class B shares is as follows :  



                                                                4 

                                                                  
FOR INTERNAL INFORMATION ONLY  NOT FOR PUBLIC CIRCULATION                                        PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL 
        “Berkshire Hathaway Inc. has two classes of common stock designated Class A and Class B. A share of 
        Class B common stock has the rights of 1/30th of a share of Class A common stock except that a Class B 
        share has 1/200th of the voting rights of a Class A share (rather than 1/30th of the vote). Each share of a 
        Class  A  common  stock  is  convertible  at  any  time,  at  the  holder’s  option,  into  30  shares  of  Class  B 
        common stock. This conversion privilege does not extend in the opposite direction. That is, holders of 
        Class B shares are not able to convert them into Class A shares.” 

        (source: www.berkshirehathaway.com) 

         
    Q5. Can I buy the underlying shares directly?  

        To  do  so  you  will  require  opening  a  brokers  account  either  overseas  or  locally  that  can  handle  cross  border 
        trading. the cost of one share of the Class B shares was US$2,564 as of 26 February 2009. Since one round lot is 
        ten shares, this means the minimum investment for one lot would be US$25,640. 

 
    Q6. How has been the performance of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Class B shares? 

        Neither  the  issuer  nor  any  member  or  employee  of  the  AmInvestment  Bank  Group  or  AmBank  Group  has 
        performed  any  investigation  or  review  of  Berkshire.  Consequently,  the  issue  of  this  warrant  should  not  be 
        considered as a recommendation by us to invest in Berkshire shares. 

        Strictly for reference purposes only, we reproduce the monthly market price history and annual book value per 
        share of the Class B shares (up to end of February 2009).  These numbers show a rare occasion when the market 
        price is close to book value. 




                                                                                                                                
                                                                                            (source: Bloomberg, annual reports) 
                                                                 5 

                                                                   
FOR INTERNAL INFORMATION ONLY  NOT FOR PUBLIC CIRCULATION                                         PRIVATE AND CONFIDENTIAL 
     

    Q7. What is Warren Buffett’s opinion about the significance of book value? 

          “Meanwhile, we regularly report our per‐share book value, an easily calculable number, though one of limited 
          use. The limitations do not arise from our holdings of marketable securities, which are carried on our books at 
          their  current  prices.  Rather  the  inadequacies  of  book  value  have  to  do  with  the  companies  we  control,  whose 
          values as stated on our books may be far different from their intrinsic values . . .  
           
          . . . Now, our book value far understates Berkshire’s intrinsic value, a point true because many of the businesses 
          we control are worth much more than their carrying value. 
           
. . . Inadequate though they are in telling the story, we give you Berkshire’s book‐value figures because they today serve 
as a rough, albeit significantly understated, tracking measure for Berkshire’s intrinsic value. In other words, the 
percentage change in book value in any given year is likely to be reasonably close to that year’s change in intrinsic 
value.”  (source: Annual Report 2008) 




                                                                  6