I Need a Persuasive Letter to a Judge Template by qmp27830

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									           Center for Performance Assessment
             ”Unwrapped,” Standards-Based
           Performance Assessment Template

                     First Draft
Grade Level: 4


Targeted Content Area(s):
Language Arts
Unit Topic: Persuasive Writing
Authors: Nancy and Deb


School, District, and State:
Pinewood El., Elkhart com. Sch., IN
Phone and E-mail (Preferred, But Optional)


Assessment Title:    The Power of the Pen
Overview of Performance Assessment: (Summary of the
assessment with a brief synopsis of each task)


Students will be introduced to the persuasive writing process
by reading, writing, and critiqueing examples before
producing individual persuasive essays on topics of choice.
Task 1

Students will read several writing samples to discern the key
elements of persuasive writing- strong statement of opinion,

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compelling evidence, relevant facts, and motivating
conclusion.
     Examples: editorials, letters to editors, advertisements,
brochures, children’s literature (I Wanna Iguana)

Task 2

Students will compare and contrast persuasive writing
samples for examples of interesting words and sentence
patterns.
     Ex- Two letters on the same topic from the newspaper.
Task 3

Cooperative groups will compose persuasive essays which
will be scored by the class using the Simple Six rubric.

Task 4

Students will write persuasive essays.


Full Text of Standard(s) and Indicators(s) in Targeted
Content Area:


.
4.5.2 Write responses to literature that:
       demonstrate an understanding of a literary work.
       support statements with evidence from the text.
Example: Write a description of a favorite character in a
      book. Include examples from the book to show why
      this character is such a favorite.




                              2
4.5.4   Write summaries that contain the main ideas of the
        reading selection and the most significant details.
        Example: Write a book review, including enough
        examples and details about the plot, character, and
        setting of the book to describe it to a reader who is
        unfamiliar with it.
4.5.5   Use varied word choices to make writing interesting.
        Example: Write stories using descriptive words in
        place of common words; for instance, use enormous,
        gigantic, or giant for the word big.
4.5.6   Write for different purposes (information, persuasion,
        description) and to a specific audience or person.
        Example: Write a persuasive report for your class
        about your hobby or interest. Use charts or pictures,
        when appropriate, to help motivate your audience to
        take up your hobby or interest.
Research Application
4.5.3   Write or deliver a research report that has been
        developed using a systematic research process
        (defines the topic, gathers information, determines
        credibility, reports findings) and that:
         includes information from a variety of sources
           (books, technology, multimedia) and documents
           sources (titles and authors).
         demonstrates that information that has been
           gathered has been summarized.
         organizes information by categorizing it into
           multiple categories (such as solid, liquid, and gas
           or reduce, reuse, and recycle) or includes
           information gained through observation.
        Example: After talking to local officials and
        conducting library or Internet research, write a report


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        about the history of the different people and
        immigrant groups who settled in Indiana. Include
        information about where these groups came from,
        where they first lived in the state, and what work they
        did.
Standard 6
WRITING: English Language Conventions
Students write using Standard English conventions
appropriate to this grade level.
Handwriting
4.6.1   Write smoothly and legibly in cursive, forming letters
        and words that can be read by others.
Sentence Structure
4.6.2   Use simple sentences (Dr. Vincent Stone is my
        dentist.) and compound sentences (His assistant
        cleans my teeth, and Dr. Stone checks for cavities.)
        in writing.
4.6.3   Create interesting sentences by using words that
        describe, explain, or provide additional details and
        connections, such as verbs, adjectives, adverbs,
        appositives, participial phrases, prepositional
        phrases, and conjunctions.
         Verbs: We strolled by the river.
         Adjectives: brown eyes, younger sisters
         Adverbs: We walked slowly.
         Appositives: noun phrases that function as
           adjectives, such as We played the Cougars, the
           team from Newport.



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         Participial phrases: verb phrases that function as
          adjectives, such as The man walking down the
          street saw the delivery truck.
         Prepositional phrases: in the field, across the
          room, over the fence
         Conjunctions: and, or, but
Grammar
4.6.4   Identify and use in writing regular (live/lived,
        shout/shouted) and irregular verbs (swim/swam,
        ride/rode, hit/hit), adverbs (constantly, quickly), and
        prepositions (through, beyond, between).
Punctuation
4.6.5   Use parentheses to explain something that is not
        considered of primary importance to the sentence,
        commas in direct quotations (He said, “I’d be happy
        to go.”), apostrophes to show possession (Jim’s
        shoes, the dog’s food), and apostrophes in
        contractions (can’t, didn’t, won’t).
4.6.6   Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to identify
        titles of documents.
         When writing by hand or by computer, use
            quotation marks to identify the titles of articles,
            short stories, poems, or chapters of books.
         When writing on a computer italicize the following,
            when writing by hand underline them: the titles of
            books, names of newspapers and magazines,
            works of art, and musical compositions.
Capitalization




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4.6.7   Capitalize names of magazines, newspapers, works
        of art, musical compositions, organizations, and the
        first word in quotations, when appropriate.
Spelling
4.6.8   Spell correctly roots (bases of words, such as
        unnecessary, cowardly), inflections (words like
        care/careful/caring), words with more than one
        acceptable spelling (like advisor/adviser), suffixes
        and prefixes (-ly, -ness, mis-, un-), and syllables
        (word parts each containing a vowel sound, such as
        sur•prise or e•col•o•gy).




Related Interdisciplinary Standard(s) and Indicators(s):
Standard 4
WRITING: Processes and Features
Students write clear sentences and paragraphs that develop
a central idea. Students progress through the stages of the



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writing process, including prewriting, drafting, revising, and
editing multiple drafts.
Organization and Focus
4.4.1   Discuss ideas for writing. Find ideas for writing in
        conversations with others and in books, magazines,
        newspapers, school textbooks, or on the Internet.
        Keep a list or notebook of ideas.
4.4.2   Select a focus, an organizational structure, and a
        point of view based upon purpose, audience, length,
        and format requirements for a piece of writing.
4.4.3   Write informational pieces with multiple paragraphs
        that:
         provide an introductory paragraph.
         establish and support a central idea with a topic
           sentence at or near the beginning of the first
           paragraph.
         include supporting paragraphs with simple facts,
           details, and explanations.
         present important ideas or events in sequence or
           in chronological order.
         provide details and transitions to link paragraphs.
         conclude with a paragraph that summarizes the
           points.
         use correct indention at the beginning of
           paragraphs.
4.4.4   Use logical organizational structures for providing
        information in writing, such as chronological order,
        cause and effect, similarity and difference, and
        posing and answering a question.
Research Process and Technology


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4.4.5   Quote or paraphrase information sources, citing them
        appropriately.
4.4.6   Locate information in reference texts by using
        organizational features, such as prefaces and
        appendixes.
4.4.7   Use multiple reference materials and online
        information (the Internet) as aids to writing.
4.4.8   Understand the organization of almanacs,
        newspapers, and periodicals and how to use those
        print materials.
4.4.9   Use a computer to draft, revise, and publish writing,
        demonstrating basic keyboarding skills and familiarity
        with common computer terminology.
Evaluation and Revision
4.4.10 Review, evaluate, and revise writing for meaning and
       clarity.
4.4.11 Proofread one’s own writing, as well as that of
       others, using an editing checklist or set of rules, with
       specific examples of corrections of frequent errors.
4.4.12 Revise writing by combining and moving sentences
       and paragraphs to improve the focus and
       progression of ideas.



Standard 5
WRITING: Applications (Different Types of Writing and
Their Characteristics)
At Grade 4, students are introduced to writing informational
reports and responses to literature. Students continue to
write compositions that describe and explain familiar objects,
events, and experiences. Student writing demonstrates a

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command of Standard English and the drafting, research,
and organizational strategies outlined in Standard 4 —
Writing Processes and Features. Writing demonstrates an
awareness of the audience (intended reader) and purpose
for writing.




              ―Unwrapping‖ Content Standard(s)
Grade Level and Content Area: 4th gr. Writing



Standard(s) and Indicators by Number: Standards 5 and 6
4.5.2 ,4.5.5, 4.5.6 and 4.6.2, 4.6.3, 4.6.4



Concepts: Need to Know About Persuasive Writing
     Persuasive statement
              Evidence from text


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             Varied word choices

            1. Verbs
            2. Adjectives
            3. Adverbs
            4. Appositives
            5. Participial phrases
            6. Prepositional phrases
            7. Conjunctions
             Specific audience
             Simple and compound sentences
             Interesting sentence patterns
             Regular and irregular verbs


Skills: Be Able to Do


   Write to persuade to a specific audience (Evaluation)
   Support statements with evidence from text (Apply)
   Use varied word choices to make writing interesting
    (Synthesis)
   Use simple and compound sentences (Apply)
   Create interesting sentences that describe, explain,
    provide additional details, connections, using verbs,
    adjs., advs., appositives, participial phrases,
    prepositional phrases, and conjunctions (Synthesis)




                             10
Topics or Context: (What you will use to teach concepts
and skills—particular unit, lessons, activities)




                            11
                Identifying Big Ideas from
            Unwrapped Standard and Indicators
1. State a clear position.


2. Support position with relevant and compelling details.


3. Focus on your audience.


4. Capture reader’s interest.




            Essential Questions from Big Ideas to
             Guide Instruction and Assessment
1. How do we convince someone?


2. How do you prove that you’re right?


3. Who do you think you’re talking to?


4. How do writers attract readers?
                ―Engaging Scenario‖ Planning
Include elements of an effective Engaging Scenario:


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       Presents students with a challenge
       Connects learning to real life – ―Why do we need to
     learn this?‖
       Conveys importance – ―What does this mean to the
     student personally?‖
       Acknowledges audience – ―Can the student present
     the completed task to others?‖




           Engaging Scenario (Full description):


What concerns you? What do you worry about? What do
you wish you could change?

Make a list with your cooperative learning group of your Top
Ten Wishes.

You do not have a magic lamp, but you DO have the Power
of the Pen!


Write a persuasive essay to someone who could make one
of your wishes come true. Who will you write to? How will
you convince them? How will you prove that you are right?
How will you keep them listening to your idea?




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Task 1 Planning Guide (―SQUARE‖ – Key Elements to
Include in the Design of a Standards-Based Performance
Task)
Which STANDARD(s) and Indicators Will This Task Target?
4.5.2 persuasive statement, evidence from text
4.5.6 write for purpose of persuasion to specific audience


Which Essential QUESTION Will This Task Address?
How do we convince someone?
How do you prove that you’re right?

Who do you think you’re talking to?

Which UNWRAPPED Concepts and Skills Will This Task
Develop?
Identify: Persuasive statement
          Evidence from text
          Specific audience


What APPLICATION of Learning Will This Task Require?
(What will the students actually do or produce in this task?)
Read persuasive writing samples



                               14
What Instruction, Information, and RESOURCES (including
Technology Connections and Related URLs) Will Students
Need First?
Read editorials, letters to editors, advertisements, brochures,
children’s literature



What Individual EVIDENCE of Learning Will This Task
Provide? (How will you know by the work students produce
what they have learned relative to this task?)
The key elements of persuasive writing will be present,
which will help provide the focus for task 2.
Task 1 Complete Description (The Full Details of What
Students Will Do in This Task)


With your partner, read the persuasive writing examples.
Using highlighters, mark statements of opinion, relevant
facts, and evidence of audience.




                              15
Task 1 – Scoring Guide
Exemplary:
              All Proficient Criteria Met PLUS:




Proficient:




                                  16
Progressing:



Not Yet Meeting Standard(s) and Indicators(s):



Peer Evaluation (Optional) _____
Self-Evaluation _____________
Teacher Evaluation- Evidence of selective hi-lighting
presented by partners to the class.
Comments__________________
Task 2 Planning Guide (―SQUARE‖ – Key Elements to
Include in the Design of a Standards-Based Performance
Task)
Which STANDARD(s) and Indicators Will This Task Target?




Which Essential QUESTION Will This Task Address?
How do we convince someone?
How do you prove that you’re right?

                             17
Who do you think you are talking to?

Which UNWRAPPED Concepts and Skills Will This Task
Develop?
Compare and contrast elements of persuasive writing.


What APPLICATION of Learning Will This Task Require?
(What will the students actually do or produce in this task?)


What Instruction, Information, and RESOURCES (including
Technology Connections and Related URLs) Will Students
Need First?




What Individual EVIDENCE of Learning Will This Task
Provide? (How will you know by the work students produce
what they have learned relative to this task?)
Task 2 Complete Description (The Full Details of What
Students Will Do in This Task)
Using the two letters to the Editor on the same topic, make a
Venn diagram comparing and contrasting statements of
opinion, relevant facts, and phrases to grab the audience.




                              18
Task 2 – Scoring Guide
Exemplary:




Proficient:




                         19
Progressing:



Not Yet Meeting Standard(s) and Indicators(s):



Peer Evaluation (Optional) _____
Self-Evaluation _____________
Teacher Evaluation - Cooperative learning groups present
venn diagrams to the class for discussion. Diagrams will be
collected and scored on a pass/fail basis.
Comments__________________
Task 3 Planning Guide (―SQUARE‖ – Key Elements to
Include in the Design of a Standards-Based Performance
Task)
Which STANDARD(s) and Indicators Will This Task Target?




                             20
Which Essential QUESTION Will This Task Address?
Questions 1-4
Which UNWRAPPED Concepts and Skills Will This Task
Develop?
Use varied word choices to make writing interesting
Use simple and compound sentences

Write to a specific audience.

Include details.


What APPLICATION of Learning Will This Task Require?
(What will the students actually do or produce in this task?)


What Instruction, Information, and RESOURCES (including
Technology Connections and Related URLs) Will Students
Need First?




What Individual EVIDENCE of Learning Will This Task
Provide? (How will you know by the work students produce
what they have learned relative to this task?)
Task 3 Complete Description (The Full Details of What
Students Will Do in This Task)
Brainstorm with your cooperative group about how to
convince Miss Shaw to give Pinewood Panthers longer
recess periods. Remember to make a strong statement of

                                21
opinion, and plan relevant facts and other details to support
your viewpoint.
Make a wordbank of interesting words as you plan your
persuasive essay.

Choose a recorder, a time keeper, ―word finder‖,and a
discussion leader.

When you are ready to write the discussion leader will
ensure that all ideas are listened to while the recorder writes
the draft.

The entire class will evaluate your essay for the key points of
the Simple Six Rubric.




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Task 3 – Scoring Guide
Exemplary:




Proficient:




Progressing:




                         23
Not Yet Meeting Standard(s) and Indicators(s):



Peer Evaluation (Optional) __Class scores group persuasive
essay using Simple Six rubric.
Self-Evaluation _____________
Teacher Evaluation __________
Comments___Essays are delivered to building principals.
Task 4 Planning Guide (―SQUARE‖ – Key Elements to
Include in the Design of a Standards-Based Performance
Task)
Which STANDARD(s) and Indicators Will This Task Target?




Which Essential QUESTION Will This Task Address?
Questions 1-4
Which UNWRAPPED Concepts and Skills Will This Task
Develop?
Persuasive statement
             Evidence from text
             Varied word choices



                             24
             8. Verbs
             9. Adjectives
             10.    Adverbs
             11.    Appositives
             12.    Participial phrases
             13.    Prepositional phrases
             14.    Conjunctions
              Specific audience
              Simple and compound sentences
              Interesting sentence patterns
              Regular and irregular verbs


Skills: Be Able to Do


   Write to persuade to a specific audience (Evaluation)
   Support statements with evidence from text (Apply)
   Use varied word choices to make writing interesting
    (Synthesis)
Use simple and compound sentences (Apply)
Create interesting sentences that describe, explain, provide
additional details, connections, using verbs, adjs., advs.
Appositives, participial phrases, prepositional phrases, and
conjunctions (Synthesis)


What APPLICATION of Learning Will This Task Require?
(What will the students actually do or produce in this task?)


What Instruction, Information, and RESOURCES (including
Technology Connections and Related URLs) Will Students
Need First?


                              25
What Individual EVIDENCE of Learning Will This Task
Provide? (How will you know by the work students produce
what they have learned relative to this task?)
Task 4 Complete Description (The Full Details of What
Students Will Do in This Task)
Students will brainstorm topics of interest that they would like
to influence. Topics and connected resources will be listed
on a class chart.


Students will choose their individual topics and put relevant
resource sites and information in their key point binders.
Using the library, the internet, and interviews, they will
compile notes and evidence to support their view.

A strong introductory statement and essay outline will be
prepared during a planning period. Students will then be
given time to draft an introduction, body, and conclusion in
three paragraphs or more.

During revision and rewriting, dictionaries and thesauruses
will be provided. Opportunities will be given for peer sharing
and editing.

Students will then write a final draft to take to a teacher
writing conference for assessment.

A final copy will be published and mailed to the appropriate
audience.



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Task 4 – Scoring Guide
Exemplary:



     Two or more references are cited in the essay.

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     Five or six of the Simple Six criteria are met.




Proficient:
      Correct format of persuasive essay including
     introductory paragraph, body of essay, and concluding
     paragraph.
     Introduction includes strong introductory statement of
     main idea.
          Body of report includes 3 subtopics which are
     relevant factual statements that support the writer’s
     opinion.
              Each subtopic must have 3 supporting details.
          The conclusion restates and summarizes the
     writer’s main idea.
              A published reference is cited in the essay.
      o 4 of the Simple Six Criteria are met.
      o 3 of the 4 Language in Use Conventions are met.



Progressing:
      One to three of the proficient criteria are not met.


Not Yet Meeting Standard(s) and Indicators(s):
              Four or more of the proficient criteria are not met.


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Peer Evaluation (Optional) _____
Self-Evaluation _____________
Teacher Evaluation __________
Comments__________________
Teacher Reflections at Conclusion of Performance
Assessment:
    1. What Worked? What Didn’t?




    2. What Will I Do Differently Next Time?




    3. What Student Work Samples Do I Have for Each
       Task? What Scoring Guide Examples of Proficiency
       Do I Have for Each Task?




                             29
4. What Field Notes Can I Provide for Other Teachers
   Who May Use This Performance Assessment?




                        30
31
                   Bloom’s Taxonomy

         Definitions
         Verbs that express varying levels of understanding
         Appropriate responses

1. Knowledge – Remembering facts
  Verbs: Know, define, memorize, record, name, recognize
  Describe ________________________________.
  Who? What? Where? When? How?
2. Comprehension – Understanding the meaning
  Verbs: Discuss, relate, clarify, explain,
  Retell in your own words ____________________.
  What is the main idea of ____________________?
3. Application – Using what you know in a new situation
  Verbs: Translate, interpret, demonstrate, dramatize,
  practice
  Why is __________ significant?
4. Analysis – Examining specific parts of information
  Verbs: Distinguish, analyze, differentiate, solve, examine
  Classify _______ according to ________________.
  Compare and contrast _____________ and
  _______________.
5. Synthesis – Combing ideas in a new way
  Verbs: Compose, plan, propose, formulate, arrange
  What could you predict from ______?
  What solutions would you suggest from _____________?



                             32
6. Evaluation – Developing opinions, judgments, or
decisions
  Verbs: Judge, appraise, evaluate, estimate, select
  Do you agree with _____?
  Prioritize _________.
  What is the most important _______________?




            Performance Assessment Roles

         Sample Roles for Students to Simulate

Advertising                       Journalist
Applicant                         Judge
Architect                         Jury Member
Artist                            Lawyer
Athlete                           Musician
Autobiographer                    Newscaster
Biographer                        Parent
Business Person                   Photographer
Campaign Worker                   Photojournalist
Cartographer                      Playwright
Cartoonist                        Poet
Character, Book/Movie             Police Officer
Chef                              Reporter
Citizen                           Researcher
Coach                             Set Designer
Collector                         Software Developer
Consumer                          Speech Writer
Consumer Advocate                 Stock Broker
Contractor                        Student

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Curator                        Teacher
Detective                      Textbook Publisher
Editor                         Tour Guide
Engineer                       Travel Agent
Executive                      Tutor
Famous Person
Farmer
Inventor




         Performance Assessment Products
 Sample Products That Students May Make or Produce

Advertising Campaign
Anthem
Anthologies
Autobiography
Brochure
Business Letter
Business Plans
Committee Board Members
Consumer Newsletter
Debate
Designs for Experiments
Diorama
Ecosystem
Eulogy

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Fable
Fashion Show
Film Review
Food Critique
Friendly Letter
GAME
Graphs
How-To Directions
HyperStudio
Inventions
Journals
Judge’s Decision
Lab Report
Lawyer’s Argument
Maps
Observation Logs
Panel Discussion
Personal Narrative
Persuasive Letter
Models
Movie or short film
Museum Exhibit
Newspaper
Prequel
Proposal
Puppet Show
Quilt
Reaction Paper
Scrapbook
Sculpture
Short Story
Slide Show
Symphony
Tall Tales


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Technical Manual
Travel Journals
Website




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