Monday Morning Memo January by mikeholy

VIEWS: 26 PAGES: 17

									                                    Monday Morning Memo
                                      January 29, 2007
                                     www.arccalifornia.org
                                          (916) 552-6619

                                      Week in Review

Tuesday January 23, 2007
We participated in webinar training for State & Local Chapter Executive Directors of The Arc
on Minimum Wage Legislation. Congress has identified raising the minimum wage as a
priority and two states, Arizona and Nevada, have raised the minimum wage without the
provision for an exemption to pay a sub-minimum wage for people with developmental
disabilities. Proponents argue that it is a matter of civil rights and that no citizen should be
paid less than the minimum allowed by the government. Opponents argue that without this
provision many people with developmental disabilities will not be able to earn money in today’s
competitive employment market. This discussion was moderated by David Mank, Ph.D.,
Indiana University and included Paul Marchand of the Disability Policy Collaboration. To view
the legislative language addressing this issue check out the following links:
    1. Full Text of Nevada Minimum Wage Legislation:
        http://www.ceridian.com/www/content/10/12455/12486/12775/nevada_ballot_initiative_q
        uestion_6.pdf
    2. Arguments for and against Nevada Ballot Question 6
        http://www.sos.state.nv.us/nvelection/2004_bq/bq6.htm
    3. Proposed AZ Legislation Amending Minimum Wage Law:
        http://www.azleg.gov/FormatDocument.asp?inDoc=/legtext/48leg/1r/bills/hb2318p.htm

Wednesday January 24, 2007
The Partners in Policymaking Collaborative met by conference call to follow-up on the
application process, session development, and action planning for next steps – see the Status
Report below for details.

The Senate Rules Committee, Chaired by Senator Don Perata held a confirmation hearing on
the Governor’s appointment to the director position of DDS, Terri Delgadillo, and for Deputy
Secretary of Health and Human Services Agency, Ann Boynton. Both appointees passed
through the Rules Committee. Our President, Shirley Dove, provided testimony in strong
support of the appointment of Ms. Delgadillo and several other advocates and professionals
also spoke in support – there was no opposition. It was noted by committee members and
several advocates that Ms. Delgadillo is the most qualified person for this job. Most of the
questions from the committee were focused on items of concern regarding the developmental
centers.

Thursday January 25, 2007

                                                                              Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                 The Arc of California
                                                                        January 22, 2007, page 1 of 17
                                                                     Tony Anderson, Executive Director
We attended the Mental Health Task Force meeting of the Association of Regional Center
Agencies and the County Mental Health Directors, co-chaired by Carlos Flores, Executive
Director of the San Diego Regional Center and Joan Hoss of the Mental Health Directors
Association. The task force consultants, Beth Robey and Dave Riester recently had a
meeting in Ventura County, the only region without an MOU between the regional center and
county Mental Health, to better understand the barriers and to see if they might be helpful in
mediating a resolution. Though many involved were interested in addressing the barriers no
progress was made at this time. On another note, committee co-chair Joan Hoss, Mental
Health Directors Association, described a recent meeting with Phil Bonent, the new Executive
Director of Alta CA Regional Center (ACRA) as very positive and said she is looking forward to
this new working relationship between her county and of ACRA. Regarding the Mental Health
budget, the good news is that the governor’s budget is projecting more revenues than
anticipated in Proposition 63 Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) funding but the bad news is
that the general Mental Health budget has continued to be less than required to maintain their
base services. Throughout the state several counties are laying off workers in mental health
while at the same time they hiring in their new programs funded by the MHSA and the
governor is proposing to cut the Mental Health Homeless Program from the general fund citing
the availability of MHSA funds. Finally the counties are impacted by two other issues. First
the 2003 MediCal rate cut of 5% was restored to fee for service providers, then to managed
care, but the county managed care was not reimbursed, and second, many counties have a
serious cash flow problem because the state has not paid the state share or federal share in
several months due to an accounting error – the Mental Health Directors Association is
working with the Department of Mental Health to solve this issue quickly.

Friday January 26, 2007 – Saturday January 27, 2007
The California Conference of Executives (CCE) of The Arc and the board of directors for The
Arc of California held their quarterly meetings in Los Angeles. Both boards engaged in
extensive dialogue, debate, and deliberation over developing a statement to communicate our
commitment to upholding the person-centered individual program plans while at the same time
expressing our belief that we have a moral obligation to achieve inclusion and full participation
of all people with intellectual and other developmental disabilities. While this seems simple it
was very important that we be very clear about this statement so that it does not get
misconstrued to mean anything else. We will disseminate the document to our membership
and publish it publically in February. We discussed the initial results of the workforce survey
conducted a few months ago and several chapters pledged to help finance the next step in our
Social Marketing campaign. This next step includes conducting focus groups using the
knowledge and skills of an experienced marketing expert. “Social marketing seeks to influence
social behaviors not to benefit the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general
society." To learn more about social marketing visit this site: http://www.social-
marketing.com/Whatis.html. The board also agreed to enter into an affinity relationship with
Aflac which will provide a member benefit to each of our chapter’s employees and to all
members within our association. The board reviewed proposed bylaw changes, employee
policy changes, committed funding for the People First of California Conference, committed
funding for our representatives on the national board to attend the Public Policy conference in
Washington DC, and made an appeal for the offices of secretary and treasurer for the slate of
nominees for our elections in April. If you’re a member of The Arc of California and would like
to run for office please contact our office (916) 552-6619.


                                                                              Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                 The Arc of California
                                                                        January 22, 2007, page 2 of 17
                                                                     Tony Anderson, Executive Director
                                      The Week Ahead
Monday January 29, 2007
The Senate will conduct “Floor Appointments” for Ann Boynton for Deputy Secretary, Health
and Human Services Agency and Terri Delgadillo for Director, Department of Developmental
Services during the floor session at 2:00 PM.

The Leadership Institute of the National Conference of Executives (NCE) of The Arc will be
meeting to follow up on our executive leadership program. We currently offer a training
manual and webinars for executive of The Arc and we are conducting interest and feasibility
studies focused on developing pod casts and integrating executive training into the College of
Direct Support.

The Alta California Regional Center Supported Living Training Network will host PATH and
Community-Building workshops with David and Faye Wetherow through Tuesday in
Sacramento. This workshop will be a hands-on course; participants will practice PATH,
Solution Circles, tools for resolving values conflicts, and graphic recording - some of the most
valued organizational and person-centered planning tools in use today. For more information
and registration forms for the event visit their website at:
http://www.communityworks.info/workshops.htm.

Tuesday January 30, 2007
We will be participating in the California Coalition for Compassionate Care workgroup on
Developmental Disabilities as part of our ongoing attention to end of life issues. Also as part of
this work the Association of Regional Center Agencies will be hosting a small conference in
Sacramento and we will support this effort.

The State Council on Developmental Disabilities (SCDD), chaired by Sascha Bittner, will be
meeting at the Doubletree Hotel, 2001 Point West Way in Sacramento from Tuesday through
Wednesday. On Tuesday SCDD will have an extensive overview of the Governor’s proposed
budget with reports by the SCDD staff and the directors or designees from Health and Human
Services Agency, Department of Aging, Department of Developmental Services, Department
of Health Services, Department of Rehabilitation, and the Department of Education (these
departments have representatives on SCDD). Later they will give an update on SB 1270, the
2007 NACDD Annual Conference, Committee reports, and their joint legislative principles
developed with the Protection and Advocacy and the University Centers for Excellence on
Developmental Disabilities. They will end with a presentation on health care for people with
disabilities and a review of the poster art contest.

Wednesday January 31, 2007
The State Council on Developmental Disabilities (SCDD), chaired by Sascha Bittner, will
continue their meeting in Sacramento and will have an update on the State Plan, State Plan
outcomes, and their strategic planning efforts. The Arc of California will provide a presentation
on the status of two Council-funded projects, Partners in Policymaking and the College of
Direct Support.

Thursday February 1, 2007

                                                                               Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                  The Arc of California
                                                                         January 22, 2007, page 3 of 17
                                                                      Tony Anderson, Executive Director
I will be meeting with Martin Sweeney, the project manager of the AT Network, to discuss
possible collaboration and outreach on assistive technology information. The AT Network is a
project funded through the Tech Act and the Department of Rehabilitation. The Alliance for
Technology Access contracted to manage and expand the AT Network. To learn more about
the AT Network visit www.atnet.org and to learn more about the Alliance for Technology
Access visit their site at: www.ataccess.org.

The California Disability Community Action Network will be hosting a teleconference on
“Affordable and Accessible Housing and Transportation” from 1:00 PM to 2:30 PM. The call-in
number is 1-800-608-4143 – check their website to confirm in case changes were made:
www.cdcan.us.

As part of the state’s planning as required by the Mental Health Services Act, the California
Department of Mental Health (DMH) will hold a statewide conference call on “Prevention and
Early Intervention” from 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm. To participate call the toll-free number at: (866)
296-6505; Verbal passcode: MHSA; TTY toll-free dial-in: #1-800-735-2929. Additional
information regarding this meeting and others visit the MHSA website at:
http://www.dmh.ca.gov/MHSA/meetings.asp.

Friday February 2, 2007 - Happy Groundhog Day.
According to legend, if Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow, there will be six more weeks of
winter weather. If he does not see his shadow, there will be an early spring.

                                                 Action Alerts1
The Arc of California
Last Friday was the last day to submit bills to the Office of Legislative Counsel which is our
trigger to begin studying the bills for potential legislation. Our Public Policy committee will
begin the review process throughout February and March and will complete our first positions
on bills by the end of March. We presented the budget overview report to the board of
directors of The Arc of California which can be found at:
http://www.arccalifornia.org/GA%20Committee/Governor%20Schwarzenegger’s%.
We have finally completed our committee roster report for the committee listings of the Senate
and Assembly, including the chairs and vice chairs, members, and the staff contact information
for each committee we are likely to work with this year. We received a couple more volunteers
this week for our Policy Partners List to match advocates with legislators. Visit our bill file
webpage to view the committee list: http://www.arccalifornia.org/BillFile2006.htm. Remember,
if you would like to be included in our “Policy Partner List” please email me at:
tanderson@arccalifornia.org and let me know your zip code.

The Arc of the U.S.
Less than two weeks left to get the early registration discount for the 2007 Disability Policy
Seminar. Check out this week's Capitol Insider for more information and register today. To
download this week's Capitol Insider (CI), start by clicking the following link (or cutting and
pasting it into your Web browser):

1
 To access the Action Alert system from The Arc of California website (www.arccalifornia.org) enter your zip code in the
“Contact Congress” federal box.
                                                                                                  Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                                     The Arc of California
                                                                                           January 22, 2007, page 4 of 17
                                                                                       Tony Anderson, Executive Director
Capitol Insider
Vol. 12, Issue 5, January 29, 2007
http://www.thearc.org/ppc/capinsider.doc
Today's CI has updates on:
   1. State of the Union Address
   2. Minimum Wage
   3. Social Security
   4. Employment
   5. Voting Rights
   6. Department of Justice
   7. House Schedule
   8. Fiscal Year 2007 Spending
   9. Federal Budget
   10. Medicaid/Medicare
   11. IDEA and NCLB
   12. Emergency Management
   13. Genetic Information Non-Discrimination

                                 Project Status Report
Partners in Policymaking
By Jordan Lindsey (funded by the State Council on Developmental Disabilities (SCDD))
The applications have been rolling in for this year's Partners class and we're expecting many
more in the next two weeks. Friends and colleagues have been voicing their support and
enthusiasm for the program which has added momentum to this application process. We are
tremendously excited to announce the confirmation of Colleen Wieck as our main speaker for
the first session. Colleen was the founding architect of the Partners program, which began 20
years ago in Minnesota and has since graduated over 13,000 partners worldwide. She will be
speaking on the history and progress of disability services and support. Once again,
applications for the 2007 Partners program are available at
http://www.arccalifornia.org/PIPCC.htm, and remember, this year only applicants from the
following Northern California counties will be accepted: Sierra, Placer, El Dorado, Alpine,
Nevada, Yuba, Sutter, Sacramento, Colusa, Yolo, Del Norte, Humboldt, Mendocino, Lake,
Sonoma, Napa, Solano, Marin, San Francisco, Contra Costa, Alameda, Siskiyou, Trinity,
Shasta, Tehama, Glen, Butte, Trinity, Plumas, Lassen, and Modoc counties. (Alta CA Regional
Center, Redwood Coast Regional Center, Far Northern Regional Center, North Bay Regional
Center, Regional Center of the East Bay, Golden Gate Regional Center, Area Boards 1-5).

California College of Direct Support
By Sack Keophimane (funded by SCDD)
We met with Kim Olson, Executive Director of Alpha Resource Center of Santa Barbara, and
provided her a brief report on CDS and our progress on the pilot project as well. We also gave
presentations to Mary Beth Leprowsky, Organizational Development Manager of Tri-Counties
Regional Center, Joe Montez, Quality Assurance Specialist for Residential Programs of
Westside Regional Center, and Ada Conner, Program Director at Alpha Resource Center of
Santa Barbara. The presentations were productive. We talked about the purpose and goals of
the CDS pilot project and how the consumers, families, DSPs, and vendors can use the
program. Mary Beth was impressed with the CDS coursework and excited to learn more on
                                                                            Monday Morning Memo
                                                                               The Arc of California
                                                                      January 22, 2007, page 5 of 17
                                                                   Tony Anderson, Executive Director
how she can incorporate her training materials onto the learning system and feels that the
CDS program would be a valuable training tool for the service providers in their region. We
gave a presentation on the College of Direct Support at the Program Managers meeting at
Independent Way in Hayward, CA. It was a good opportunity for us to share information on
CDS and talk about our program and its benefits. We also communicated with Jeff Ross, who
is the Director of Student Services at Taft Community College in Bakersfield. We’re happy to
report that Jeff and his colleagues have completed the full CDS course outline and are in the
process of submitting the curriculum to his committee for approval. The CDS curriculum would
lead to an on-line Associates of Arts degree for students and DSPs to achieve who are
enrolled in the college. We continued to reach out to the regional centers who have indicated
an interest in the pilot project and so far we have connected with and are working together in
designing a program for Redwood Coast Regional Center, Golden Gate Regional Center,
North Bay Regional Center, Valley Mountain Regional Center, Kern County Regional Center,
Central Valley Regional Center, Tri-Counties Regional Center, and Westside Regional Center.
All of these regional centers are at an implementation planning stage. Upcoming and pending
meetings:
    1. Far Northern Regional Center 1/30/07
    2. Taft Community College, Jeff Ross, 1/31/07
    3. Tri-Counties Regional Center, Telephone conference with Mary Beth Leprowsky
        2/06/07
    4. East Bay Regional Center 2/20/07
    5. San Andreas Regional Center (Setting Appointment)
    6. Alta California Regional Center (Setting Appointment)
Finally the national office of the College of Direct Support recently published the latest
newsletter. We encourage everyone to check this out, there is some exciting news about
another state coming on board to provide the training statewide:
http://www.arccalifornia.org/CA_CDS/CDS%20Times%20Jan%202007.doc

                                       Upcoming Events

February 5th – 6th 2007
The Association of Regional Center Agencies presents A New Day 2007: Exploring Inclusive
Alternatives to Traditional Strategies for Living and Working February 5th & 6th, 2007 in San
Diego, CA. For more information call Irene Griego at 916-446-7961 or visit their website at:
http://www.arcanet.org/pdfs/brochure.pdf

February 4, 2007
The Arc South Bay is sponsoring a Super Bowl Opportunity Drawing. The grand prize is two
tickets to Super Bowl XLI (game is February 4, 2007 in Miami, Florida), 4 nights lodging
(February 1-5 at the Courtyard by Marriott) and r/t airfare. Each ticket is $20 with only 650 to
be sold (great odds!) Please contact the Arc South Bay at (310) 532-6333 to obtain tickets or
for additional information.

February 6th 2007
SAVE THE DATES: California Department of Mental Health (DMH) Mental Health Services Act
Upcoming Stakeholders Conference Calls, General Stakeholders Meetings and Special Topic
Workgroups General Stakeholders Meeting – Southern California on: Prevention and Early
Intervention Hyatt Regency Irvine 17900 Jamboree Road Irvine 92614 from 9:30 am – 1:00
                                                                               Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                  The Arc of California
                                                                         January 22, 2007, page 6 of 17
                                                                      Tony Anderson, Executive Director
pm. (Contact number: (949) 975-1234.). Additional information regarding meeting sites will
be provided as soon as possible. Watch the MHSA Website for details:
http://www.dmh.ca.gov/MHSA/meetings.asp.

February 9th 2007
SAVE THE DATES: California Department of Mental Health (DMH) Mental Health Services Act
Upcoming Stakeholders Conference Calls, General Stakeholders Meetings and Special Topic
Workgroups. General Stakeholders Meeting – Northern California on: Prevention and Early
Intervention Waterfront Plaza Hotel Ten Washington Street Oakland 94607 from 9:30 AM -
1:00 PM (Contact number: (510) 836-3800.) Additional information regarding meeting sites will
be provided as soon as possible. Watch the MHSA Website for details:
http://www.dmh.ca.gov/MHSA/meetings.asp.

Saturday, February 10, 2007
 VoiceforLiving.com, an educational Web site designed to help families and caregivers learn
about Augmentative and Assistive Communications (AAC) technology and available funding,
will present Voice for Los Angeles. This free technology, health and information fair will be
held the Sheraton Pasadena Hotel, 3303 East Cordova Street in Pasadena from 9:30 a.m until
12:30 p.m. Doors open at 9 a.m. Spanish translation will be available. It is estimated that
almost 150,000 people in the five-county Los Angeles area have severe speech difficulties,
and three out of four of these individuals could benefit from an AAC device. Unfortunately,
only one percent of adults and six percent of children who could use AAC do. Voice for Los
Angeles will include presentations from speech/language professionals, augmented
communicators and their families, and funding specialists as well as financial planners from
event co-sponsor Mass Mutual. Families can experience the hands-on device showcase and
enjoy children’s activities, refreshments and childcare. Contact: Patrick Mangus 412-279-4500

February 19th – 21st 2007
Tierra Del Sol Foundation will host PATH and Community-Building workshops with David and
Faye Wetherow in Burbank, CA. This workshop will be a hands-on course, participants will
practice PATH, Solution Circles, tools for resolving values conflicts, and graphic recording -
some of the most valued organizational and person-centered planning tools in use today. For
more information and registration forms for this event visit their website at:
http://www.communityworks.info/workshops.htm.

March 4 - 6, 2007
The Arc of the United States, United Cerebral Palsy, AAMR, the Association of University
Centers on Disability and the National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities
are joining together again to host the 2007 Disability Policy Seminar. It is critical that the
disability community and other interested participants from around the country participate in
this seminar. Preserving and strengthening the federal policies and programs important to
people with disabilities is our top priority. The Disability Policy Collaboration, with these
national leading organizations in field of mental retardation, cerebral palsy and related
disabilities, brings together state and local executives and affiliates, self-advocates, families,
providers and others, for a two-day intense public policy discussion/ meeting that is focused
solely on issues affecting people with disabilities and their families. On the third and final day,
participants will go to Capitol Hill to deliver a unified message that Congress and the
Administration cannot continue dismantling the benefits and services important to the disability
                                                                                Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                   The Arc of California
                                                                          January 22, 2007, page 7 of 17
                                                                       Tony Anderson, Executive Director
community. A preliminary seminar agenda, seminar registration information and hotel
registration information for the 2007 Seminar will available in late fall/early winter. In addition
to the 2007 Seminar, please mark your calendars for the 2008 Disability Policy Seminar
(March 2 – 4) at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, 400 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington, DC
20001. The Hyatt Regency Hotel, 400 New Jersey Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20001

March 25th, 2007
The 2nd Annual Forum for the College of Direct Support Administrators from 11:00 – 4:00pm
in San Diego. Please contact Donna Kosak at the CDS at 1-877-353-2767 (toll free) or email
her at donna@collegeofdirectsupport.com if you plan to attend. The College of Direct Support
(CDS) will host its 2nd Annual Administrators’ Forum on Sunday, March 25, during the opening
day of ANCOR’s Management Practices Conference in San Diego. The Forum will be
presented from 11 am to 4pm and will include a free lunch. The forum is open to anyone who
wants to learn more about the CDS. The session, open to ANCOR members and non-
members alike, will provide informative updates on the CDS, a time to share best practices
and insights into how other organizations are using the CDS and will include an expanded
Q&A session. Seating is limited, so please contact Donna Kosak at the CDS at 1-877-353-
2767 (toll free) or email her at donna@collegeofdirectsupport.com if you plan to attend. You
do not have to be an ANCOR member to attend the conference. Participants in the College of
Direct Support Administrators’ Forum will receive the ANCOR member registration rate for the
conference.

March 25-27th, 2007
ANCOR’s Management Practices Conference: San Diego is the Place to Be! ANCOR is
pleased to be holding its annual Management Practices Conference from March 25-27th in San
Diego. Designed for upper-level managers providing services and supports to individuals with
disabilities, this conference is the must meeting for organizations seeking innovative practices,
cutting-edge business solutions and a national network committed to providing quality supports
and services to individuals with disabilities. This two-day conference will feature national
experts and panels focused on addressing critical issues within the four areas of Leadership,
Human Resources, Business Practices and Consumer Self-Direction. ANCOR wants to hear
from Californians during this 2 ½ day conference and has developed two distinct opportunities
especially for you:
    1. For those interested in learning more about the College of Direct Support, there will be
        the CDS Administrators Forum from 11am-4pm on Sunday, March 25th. Anyone
        attending this event will receive the ANCOR member registration rate for the
        Management Practices Conference, a savings of nearly $300! Attending the conference
        will enable you to gain first-hand knowledge of who the ANCOR members are, the
        range of supports and services they provide and the innovative ways they are tackling
        the leadership, workforce and other challenges facing the disabilities field.
    2. For those who can’t come to the conference but want to gain critical information on how
        to effectively conduct behavioral interviews, work with labor interests to achieve positive
        outcomes, or create an engaged workforce where multiple ideas are generated and
        evaluated, ANCOR is pleased to offer 3 in-depth pre-conference sessions for $100/
        person.
    3. Even better, those attending the pre-conference session are invited to stay for the
        interactive and engaging keynote Meeting the Leadership Challenge by Bodine
        Bolasco! Possessing a client list comprised of many of the Fortune 100 and recently
        named “One of the Top 21 Speakers for the 21st Century” you won’t want to miss
                                                                                 Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                    The Arc of California
                                                                           January 22, 2007, page 8 of 17
                                                                        Tony Anderson, Executive Director
        Bodine as he challenges attendees to ask what they give in exchange when they ask
        more from their staff!
For further information on ANCOR’s Management Practices Conference, see the official
conference page at http://www.ancor.org/cet/07MGMNT.html. For general information on
ANCOR, a 501(c) 3 organization representing 800 private providers serving individuals with
disabilities, go to www.ancor.org. For questions related to the conference, contact Jerri
McCandless (jmccandless@ancor.org) or Kari Amidon (kamidon@ancor.org) or at 703-535-
7850.

May 7th & 8th, 2007
Save the Date: California Support Living Network Leadership Conference. The Leadership
Conference returns to Shelter Point Hotel and Marina San Diego! Visit CSLN at
www.supportedliving.com for more information.

May 23, 2007
Save the Date: 4th Annual Disability Capitol Action Day in Sacramento, California. “Join us as
we come together in solidarity” the activities include an Educational Forum, March, Rally at the
State Capital, and Legislative Visits. For more information or to become a member of the
action please log onto our website at www.cfilc.org. You can also contact us by calling
(916)325-1690, (916)325-1695TDD.

                             Recently Released Reports, Studies, etc.
California Travels: Financing Our Transportation by Kendra Breiland, The Legislative
Analyst's Office. “Transit Ridership. In 2003‑04, almost 1.3 billion passenger trips were made on various modes of
transit, including bus, rail, and ferry. Most Transit Patrons Ride the Bus. About 70 percent of these trips were on buses.
Most of the remaining trips (27 percent) were made on commuter and urban (light) rail systems. Intercity rail, paratransit,
and ferry systems carried less than 3 percent of all trips. Increasing Number of Trips by Train. Since the late 1990s, the
number of transit trips made by rail has significantly increased. In 2003 ‑04, about 347 million trips were made by train
compared to only 287 million in 1997‑98. Bus Ridership Down. In contrast to rail, the total number of annual bus trips in
California has actually declined slightly. In 2003 ‑04, 881 million trips were made on buses, down from 889 million in
1997‑98. While Auto Travel Grows, Transit Ridership Stagnates. While auto travel on state highways has increased by 26
percent since 1990, transit (bus and rail) ridership overall has experienced almost no growth. Again, this is due to the slight
drop in bus trips (the mode representing the bulk of transit ridership), offset by growth in other transit modes, such as
intercity, commuter, and urban rail which have experienced considerable ridership growth.
http://www.lao.ca.gov/2007/ca_travels/ca_travels_012607.pdf”


                                                    News Articles

Label Falls Short for Those with Mental Retardation
All Things Considered, National Public Radio January 22, 2007
By Joseph Shapiro
Minority groups often object to, and then change, the words that are used to describe them. That's been
true, too, for people with mental retardation. In the past, they've been called by some ugly words: idiot,
moron, feeble-minded. And those were official and legal definitions. The term mental retardation was
supposed to be an improvement. But the fight over language keeps going on. That becomes clear if you
ask those with mental retardation what they think about that description. "I hate that word — mental
retardation," says Thelma Greene of Washington, D.C. "I wish they would change that one, because it
sounds so institutional, like you can't do nothing for yourself and you're depending on somebody else to
do everything, from putting on all your clothes down to your shoes. And that's not right." "Retardation
                                                                                                     Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                                        The Arc of California
                                                                                               January 22, 2007, page 9 of 17
                                                                                            Tony Anderson, Executive Director
is not the good word," Anthony Vessels, also of Washington, says in agreement. "I never did like that
word 'retardation' or 'mental retardation,' adds Victor Robinson. "Because everyone has called people
names about that. And no, none of my friends did like that name or any other name, being called 'stupid,
dumb.' And it hurts a person very much."

Sometimes it helps to have the label of mental retardation. It is a diagnosis that leads to services, such as
special education, job support and housing. But it is also commonplace to hear the term, especially its
abbreviations, "retarded" or "retard," used as an insult in schools, movies and music. "Some people who
are kind of nasty, they would make fun of you and play at, you know with you and make you look like if
you are a stupid person," says Robinson. "But a person who has a disability is not that. They are very
wise on some things, and they can be very knowledgeable about some things." Nancy Ward, who has
mental retardation, works for a group of disability attorneys in Oklahoma City. She says there's a lot
more to her than that label. She says her work and her hobbies define her, not her IQ. The definition of
who has mental retardation isn't precise; it's not like determing a person's blood type. Officially, anyone
with an IQ of 70 or under is considered to have mental retardation. A generation ago, the official
definition applied to IQs under 85. And other things are measured, including how well a person
functions in the world. There have long been attempts to replace the term "mental retardation" with
something more friendly. But Ward hasn't liked most of them. The term "mentally challenged"? "I think
it's just another label," she says, "Because what does that mean? How does that define us? It doesn't
define us." Nor does she like the term "special." …
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=6943699

90,000 handicap cards -- 4 per S.F. parking meter
San Francisco Chronicle Friday, January 26, 2007
By Charlie Goodyear
With tough questions being asked at City Hall over why San Francisco's parking meters aren't
generating more revenue, one possible explanation beginning to emerge is the astonishingly high
number of handicap placards that have been handed out in the city. San Francisco has about 23,000
coin-fed parking meters, while city residents hold about 90,000 permanent and temporary handicap
parking placards, issued by the state Department of Motor Vehicles, allowing them to park for free, said
Judson True, spokesman for the city's Municipal Transportation Agency.
That's about four placards for every meter. "While the MTA supports the legitimate use of disability
placards, there's no doubt that they have an effect on our parking meter revenue," True said.

Tim Hornbeck is the executive director of the Arc of San Francisco, a nonprofit group that helps and
advocates for people with disabilities. He agreed that better enforcement of handicap placards by the
state DMV perhaps is needed. But so is parking meter enforcement, he said.
"I just walked outside of our building," Hornbeck said. "Out of 27 meters, nine were expired with no
tickets, five had disability placards, and one was a city vehicle. Only 12 of those meters were getting
revenue." To obtain a handicap placard, California residents must have certain medical conditions --
such as heart disease, vision problems or impaired walking -- and have them certified by a doctor or
other medical professional. The uproar over a report revealing that the city's meters are capturing an
average citywide of just 22 percent of their potential revenue showed no signs of abating Thursday.
Supervisor Jake McGoldrick, who has waged an often lonely campaign for parking reform in the city,
suddenly found himself in the spotlight, spending much of the day delivering on-camera
interviews.…(Donald) Shoup (UCLA) said handicap placards -- and their abuse -- is a problem facing
many cities. He said he believes one solution is ending meter time limits and eliminating free parking for
people with disabilities, who often need to park for long periods and don't have the mobility to feed a
                                                                                       Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                          The Arc of California
                                                                                January 22, 2007, page 10 of 17
                                                                              Tony Anderson, Executive Director
meter. "All you have to do is look out your window and see how many spots are occupied by cars with
disabled placards," he said. "If you ended time limits, parking becomes like milk or gasoline or any
other commodity. You pay for what you use."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/c/a/2007/01/26/MNGMHNPK6H1.DTL

Golly, What Did Jon Do?
Newsweek January 29, 2007
By George F. Will
What did Jon Will and the more than 350,000 American citizens like him do to tick off the American
College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists? It seems to want to help eliminate from America almost all
of a category of citizens, a category that includes Jon. Born in 1972, Jon has Down syndrome. That is a
congenital condition resulting from a chromosomal defect that causes varying degrees of mental
retardation and some physical abnormalities, such as low muscle tone, small stature, a single crease
across the center of the palms, flatness of the back of the head and an upward slant to the eyes (when Jon
was born, Down syndrome people were still commonly called Mongoloids). There also is increased risk
of congenital heart defects, childhood leukemia and Alzheimer’s disease. Down syndrome, although not
common, is among the most common congenital anomalies—47.9 per 100,000 births (compared with
77.7 with cleft lips or palates, which also can be diagnosed in utero, and which sometimes result in
abortions). As women age, their risk of having a Down syndrome baby increases. It has become
standard practice for women older than 35 years old to be offered genetic counseling and diagnostic
testing. But because of the higher fertility rates of women under 35, such women have 80 percent of
Down syndrome babies. So new ACOG guidelines recommend that all pregnant women, regardless of
age, be offered such counseling and testing.

The ACOG guidelines are formally neutral concerning what decisions parents should make on the basis
of the information offered. But what is antiseptically called “screening” for Down syndrome is, much
more often than not, a search-and-destroy mission: At least 85 percent of pregnancies in which Down
syndrome is diagnosed are ended by abortions. Medicine now has astonishing and multiplying abilities
to treat problems of unborn children in utero, but it has no ability to do anything about Down syndrome
(the result of an extra 21st chromosome). So diagnosing Down syndrome can have only the purpose of
enabling—and, in a clinically neutral way, of encouraging—parents to choose to reject people like Jon
as unworthy of life. And as more is learned about genetic components of other abnormalities, search-
and-destroy missions will multiply. Nothing—nothing—in the professional qualifications of
obstetricians and gynecologists gives them standing to adopt policies that predictably will have, and
seem intended to have, the effect of increasing abortions in the service of an especially repulsive
manifestation of today’s entitlement mentality—every parent’s “right” to a perfect baby. Happily, that
mentality is not yet universal: 214 American families are looking for Down syndrome children to
adopt….http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/16720750/site/newsweek/

The Response of the National Down Syndrome Congress to the Recommendations of the American
College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG)
National Down Syndrome Congress Press Release January 23, 2007
Contact: David Tolleso (770) 604-9500
ATLANTA The National Down Syndrome Congress (NDSC) condemns recent recommendations by the
American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) that convey tacit approval for
terminating pregnancies where the fetus has Down syndrome.
The recommendation for first trimester screening of all pregnant women is a change from the current
practice of primarily screening women over age 35 who have a higher probability of having a baby with
                                                                                     Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                        The Arc of California
                                                                              January 22, 2007, page 11 of 17
                                                                            Tony Anderson, Executive Director
Down syndrome. Women under age 35 are also being screened, often without their full knowledge or
consent. Among the concerns cited by the medical doctors comprising NDSC’s Professional Advisory
Committee: The primary medical reason for first trimester screening is to encourage earlier diagnostic
testing in “at risk” pregnancies, in order to facilitate early terminations. Other reasons for prenatal
diagnosis, such as hospital selection and delivery management, do not require first trimester testing.
Based on ACOG’s figures, the recommended screenings will produce numerous false positives,
potentially leading to unnecessary patient distress and possible termination of pregnancies where
medical concerns do not exist.

All screening or diagnostic tests need to be fully explained to patients, who should be provided the
opportunity to decline or give their informed consent for testing. If patients decline certain tests,
physicians and other medical personnel should respect the individual’s wishes and not overtly or
covertly pressure patients to undergo undesired screenings. Recent studies by Dr. Brian Skotko,
published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (2005) and Pediatrics (2005) note that
many doctors are inadequately prepared to deliver a diagnosis of Down syndrome, and often use
negative language or out-of-date information. ACOG’s recommendations do not address this situation,
nor how it will be corrected. Studies have shown that parents and siblings of children with Down
syndrome overwhelmingly report that having a family member with that diagnosis has been a good
situation. Early intervention and inclusive education have led to largely positive outcomes for children
with Down syndrome. It is unacceptable that many obstetricians present negatives and seem to
emphasize pregnancy termination rather than reporting the facts, which paint a much more positive
picture. Parents who receive a diagnosis that their fetus has Down syndrome should have the
opportunity to meet a family that includes a person with the syndrome, a move in keeping with the spirit
of the Kennedy-Brownback bill. http://www.ndsccenter.org/

Disability and discipline in special ed
Brenda Ryan speaking on special education issues at the September 2006 forum.
The Centennial (Denver, CO) January 24, 2007
By Darla Stuart
…The federal special education law passed in 1975 by Congress created the assurance that children with
disabilities in every state would be guaranteed a free public education in the least restrictive
environment. Thirty-one years later, the nation has made great steps in meeting this challenge.
Nevertheless, today many schools struggle with managing special education including how to educate
and support students whose disabilities are the cause of their behaviors. That issue of discipline coupled
with zero tolerance practices leaves many students with disabilities and their families confused and
angry over school treatment that seems less than fair or welcoming. Originally, zero tolerance was
created to focus on addressing students with dangerous and criminal behavior, requiring mandatory
expulsion for possession of guns on school property. However, many school districts have expanded
zero tolerance to include behavior and infractions that pose no authentic safety concerns. In our current
times of hyper-vigilance, some schools have defined aspirin, Alka-Seltzer, and Certs as "drugs" and
paper clips, nail files, and scissors as "weapons."

The Arc of Aurora has seen similar "take no prisoners" discipline approaches applied to students with
disabilities resulting in suspension and expulsion of some students as young as kindergarten for trivial
misconduct and innocent mistakes like forgetting to remove a toy gun from a backpack which contained
the child's diapers. Furthermore, some students with disabilities have been criminally ticketed while at
school and received deferred judgments for behaviors like having a seizure that caused physical
upheaval. The human and financial cost of prevention strategies is always lower than the cost of
                                                                                     Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                        The Arc of California
                                                                              January 22, 2007, page 12 of 17
                                                                            Tony Anderson, Executive Director
remediating or trying to contain more serious problems later on. Additionally, restraint and seclusion
which were once considered acceptable in special education as useful tools in maintaining control of
unruly students with disabilities is going the way of corporal punishment, and the cry for alternatives is
growing louder….
http://denver.yourhub.com/CENTENNIAL/Stories/News/About-Town/Story~174574.aspx

                                     Funding Opportunities
HHS - Department of Health and Human Services Administration for
Children and Families Head Start Replacement Grantee: Grant Parish,
Louisiana Grant, City of Alamosa, Colorado Grant, Dinwiddie County,
Virginia Grant
http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=12355

USDOJ - United States Department of Justice Office of Justice
Programs Office of Violence Against Women Rural Domestic Violence,
Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, Stalking, and Child Abuse
Enforcement Assistance Program Modification 2
http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=11944

USDOJ - United States Department of Justice Office of Justice
Programs Office of Violence Against Women OVW FY 2007 Legal
Assistance for Victims Grant Program Modification 7
http://www.grants.gov/search/search.do?mode=VIEW&oppId=11709

CDE – CA Dept Education Funding Name: 21st Century High School ASSETs
Eligible Applicants: institutions of higher education, local
educational agencies, nonprofit organizations, other organizations or
agencies. Funding Description: The 21st Century High School After
School Safety and Enrichment for Teens (ASSETs) Program provides
incentives for establishing before- and after-school enrichment
programs that partner schools and communities to provide academic
support; safe, constructive alternatives for high school students;
and assistance in passing the California High School Exit Exam.
Programs may operate after school only, or after school and any
combination of before school, weekends, summer, intersession, and
vacation. Each program must consist of three elements: academic
assistance, educational enrichment, and family literacy services.
http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/fo/profile.asp?id=1000

CDE - CA Dept of Education Funding. Funding Name: Nell Soto
Parent/Teacher Involvement Program. Eligible Applicants: local
educational agencies. Required Eligibility Criteria: At least 50% of
teachers employed at the school have voluntarily agreed to
participate in either home visits or community meetings. See detailed
RFA for additional criteria. Funding Description: The purpose of this
program is to strengthen communication between schools and parents as
a means of improving pupil academic achievement.
http://www.cde.ca.gov/fg/fo/profile.asp?id=1011
                                                                                      Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                         The Arc of California
                                                                               January 22, 2007, page 13 of 17
                                                                             Tony Anderson, Executive Director
To view additional funding opportunities on an ongoing basis visit the Funding News Section of the Quality Mall. The
Quality Mall is maintained by the Research and Training Center on Community Living at the University of Minnesota with
support from the National Association of State Directors of Developmental Disabilities Services, the Human Services
Research Institute and the Administration on Developmental Disabilities - U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
http://www.qualitymall.org/funding/index.asp

                                                 Career Ladder
Position: Assistant Chief, Social Work Services (Early Start), Golden Gate Regional Center
Description: Under general direction of the Chief, Social Work Services, manages the Early Start Case
Management units and performs related work as required. Provides management direction and is accountable for
“Early Start”, case management, advocacy, and community organization programs of the agency. In coordination
with specialist staff, assists in agency outreach and prevention efforts. Plans for, recruits, trains, organizes,
supervises and evaluates staff; provides leadership which enables staff to efficiently utilize time and resources;
coordinates and serves as a communication link among assigned staff and other administrative and program
area; prepares agenda and conducts staff meetings; prepares and implements procedures and provides
leadership to insure mandated services are provided to clients and families; monitors services funded by GGRC
and provided by vendored agencies, and participates in training staff in such agencies; participates in recruitment
and certification of vendors; represents the agency in community planning; provides public information and
education regarding regional center services and constituent needs; participates as a member of the case
management administrative team and in county developmental disabilities council, if applicable. Represents
agency in due process proceedings.
Salary: $4,583 - $7,792/month.
How To Apply: Please send resume and cover letter to jobs@ggrc.org You may also mail your resume and
cover letter to this address:
    Human Resource Dept.
    Golden Gate Regional Center
    120 Howard Street, 3rd Floor
    San Francisco, CA 94105
or fax to this number: (415) 546-9203, for a copy of the complete announcement visit:
http://www.ggrc.org/Job%20Postings/Assistant%20Chief%20Early%20Start.pdf

Position: Project Coordinator, The Tarjan Center UCLA
Description: The Tarjan Center Service Inclusion Project at UCLA helps communities include people with
disabilities in national service, community service and volunteer activities. We are seeking a:
The Project Coordinator will establish and maintain two community coalitions of volunteer programs and disability
organizations/individuals. In addition, the Coordinator will coordinate a small-grants program that will offer awards
to community organizations for inclusive service activities. Demonstrated experience in community outreach,
coalition building, collaborative planning and/or leadership development is required.
Salary: Competitive, applicant must be able to travel and work flexible hours as needed. This position is full-time
and located in Los Angeles, California.
How To Apply: Please contact Karen Leventhal, Tarjan Center Service Inclusion Project Coordinator, to apply or
for more information. kleventhal@mednet.ucla.edu, 310-825-0067

Position: Parent Advocate:Special Education (Two Positions) The Disability Rights Education and
Defense Fund (DREDF)
Description: The Parent Advocate participates in the day-to-day activities of DREDF’s U.S. Department of
Education Parent Training and Information Center, which provides information and advocacy regarding the
Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA) to parents of children with disabilities.
Salary: We provide good benefits, competitive salaries and flexible working environment.
How to Apply: DREDF is an equal opportunity employer committed to building and maintaining a culturally
diverse workplace. We encourage applications from people with disabilities, parents of children with disabilities,
people of color, bi-lingual English-Spanish speakers, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals, women,
and people living with HIV. If you're interested in this position, please email (or fax) a cover letter and resume to
Susan Henderson, Managing Director, at shenderson@dredf.org. Fax: 510-841-8645. To find out more about
DREDF, please visit www.dredf.org
                                                                                                 Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                                     The Arc of California
                                                                                          January 22, 2007, page 14 of 17
                                                                                       Tony Anderson, Executive Director
Position: Program Support Specialist The California Institute for Mental Health (CiMH)
Description: This position provides support services for a variety of agency activities: (1) Draft and edit project
and grant reports, and coordinate grant proposals, (2) Take minutes of staff and committee meetings, (3)
Compile and present evaluations of Mental Health Services Act and department events (trainings,meetings,
Technical Assistance, etc), including conduct of follow-up evaluations, (4) Develop and maintain filing system for
project and grant reports; track due dates, (5) Maintain project schedule of activities, deadlines, etc…The
California Institute for Mental Health (CiMH) was established in 1993 with a declared mission to "promote
excellence in mental health services through training, technical assistance, research and policy development."
CiMH conducts all of its work collaboratively with mental health stakeholders including consumers and family
members (for more information please visit our website at www.cimh.org).
Salary: Commensurate with experience (full-time, exempt)
How to Apply: Review of application materials will begin January 2, 2006 and will be accepted until the position
is filled. If you have specific questions, please email them to the Human Resources Manager at
hrmanager@cimh.org. (Resumes will be accepted by email only.)

Position: Accounting Assistant, The California Institute for Mental Health (CiMH)
Description: This position fills an immediate need for an Accounting Assistant with accounts payable and
accounts receivable experience.
• Processing and coding of vendor invoices
• Processing employee expense reimbursements and travel advances
• Check disbursements
• Creating client invoices and follow-up collection inquires
• Reconciliation of conference revenues, credit card statements, and operational expenses
• Maintain information databases
The California Institute for Mental Health (CiMH) was established in 1993 with a
declared mission to "promote excellence in mental health services through training, technical assistance,
research and policy development." CiMH conducts all of its work collaboratively with mental health
stakeholders including consumers and family members (for more information please visit our website at
www.cimh.org).
Salary: Commensurate with experience (full-time, non-exempt)
How to Apply: Review of application materials will begin January 8, 2006 and will be accepted until the position
is filled. If you have specific questions, please email them to the Human Resources Manager at
hrmanager@cimh.org. (Resumes will be accepted by email only.)

Position: Program Manager/Adult Education Teacher United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) Sacramento
Description: All aspects of management required to run an adults with disabilities program in Woodland, Ca,
including supervising twelve staff members, paperwork, the ability to deal with the public, and licensing. This is a
collaborative effort between UCP and Woodland Adult Education. Requirements for this position are graduation
from an accredited college with a BA or BS degree. A current Adult Ed. Credential or prospective employee must
be willing to get your credential with our guidance. Management/Supervisory experience a must, teaching
experience and/or prior work with the disabled a major plus.
Salary: Combined salary $50,000 plus benefits.
How to Apply: Please send resumes to United Cerebral Palsy, 191 Lathrop Way, Ste N, Sacramento, Ca 95815
or fax 916-565-7773. EOE Source - The Sacramento Bee.

Position: Therapist Instructor (Music, Dance/Movement, Drama or Art), Arts & Services for Disabled, Inc.
Description: Arts & Services for Disabled, Inc. is looking for talented and dynamic artists interested in teaching
and learning from artists with developmental disabilities in the Greater Long Beach and Los Angeles areas. Full
time and part time positions available immediately for the right candidates. A Bachelor of Arts Degree in a related
instructional field (art, drama, music or movement) is required. A minimum of one year’s experience working with
individuals with disabilities or a Creative Arts Therapy Certification is also required. Applicants for this position
must possess an understanding and caring personality.
Salary: Based on education, experience and credentials. Full medical benefits including dental and vision, paid
personal days and vacation time after 6 month orientation period. 35 hour workweek, 8:30am - 3:30pm, Monday
through Friday, no weekends.
How to Apply: Send resumes to: ARTS & SERVICES FOR DISABLED, INC., Helen Dolas, MS, MT-BC, CEO

                                                                                             Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                                The Arc of California
                                                                                      January 22, 2007, page 15 of 17
                                                                                    Tony Anderson, Executive Director
3962 Studebaker Road, Suite 206, Long Beach, CA 90808 Fax: 562.982.0254 E-mail: info@artsandservices.com
OR CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION: (562) 982-0247. Please visit us on our website at
www.artsandservices.org.

Position: Program Director, Arts & Services for Disabled, Inc.
Description: Program Director is responsible for the oversight and daily operations of an adult day program for
individuals with developmental disabilities utilizing the creative arts (music, dance, drama, visual and literary arts).
Services include a transition program (high school and developmental center), adult education and community
college courses. Requires knowledge in advocacy issues, staff supervision & training, development and
coordination of clinical, educational and behavioral interventions and curriculum. Other duties include
collaboration with Regional Center, State Developmental Center and other outside agencies for communication
and interface of clients and program; music therapy clinical supervision; fundraising; etc. BA, (creative arts
therapy preferred) or in related field, 2 years experience working with individuals with developmental disabilities.
Salary: Commensurate with experience. Full medical including dental and vision, paid personal days and
vacation time after 6 month orientation period. 35 hour workweek, 8:30 am-3:30 pm, Monday through Friday, no
weekends.
How to Apply: Send resumes to: ARTS & SERVICES FOR DISABLED, INC., Helen Dolas, MS, MT-BC, CEO
3962 Studebaker Road, Suite 206, Long Beach, CA 90808 Fax: 562.982.0254 E-mail: info@artsandservices.com
OR CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION: (562) 982-0247. Please visit us on our website at
www.artsandservices.org.

Position: Assistant Program Director, Arts & Services for Disabled, Inc.
Description: Arts & Services for Disabled, Inc. is looking for talented and dynamic artists interested in teaching
and facilitating classes. The Assistant Program Director will assist in the supervision of staff and the
responsibilities of the daily duties of the program director. Assistant Program Director is responsible in assisting
the Program Director in the oversight and daily operations of an adult day program for individuals with
developmental disabilities utilizing the creative arts (music, dance, drama, visual and literary arts). Services
include a transition program (high school and developmental center), adult education and community college
courses. BA in creative arts therapy or related field, 2 years experience working with individuals with
developmental disabilities.
Salary: Commensurate with experience. Full medical including dental and vision, paid personal days and
vacation time after 6 month orientation period. 35 hour workweek, 8:30 am-3:30 pm, Monday through Friday, no
weekends.
How to Apply: Send resumes to: ARTS & SERVICES FOR DISABLED, INC., Helen Dolas, MS, MT-BC, CEO
3962 Studebaker Road, Suite 206, Long Beach, CA 90808 Fax: 562.982.0254 E-mail: info@artsandservices.com
OR CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION: (562) 982-0247. Please visit us on our website at
www.artsandservices.org.

Position: Executive Director ARC, Greenwich/Stamford, CT
Description: ARC, an organization recognized as providing innovative, person-centered supports to children and
adults with developmental disabilities in the Greenwich/Stamford, CT area, seeks an Executive Director.
Reporting to the President and Board of Directors, the Executive Director is ARC’s chief executive officer. He/she
is responsible to lead the Board and staff in the development and implementation of a system of responsive and
accessible supports in our community. The Executive Director has the ultimate responsibility for developing and
implementing a strategic plan for such supports, assuring the smooth day-to-day operation of current programs
and services, and supervising ARC’s $1.5M+ annual fund raising efforts. Applicants should demonstrate a
professional philosophy directed toward individual choice, person-centered planning, community inclusion, and a
strong preference for emphasizing the quality, rather than quantity, of services. Applicants should also possess
an extensive background in supervising successful community programs supporting people with special needs, a
thorough understanding of outcome measurement/program evaluation systems, and an ability to mentor staff,
including in-service/professional education. Successful fund raising experience is a must. This position requires,
at a minimum, a Master’s Degree with a combination of professional training or degrees relating to disabilities
(psychology, special education or rehabilitation counseling, etc.) and business management (MBA, accounting or
similar field). Seven years progressive non-profit management experience, preferably in a rehabilitation setting, is
also required.
Salary: Salary commensurate with responsibilities of the position. ARC offers extensive benefits including,
medical, dental, vision, and life insurance, 125 Cafeteria Plan, employer-contributed retirement, 403B, Roth IRA,
and tuition reimbursement.
                                                                                               Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                                  The Arc of California
                                                                                        January 22, 2007, page 16 of 17
                                                                                      Tony Anderson, Executive Director
How to Apply: To apply for this position, forward your resume and letter of intent to: Beth Lurie, President, ARC
Executive Director Search, 50 Glenville Street, Greenwich, CT 06831. Application Deadline: January 31, 2007

Position: Special Assistant to the Executive Director, the Center for Community Change
Description: The Center for Community Change is a large national non-profit organization headquartered
in Washington, D.C. Its mission is to promote the development of community organizing as
a national force for social and economic justice. The Writer/Special Assistant to the Executive Director is a new
position to assist the Executive Director in carrying out a variety of responsibilities, particularly focused on writing
and information gathering. The Writer/Special Assistant will work closely with other staff in the Executive Office,
including the Senior Executive Assistant, Chief of Staff, and Development Department staff. The Writer/Special
Assistant to the Executive Director need not bring extensive work experience but a successful candidate will be
an excellent and fast writer, a self-directed information gatherer who is good at conducting quick research in a
broad range of subject areas, able to communicate extremely well with diverse groups and people, be extremely
detail oriented and meticulous about follow through; and be flexible and adaptable. This position reports to:
Executive Director
Salary: Salary commensurate with experience. CCC offers an excellent benefits package.
How to Apply: Closing Date of Position: January 31, 2007. Submit resume and cover letter with salary
expectation to: Human Resources, Attn: Writer/Special Assistant to the Executive Director, Center for Community
Change, 1536 U Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20009, (fax) 202-387-4891,
employment@communitychange.org.




                                                                                               Monday Morning Memo
                                                                                                  The Arc of California
                                                                                        January 22, 2007, page 17 of 17
                                                                                      Tony Anderson, Executive Director

								
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