LEED and Concrete - Building for the Future

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LEED and Concrete - Building for the Future Powered By Docstoc
					The LEED® Green Building Rating System
                 and

           Concrete
                       Building for the Future



                                   Presented by:
                                   Douglas O’Neill – LEED® AP
                                   National Resource Director
                                   NRMCA
 Seminar Objectives


 Introduce concepts:
  Green Building Design and the
  LEED® Certification Program


 How it Works: LEED®
  Green Building Rating System


 Review: Concrete’s Impact
  on Green Building Design




                                  WWW. NRMCA.ORG
          Sustainability

   Sustainable development
       Development that meets the needs of the
        present generation without compromising
        the needs of future generations
       Encompasses shelter, food, social
        welfare, health issues, and ecology
   Green Building
       Focuses on the built environment
       Minimize environmental impact of
        buildings
       A subset of sustainable development



                                                  WWW. NRMCA.ORG
        What is “GREEN” Design


• Design and construction practices that significantly
  reduce or eliminate the negative impact of buildings on
  the environment and occupants in five broad areas:
   – Sustainable site planning
   – Safeguarding water and water efficiency
   – Energy efficiency and renewable energy
   – Conservation of materials and resources
   – Indoor environmental quality




                                                      WWW. NRMCA.ORG
    U. S. Green Building Council


   The nation's foremost coalition of leaders from
    across the building industry working to promote
    buildings that are environmentally responsible,
    profitable, and healthy places to live and work.

             Purpose
•    Integrate building industry sectors
•    Lead market transformation
•    Educate owners and practitioners

                                               WWW. NRMCA.ORG
     U. S. Green Building Council
   National nonprofit organization
   Diverse membership
   Consensus-driven
   Committee-based product development
   Developer and administrator of the LEED®
    Green Building Rating System




                                               WWW. NRMCA.ORG
    U. S. Green Building Council
MEMBERS:
   Building Product Manufacturers
   Building Owners, Managers, Users and Brokers
   Financial and Insurance Firms
   Professional Societies
   Architecture and Engineering Firms
   Contractors and Builders
   Some Non Profit Organizations
   Utility Companies
   Educational Institutions
   State, Local and Federal Governments

                                                   WWW. NRMCA.ORG
 U. S. Green Building Council

USGBC
National Membership Costs: $500 to $5,000 based on
  annual budget
Chapter Membership Costs: $65




                                            WWW. NRMCA.ORG
LEED ®          AP (Accredited Professional)
   Costs:
       Reference Guide
        $150-$200
       Exam $250-$350
   Benefits:
       Higher Level of
        Credibility with
        Designers
       Higher Level of
        Understanding of
        Green Concepts
       Another Tool for your
        Toolbox

                                      WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Important Facts
   Energy consumption
       Buildings represent 39% of U.S. primary energy use (includes fuel input for production)
       Source: 2003 U.S. DOE Buildings Energy Databook.
    Electricity consumption
       Buildings represent 70% of U.S consumption
       Source: 2003 U.S. DOE Buildings Energy Databook
   Water use:
       Buildings use 12.2% of all potable water, or 15 trillion gallons per year
       Source: U.S. Geological Service, 1995 data.
   Materials use:
       Buildings use 40% of raw materials globally (3 billion tons annually)
        Source: Lenssen and Roodman, 1995, “Worldwatch Paper 124: A Building Revolution: How
        Ecology and Health Concerns are Transforming Construction,” Worldwatch Institute.
   Waste:
       The EPA estimates that 136 million tons of building-related construction and demolition
        (C&D) debris was generated in the U.S. in a single year
        Source: http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/debris/about.htm, and U.S. EPA
        Characterization of Construction and Demolition Debris in the United States, 1997 Update.
            Compare that to 209.7 million tons of municipal solid waste generated in the same
             year. Source: U.S. EPA Characterization of Municipal Solid Waste in the United States, 1997
             Update. Report No. EPA530-R-98-007

                                                                                       WWW. NRMCA.ORG
The Life-Cycle of Building Materials


   Embodied energy for materials
    acquisition, manufacturing and
    construction accounts
    for < 2% of total energy
   Occupant energy-use accounts for
    98% of life-cycle energy




                                       WWW. NRMCA.ORG
U.S. Building
Impacts:




   12%          30%             65%      70%
   Water Use    Greenhouse      Waste    Electricity
                Gas Emissions   Output   Consumption
Average
Savings of
Green
Buildings                                        WASTE
                                                 COST
                                       WATER    SAVINGS
                                        USE     50-90%
                            CARBON    SAVINGS
                            SAVINGS   30-50%
                             35%
                  ENERGY
                  SAVINGS
                   30%


      Source:
      Capital E
Improved
Bottom
Line.



                  30-70%     VERIFIED
                 ENERGY    PERFORMANCE
                 SAVINGS



            ENHANCED           INCREASED
           PRODUCTIVITY          VALUE
                      REDUCED
                     LIABILITY &
                     IMPROVED
                        RISK
                    MANAGEMENT
Improved
Bottom
Line.



                                 30-70%     VERIFIED
                                ENERGY    PERFORMANCE
                                SAVINGS



                  REDUCED
                ABSENTEEISM                        INCREASED
                                                     VALUE
               PRODUCTIVITY
                                      REDUCED
                                     LIABILITY &
            ENHANCED     IMPROVED    IMPROVED
           RECRUITMENT   EMPLOYEE       RISK
                          MORALE    MANAGEMENT
Average
Productivity
Gains

                                  INDIVIDUAL TEMPERATURE
                                          CONTROL
                                  ENHANCES PRODUCTIVITY

                                        3.6%
                 HIGH-PERFORMANCE
                      LIGHTING
               ENHANCES PRODUCTIVITY

                     6.7%
Increased           SCHOOLS             HOSPITALS
Productivity.



                              20%               EARLIER
                          BETTER TEST          DISCHARGE
                         PERFORMANCE




RETAIL              FACTORIES           OFFICES




       INCREASE                                  2-16%
                           INCREASED         PRODUCTIVITY
     IN SALES PER         PRODUCTION
     SQUARE FOOT                               INCREASE
Occupants and
tenants
perceive value
of working in a     REDUCED
green building       ENERGY
to be:            CONSUMPTION      INCREASED
                                  PRODUCTIVITY


                              HEALTH
                   LOWER
                  OPERATING   BENEFIT
                    COSTS
                                         POSITIVE
                                        MARKETING
                                           AND
                                        PROMOTION
                      OVERALL
                   ENVIRONMENTAL
                      BENEFIT
                                    ®
    Why Was LEED Created?
 Facilitate positive results for          Recognize leaders
  the environment, occupant                Stimulate green
  health and financial return               competition
 Define “green” by providing              Establish market value
  a standard for measurement                with recognizable national
 Prevent “greenwashing”                    “brand”
  (false or exaggerated                    Raise consumer
  claims)                                   awareness
 Promote whole-building,                  Transform the
  integrated design processes               marketplace!




                                                             WWW. NRMCA.ORG
What is the
LEED System?
                            Scores are tallied for
                            different aspects of
                            efficiency and design
                            in appropriate
                            categories.

         LEADERSHIP in
         ENERGY and         For instance, LEED
         ENVIRONMENTAL      assesses in detail:
         DESIGN
                            1. Site Planning
                            2. Water Management
         A leading-edge
                            3. Energy Management
         system for         4. Material Use
         certifying         5. Indoor
         DESIGN,               Environmental
         CONSTRUCTION,         Air Quality
         & OPERATIONS       6. Innovation &
         of the greenest       Design Process
         buildings in the
         world
Levels of
LEED
Ratings




            Green Buildings
            worldwide are certified
            with a voluntary,
            consensus-based
            rating system.
            USGBC has four
            levels of LEED.
Increase                                                    2006:
                                                            642 million
in LEED
                                                            square feet.
Projects
in three                                     2005:
years.                                       500 million
                                             square feet.




                              2004:
                              More than
                              180 million
                              square feet.
               2003:
               More than
               141 million
               square feet.

2002:
More than
80 million
square feet.
Estimated value                                                                             $200 BILLION
                                                                                            PROJECTED
of new LEED for
New Construction                                                                            $10
registered projects                                                                        BILLION




                                                                           $7.73 BILLION
The value of U.S.
construction
starts significantly
declined by
almost half from
                                                           $5.76 BILLION
2000 to 2003


                                           $3.81 BILLION
                           $3.24 BILLION




            $792 MILLION


               2000           2001            2002            2003            2004         2006
LEED for new construction                                                            Distribution               200+
                                                                                                                100-199
buildings as of 07/06                                                              by geography                 50-99
                                                                                                                20-49
                                                                                                                1-19



               186
  480
                                                                                                              23 (DE)
                                                                                                                24 (NH)
              134
                                                                                                          174
                                    9                                                                              33
                                             4         22                                               173        105
                                                                     36            119
                          11                 9
                                        11
AK=10                                                                     120                      68                   12
                     40                                     23                           79                     61 27
HI=16                          28       69   14                                                          95
PR=1                                                                                                             9 (DE) 38 (DC)
                                                                                19       4
                                             8               57
                                                   5 (OK)                                                74
                          82                                                       11
                                    25
                                                                              22                    52
                                             125                                             102
                                                             19                 18
                                                                          6
                                                                 6
                                                                                                   73
LEED for New                                                                                                                 300+
                                                                                                                             100-299
Construction                                             Retail                                                              50-99
Buildings                                                                       Health                                       3-49
                                                    25
Distribution                                                                     Care
                                        K-12                                     73
by Building Type                      Education                   Multi-Unit
as of 09/06                                                       Residential                      Military
                                          166                                                       Base
                                                                     148                             20
                           Recreation
                               42                  Higher                                                  Interpretive
                                                  Education                     Commercial                    Center    8
                                                                                                                                   Park
                     Campus                         199                           Office                           86
                                     24
                                                                                      391
   Financial &                                                                                                                Stadium
 Communications                                                                                                                Arena
                                                                                                       Industrial            3
                     28    Public Order                                                                       91
                             & Safety                                                                                   Assembly
                                                                                                                           37
                                 142
              Laboratory                                                                    Not                      12
                     64                                                                  Classified                       Animal Care
                7                                        Multi-Use                           101
                                                                                                         11
                              Other                          1074                                              Hotel/Resort
Special Needs                  92
  Housing
                                                                                                      12
                                                                                                              Daycare
                                     18                                                  Library
                    Transportation                                                          91          17
                                                                                                                   Community
LEED ®           Products
   LEED-NC (New Construction and Major
    Renovations/Additions) first launched in 1998
       Current Version 2.2
   LEED-EB (Existing Buildings)
   LEED-CI (Commercial Interiors)
   LEED-CS (Core and Shell)
   LEED-H (Homes)
   LEED-ND (Neighborhood Development)
   LEED for Schools
   LEED for Retail

                                                    WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Jack Evans Police Headquarters – Dallas TX

   The most important material
    selection concerned the
    building's structural system.
    Steel framing was slightly less
    expensive and higher in
    recycled content than cast-in-
    place concrete; however, its
    transportation costs were
    moderately higher. Concrete
    was determined to be more
    desirable for its local
    availability, stability, and
    durability over a potentially
    longer life-cycle.
                                         LEED® SILVER

                                                WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Seattle Terminal Radar Approach – Seattle, WA
   Light-colored concrete was
    used to minimize the project's
    contribution to the urban heat-
    island effect.
   This project was constructed
    with tilt-up concrete walls,
    concrete foundations,
    concrete slab-on-grade, and
    concrete floor decks over
    metal decking.
   Materials were selected for
    their environmental
    characteristics. On a cost
    basis, 26% of the materials
    used in the project are derived      LEED® GOLD
    from recycled content.
                                                WWW. NRMCA.ORG
IEUA Headquarters – Chino, CA

   The headquarters functions were
    divided into two components to
    reduce the "big box" image
    usually associated with large
    concrete tilt-up buildings. The
    concrete tilt-up system used
    aggregates and materials that
    were economical and locally
    produced.
   The concrete exterior walls ably
    withstand the desert temperature
    cycle that sometimes spans 100
    degrees F between nighttime
    and daytime. The walls were
    insulated to prevent re-radiation
    of heat into the building due to
    prolonged daylight exposure
    during the summer months.              LEED® PLATNIUM

                                                  WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Technical Overview of LEED®
    Whole-building approach encourages and guides
     a collaborative, integrated design and
     construction process
    Optimizes environmental and economic factors
    Four levels of LEED-NC certification:
        Certified Level       26 - 32 points
        Silver Level          33 - 38 points
        Gold Level            39 - 51 points
        Platinum Level 52+ points (69 possible)



                                                   WWW. NRMCA.ORG
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Sustainable Sites
  Sustainable
     Sites             Water               Energy &
     22%              Efficiency          Atmosphere
                          8%                 27%




         Indoor
      Environmental         Materials &
         Quality            Resources
           23%                20%




                                      WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Highlighted
   Credits

Sustainable
   Sites

 Credit 6.1 & 6.2:
Stormwater Design

   Credit 7.1:
Heat Island Effect,
   Non-Roof

                      WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Stormwater Design                              Credit 6.1 & 6.2



Quantity                                                  Quality




              Reduce or eliminate runoff
              “Treatment” of Pollutants (Percolation)
              Groundwater and aquifer recharge
              Minimize Flooding


                                                         WWW. NRMCA.ORG
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             When it Rains, It Drains!




Pervious concrete is defined as a BMP
 (Best Management Practice) by the EPA
  and has a 20+ year history of use.




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WWW. NRMCA.ORG
    Heat Island Effect – Non Roof                      Credit 7.1

Provide any combo of the following for at
   least 50% of the Site Hardscape

   Either Provide Shade (within 5 years)
   Use light colored material (SRI)2 of at least 29
   Open Grid Pavement System




                                                        WWW. NRMCA.ORG
WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Energy & Atmosphere
                                    Energy &
       Sustainable                 Atmosphere
                       Water
          Sites                       27%
                      Efficiency
          22%
                          8%




       Indoor
    Environmental           Materials &
       Quality              Resources
         23%                  20%




                                      WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Highlighted
   Credits
 Energy &
Atmosphere

    Prereq 2:
 Minimum Energy
  Performance

  Credits 1-10:
 Optimize Energy
  Performance

                   WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Minimum Energy Performance                                     Prereq 2

      Establish a minimum level of Energy Efficiency by
      designing to comply with mandatory provisions and
      prescriptive requirements per:
      ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1 2004




            Does NOT meet minimum level of Energy Efficiency



                                                               WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Optimize Energy Performance                          Credit 1-10

   Compare with Energy Cost of a Base Building
Components to be considered:
 Building Envelope, HVAC, Water Heating, Electric
  Power, Electric Motors, Lighting, etc.
 Points are awarded for 10.5% to 42% Reduction




                                                       WWW. NRMCA.ORG
ICF Commercial          Energy Efficient

Construction
                          Superior Insulation, air tightness, and
                           thermal mass of the concrete cut the
                           amount of energy needed for heating and
                           cooling by 30%-40%
                          Allows for installation of smaller heating
                           and cooling units

                        Environmentally Friendly
                          Concrete is made from abundant natural
                           resources: Water, sand, stones, Portland
                           cement
                          ICF construction generates less job site
                           waste than wood construction
                          ICF structures consume less energy

                        Disaster Resistant
                          Tornadoes, Hurricanes, Floods,
                           Earthquakes

                        Fire Resistant
                          Concrete walls won’t burn at the typical
                           temperatures of a structure fire

                        Ease of Construction
                          Can build in any weather
                          Work crews less prone to injury and
                           exhaustion due to light weight blocks
                                            WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Tilt-Up           Economy
                      Efficient use of construction materials combined with assembly line
                       field production techniques keep material and labor costs to a

Construction   
                       minimum.
                   Speed of Construction
                      Ability to put in place large wall areas in a short time and the
                       opportunity of time savings with the design/build method offers
                       owners earlier effective occupancy and lower construction debt
                       service.
                  Energy Efficient
                      Tilt-up walls reduce infiltration and utilize the thermal properties of
                       concrete to take the peaks off heating and cooling cycles. Both
                       factors offer building owners real energy savings.
                  Lower Maintenance
                      The rugged durability of concrete virtually eliminates the effects of
                       normal building wear; inside and out.
                  Security
                      Reinforced concrete walls offer an imposing deterrent to those
                       seeking illegal entry to a building.
                  Lower Insurance
                      The natural fire resistance of concrete combined with the advantages of
                       durability and security are recognized lower rate factors for insurance
                       underwriters.
                  Distinctiveness
                      Concrete buildings allow the greatest design freedom. Individual
                       architectural features permit a building to be as simple or sophisticated as
                       the owner wishes.
                  Local Materials
                      Every community is sensitive to buying products locally produced. Concrete
                       buildings demonstrate community commitment by the building owner.

                                                                  WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Concrete – Light Reflectivity
   Concrete has 30%
    reflectance advantage
    (increased light) over
    asphalt in similar pavement
    apps.
   Corresponding reduction in
    light poles is warranted
   Reduces First Costs and
    Operating Costs
    accordingly




                                  WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Materials & Resources
       Sustainable
                         Water         Energy &
          Sites
                        Efficiency    Atmosphere
          22%
                            8%           27%




       Indoor
    Environmental
       Quality                       Materials &
         23%                         Resources
                                        20%



                                     WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Highlighted
   Credits

 Materials &
 Resources
 Credit 2.1 & 2.2:
Construction Waste
  Management

 Credit 4.1 & 4.2:
 Recycled Content

 Credit 5.1 & 5.2:
 Regional Materials

    Credit 7:
  Certified Wood      WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Construction Waste Mngt.            Credit 2.1 & 2.2



           Credit 2.1
 Recycle and/or Salvage at least
    50% of the non-hazardous
    construction and demolition
               debris.

           Credit 2.2
   Recycle and/or Salvage an
      additional 25% beyond
    Credit 2.1 for a total of 75%


                                          WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Construction Waste Mngt.   Credit 2.1 & 2.2




                                 WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Recycled Content                            Credit 4.1 & 4.2




               Credit 4.1
  Use materials with recycled content
   such that the sum of post consumer
   recycled content plus 1/2 of the pre-
                                            Post-Consumer: Waste material
  consumer content constitutes at least             generated by households or by
                                               commercial, industrial and institutional
     10% (based on cost) of the total         facilities in their role as end users of the
   value of the materials on the project.      product, which can no longer be used
                                                        for its intended purpose.


              Credit 4.2                    Pre-Consumer: Material diverted
                                                 from the waste stream during the
 An additional 10% beyond Credit 4.1                 manufacturing process.


                                                              WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Recycled Content                                     Credit 4.1 & 4.2

Assume 4,000 yards in project at
   $100/yrd.
                                               1 Yard 15% Fly Ash Mix
   Cost of Concrete = $400,000
    $400,000 x (% Fly Ash ) 2.5% = $10,000    Materials        Weights
    (Pre-Consumer Value)                                        (ssd)
   ½ Pre-Consumer Value = $5,000
                                              Cement            547 lb
   Total Value of Materials on Project =
   $3,000,000
                                              Fly Ash           96 lb
                                              Sand              1236 lb
   Recycled Value needs to be at least
    $300,000 Total                            ¾ Stone           1674 lb

   FLY ASH contributes 1.67% towards the
                                              Water             270 lb
    $300,000 goal                             TOTAL             3823 lb
                                              % Fly Ash by
                                              weight             2.5%
                                                             WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Regional Materials                    Credit 5.1 & 5.2

        Credit 5.1
 Use materials that have
       been extracted,
  harvested or recovered,
  as well as manufactured,
   within 500 miles of the
      project site for a
  minimum of 10% (based
     on cost) of the total   500 mi
      materials value.

        Credit 5.2
An additional 10% beyond
          Credit 5.1



                                            WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Certified Wood                                                   Credit 7



  Credit 7: Certified Wood
                                                 Back off!!
                                               There’s nothing               Wanna
Use a minimum of 50% of wood-based
                                                 CERTIFIED                    bet?
materials and products, which are certified
                                                    here.
in accordance with the Forest Stewardship
Council’s (FSC) Principles and Criteria, for
        wood building components.




                                                                 WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Highlighted
   Credits

 Innovation
     &
   Design
  Process
 Credit: 1.1 to 1.4



                      WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Innovation and Design Credits

   Exemplary Performance in Meeting Credit
    Requirements
       Reaching the next logical step above the
        requirements set by the LEED Green Building
        Rating System
           40% Reduction in the use of Portland Cement
           Site-Wide VOC Reduction




                                                      WWW. NRMCA.ORG
 Incidental
   Credits

Sustainable
   Sites
     Credit 3:
     Brownfield
    Redevelopment

  Credit 5.1 & 5.2:
 Site Development,
• Protect or Restore
        Habitat
 • Maximize Open
         Space

                       WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Brownfield Redevelopment                        Credit 3
Site Development                        Credit 5.1 & 5.2
               Credit 3
 Cement can be used to solidify and
   stabilize contaminated soils and
   reduce leaching concentrations.

            Credit 5.1 & 5.2
Placing Concrete with Boom Pump or
    using SCC concrete where large
      areas can be placed from one
    point, eliminating the need for a
    transit mix truck to drive around
                 the site.
 Parking Garages within the building
      can help reduce the footprint.
                                              WWW. NRMCA.ORG
 Incidental
   Credits

     Water
    Efficiency
  Credit 1.1 & 1.2:
   Water Efficient
     Landscaping,
 • Reduce by 50%
• No Potable Use or
     No Irrigation

      Credit 2:
Innovative Wastewater
      Technologies

                        WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Water Efficient Landscaping   Credits 1.1 & 1.2
Innovative Wastewater Technologies     Credit 2


           Credit 1.1 & 1.2
Concrete is a suitable material for the
   construction of cisterns used to
    collect rainwater or greywater.

               Credit 2
Concrete is the likely material to form
  the large storage tanks needed for
     the storage of stormwater or
    greywater for reuse, and for the
   storage of treated and untreated
                sewage.
                                          WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Incidental
  Credits

Materials &
 Resources

 Credit 1.1 & 1.2:
 Building Reuse,
• Maintain 75% of
   Existing Walls,
    Floors & Roof
• Maintain 95% of
   Existing Walls,
    Floors & Roof

                     WWW. NRMCA.ORG
Building Reuse                          Credits 1.1 & 1.2




          Credit 1.1 & 1.2
An existing building with a concrete
 structure is more likely than others
            to be reusable.




                                               WWW. NRMCA.ORG
  Incidental
    Credits
     Indoor
   Environmental
      Quality
   Credit 4.1, 4.2, 4.3:
 Low-Emitting Materials
• Adhesives & Sealants
  • Paints & Coatings
   • Carpet Systems
         Credit 5:
    Indoor Chemical &
       Pollutant Source
            Control
        Credit 7.1:
     Thermal Comfort       WWW. NRMCA.ORG
 Low Emitting Materials             Credits 4.1, 4.2, 4.3
Indoor Chemical & Pollutant Source Control      Credit 5
Thermal Comfort                               Credit 7.1

            Credit 4.1, 4.2, 4.3
Low VOC adhesives & sealants (used as
   fillers as opposed to coatings) must
      be used in conjunction with any
     concrete work. Finished floors of
       concrete reduce the amount of
              carpeting needed.

               Credit 7.1
   The thermal mass of concrete may
    provide important forms of thermal
                 storage
                                              WWW. NRMCA.ORG
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                          LEED® Summary
       Category                           Number of Points
                                Total         Possible Using Concrete
                               Possible
                                            Number          % of Total
     Sustainable Sites           14           3                21%
      Water Efficiency            5           0                 0
   Energy & Atmosphere           17           10               59%
   Materials & Resources         13           7                54%
Indoor Environmental quality     15           0                 0

     Innovation Credits           4           ?                 ?
     LEED-accredited              1           0                 0
       professional

      Total Points               69           20               29%

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             LEED® Certification Benefits


   Third party validation of achievement
   LEED® certification plaque to mount on building
   Official certificate from the USGBC
   Marketing exposure through USGBC Web site, case studies, media
    coverage
   Qualification for possible local, state or federal government
    incentives
   Possibility of future local, state or federal legislation that will
    mandate a certain level of LEED® certification




                                                                WWW. NRMCA.ORG
                                      Summary
   Sustainable Development
       “Green Building”
           “Development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future
            generations to meet their own needs.”

   U.S. Green Building Council (USGB)
       Developer and administrator of the LEED® Green Building Rating System
   LEED® - A leading-edge system for designing, constructing, operating and
    certifying the world’s greenest buildings.
   LEED® - Categories:
       Sustainable site planning
       Safeguarding water and water efficiency
       Energy efficiency and renewable energy
       Conservation of materials and resources
       Indoor environmental quality

   CONCRETE - Is a major contributor to earning points necessary for
    LEED® Certification.




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Thank you




            WWW. NRMCA.ORG