Configuring QoS for IEEE 802 by jlhd32

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Link Aggregation is an important technology, the bandwidth is used to merge and create a resilient redundant links. It can also be used to establish a Gigabit Ethernet switch between the multi-gigabit connections, or the aggregate Fast Ethernet, FDDI or other aircraft, such as lower co-gigabit link. With more than one destination in the destination of the physical link switch, through distribution across the physical link to the data received will be forwarded to the destination data. Included in the received data in accordance with the destination address and source address to the receive data stream selection dispersed column. Dispersed out of the physical link selected one of the whereabouts of the destination, rather than the potential of different data streams of different physical links, thereby allocated across the physical link to forward the received data to receive data, while maintaining the order of frames in the data stream .

More Info
									Appendix D
Configuring QoS for IEEE 802.3ad Link
Aggregation Interfaces

             This appendix describes how to configure QoS for 802.3ad link aggregation
             interfaces, and contains the following sections:

                 Overview on page 109

                 QoS over 802.3ad LAG Considerations on page 116

                 Enabling Default Subscriber Load Balancing on page 116

                 Configuring the Scheduler Hierarchy for Load Balancing on page 117

                 Configuring Load Rebalancing for 802.3ad Link Aggregation on page 119

                 Monitoring Ethernet Configurations for QoS on page 121

                 JUNOSe Command Reference Guide Updates on page 123

             For more information about configuring Ethernet for QoS, see JUNOSe Quality of
             Service Configuration Guide, Chapter 8, Configuring ATM, Ethernet, and L2TP for QoS.
             This appendix supplements the information provided in that chapter.


Overview
             You can configure QoS for 802.3ad link aggregation interfaces. To ensure that QoS
             is applied properly to the interface column, you configure the QoS profile using
             either a hashed load-balancing scheme or a subscriber load-balancing scheme.

             For hashed load balancing, you configure the scheduler hierarchy with Ethernet
             queues, and the system replicates them on each link within the link aggregation
             group (LAG). The system demultiplexes each packet to one of the active links in the
             LAG using a random hash generated by fields in the packet header. For example,
             when an IP packet is routed to a LAG, the hash algorithm is based on the IP Source
             Address and Destination Address in the IP header.




                                                                                         Overview   109
  JUNOSe 8.0.1 Release Notes




                               For subscriber load balancing, you configure the scheduler hierarchy with IP, VLAN,
                               and S-VLAN queues and the system allocates them to individual ports in the LAG.
                               The system demultiplexes each packet to an active link based on the subinterface
                               underlying the egress interface. For example, when an IP packet is routed to an IP
                               interface over a LAG, the system binds the underlying VLAN, PPPoE, or MPLS
                               subinterface to one of the active links in the LAG. The packet is transmitted over the
                               interface.

                               Most network operators configure QoS over 802.3ad LAGs using subscriber load
                               balancing to take advantage of subscriber class-based queueing (SCBQ) features.
                               However, configuring hashed load balancing is useful for achieving fine-grained
                               distribution of multicast VLAN traffic or for any high bandwidth VLAN that does not
                               require shared shaping.

                               To ensure that QoS is symmetrically applied to all the links, the router periodically
                               rebalances the traffic on the LAG. You can control the load-balancing parameters.

                               For a list of modules that support 802.3ad link aggregation, see the ERX Module
                               Guide and the E320 Module Guide.


       Hashed Load Balancing
                               To configure hashed load balancing, you configure a scheduler hierarchy with
                               Ethernet queues and the system replicates the queues for each link within the LAG.
                               The system shares the traffic equally across the links based on the distribution
                               characteristics defined in the hash algorithm.

                               Because all traffic is carried in Ethernet queues, per-subscriber QoS features such as
                               shared shaping for VLANs are not available.

                               Sample Scheduler Hierarchy for Hashed Load Balancing
                               Figure 1 displays a sample 802.3ad link aggregation scheduler hierarchy that uses
                               hashed load balancing.

                               The Gigabit Ethernet interfaces are on the same line module and are members of a
                               LAG. The system dynamically balances traffic between the Ethernet queues on the
                               two ports.




110     Overview
                                                                        Appendix D: Configuring QoS for IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Interfaces




Figure 1: 802.3ad Link Aggregation Scheduler Hierarchy


              Fast Ethernet interface 3/0 Fast Ethernet interface 3/0                  Fast Ethernet interface 3/1 Fast Ethernet interface 3/1
                    Traffic class 1             Traffic class 2                              Traffic class 1             Traffic class 2



Fast Ethernet 3/0                                                       Fast Ethernet 3/1
   best-effort                                                             best-effort
                     Traffic-class                Traffic-class                               Traffic-class                Traffic-class
                       group 1                      group 2                                     group 1                      group 2



    interface                                                                interface




                                                                                                                                           g016435
 gigabitEthernet                                                          gigabitEthernet
       3/0                                                                      3/1


Subscriber Load Balancing
                                To configure subscriber load balancing, you configure a scheduler hierarchy with
                                nodes and queues for IP, VLANs, and S-VLANs. The system distributes those nodes
                                and queues in the scheduler hierarchy over the ports within the LAG using a
                                technique called partitioning.

                                Ethernet queues used for hashed load balancing are always present in the scheduler
                                hierarchy.

                                To ensure that QoS is symmetrically applied to all the links, the router periodically
                                rebalances the load within the LAG using a hash algorithm. You can control the
                                load-balancing parameters and configure the system to dynamically rebalance. For
                                more information, see Configuring Load Rebalancing for 802.3ad Link Aggregation on
                                page 119.

                                Partitioning the Scheduler Hierarchy
                                The system then partitions the scheduler hierarchy by binding the IP, VLAN,
                                L2TP session, and MPLS resources for each subscriber to a selected link within the
                                LAG at the time the subscriber interface is configured.

                                S-VLANs
                                The system clones S-VLAN nodes and queues on each link in the LAG. The system
                                clone S-VLANs so it can allocate subscribers that share a common S-VLAN ID to
                                different links within the LAG. S-VLAN nodes and queues are the only resources that
                                are cloned; the system always allocates nodes and queues for other interface types
                                to a single selected link.

                                Cloning S-VLAN nodes enables fine-grained load balancing within the LAG because
                                VLANs within the S-VLAN can be allocated to the link with the least traffic. However,
                                cloned S-VLANs can introduce anomalous scheduling behavior. A shaped S-VLAN
                                node within the LAG shapes traffic on a per-link basis. Shaping a LAG S-VLAN node
                                to 2 Mbps on a LAG with 2 links can enable up to 4 Mbps of traffic (2 Mbps per link).



                                                                                                                                     Overview        111
  JUNOSe 8.0.1 Release Notes




                               Shared shaping on an S-VLAN within a LAG has the same behavior; the LAG S-VLAN
                               that is shared shaped to 10 Mbps on a LAG with 2 ports allows up to 20 Mbps of
                               traffic; 10 Mbps for each link.

                               PPPoE over VLANs
                               The system binds PPPoE subscribers stacked over a common VLAN to the same link
                               within the LAG. Because the underlying VLAN node is allocated to a single link, the
                               system allocates all traffic over that VLAN to that link.

                               PPPoE over Ethernet (No VLANs)
                               The system allocates subscribers to each link independently. There are no S-VLAN
                               nodes to clone, and no related VLAN nodes that require allocation on the same link.

                               MPLS over LAG
                               For QoS purposes, the system considers base tunnels as logical interfaces, but does
                               not consider stacked tunnels. The system assigns MPLS base tunnels stacked over
                               VLANs to the link to which the VLAN is assigned.

                               Sample Scheduler Hierarchy for Subscriber Load Balancing
                               Figure 2 on page 113 displays a scheduler hierarchy for the Gigabit Ethernet
                               interface in slot 3, port 0. Figure 3 on page 113 displays the scheduler hierarchy for
                               the Gigabit Ethernet interface in slot 3, port 1.

                               The Ethernet queues are shown in gray; they are not bound to a link in the LAG and
                               are replicated for each link in the LAG. These queues are used for subscribers with
                               QoS profiles that indicate Ethernet queues, and for traffic classes other than
                               best-effort, traffic class 1, and traffic class 2.

                               When partitioning the scheduler hierarchy that includes 1000 VLAN subinterfaces,
                               the system binds 500 of the subinterfaces to port 0, and binds another 500 to port
                               1. The binding for a given VLAN subinterface is arbitrary.

                               The scheduler nodes for a given VLAN subinterface are always allocated to the same
                               port within the LAG. In this example, the scheduler nodes for VLAN 0,0 are all
                               allocated to Gigabit Ethernet interface in slot 3, port 0.

                               S-VLAN nodes and queues are cloned for each link in the LAG. S-VLAN nodes in
                               each traffic-class group are shown identically on both ports.




112     Overview
                                                               Appendix D: Configuring QoS for IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Interfaces




Figure 2: Subscriber Load-Balanced Scheduler Hierarchy for Port 0


    VLAN 0, 0 to 0, 500            VLAN 3, 0 to 3, 500                 VLAN 0, 0 to 3, 500          VLAN 0, 0 to 3, 500
       Best-effort                    Best-effort                        Traffic class 1              Traffic class 2




 VLAN 0, 0       VLAN 0, z      VLAN 3, 1      VLAN 3, z         S-VLAN 0           S-VLAN 3     S-VLAN 0        S-VLAN 3




                                                                          Traffic-class                Traffic-class
        S-VLAN 0                       S-VLAN 3
                                                                            group 1                      group 2



                                                       interface




                                                                                                                               g016433
                                                    gigabitEthernet
                                                          3/0

Figure 3: Subscriber Load-Balanced Scheduler Hierarchy for Port 1


   VLAN 0, 500 to 0, 999          VLAN 3, 500 to 3, 999               VLAN 0, 500 to 3, 999        VLAN 0, 500 to 3, 999
       Best-effort                    Best-effort                        Traffic class 1              Traffic class 2




 VLAN 0, 0       VLAN 0, z      VLAN 3, 1      VLAN 3, z         S-VLAN 0           S-VLAN 3     S-VLAN 0        S-VLAN 3




        S-VLAN 0                       S-VLAN 3                           Traffic-class                Traffic-class
                                                                            group 1                      group 2



                                                       interface
                                                                                                                               g016434




                                                    gigabitEthernet
                                                          3/1


                             Subscriber Allocation and Behavior
                             You can configure upper-layer subinterfaces over a LAG interface, including VLANs,
                             PPPoE, and MPLS.

                             The system balances any upper-layer subinterfaces so that each active link in the
                             LAG carriers an equal number of upper-layer subinterfaces. For this purpose, the
                             system counts each upper-layer interface as a single subscriber, regardless of the
                             number of forwarding interfaces stacked above it.


                                                                                                                          Overview       113
  JUNOSe 8.0.1 Release Notes




                                       Figure 4 displays a sample allocation of subscribers.

       Figure 4: Subscriber Allocation and Load Balancing


             VLAN 0, 0 to 0, 999                 VLAN 3, 0 to 6, 999        VLAN 0, 0 to 0, 999                VLAN 0, 0 to 2, 999
                Best-effort                        Traffic class 1             Best-effort                       Traffic class 1




          VLAN 0, 0       VLAN 0, z        S-VLAN L3         S-VLAN L6   VLAN 0, 0      VLAN 0, z        S-VLAN L0         S-VLAN L2




                   S-VLAN L0                        Traffic-class               S-VLAN L1                         Traffic-class
                                                      group 1                                                       group 1



                                  interface                                                     interface
                               gigabitEthernet                                               gigabitEthernet




                                                                                                                                     g016436
                                     3/0                                                           3/1

                                       In an ideal QoS configuration, queues and nodes are stacked over a single port that
                                       corresponds to a LAG, with the port bandwidth equal to the sum of the overall port
                                       bandwidth.

                                       However, the actual LAG behavior is different. No level 1 node or queue can exceed
                                       the bandwidth of a link. The relative weighting of queues and nodes results in
                                       proportional bandwidth allocation only within a link, but not across the entire LAG.
                                       Actual traffic might not be evenly balanced across links in the LAG, resulting in
                                       latency and loss on one link, while another link may be lightly loaded.

                                       Even though relative weighting is different on a LAG, shaping and shared shaping in
                                       the partitioned scheduler hierarchy operate in the same way as a typical Ethernet
                                       configuration.


       Munged QoS Profiles and Load Balancing
                                       To determine whether to use hashed load balancing or subscriber load balancing,
                                       the system munges a QoS profile for a subscriber.

                                       In typical Ethernet configurations, the munged QoS profile for a given subscriber
                                       interface comprises the accumulated rules of the QoS profiles attached below the
                                       subscriber interface in the interface column. Rules in higher-attached QoS profiles
                                       override or eclipse rules in lower-attached QoS profiles. For example, rules from
                                       specific interface attachments such as a VLAN override those from attachments at
                                       S-VLANs or ports. For more information about the munge algorithm, see JUNOSe
                                       Quality of Service Configuration Guide, Chapter 7, Configuring QoS Profiles.

                                       When applying QoS to LAGs, the system uses a modified algorithm to munge QoS
                                       profile attachments. The system automatically builds the munged QoS profile using
                                       the rules in the QoS profile attached at the LAG interface.


114     Overview
                                                Appendix D: Configuring QoS for IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Interfaces




                  For example, the munged Qos profile for VLAN 0,0 consists of the munge of:

                          Attachment 1—QoS profile attached to the VLAN

                          Attachment 2—QoS profile attached to the S-VLAN

                          Attachment 3—QoS profile attached to the LAG

                  If there is no QoS profile attached to the LAG, the system locates the lag-default QoS
                  profile indicated in the qos-port-type-profile command. For more information
                  about configuring the lag-default QoS profile for default subscriber load balancing,
                  see Enabling Default Subscriber Load Balancing on page 116.

                  If the resulting QoS profile specifies only Ethernet queues, the system uses the hash
                  algorithm to balance the links. If the resulting QoS profile specifies any VLAN, IP, or
                  L2TP-Session queues, then the system uses subscriber load balancing.


802.3ad Link Aggregation and QoS Parameters
                  You can create parameter instances for IEEE 803.ad LAG interfaces. A parameter
                  instance for LAG can control an Ethernet port or a node, but you cannot create
                  parameter instances for the Ethernet interfaces within the LAG.

                  For example, a LAG instance can specify a shaping rate of 100 Mbps on an Ethernet
                  port or a group node. The system shapes all Ethernet ports or group nodes to the
                  same rate within the LAG. Using load balancing, the system strives to balance the
                  traffic each link equally.

                  For more information about configuring QoS parameters, see JUNOSe Quality of
                  Service Configuration Guide, Chapter 9, Configuring QoS Parameters.


QoS and Ethernet Link Redundancy
                  You can configure Ethernet link redundancy for LAG interfaces. When you configure
                  QoS for those links, be sure to consider the following behaviors.

                  For more information about Ethernet link redundancy, see JUNOSe Physical Layer
                  Configuration Guide, Chapter 6, Configuring Ethernet Interfaces.

                  Active Link Failure
                  When an active link fails, traffic that is hashed-load balanced is redirected onto the
                  remaining active links in the LAG. Traffic that is hashed-load balanced might be lost
                  on the disabled link, but from the moment of switchover, traffic arriving from the
                  fabric on the egress line module is directed towards one of the remaining hashed
                  load-balanced queues.

                  Subscriber load-balanced traffic takes more time to reestablish on active links
                  because of the amount of computation (approximately 3 ms per subscriber). During
                  this time period, traffic directed to the disabled link might be lost.

                  Administratively Disabling a Link
                  When a link is administratively disabled, the system immediately redirects traffic
                  from the link to other links in the LAG.


                                                                                                        Overview      115
  JUNOSe 8.0.1 Release Notes




                                   Adding a New Link to the LAG
                                   When you add a new link to the LAG, the system immediately sends traffic that is
                                   hashed-load balanced to the link. Traffic that is subscriber-load balanced moves to
                                   the new link as new subscribers log in. The system automatically rebalances traffic
                                   to the new link based on the load rebalance configuration for the LAG.


       QoS over 802.3ad LAG Considerations
                                   When you configure QoS over 802.3ad LAGs, be sure to consider the following
                                   behaviors:

                                       QoS profiles cannot be attached to Ethernet ports if the port is a member of a
                                       LAG. In typical QoS configurations, the Ethernet interface is considered the root
                                       of the interface hierarchy. When you configure QoS for 802.3ad link
                                       aggregation, the LAG interface is considered the root of the interface hierarchy.

                                       You cannot configure hierarchical QoS for IP configured directly over a LAG
                                       interface.

                                       Do not attach qos-profiles to IP or VLAN subinterfaces in a LAG that contain
                                       downreferences (that is, rules for S-VLAN or Ethernet nodes or queues). QoS
                                       profiles attached at subinterfaces above a LAG that also include downreference
                                       create an asymmetric scheduler hierarchy. For example, one Ethernet port
                                       might be shaped and not another.

                                       Also, if the QoS profile specifies only Ethernet, then the traffic sent to the
                                       subinterface might be only partially affected by the QoS profile, or not at all.
                                       The traffic can be allocated to another port entirely.


       Enabling Default Subscriber Load Balancing
                                   The factory default contents of the lag-default QoS profile include an Ethernet
                                   queue and the best-effort traffic class.

                                   When you use the lag-default QoS profile, the system automatically sends traffic to
                                   the Ethernet queue and uses hash load balancing for the Ethernet queues.

                                   To enable subscriber load balancing as the default behavior for all LAGs, issue the
                                   following command:

                                       host1(config)#qos-port-type-profile lag qos-profile ethernet-default


        qos-port-type-profile
                                       Use to associate a QoS profile with all the ports of an interface type.
                                       For configuring QoS over LAG interfaces, use the lag interface type.
                                       A profile attached to a port must specify a queue for each forwarding interface
                                       type in the best-effort traffic class.
                                       Example
                                       host1(config)#qos-port-type-profile lag qos-profile hashed-lag



116     QoS over 802.3ad LAG Considerations
                                                 Appendix D: Configuring QoS for IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Interfaces




                       To restore the default, issue the qos-port-type-profile lag qos-profile
                       ethernet-default command.
                       There is no no version.


Configuring the Scheduler Hierarchy for Load Balancing
                   The type of load balancing that the system performs depends on the configuration
                   of the scheduler hierarchy in the QoS profile. These sections describe how to
                   configure a QoS profile for hashed load balancing and a QoS profile for subscriber
                   load balancing.


Configuring Hashed Load Balancing
                   To configure the scheduler hierarchy for hashed load balancing:

                   1. Configure a QoS profile.

                       host1(config)#qos-profile hashed-lag

                   2. Configure the nodes and queues, including an Ethernet queue.

                       host1(config-qos-profile)#ethernet queue traffic-class best-effort
                       host1(config-qos-profile)#ethernet queue traffic-class tc1
                       host1(config-qos-profile)#ethernet queue traffic-class tc2

                   3. Create the LAG interface and attach the QoS profile.

                       host1(config)#interface lag lg1
                       host1(config-if)#qos-profile hashed-lag

                   Configuring Subscriber Load Balancing
                   To configure the scheduler hierarchy for subscriber load balancing:

                   1. Configure the QoS profile.

                       host1(config)#qos-profile subscriber-lag

                   2. Configure the queues and nodes for VLANs and S-VLANs.

                       host1(config-qos-profile)#vlan queue traffic-class best-effort
                       host1(config-qos-profile)#vlan queue traffic-class tc1
                       host1(config-qos-profile)#vlan node scheduler-profile subscriber
                       host1(config-qos-profile)#svlan node scheduler-profile svlan
                       host1(config-qos-profile)#svlan node group g1 scheduler-profile svlan

                   3. Create the LAG interface and assign member interfaces.

                       host1(config)#interface lag lg1
                       host1(config-if)#member-interface gigabitEthernet 3/0
                       host1(config-if)#member-interface gigabitEthernet 3/1

                   4. Attach the QoS profile to the LAG interface.

                       host1(config-if)#qos-profile subscriber-lag

                                                            Configuring the Scheduler Hierarchy for Load Balancing     117
  JUNOSe 8.0.1 Release Notes




                interface lag
                                          Use to create an IEEE 802.3ad LAG interface, also known as an LAG bundle, or a
                                          subinterface for the LAG bundle.
                                          Examples
                                          host1(config)#interface lag boston
                                          host1(config)#interface lag boston.2
                                          host1(config)#interface lag boston.2.1

                                          Use the no version to delete the LAG bundle.

           member-interface
                                          Use to add a Fast Ethernet interface or Gigabit Ethernet interface, also known as
                                          a bundle member, to a LAG bundle.
                                          Example
                                          host1(config-if)#member-interface fastEthernet 4/0

                                          Use the no version to remove the specified Ethernet link from the bundle.

                          node
                                          Use to configure a scheduler node for each interface of the specified type.
                                          The optional scheduler profile supplies a relative weight and potentially a
                                          shaping rate to be applied at the scheduler node.

                                     NOTE: For ASIC modules, you cannot associate a scheduler profile with a port-type
                                     interface unless you also specify the strict-priority group.

                                          Example
                                          host1(config-qos-profile)#ip node scheduler-profile scheduler1 group strict-priority

                                          Use the no version to remove this rule from the QoS profile.

                   qos-profile
                                          Use to create a QoS profile and to enter QoS Profile Configuration mode.
                                          Example
                                          host1(config)#qos-profile qosp-vlan-queuing
                                          host1(config-qos-profile)#

                                          Use the no version to remove the QoS profile.




118     Configuring the Scheduler Hierarchy for Load Balancing
                                                   Appendix D: Configuring QoS for IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Interfaces




            queue
                         Use to configure a queue for each interface in the specified traffic class.
                         You can include any of the following profiles:
                             The scheduler profile supplies a relative weight and potentially a shaping
                             rate to be applied at the queue.
                             The queue profile supplies threshold information for the queue if the router
                             defaults are not appropriate.
                             The drop profile supplies dropping behavior of a set of egress queues.
                         Each queue traffic class can appear in only one traffic-class group.
                         Example
                         host1(config-qos-profile)#atm queue traffic-class strictPriority

                         Use the no version to remove this rule from the QoS profile.


Configuring Load Rebalancing for 802.3ad Link Aggregation
                     You can configure the algorithm that the system uses to rebalance the links in a
                     LAG.

                     You can control the parameters of the load-rebalancing algorithm, including the
                     time period over which the system rebalances. You can also configure the algorithm
                     to dynamically rebalance the LAG using existing parameters.


Configuring Load-Rebalancing Parameters
                     To configure load-rebalancing parameters:

                     1. Configure the LAG interface.

                         host1(config)#interface lag lg1

                     2. Configure parameters that guide the system to rebalance.

                         host1(config-if)#load-rebalance period 600 start-threshold 100 stop-threshold 20


Configuring the System to Dynamically Rebalance the LAG
                     To configure the system to dynamically rebalance the LAG, issue the following
                     command:

                         host1(config-if)#load-rebalance


    load-rebalance
                         Use to configure the algorithm that the system uses to rebalance the links in a
                         LAG.
                         To configure the system to dynamically rebalance the LAG using existing
                         parameters, issue the load-rebalance command without any keywords.
                         Use the period keyword to configure the time period for rebalancing. For
                         example, a period of 120 specifies that rebalancing occur once every 2 minutes.

                                                           Configuring Load Rebalancing for 802.3ad Link Aggregation     119
  JUNOSe 8.0.1 Release Notes




                                         Use the start-threshold keyword to configure the amount of imbalance in the
                                         LAG that triggers the algorithm to start rebalancing. The default is 0 percent.
                                         Optionally, you can specify the unit of measure by using one of the following
                                         keywords:
                                              percent—Specifies that the amount of imbalance is measured as a
                                              percentage of the average load per link. The range is 0–100 percent.
                                              For example, the average load per link in a LAG is 500. Specifying
                                              start-threshold 5 percent indicates that the algorithm rebalances any link
                                              that deviates from the average load per link by 25 (5 percent of 500).

                                              subscribers—Specifies that the amount of imbalance is measured by the
                                              number of subscribers from the average subscriber count in the LAG. The
                                              range is 0–10000.
                                              For example, specifying start-threshold 20 subscribers indicates that the
                                              algorithm rebalances any link with a subscriber count that differs from the
                                              average subscriber count by more than 20.

                                         Use the stop-threshold keyword to specify the amount of imbalance in the LAG
                                         that triggers the algorithm to stop rebalancing. The algorithm continues
                                         rebalancing until this value is reached. The default is 0 percent. Optionally, you
                                         can specify the unit of measure by issuing one of the following keywords:
                                              percent—Specifies that the amount of imbalance is measured as a
                                              percentage of the average load per link. The range is 0–100 percent.
                                              For example, the average load per link in a LAG is 500. Specifying the
                                              stop-threshold 2 percent command indicates that the algorithm stops
                                              within 10 of 500 (2 percent of 500). In this case, the algorithm stops when
                                              the links are at 510 and 490.

                                              subscribers—Specifies that the amount of imbalance is measured by the
                                              number of subscribers. The range is 0–10000.
                                              For example, specifying stop-threshold 100 subscribers indicates that the
                                              algorithm continues until each link in the LAG is within 100 subscribers of
                                              the average subscriber count.

                                         Use the maximum-improvement keyword to specify the maximum number of
                                         links to rebalance in the LAG per period. The default is 100 percent. Optionally,
                                         you can specify the unit of measure by issuing one of the following keywords:
                                              percent—Specifies that the maximum number of links is measured as a
                                              percentage of the total links. The range is 0–100 percent.
                                              For example, specifying maximum-improvement 1 percent indicates that
                                              the algorithm rebalances 10 links per period (1 percent of 1000).

                                              subscribers—Specifies that the maximum number of links is measured by
                                              the number of subscribers. The range is 0–10000 subscribers.
                                              For example, specifying maximum-improvement 40 subscribers indicates
                                              that the algorithm rebalances 40 subscribers per period.

                                         Example 1—Forces the algorithm to dynamically rebalance the LAG
                                         host1(config-if)#load-rebalance



120     Configuring Load Rebalancing for 802.3ad Link Aggregation
                                                      Appendix D: Configuring QoS for IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Interfaces




                             Example 2—Specifies that the system rebalance within 120 seconds, can
                             accept imbalance in the LAG in the range 20–100 percent, and can move 300
                             subscribers to other ports during that time
                             host1(config-if)#load-rebalance period 120 start-threshold 20 percent
                             stop-threshold 100 percent maximum-improvement 300

                             Use the no version to restore the defaults.


Monitoring Ethernet Configurations for QoS
                         To monitor Ethernet configurations for QoS, use the following commands.

show interfaces fastEthernet
show interfaces gigabitEthernet
                            Use to display Ethernet QoS shaping mode status for a specific Fast Ethernet or
                            Gigabit Ethernet interface. For a detailed description of all fields displayed by
                            these commands, see the JUNOSe Physical Layer Configuration Guide.
                             Related field descriptions
                                 Administrative qos-shaping-mode—QoS shaping mode: disabled, frame,
                                 cell, none
                                 Operational qos-shaping-mode—QoS shaping mode: disabled, frame, cell,
                                 none
                                 Attached QoS profile—QoS profile attachment at or below the displayed
                                 interface. For example, if the interface being displayed is a VLAN
                                 subinterface, and the attachment is at the Gigabit Ethernet interface, the
                                 Gigabit Ethernet attachment is displayed.
                             Example
                             host1#show interfaces gigabitEthernet 6/0
                             GigEthernet6/0 is Up, Administrative status is Up
                               Hardware is Intel 21440, address is 0090.1a40.5508
                               MAU is 100BASE-TX
                               MTU: Operational 1522, Administrative 1522
                               Duplex Mode: Operational Full Duplex, Administrative Auto Negotiate
                               Speed: Operational 100 Mbps, Administrative Auto Negotiate

                               5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec
                               5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec

                               In: Bytes 0, Unicast 0
                                Multicast 0, Broadcast 0
                                Errors 0, Discards 0, Mac Errors 0, Alignment 0
                                CRC 0, Too Longs 0, Symbol Errors 0
                               Out: Bytes 64, Unicast 0
                                Multicast 0, Broadcast 1
                                Errors 0, Discards 0, Mac Errors 0, Deferred 0, No Carrier 0
                                Collisions: Single 0, Multiple 0, Late 0, Excessive 0

                             Administrative qos-shaping-mode: cell
                             Operational qos-shaping-mode: cell

                             Attached QoS profile: ss




                                                                             Monitoring Ethernet Configurations for QoS     121
  JUNOSe 8.0.1 Release Notes




       show interfaces lag members
                                 Use to display information about the Ethernet member links in all IEEE 802.3ad
                                 link aggregation group (LAG) bundles configured on the router, or about the
                                 member links in a specified IEEE 802.3ad LAG bundle.
                                          Field descriptions
                                               Lag—Name of the LAG bundle
                                               Administrative status—Operational state that you configured for the LAG
                                               QoS parameter—QoS parameter instance at the displayed interface
                                               Attached QoS profile—QoS profile attachment at the displayed interface
                                               Member-interface—Status of the member interface in the bundle
                                                     Interface Specifier—Status of the hardware on this interface (Up or
                                                     Down)
                                                     LACP active—Ethernet link participates in the protocol regardless of
                                                     whether its Partner member link is set to active or passive LACP PDU
                                                     participation
                                                     LACP passive—Ethernet link transmits LACP PDUs only when it
                                                     receives LACP PDUs from its Partner link
                                                     collecting/distributing—Ethernet link is actively collecting incoming
                                                     frames and distributing outgoing frames
                                                     detached—Ethernet link is detached from the LAG bundle due to
                                                     protocol changes or system constraints
                                                     waiting—Ethernet link is waiting to attach to a LAG bundle
                                          Example
                                          host1#show interfaces lag lg0 members

                                          Lag lg0 is Up, Administrative status is Up
                                           MAC Address is 0090.1a40.01be
                                           MTU: Operational 1526
                                           Duplex Mode: Operational Full Duplex
                                           Speed: Operational 100 Mbps
                                           System Priority 32768 System MAC Address is 0090.1a00.00e0 key 8
                                           Partner System Priority 0 System MAC Address is 0000.0000.0000 key 0

                                          QoS parameter: vlan 1500000

                                          Attached QoS profile: eth1

                                              Member-interface FastEthernet11/2 is Up
                                                 (LACP disabled, state collecting/distributing)
                                              Member-interface FastEthernet11/3 is Down
                                                 (LACP disabled, state waiting)
                                              Member-interface FastEthernet11/4 is Up
                                                 (LACP disabled, state collecting/distributing)




122     Monitoring Ethernet Configurations for QoS
                                                     Appendix D: Configuring QoS for IEEE 802.3ad Link Aggregation Interfaces




JUNOSe Command Reference Guide Updates
                      This section supplements the JUNOSe 8.0.x Command Reference Guide and describes
                      the new commands added and updated to configure the QoS for 802.3ad link
                      aggregation interfaces.


instance-interface-type

        Description   Assigns an instance-interface type to a QoS parameter definition. Instance-interface
                      types indicate the interfaces for which QoS clients can assign QoS parameter
                      instances. You can specify up to eight instance-interface types for each parameter
                      definition. The no version removes the specified instance-interface type from the
                      parameter definition.

            Syntax    instance-interface-type instanceInterfaceType
                      no instance-interface-type { instanceInterfaceType | all }

                          instanceInterfaceType—One of the following instance-interface types: atm,
                          atm-vc, atm-vp, bridge, cbf, ethernet, fr-vc, ip, ip-tunnel, ipv6, lag, l2tp-session,
                          l2tp-tunnel, lsp, pppoe, serial, server-port, svlan, vlan
                          all—Removes all instance-interface types

             Mode     QoS Parameter Definition




                                                                         JUNOSe Command Reference Guide Updates            123
  JUNOSe 8.0.1 Release Notes




       load-rebalance

                    Description   Configures the QoS algorithm for rebalancing the links in an 802.3ad link
                                  aggregation group (LAG). To configure the algorithm to dynamically rebalance the
                                  LAG using existing parameters, issue the load-rebalance command without any
                                  keywords. The no version restores the default parameters.

                         Syntax   [ no ] load-rebalance [ period rebalancePeriod start-threshold rebalanceStartThreshold
                                  [ percent | subscribers ] stop-threshold rebalanceStopThreshold
                                  [ percent | subscribers ] maximum-improvement rebalanceMaximumImprovement
                                  [ percent | subscribers ] ]
                                      rebalancePeriod—Time period for rebalancing in seconds; in the range
                                      0–86400; the default is 60 seconds
                                      rebalanceStartThreshold—Amount of imbalance in the LAG that triggers the
                                      algorithm to start rebalancing; the default is 0 percent
                                          percent—Specifies that the threshold is measured as a percentage of the
                                          average load per link; in the range 0–100
                                          subscribers—Specifies that the threshold is measured by the number of
                                          subscribers away from the average subscriber count per link in the LAG; in
                                          the range 0–100000
                                      rebalanceStopThreshold—Amount of imbalance in the LAG that triggers the
                                      algorithm to stop rebalancing; the default is 0 percent
                                          percent—Specifies that the amount of imbalance is measured as a
                                          percentage of the average load per link; in the range 0–100
                                          subscribers—Specifies that the threshold is measured by the number of
                                          subscribers away from the average subscriber count link in the LAG; in the
                                          range 0–100000
                                      rebalanceMaximumImprovement—Maximum number of links in the LAG to
                                      rebalance; the default is 100 percent
                                          percent—Specifies that the maximum number of links is measured as a
                                          percentage of the total links; in the range 0–100
                                          subscribers—Specifies that the maximum number of links is measured by
                                          the number of subscribers; in the range 0–100000

                          Mode    Interface Configuration


       qos-port-type-profile

                    Description   Associates a QoS profile with all the ports of a given interface type. There is no no
                                  version for this command.

                         Syntax   qos-port-type-profile typeOfInterface qos-profile qosProfileName
                                      typeOfInterface—One of the following interface types to be associated with the
                                      QoS port-type profile; atm, ethernet, lag, serial, server-port
                                      qosProfileName—Name of the QoS profile

                          Mode    Global Configuration


124     load-rebalance

								
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