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					        Unit 4
Dance for Sustainability


      Years 9-11
        Level 5
Unit 4                            Dance for Sustainability
Years 9-11                        Level 5                   Duration 8-10 lessons

The students will create a dance to highlight the need for New
Zealanders to protect and sustain our native birds and animals.
They will study a range of Te Papa icons that depict either extinct
or endangered wildlife. One icon will be selected and a dance will
be composed based on its shape, habits, reasons for its demise
and one contribution we can make for future sustainability.
Access to the digital resources is through Digistore, Te Pātaka Matihiko
http://www.tki.org.nz/r/digistore/

ID 40545: Embroidered picture of a huia, c1900

                                                                     Access      Digistore
                                                                                 http://www.tki.org.nz/r/digistore/
                                                                     Copyright Reproduced courtesy of the
                                                                               Museum of New Zealand Te Papa
                                                                               Tongarewa
                                                                     Creator     Unidentified
                                                                     Identifiers Museum of New Zealand Te Papa
                                                                                 Tongarewa number PC003937 TLF
                                                                                 resource R5937
                                                                     Source      Museum of New Zealand Te Papa
                                                                                 Tongarewa,
                                                                                 http://www.tepapa.govt.nz


Description
This is an embroidered picture of a female huia bird ('Heteralocha acutirostris') on a branch taking nectar
from the flowers of a rata (a native New Zealand tree). (For notes on the significance of this resource go to
'metadata record' at the end of this description and see the 'educational value' section). The dark-coloured
bird has white-tipped tail feathers, and light orange wattles at the base of its beak. The work has a stylised
Mäori design around the edges of the embroidery and a frame also carved with Mäori designs. It is made from
coloured silks on linen and the frame is kauri (another native New Zealand tree). A small piece of paper
attached to the lower right corner of the linen reads, 'This Bird Was Worked and the Frame Made and
Carved, By an Old Crippled Mäori Named "Rungomai", At Tokomaru Bay - East Coast'. It was made around 1900
and measures 48 cm x 70 cm.
Educational Value
The embroidery was purchased in 1990 by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa as an unusual item
from the early 20th century - the words 'East Coast' refer to a coastal region of the North Island of New
Zealand.The picture shows an extinct species of bird, about the size of a magpie, which was found only in the
North Island of New Zealand - the huia was one of the most ancient New Zealand birds, and only the moa and
kiwi are thought to be older; land clearing and the introduction of rats and dogs (natural predators to the
huia) by both Europeans and Māori and hunting of the birds for their feathers and beaks as personal
adornments, led to a steep decline in the number of huia birds; the last sighting of the huia was in 1907, the
date that is commonly accepted as the date of their extinction.The huia is considered tapu (sacred) by
                                                                                                            2
Māori - to wear a beak or feathers, especially the white-tipped tail feathers, of the huia as ornamentation was
a great honour and one bestowed only on rangatira (chiefs).The bird in the image is a female huia - the male
huia had a markedly different beak style (short and stout as opposed to long, slender, and curved); no other
bird is known to have such a marked distinction in beaks within its own species, the male used his bill to chisel
into outer layers of decaying or live wood, the female used her bill to probe into areas inaccessible to the male
to find insects and their larvae and spiders. In the last two centuries more than 100 species of bird have
disappeared from the Earth, having an impact on people, their communities and cultures - birds are important
for seed dispersal, insect and rodent control, scavenging, and pollination; the disappearance of the huia means
that for the Māori they can no longer see their sacred bird and the chiefs can no longer wear the feathers as
a sign of their status.


ID 43280: South Island Kokako, 1833



                                                 Access      Digistore
                                                             http://www.tki.org.nz/r/digistore/
                                                 Copyright Reproduced courtesy of the Museum of New
                                                           Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
                                                 Creator     Guyard, artist, 1833
                                                 Identifiers Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
                                                             number A69 TLF resource R2668
                                                 Source      Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa,
                                                             http://www.tepapa.govt.nz




Description
This is a hand-coloured engraving of a South Island kōkako ('Callaeas cinerea cinerea'), a sleek, blue-grey
forest bird of moderate size. (For notes on the significance of this resource go to 'metadata record' at the
end of this description and see the 'educational value' section). We know this is a South Island kōkako as its
wattle is orange-red in colour; the North Island kōkako has a blue wattle. Like all kōkako, it has distinctive and
colourful fleshy wattles below the beak, and a velvet-black 'mask' directly below the eyes. The wings are small
and weak for a bird of its size, as it preferred to get about by running and jumping on its long black legs
rather than by flying or gliding. There are pencil sketches of the bird's anatomy towards the bottom of the
engraving. The image is modelled after a painting by ornithological artist Jean Gabriel Pretre (c1800-50),
which he based on a specimen shot in Tasman Bay, New Zealand, in 1827. The engraving is plate 15 from the
atlas of the 'Voyage de la corvette l'Astrolabe' by J S C Dumont d'Urville, 1833, and measures 40 cm x 26.5
cm.
Educational Value
This asset features a unique New Zealand animal now thought to be extinct - there have been no confirmed
sightings of the South Island kōkako since the 1960s (about 400 pairs of North Island kōkako survive), mainly
due to forest clearance and the introduction of predators such as rats, stoats and possums. It is an example
of one the oldest bird species in New Zealand - the kōkako belongs to the endemic New Zealand wattlebirds
(Callaeidae), an ancient family of birds that includes the North and South Island saddleback and the extinct
huia. It demonstrates that early European expeditions to New Zealand provided images of native birds - until
Walter Bullerâs 'Birds of New Zealand' book was published in 1873, expedition reports, such as the 'Voyage
de la corvette l'Astrolabe' and their accompanying atlases of plates, provided the standard images of New
Zealand birds. It depicts a bird entrenched in Māori legend - it was the kōkako that gave Maui (the Māori
trickster hero) water as he fought the sun: it filled its wattles with water and brought it to Maui to quench
                                                                                                               3
his thirst; Maui rewarded the kōkako by making its legs long and slender, enabling the bird to bound through
the forest with ease in search of food.


ID 42518: „White spotted Greyling‟, 1889

                                                           Access      Digistore
                                                                       http://www.tki.org.nz/r/digistore/
                                                           Copyright   Reproduced courtesy of the Museum of
                                                                       New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
                                                           Creator     F E Clarke, artist, 1889
                                                           Identifiers Museum of New Zealand Te Papa
                                                                       Tongarewa number 1992-35-2278/1 TLF
                                                                       resource R4414
                                                           Source      Museum of New Zealand Te Papa
Description                                                            Tongarewa, http://www.tepapa.govt.nz
This is a watercolour of the New Zealand grayling ('Prototroctes oxyrhynchus') by the flora and fauna artist
F E Clarke (1849-99), made in 1889. (For notes on the significance of this resource go to 'metadata record' at
the end of this description and see the 'educational value' section). The fish, also known as upokororo, is long
and slim with slivery-blue hues on the underside. Yellow-brown shades on the back, head and tail fin, pattern
into spots along the back. The words 'White Spotted Greyling. (Nat: Size) (Prototroctes Saleii) Hokitika R.
26th October 1889' are written beneath the image. It measures 12 cm x 27 cm.
Educational Value
This asset illustrates the once-abundant New Zealand grayling, which is now extinct - apart from four
specimens at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa; there are fewer than a dozen museum examples
in the world. It is the only reliable clue to the fish's colouring - it has been described variously as silvery with
slightly brown hues on the back, as a rich red-brown speckled with grey, and as a golden yellow; this lack of
exact information is presumably due to the fact that specimens preserved in formalin or alcohol lose their
colour. It illustrates a fish about which little is known - it lived in streams and estuaries, where it grazed on
algae, grew to 45 cm and weighed up to 1.5 kg; like other native species, the fish probably grew and spawned in
fresh water and then, as newly hatched larvae, were washed out to sea to live for several months. It
illustrates a species that was a valuable food source for Maori, who caught it in long woven traps called hīnaki.
It illustrates a species that became extinct following European settlement - the grayling was widespread in
the early years of settlement, and was even used as bulk fertiliser on market gardens, but by the late 1870s
numbers were declining, and by 1930 it was considered extinct; the introduction of trout almost certainly
contributed to its disappearance, combined with the clearing of vegetation along rivers, resulting in increased
light penetration and raised water temperatures. It illustrates a species that is misnamed - it was not related
to the European or US grayling, but belonged in a separate family, together with one other Australian species.




                                                                                                                 4
Key Competency
Participating and Contributing Through movement the students will explore,
question and form opinions about the concept of sustainability. They will consider
the effect human habitation and the introduction of pests have had on our
environment and they will work with others to discuss and share ideas, to consider
different points of view and to create a dance about sustainability for the local,
national or global community.
Resources
Te Papa assets (two or three copies of each icon and accompanying information):
There are ten assets listed here. The first three are detailed above and the other
seven can be accessed using through Digistore, http://www.tki.org.nz/r/digistore/
Use all or just a selection.
     Embroidered picture of a huia, c1900
     South Island Kokako, 1833
     Hinaki (fish trap)
     Upland Moa skeleton
     Feathers of an upland Moa
     North Island Brown Kiwi
     Wandering Albatross, 1993
     Skulls of Hector‟s and Maui‟s dolphins
     „White spotted greyling‟, (upokororo) 1889
     Fishing for „upokororo‟, 1922
Worksheet 1 – one per student
Worksheet 2 – one per student
One set each of: Tempo Cards (green); Weight Cards (brown); Quality cards
(yellow)
Extinct/Endangered sheets (one of each enlarged to A3,)
„Reasons for extinction‟ sheet (enlarged to A3)
„Protecting our wildlife – what we can do‟ (enlarged to A3)
Tambourine or small drum
Music suggestions:
Electronomicon: Pitch Black – Reptile Room (1), Electric Earth Part 2 (3)
Whale Rider: Lisa Gerrard – Biking Home (4)
Watermark: Enya – River (9)
Moods: Ian Anderson – In a Stone Circle (4)
Websites:
www.wildlife.org.nz
www.kcc.org.nz       Kiwi Conservation Club
www.doc.govt.nz Department of Conservation
                                                                                5
Achievement Objectives: Level 5
The student will:
Developing Practical Knowledge (PK)
Develop a variety of skills, dance techniques, vocabularies and movement practices.
Developing Ideas (DI)
Manipulate the elements and explore the use of choreographic devices and
structures to organise dance movement.
Communicating and Interpreting (CI)
Reflect on and describe how choreography communicates ideas, feelings, moods
and experiences.

Specific Learning Outcomes
The student can:
LO1: Explore and use the Dance Element of Time to perform movement with
varying tempos (PK and DI)
LO2: Explore and use the Dance Element of Energy to perform movements with
varying weight (PK and DI)
LO3: Explore and use the Dance Element of Energy to perform movements with
varying qualities (PK and DI)
LO4: Create abstract movement based on animal and bird actions (DI)
LO5: Perform a dance about an extinct or endangered animal (CI)

Key Words
Abstract movement: movement to represent an action – not mime.
Air Pathway: a pattern made in the air by the use of body parts (e.g. arm, leg,
head).
Floor Pathway: a direction taken across the floor (zigzag, curved, straight,
diagonal).
Locomotor Movement: movement in which the body travels across space (e.g.
running, creeping, rolling).
Non-Locomotor Movement: movement in which the body remains anchored to one
spot by a body part (e.g. bending, twisting, stretching).
Movement Motif: a movement or gesture that can be elaborated on or developed
in a variety of ways in the process of dance choreography.




                                                                                6
Suggested Learning Sequence

1. What was here before us?
   Show the class ID 40545: Embroidered picture of a huia, c1900
   What is the name of this bird?
   Describe the bird
   What would it eat?
   How would it eat?
   Where do you think it would live?
   Where do you think this bird comes from? What information did you use to
   decide this?

2. Extinct or endangered?
   Divide the class into groups of two or three and allocate a copy of one Te Papa
   asset and the information, plus Worksheet One to each group.
   The groups read the information and answer the questions on the worksheet.
   Display the Extinct and Endangered sheets in a prominent place on the wall.
   Facilitate a class presentation/discussion where each group briefly discusses
   their findings and then attaches their worksheet on the appropriate Extinct or
   Endangered sheet on the wall.

   Summarise the main reasons why the icons have become extinct or endangered
   on the „Reasons for Extinction‟ sheet, and display on the wall. The students
   could write their answers on the sheet themselves.

   What are we doing to prevent more of our wildlife from becoming extinct?
   What can each of us, our families and our communities do to assist this?
   Complete the final A3 sheet: „Protecting our wildlife – what we can do‟
   Some suggestions: Replanting, pest eradication, resiting endangered animals to
   safe islands, keeping dogs under control in the bush, forest protection,
   monitoring new generations of endangered animals, raising awareness of
   conservation through Department of Conservation, Kiwi Conservation Club (KCC)
   and other organisations.




                                                                                7
Practical Dance activities

3. Using tempo
   Have each of the green tempo cards photocopied, cut and laminated.
   Discuss each of the words (slow, fast, increasing and decreasing) and some
   situations where we could apply them to the icons (such as running away from a
   predator, being caught in a set net or on a long line).

   The students move to the sound of a tambourine or the beat of a drum played
   by the teacher (or a student). Vary the tempo of the instrument – slow, fast,
   increasing and decreasing. The students match the tempo of their movements
   to the tempo of the instrument.

   Suggested movements:

      Non-Locomotor – turning head from side to side (carefully), moving eyes
       from side to side, lifting shoulders, shaking a hand, flicking fingers, sitting
       or lying down and lifting knees alternately up and down, lying on stomachs
       and lift heels up and down or out and in, standing and rocking hips from side
       to side, standing and lifting knees alternately up and down, combined arm
       and leg movements such as elbow to knee.

      Locomotor movements – Walking, skipping, galloping, jumping, hopping,
       rolling.

      Work in pairs and select two non-locomotor movements and two locomotor
       movements. Link them, in any order into a sequence. The teacher then calls
       out either “fast”, “slow”; “increasing” or “decreasing” and the students
       perform their sequence accordingly.

      Teach a routine and encourage the students to perform it at different
       tempos. The following routine is 32 counts or 4 x 8 counts in duration.
       (If the roll in Counts 1/5-8 is too challenging for some students, it could be
       exchanged for a walk in a circle, crouch and rise to stand in an unfolding
       curve as in Counts 2/1-8.)




                                                                                    8
Tempo Routine
Counts 1/1-4:
„Grow‟ into a balance on the right leg (arabesque), with the left leg extended
behind (add interesting arm movements)
Counts 1/5-8:
Lower the left leg to place the left knee on the floor behind the front foot.
Place the left hand on the floor and lower to sit on the left hip with the legs
crossed right over left.
Rock around on the buttocks to the right side, placing the right hand on the
floor and lifting up the left hand
Counts 2/1-8:
Cross the left leg over the right and rise to stand in an unfolding curve (build
up the vertebrae over the pelvis with the head rising last)
Counts 3/1-4:
Place right foot out to side (second position) and lunge to the right (push the
right knee diagonally out to the right) as the right arm moves out to the side
and left arm moves up above the head (fourth position with the arms).
Transfer weight to the left leg and lunge on the left, as the left arm moves
out the side and the right arm moves forward in front of the body (third
position with the arms)
Counts 3/5-8:
Half turn in (pull right shoulder back around), on the left foot to face the
back. Look to the right, look to the left
Counts 4/1-4:
Walk forward for 4 steps
Counts 4/5-8:
Step back with the right foot and jump around (180 to face the front)
Invent a final shape and hold for 2 counts



Assessment opportunity:
LO1: Explore the Dance Element of Time to perform movement with varying
tempos




                                                                                   9
4. Using weight
   Have each of the brown „weight‟ cards photocopied, cut and laminated.
   Using non-locomotor and locomotor movement, the students explore ways the
   body can move in response to the words: firm; light; soft; strong; weak and
   heavy.
       Touch the floor using one hand with a soft, strong, weak, firm, light or
         heavy movements
       Wave your hand and pretend you are in these different situations:
         waving to a friend you haven‟t seen for ages (strong or firm); waving to
         someone you think you know but aren‟t sure (weak); waving to a baby
         (soft); waving to someone far away (strong)
       Working alone, push with one hand on the other arm or leg using soft,
         strong, weak, firm, light or heavy actions
       Shake hands with a partner. Pretend that you are: in a business meeting
         (firm); an adult and child (soft); two very old people (light); a nurse and a
         patient (weak); two school mates (strong); two people who want to be the
         boss (heavy – perhaps!)

   How is „light‟ different from „soft‟ or „weak‟?
   How can „firm‟ be different from „strong‟ or „heavy‟?

   Working in pairs, explore firm; light; soft; strong; weak and heavy with full
   body and travelling actions:
   Some suggested ideas to assist students to „perform‟ these words:
       Imagine that you are walking quietly through the bush to check a kiwi
         nest (soft)
       You are lifting a Hinaki (fish trap) which is full of upokororo or grayling
         (heavy)
       You are a Hector‟s Dolphin caught in a net (strong, then weak)
       You are trying to transfer ancient moa feathers to a new display area in
         the Te Papa museum (light)
       Imagine that you are trying to walk through long grass like a moa (firm)
       Imagine that you are trying to release a native bird from a trap (soft)
       You are weaving a Hinaki out of kiekie vines (firm)
       You are clearing a forest and have to pull out a huge log with a rope
         (heavy)
       You are carefully walking around a kokako nest destroyed by a stoat
         (light)
       You are carrying huge packs on your backs (heavy)

                                                                                    10
        You are a huia landing on a rata tree (soft)
        You are wading through a swiftly flowing creek (strong)

  Working in pairs or trios, the students select three „weight‟ actions they have
  explored. They link these into a short sequence, trying to show a clear contrast
  between the movements of each action.

  Present the sequences to another pair or trio and they try to guess the weight
  actions being performed.

  Return to the sequence learned in Activity 3. Rehearse performing it using
  different weight actions or combinations of weight actions.
  For example, perform the sequence as if you have a huge pack on your back, or
  as if you are extremely tired.

  Assessment opportunity:
  LO2: Explore the Dance Element of Energy to perform movements with varying
  weight



5. Using movement qualities

  Sudden, sharp, percussive, smooth, delicate, vibratory, sustained, erratic,
  explosive, collapse
  Have each of the gold movement quality cards photocopied, cut and laminated.
  Use all, or just selection as appropriate for the class.

  As a class, study each of the cards. Some may need defining, such as
  percussive, delicate, vibratory, sustained and erratic.
  A percussive movement could be a tapping or the foot or a slapping of the leg
  as in a haka.
  A delicate movement could be picking up an egg or brushing your hair off your
  face.
  A vibratory movement could be likened to sitting in a fast-moving train.
  A sustained movement could be likened to the pause at the top of a high swing.
  An erratic movement could be likened to an out-of-control car.




                                                                                11
Exploring movement qualities

Percussive: Students sit in a circle.
Clap a rhythm of eight counts, accenting the first and fifth counts. Repeat
several times.
Teach a new rhythm:
 Count       1       2        3       4       5        6       7       8
 Movement Clap       Rest     Clap    Rest    Clap,    Clap,   Rest, CLAP
                                              Clap     Clap    Clap

Have half the class perform the new rhythm and others perform the original
one. Change over after several attempts.
Keeping the same rhythms, explore other movements instead of the clap (such
as body slaps, clicking the fingers, nods or the head, stamping).
Now take the rhythm out into the dance space and have the students move
around performing either one of the rhythms with whatever body percussion
they choose.
Change the tempo by speeding the rhythm up or slowing it down.
Change the weight by performing it softly, firmly, weakly and strongly.

Sustained
Teach a short swing sequence: Students standing, with feet shoulder width
apart. For each of the swings, relax the knees.
    Swing your arms in a large figure eight air pathway on the right side
       followed by the left side (hold arms forward, and swing them down to
       the right, circle them up and over to the left and repeat the circle on
       the left side) – 4 counts
    Swing arms down each side of the body making a „U‟ shaped air pathway,
       backward and forwards – 4 counts
    Repeat from the start, making the movements as large and smooth as
       possible.
There are four moments in the sequence where the idea of sustained movement
could be explored – between each circle and „U‟ pathways. Give the students
time to develop the „feeling‟. Painting pictures of a roller coaster or a wave at
the beach may help.
Music may also help.
Music suggestions: Texas: Southside – Everyday Now (3); Anika Moa: Triumph –
Falling in Love Again (7); The Artistry: Triumph – Preachin‟ (14)

Smooth, sharp, sudden, delicate, vibratory, explosive, collapse
                                                                              12
“Follow me!”
Students move around the dance space in pairs (one behind the other like a
shadow) following instructions from the teacher. Change leaders regularly
through the exercise.
    Walk around the dance space as smoothly as possible, making all your
       changes of direction flowing and continuous
    Now on the beat of the drum, make a sharp turn to change direction
    Continue walking but change direction suddenly whenever you want to
       (your partner will have to follow carefully)
    Whenever you come close to another pair, do an explosive „high five‟
       greeting with them
    You are walking on sharp rocks in bare feet. Delicately lift and place your
       feet
    You are walking in a carriage of a fast-moving train. Everything shakes or
       vibrates
    Join the „Weird Walking‟ club! Move erratically side-by-side by changing
       your walking style at any time: walk backwards, add leg lifts, add kicks,
       add turns, add arm movements
    With your partner, explore different ways to collapse (carefully!)
       Delicately - as if in a faint, suddenly, vibrating as if you have been shot
       by a machine gun, smoothly like a melting ice-cream

Return to the sequence from Activity 3 (which was further explored in Activity
4).

      Find a moment in the sequence where there could be a sustained
       movement (after the balance on one leg and just before the left hand
       and knee touch the floor.) Rehearse the idea of suspending the
       arabesque, then moving smoothly into the roll.

      Make the lunges to the right and left very sudden

      Make the head turns very sharp

      Make the four walks forward very erratic and percussive. Where do you
       go and what movements do you use? (Clapping, slapping thighs, stamping
       feet)

      Make the jump to the front very explosive. How high can you jump?
       What direction will you go?

                                                                               13
        What position are your arms and legs in?

        Instead of holding your final shape, collapse in a heap!

        Optional: add in vibratory and delicate movements

        Rehearse with a partner

See the summary that follows.




                                                                    14
Summary of the sequence with movement qualities added:

Tempo/Movement Quality Routine
Counts 1/1-4:
Balance on the right leg (arabesque), with the left leg extended behind (add
interesting arm movements) SUSTAINED
Counts 1/5-8:
Lower the left leg to place the left knee on the floor behind the front foot.
SMOOTH
Place the left hand on the floor and lower to sit on the left hip with the legs
crossed right over left.
Rock around on the buttocks to the right side, placing the right hand on the floor
and lifting up the left hand
Counts 2/1-8:
Cross the left leg over the right and rise to stand in an unfolding curve (build up
the vertebrae over the pelvis with the head rising last) SMOOTH
Counts 3/1-4:
Place right foot out to side (second position) and lunge to the right (push the right
knee diagonally out to the right) as the right arm moves out to the side and left
arm moves up above the head (fourth position with the arms). SUDDEN
Transfer weight to the left leg and lunge on the left, as the left arm moves out
the side and the right arm moves forward in front of the body (third position with
the arms) SUDDEN
Counts 3/5-8:
Half turn in, on the left foot to face the back. Look to the right, look to the left
SHARP
Counts 4/1-4:
Walk forward for 4 steps ERRATIC & PERCUSSIVE
Counts 4/5-8:
Step backwards with the right foot and jump around (180 to face the front)
EXPLOSIVE
Invent a final shape COLLAPSE

Assessment opportunity:
LO3: Explore the Dance Element of Energy to perform movements with varying
qualities




                                                                                   15
Creating a „Dance for Sustainability‟
The following activities build into a short group dance.
The sequence from Activity 3 can also be incorporated into the dance.

6. Planning a „Dance for Sustainability‟
   (Worksheet 2, - one per student)
   Organise the students into groups of three or four.
   Give them time to select one of the „extinct‟ or „endangered‟ icons and read the
   information about it.
   What are the main features of your icon?
   The huia: the long curved beak
   The kokako: the wattle under its chin
   The grayling: long slim body
   The kiwi: the long beak
   The albatross: Long extended wings
   Hector‟s Dolphin: Long pointed skull, short and strong body
   The moa: Long legs, three toed feet

   What are the main actions your icon would perform (or would have
   performed)?
   Some suggested actions:
       The huia: putting its very long and curved beak in and out of a flower to
         drink the nectar
       The kokako: running and jumping through the forest
       The grayling: struggling in the Hinaki (trap)
       The kiwi: searching for insects on the forest floor
       The albatross: gliding across the oceans
       Hector‟s Dolphin: leaping out of the water
       The moa: walking with giant feet through a swamp.

   Think about the way your icon naturally moved or moves. Select the most
   appropriated weight action for your icon.
   Firm, light, soft, strong, weak and heavy
   Name a contrasting weight action – the opposite action.

   Select two movement qualities for your icon. These may relate to the way
   the icon moved in its natural habitat, or perhaps could reflect the
   movements the icon made when caught in a trap or hooked on a long line or
   when racing away from a predator.
   Sudden, sharp, percussive, smooth, delicate, vibratory, sustained, erratic,
   explosive, collapse

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   Summarise all these decisions on Worksheet 2

7. The Opening Moment: Exploring features of an icon
   The groups explore ways to communicate the main feature/s of their icons,
   using still shapes or movement.
   Suggestions:
       Work together to form the shape of the feature (such as the beak of
          the huia)
       Perform an action one after the other to highlight the feature (such as a
          curved air pathway with the arms from the nose out as far as possible to
          represent the huia‟s beak)
       A varied rolling action with the hands under the chin to represent the
          wattle of the kokako
       Three people making the moas foot in a fan shape.
   These still shapes or movements will form the opening moment of the dance
   and will be repeated during the dance.

8. Exploring actions of an icon
   Each group looks at the two actions they selected for their icon. They create a
   short movement phrase using locomotor and non-locomotor movement to add
   onto their opening moment.
   Suggestions:
       The huia: putting its very long and curved beak in and out of a flower to
          drink the nectar. The students could stand bent over with curved spines,
          making a curved line, connected by left hands on left shoulders while
          they make curved „beak‟ actions with their right arms
       The kokako: a graceful arm action to finish with them tucked in the
          underarms to represent the small wings
       The moa: creeping with exaggerated knee lifts and careful placing of the
          feet.
   If possible, the groups should change their formations for the second action
   and link them together with a smooth transition.

9. The motif: The feature and the two actions
   Groups put Activities 7 and 8 together to create one sequence of movement.
   This sequence becomes a motif, and variations of it are later to be
   performed four more times by changing the „weight‟ and the quality of the
   movement. It is therefore important that the motif is clear and relevant
   to their icon.


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   Assessment opportunity:
   LO4: Create abstract movement based on animal and bird actions.

10. Changing the weight
   The groups refer to the weight actions they chose on Worksheet 2. They
   explore ways they can perform their motif (from Activity 9) in two different
   ways by applying these actions.
   For example, the sequence is performed as softly as possible, followed by a big
   contrast to very strong movements.
   What formations will the dancers create?
   What direction/s will they travel in? Where will their focus be?
   How can you make the contrast between the two weight actions very clear?

   Second assessment opportunity: LO2: Explore the Dance Element of Energy to
   perform movements with varying weight (PK)

11. The reason the icon is extinct/endangered
   How did the icon become extinct/endangered? The groups create an action and
   a still shape to represent the reason.
   Some suggestions:
       A rat or a stoat - a long tail shape, the whiskers, the ears
       The Hinaki – weaving the trap followed by the completed rounded shape
       A set net – feeding out the line, followed by a large hook shape
       A human being parading while „wearing‟ a cloak of feathers
       A gun, fire, an abstract action of eating followed by „satisfaction‟.

12. Changing the movement quality
   The groups refer to the movement qualities they chose on Worksheet 2. They
   explore ways that they can perform their motif by applying these qualities.
   For example, the sequence is performed using sharp and abrupt movements
   (perhaps representing a grayling caught in a Hinaki/trap), then contrasted with
   percussive movements (perhaps representing the grayling pushing frantically on
   the Hinaki).

   Second assessment opportunity:
   LO3: Explore the Dance Element of Energy to perform movements with varying
   qualities

13. The final moment
   Future sustainability – how can we protect the wildlife we still have?
   Refer to the final A3 page: „Protecting our wildlife – what we can do‟. The

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   groups select one method for sustainability and create an action and a still final
   shape to represent this.


14. Rehearse the entire dance
   The motif is to be performed in five different ways and the students should
   try to make the contrasts in their sequences as clear as possible.
   The sequence from Activity 3 (or selected movements from it) can be
   incorporated into the dance if the movements relate to the students‟ work.
   The Activity 3 sequence could also be used to further develop the motif if
   necessary.

   Assessment opportunity:
   LO5: Perform a dance about an extinct or endangered animal



                 Summary of the „Dance for Sustainability‟

          Opening Moment = Motif – The main feature of the icon and
           two actions the icon makes

          Two Motif variations - Changing weight

          Sequence: Reason for extinct/endangered

          Two Motif variations - Changing movement qualities

          Final Moment – Future sustainability



   Music suggestions:
   Electronomicon: Pitch Black – Reptile Room (1), Electric Earth Part 2 (3)
   Whale Rider: Lisa Gerrard – Biking Home (4)
   Watermark: Enya – River (9)
   Moods: Ian Anderson – In a Stone Circle (4)



15. Perform for an audience – perhaps a science, social studies, or
   geography class studying the topic of Education for Sustainability.


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Assessment
All of the Learning Outcomes have been included in this assessment sheet. It is
not necessary to assess every Learning Outcome. Use only the ones that are most
relevant for your students.



        Dance for Sustainability             Name: _________________

  Learning Outcome                 Working    Achieved   Achieved     Achieved
                                   towards                 with         with
                                                          Merit      Excellence
  LO1: Explore and use the
  Dance Element of Time to
  perform movement with
  varying tempo
  (PK & DI)
  LO2: Explore and use the
  Dance Element of Energy to
  perform movements with
  varying weight
  (PK & DI)
  LO3: Explore and use the
  Dance Element of Energy to
  perform movements with
  varying qualities
  (PK & DI)
  LO4: Create abstract
  movement based on animal and
  bird actions
  (DI)
  LO5: Perform a dance about an
  extinct or endangered animal
  (CI)

 Comment:




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Worksheet 1: Extinct or Endangered   Name ___________

Te Papa Icon name ___________________

A sketch of the icon




A description of the icon
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________

Three interesting facts about the icon
   ________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________
   ________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________
   ________________________________________________
    ________________________________________________

The reason/s this icon is now extinct/endangered
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________

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Worksheet 2: „Dance for Sustainability‟ plan          Name __________

Group name            _______________
Group members         ____________________________________
Our icon: ID _____________________________________________
A sketch of the icon




1. The main features of our icon
   ___________________________________________________________
   ___________________________________________________________
   ___________________________________________________________

2. The main actions our icon would perform (or would have performed)?
   ___________________________________________________________
   ___________________________________________________________
   ___________________________________________________________

3. The most appropriated weight action for our icon. (Circle the best one)
   Firm     light      soft         strong       weak heavy

4. One contrasting „Weight‟ action. (Circle the best one)
   Firm      light      soft         strong       weak heavy

5. Two most appropriate movement qualities for our icon. (Circle the best two)
   Sudden        sharp        percussive smooth       delicate     vibratory
      sustained         erratic          explosive          collapse

6. This icon is extinct/endangered (Circle the correct answer)

7. It is extinct/endangered because:
   _________________________________________________________


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