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Vic_Transport_Association_Safe_Rates_Summit_29nd_July_2009_Presentation

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Vic_Transport_Association_Safe_Rates_Summit_29nd_July_2009_Presentation Powered By Docstoc
					PRESENTATION TO TWU
 SAFE RATES SUMMIT



            WEDNESDAY
          29th JULY 2009
         PHILIP LOVEL AM
            CHAIRMAN
 TRANSPORT INDUSTRY SAFETY GROUP
THE INDUSTRY
Overview of Industry

• It is estimated that the freight task will increase significantly in
    some sectors by 2020 (NTC)-at the same time it will change!
•   The Freight & Logistics industry is a $60 billion business
•   80% of all road freight moves less than 100km - average length of
    road haul is 86 km
•   Interstate road freight is only around 7% of the total freight moved
•   96% of urban freight moves by road
•   Growth of freight – depends on sector e.g. Port of Melbourne 14%
    increase in 2008
•   Growth mainly in urban freight matching population growth
•   Exports & imports increasing – local manufacturing decreasing
    therefore a changing freight task!
•   The domestic freight task is huge!!
        THE INDUSTRY

• 25% IS HIRE & REWARD



• 75% IS ANCILLARY (OWN THE FREIGHT)
THE PARTICIPANTS

• EMPLOYEES- LOCAL AND LONG
 DISTANCE ( AWARDS AND EBAS)



• OWNER DRIVERS AND SUB-
 CONTRACTORS ( CONTRACTS AND
 AGREEMENTS)
Industry Composition –
Fleet Size
      1 Vehicle         72%

     2 Vehicles         17%

   3 to 9 Vehicles      10%

More than 10 Vehicles   1%
How many trucks operate in Australia?
                         • 2,589,852                                                 Avg Age Yrs
                                                                                        Aust

-2,114,333 - Light Commercial                             1.5 to 4.5tonne   81.09%    10.8 – 11.5




-   95,452 - Light Rigid..4.5 to 12 tonne capacity                          3.31%     11.2 – 11.7



-   288,094 - Heavy Rigid.. Over 12 tonne                                   11.91%    15.9 – 17.4




-    71,680 - Articulated..                                                 2.85%     11.2 – 11.5



-    20,293 - Other (non freight)..                                          0.84%    14.4 – 15.4




                       all data from published ABS statistics March 2008
Trucks by Industry
Agriculture            36.5%
Hire and Reward        26.1%
Wholesale and Retail   12.1%
Building /             9.7%
Construction
Manufacturing          6.7%
Mining / Quarrying     2.3%
Other                  6.6%
    Sectors of the Freight /
    Transport Industry
•   Long Distance Road Freight   •   Bulk Tankers
•   Container Transport          •   Car Carrying
•   Furniture                    •   Refrigeration
•   Local Government             •   Ancillary Transport
•   Warehousing                  •   Country Carriers
•   Contract Distribution        •   Agriculture
•   Tip Trucks                   •   Primary Producers
•   Armored Vehicles             •   Federal Government Agencies
•   Waste                        •   Building & Construction
•   Concrete                     •   Oil & Petroleum
•   Mining Industries            •   Wholesale & Retail
•   Earthmoving & Demolition     •   Freight Forwarding
Many Different Types of Operators
in the Industry Sectors

• Hire & Reward –         • Farmers
    Prime Contractors     • Federal Authorities –
•   Sub-Contractors           Army – Australia Post
•   Freight Forwarders    •   Government Agencies
•   Fleet Operators           – State & Local
•   Interstate Carriers   •   Hired Vehicles (Rent)
•   Ancillary Operators   •   Retailers /
                              Manufacturers
•   Country Carriers
                          •   Small Businesses
•   Waste Operators
Key Facts about Heavy Vehicle
Crashes:
• Since 1986 there has been a steady decline in fatal crashes involving heavy vehicles
   in Australia. In 1986, 232 road users died in 218 truck involved crashes and in 2008,
   150 deaths occurred in 130 fatal crashes..



• It is estimated that heavy vehicle crashes cost $2 billion per year in Australia.
• MUARC reports that USA and UK have significantly lower heavy vehicle crash rates
   than Australian heavy vehicles. This would be caused by the different operating
   environments and road types e.g. more freeways in USA.


• Coroners findings’ indicate that the other road user is at fault in about 70% of fatal
   heavy vehicle crashes (Austroads and ATSB).
Transport Industry Safety
          Group (TISG)
• The TISG is made up of VicRoads, VTA, TWU, TAC, Victoria Police, the Bus
   Association, ARRB,ARTSA and has the Victorian Coroner as an observer.
   The TISG identifies transport related safety issues and develops safety
   initiatives to address the problems.
-Recent initiatives include:
• Buying a Safer Truck & Trailer DVD’s and brochures to encourage the up
   take of vehicle safety features
• The Transport Safety Pack – road safety DVD containing safety fact sheets,
   videos and brochures to assist training programs
• OH&S Guide for the Transport Industry-7th Edition
• Pilot to introduce Drug Policies and testing in transport companies
• Up coming TISG Safety Technology Expo-Sandown 7th August 09
• TWU Safety Day on July 28th at Moonee Valley-700 delegates
• Fatigue & Drugs and Driving publication
• The TISG has been conducting safety forums with the transport industry
   across Victoria supported by Vicroads
TISG INDUSTRY INITIATIVES
• Driver fatigue training      •   Rest areas
• Codes of conduct- drivers    •   Seat belts
    & operators
•   Truck roll over campaign   •   Railway crossing safety
•   Distraction campaign       •   Buying a safer truck &
•   Braking compatibility          trailer
    study
                               •   Driver fit for work
•   Road Worthy Vehicles
•   Load restraint             •   Road side Loading
•   Vehicle                    •   Towing
    Breakdowns/maintenance     •   Road side
    on side of road                loading/unloading
Seat Belts in Trucks

• On average around 10 truck drivers a year are
    killed in Victoria. Many of these truck drivers (3
    to 8 drivers on average) were not wearing seat
    belts.
•   A recent NSW promotion of wearing seat belts in
    trucks indicated some success at increasing
    wearing rates of truck drivers.
•   A similar promotion is to be conducted in
    Victoria through the TISG & TWU.
Drugs

• Around one in 70 truck drivers drug tested is currently
  affected by illicit drugs.
• The introduction of drug policies with a drug testing
  process should be encouraged in transport companies.
  Best practice companies such as Linfox have random
  testing, testing when an incident occurs and testing
  when there is suspicion that an employee is affected by
  drugs.
• The VTA is currently testing over 1300 Truck drivers and
  other personnel on a random basis.
Chain of Responsibility

• Chain of Responsibility legislation has been implemented to cover issues
   such as fatigue, mass and load restraint. The NTC is also introducing COR
   legislation for speeding.

• Many industries have responded by implementing Codes of Practice e.g.
   Steel Industry Load Restraint Code/ Retail code of conduct. COR training is
   also occurring within many transport companies and customers.

• Unfortunately there have been few convictions for COR because of the
   enormous amount of investigation required by the police.

• Some companies are asking for COR accreditation to be introduced as a
   way of reducing the amount of auditing required in dealing with a large
   number of customers/suppliers.
Operation
Seams - COR
FATIGUE
• New Fatigue National Fatigue Regulations
• In 2008 new national fatigue regulations were
   introduced. The new regulations will provide safety gains
   through the regulating driving hours to better manage
   fatigue in all sectors of the transport industry.
• Fatigue (General)
-A recent VTA survey highlighted that:
• Many rest areas do not provide facilities/amenities that
   assist truck drivers getting a “good” sleep. Many rest
   areas need a quiet area to sleep, separate parking for
   livestock and refrigeration vehicles, shade and toilets
• Some rest areas are overcrowding on key routes
Truck Rollovers

 • Significant killer of truck drivers
 • Developing a safety program with
  industry & government
SAFE SYSTEM OF WORK



A SAFE RATES PHILOSOPHY MEANS NOT
             JUST RATES!!!
SAFE ROADS

-   Rest stops along all highways and urban areas
-   Ban truck and car repairs on side of road
-   Guidelines for loading & unloading at roadside
-   Fix up road signage and street numbering
-   Design for emergency stopping areas
-   Eliminate poor roundabouts
-   Develop reporting systems for road safety issues
SAFE DRIVERS
-fit for work controls
-employee medicals
-compulsory drug & alcohol testing
-fatigue training and controls
-appropriate induction training
-suitable skills for the job-by industry and vehicle
      type
-attitude training- sharing the road
SAFE RATES

-Cost models for different vehicle
  combinations and information provision
- Regular reviews of cost models
- Develop model contracts
- Use small business model for disputes
- Ensure fair and minimum labour rates
  used in models
SAFE PAYMENTS

• Fair payments for work done
- Reasonable payment terms
        -immediate on delivery
        -not greater than 14 days
- Payment for all work done
         -   Loading/ unloading
         -   Waiting time over half an hour( fixed & labour)
         -   Picking up locally on long distance trips
SAFE CUSTOMERS

-   Site inductions
-   Use of on site facilities-toilets and canteens
-   Parking areas for waiting to load/unload
-   No penalties for missing time slots- drivers
-   Minimum waiting times
-   Paid demurrage (fixed & labour rate)
-   Site safety such as driver exclusion zones
-   Customer safety audits
-   Disputes procedures
SAFE OPERATORS
                              --manager & supervisor
-buying a safe truck &           training
   trailer                    -accident & incident
-appropriate distraction         management( driver
   controls                      welfare)
-seat belts wearing culture   -drug & alcohol
-railway crossing awareness      management
-truck roll over training     -speed management
                              -induction of staff
-road worthy vehicles
                              -security of drivers-night
-tracking systems
                                 time deliveries
SO WHERE TO FROM HERE?


• A LOT OF WORK HAS ALREADY BEEN
  DONE!
• WE NEED TO GET A FRAME WORK
  TOGETHER
• ALL THAT IS NEEDED IS GOODWILL AND
  COOPERATION

				
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