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LAB SAFETY SEMINAR - RIT

VIEWS: 15 PAGES: 53

									LAB SAFETY at SUNY Brockport

 • David Turkow, Director of EHS
 • Dturkow@brockport.edu or X2005
      LAB SAFETY SEMINAR
       SUNY BROCKPORT
•   Responsibilities: is everyone really responsible??
•   Overview of the Lab Safety Law
•   Specific areas of concern
•   Training requirements
•   Emergency response
•   Hazardous waste
•   Pictures and examples
•   Questions and answers - anytime, just ask
         RESPONSIBILITIES
     Chemical Hygiene Coordinator
              (Dawn Lee)
•   Dean/Department designates
•   Inspect labs each semester
•   Lab hoods - tested each semester
•   New chemicals - evaluated
•   Answer questions from others
•   Provide an example
           Departmental
        RESPONSIBILITIES
•   Oversee implementation of CHP & update
•   Work with faculty to implement CHP
•   Know current legal requirements
•   Investigate accidents/spills/medical aspects
•   Provide training and information
•   Respond to PESH/OSHA, if necessary
              Everyone else??

• Students are responsible to obey rules in the
  lab, in the dorm, in their car, etc.
• Staff is responsible to report dangerous
  conditions, act in a responsible fashion.
• Faculty is responsible to teach safely, provide a
  safe learning environment and provide safe
  procedures for chemical handling.
• EHS is responsible to oversee safety programs
• Administration is ultimately responsible
     CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN
     at www.brockport.edu/ehs
•   Required by law – PESH/OSHA
•   Written plan – if you say it, you must do it
•   Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
•   Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
•   Ventilation and Lab Hood performance
•   Prior approval for acutely toxic materials
•   Medical evaluations/consultations
    Standard Operating Procedures

•   Teaching Lab - course syllabus/lab manual
•   Research Lab - more complicated, changes
•   List chemicals - inventory
•   Handling protocols - hood, controls, etc.
•   PPE to be used
•   Extremely toxic materials - precautions
•   Unknowns - treat as hazardous
      Who is a lab employee?
• Handles small amounts of chemicals -
  can be handled by one person
• No production involved in process
• Chemicals used - if not Lab Safety Law,
  the Hazard Communication Law applies
• Students are not covered by OSHA
• Students expect same or better level of care
    OSHA LAW REQUIREMENTS
    Lab Safety Standard - 1910.1450

•   Written Chemical Hygiene Plan – EHS web
•   Inspections on a regular basis
•   Standard Operating Procedures
•   Medical Care
•   Record keeping
•   Chemical Hygiene Officer
•   Monitor employee exposure
•   Lab hoods, ventilation, controls
    Things you need to know/have!!
•   Location of the Chemical Hygiene Plan
•   OSHA Standard available?? osha.gov
•   What are PELs, TLVs, STELs, MSDSs
•   Signs/symptoms of overexposure
•   Location of reference materials - MSDSs
•   Emergency preparedness
 Material Safety Data Sheet-MSDS

• Accessible? www.msdssearch.com or
  www.ilpi.com
• Manufacturer responsible to prepare
• Hazardous ingredients listed if
   1% hazardous or 0.1 carcinogenic
• If questions - seek other sources/ask
  manufacturer
• MSDSs are not the only source of
  information
  OTHER SOURCES OF INFO.
• Internet sites: www.osha.gov
• Sax’s Dangerous Properties on Industrial
  Materials, Merck Index
• R-Tecs - Registry of toxic effects
• Call the manufacturer, supplier, sales rep
• FDA, NIOSH, EPA, Health Dept., etc.
             WHY WEAR PERSONAL
          PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT ?

• PROTECT THE EYES - from chemicals, burns, projectiles
• PROTECT THE HANDS - skin of the hand not a good barrier
• PROTECT SKIN - corrosives, heat, cuts, irritation
• LAB COATS - another layer of protection
• SHIELDS - explosion, implosion, reactives always with eyewear
• ARE REGULAR GLASSES PROTECTIVE? Better than nothing.
• GOGGLES v.s. SAFETY GLASSES ???
         Routes of entry
• INHALATION – it’s in the air
• INGESTION - food, hands,
  cosmetics
• SKIN ABSORPTION - solvents,
  – especially with broken skin, openings
   in skin, eyes.
  –INJECTION – needles, sharps
      LABELING OF CHEMICALS
• Original container – the best
• If transferred - name of chemical, hazards,
  HMIS or NFPA system, target organs if
  appropriate, date of transfer or purchase
• HMIS system
• NFPA system
• Unknowns are a big problem
• No label = violation
         NFPA DIAMOND
                       FLAMMABILITY


                  3
HEALTH
            2          1
                           REACTIVITY
                 0XY
   SPECIFIC HAZARDS
     HMIS LABELING SYSTEM
   (Hazardous Materials Identification System)


   H = HEALTH (0-4)
   F = FLAMMABILITY (0-4)
   R = REACTIVITY (0-4)

0=NO DANGER            4= HIGH DANGER
   SPILLS & EMERGENCIES
• If any question call X2005 (day) or
  University Police (X2222)
• Over 2.5 liters - call for help
• Unknown - call for help
• Acutely Toxic - call for help
• Reactive or explosive - call for help
• Radioactive - call RSO for help
• Operations staff in college can be contacted
    EMERGENCY EYE WASH &
          SHOWERS
• EYEWASH - 15 MINUTES MINIMUM
• HELP by holding lids open & rolling eyes
• Should be within 50’ or 10 seconds
• Tested and flushed periodically – otherwise,
  eye damage is a potential problem.
• SHOWERS - TAKE OFF EFFECTED
  CLOTHING, FLUSH FOR 15 MINUTES
       RULES SPECIFIC TO
       SUNY BROCKPORT

• CHEMICALLY RESISTANT GOGGLES
  IF CHANCE OF SPLASH
• TRAIN PERIODICALLY (1-2 YEARS)
• LAB COATS ENCOURAGED
• NO EATING/DRINKING IN LABS
• LABEL ALL CHEMICAL MATERIALS
  – Formulas or acronyms are not acceptable
    HAZARDOUS WASTE
• LABEL, LABEL, LABEL!!!!
• CHEMICAL(S) IN CONTAINER –
  chemical name; not formula or code
• NAME OF GENERATOR: who made it?
• DATE INTO STORAGE VAULT
• “HAZARDOUS WASTE” ON LABEL
• TIME LIMIT ON DISPOSAL
• SEGREGATE INCOMPATIBLES
        Hazardous waste violations
• Caps not tight – if tipped over, would it spill?
• Satellite accumulation areas
  –   55 gallon maximum, or 1 qt. acutely toxic
  –   Remove within in 3 days once full
  –   Labeled as “Hazardous Waste”
  –   2ndary containment in lab hoods – need a tray
  –   Incompatibles stored together
  –   Labeled as satellite accumulation area - optional
  –   Old chemicals that appear inherently waste-like
  –   Must be in same lab that it was generated
  –   Neutralizations – must be recorded.
   Hazardous waste - continued
• The law: guilty until proven innocent
• EPA inspectors - the silent treatment
• Those trained/informed/aware and still
  engaging in non-compliance – check with a
  good attorney
• Manage your chemicals from the start –
  when bought/brought on campus
       Hazardous Waste Tips
• Old containers of liquid chemicals should
  be removed and disposed of properly
• Lab personnel (including students) should
  have some basic knowledge of hazardous
  waste dos and don’ts
• Evaporation of chemicals in lab hoods is not
  allowed. “Empty” is a subjective term.
• Reactives are of particular concern – old
  picric, THF, ethers, oxidizers, peroxides.
  WASTE MINIMIZATION
• MICROSCALE EXPERIMENTS
• CARRY OUT EXPERIMENT TO
  CREATE LEAST TOXIC OR NON-
  TOXIC MATERIALS
• USE LEAST TOXIC MATERIALS
• SUBSTITUTE WHEN POSSIBLE
   ELECTRICAL SAFETY
• GROUND FAULT INTERRUPTERS
• GROUNDED RECEPTICLES
• EXPLOSION-PROOF IF
  USING/STORING FLAMMABLES
• TWO PRONGS THE SAME SIZE = BAD
• OVERLOADING CIRCUITS
• PINCH POINTS ON EXTENSION
  CORDS
   SIGNAGE IN A LAB
• IS AN INDICATION THAT SOMEONE
  HAS THOUGHT ABOUT IT
• SETS A TONE…... ESPECIALLY IF
  SIGNAGE IS ENFORCED
• REMINDS LAB PERSONNEL
• IF YOUR GOING TO SAY IT - DO IT!!
            HOUSEKEEPING
• CLUTTERED LABS MAKE FOR BAD
  SCIENCE AND UNSAFE CONDITIONS
• IF IT LOOKS BAD = more vigilant inspection
• MAKE IT A RULE to clean up after the
  experiment is done
• IF STRUCTURAL IMPROVEMENTS ARE
  NEEDED - MAKE THE (written) REQUEST
• IF YOUR SON/DAUGHTER WAS GOING TO
  BE A STUDENT IN THIS LAB ????????
                 QUIZ?
• What does PEL stand for?
• Who regulates labs? Health Dept. PESH,
  OSHA
• What is PPE and what PPE is required in a
  chemistry lab?
• What’s an MSDS?
• Is 55 lfm lab hood flow acceptable?
          QUIZ (continued)
• What is an SOP and who needs one
• Who is EPA and what things are they
  concerned with in a lab?
• How much hazardous waste can you store
  in the lab it was generated (acute toxic)?
• When is an eyewash or emergency shower
  required?
• What do fumes consist of? gases or
  particles?
           Definition of Toxicity
label term              LD50        LC50(ppm)
Nontoxic                >5 g/kg     >20,000
Toxic                 .05-5.0 “   200-20,000
Highly toxic             <.05 “        <200

Caution - least toxic potential
Warning - less toxic potential
Danger - toxic potential
            Dose IS the poison!!

• LD50 - the dose in g/kg ingested that will
  kill 50% of the animals (not humans)
• LC50 - the concentration in the air (PPM or
  mg/m3) that will kill 50%
• LD/LC lo - the dose at which ANY effect
  is demonstrated
• IDLH - immediately dangerous to life and
  health : GET THE HELL OUT!!!!!!!!
PATHWAY IN THE LUNGS
                  GASES

•   a “formless liquid” that expands to fill a space
•   a mixture containing different molecules
•   once mixed they stay mixed
•   vary greatly in toxicity - O2 needed to live
•   hydrochloric acid gas
•   chlorine gas
•   inert but can displace O2 = asphyxiant
                  VAPORS
• gaseous forms of liquids
• water - evaporates & condenses = rain
• vaporization point = boiling point (no so)
• higher temperatures = more vapors
• solids can vaporize (ex.-mothballs / naptha)
• solvents such as turpentine, mineral spirits,
  stoddard solvent, gasoline, etc. all vaporize
• vary greatly in toxicity
             MISTS
• TINY LIQUID DROPLETS IN THE AIR
• ANY LIQUID CAN BE MISTED
• THE FINER THE SIZE, THE DEEPER IT
  IS INHALED
• A MIST OF A SUBSTANCE IS MORE
  TOXIC THAN A VAPOR IN THE SAME
  CONCENTRATION - IT DELIVERS
  MATERIAL TO A SPOT RATHER THAN
  DISPERSED THROUGHOUT.
                  FUMES
• very tiny particles usually created by heat
• diameter = 0.01 to 0.5 microns
• can remain suspended for long periods of
  time
• eventually will settle
• bluish haze from soldering or welding
• more toxic due to small particle size
• metals, organic chemicals, plastics, silica will
  fume
                 DUSTS
• when solid material is broken down
• 40-60% in household is dead skin
• sanding, sawing, grinding, etc.
• the finer the dust the deeper into the lungs
• Respirable dust = 0.5 to 10 microns
• Asbestos is a needle like structure and size
  is 0.5-2.0 microns and very stable
• toxic materials can also disolve in the lungs
  or digestive system
          SMOKE
• BURNING OF ORGANIC MATTER
• USUALLY CO2 AND WATER GIVEN
  OFF
• CAN CONTAIN FUMES, VAPORS,
  GASES, AND OTHER HEAVY METALS
  INCLUDING TOXICS
• CIGARETTES = 4,000 CHEMICALS
  AND CO GAS, BENZENE VAPOR,
  FUME SIZED PARTICLES OF TAR

								
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