Peggotty Beach Management Plan (draft) by ScituateMariner

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									March 18, 2008 Hand Delivery Town of Scituate Richard H. Agnew Town Administrator 600 Chief Cushing Justice Highway Scituate, MA 02066 Re: Peggotty Beach Management Plan Feasibility Study Scituate, Massachusetts
[LEC File#: TOSc\07-105.01]

Dear Mr. Agnew: LEC Environmental Consultants, Inc. (LEC) is pleased to submit this partial draft of the feasibility study for the Peggotty Beach Management Plan. The dynamic nature of Peggotty Beach provides numerous challenges to sustaining private and public interests. This feasibility study has been designed to serve as a foundation for future engineering design, permitting and construction contracts that will implement part or all of a Management Plan for Peggotty Beach, and may be used by the town in its efforts to acquire funding to implement aspects of the plan. The draft is only partial because we’re looking for review and comments prior to drafting the third section concerning recommendations. Thank you for the opportunity to work on this study. Should you have any questions or require additional information, please do not hesitate to contact Stan Humphries at (508) 746-9491 or at shumphries@lecenvironmental.com. Sincerely, LEC Environmental Consultants, Inc.

Draft for Review
Stanley M. Humphries Senior Coastal Geologist

Jim Manganello Wetlands Specialist
cc: Conservation Department DPW

Table of Contents

PEGGOTTY BEACH MANAGEMENT PLAN
Introduction 1

Interaction of Human Uses and Natural Resources
1. 1.1 1.1.1 1.1.2 1.1.3 1.1.4 1.1.5 1.1.6 1.1.7 1.2 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.3 1.3.1 1.3.2 1.3.3 1.4 1.4.1 1.4.2 1.4.3 1.4.4 1.4.5 1.4.6 1.4.7 1.4.8 1.4.9 Natural Resources and Coastal Processes Physical and Biological Characteristics Surficial Geology Nearshore Bathymetry Sediments Shoreline Changes Vegetation and Wildlife Habitat Utilization Estimated Habitat and Priority Habitat of Rare Species Essential Fish Habitat Tidal, Wave and Current Regime Mean Low Water, Mean High Water, Spring High Tide and 1 Year Flood Non-Storm Wave Conditions Currents Coastal Flood Hazards Storm History and Effects FEMA FIRMS (Past and Present) Projected Impacts and Sea Level Rise Wetland Resource Areas Barrier Beach Coastal Beach Coastal Dune Land Subject to Coastal Storm Flowage Riverfront Area Salt Marsh Land Containing Shellfish Land Under the Ocean Estimated Habitat of Rare Wildlife 2 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9

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Table of Contents
2. 2.1 2.1.1 2.1.2 2.2 2.2.1 2.2.2 3. Human Uses Past History Public Lands Private Property Present Conditions Public lands Private Property Summary: Interaction of Human Use and Natural Resources 9 9 9 10 10 10 11 11

Assessment of Land Use Change Alternatives
1. 1.1 1.2 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 2. 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 3. 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 Regulatory Compliance Zoning and Building Wetlands Local State Federal Strategy for Maintaining or Relocating Human Uses Parking Lot Public Beach Access Dune Maintenance Vehicular Access Utilities Residential Dwellings 12 12 12 12 13 13 14 14 14 15 15 15 16

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Strategy for Maintaining and Enhancing Natural Landforms Coastal Beaches Coastal Dunes Land Under the Ocean and Land Containing Shellfish Salt Marsh

16 16 17 18 18

Recommended Future Actions
1. 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Town Government Responsibilities (roads, utilities, emergency response) Design Permitting Construction Maintenance

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2. 2.1 2.2 2.3 3. 3.1 3.2 Private Property Stewardship Annual Maintenace Post-Storm Rebuilding Vehicular Access and Parking Implementation Schedule Strategy to Formulate and Adopt Plan Contract Engineering Services for Final Designs, Permitting and Construction Literature Referenced Appendix A USGS Topographic Map Appendix B FEMA Flood Insurance Rate (FIRM) Map Appendix C NHESP Map and Aerial Photograph

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Appendix E Existing Beach Profiles Appendix F MCZM Shoreline Change Data Appendix G NHESP State Listed Rare Species Letter, dated 1/18/08 Appendix H Existing Privately Owned Residences on Peggotty Beach Appendix I Private and Town Ownership on Peggotty Beach Table 1. Parcels Currently Owned by the Town of Scituate Table 2. Privately Owned Parcels
Appendix J

Appendix D Study Area Sections Figure 1. Aerial Photographic of the Entire Study Area Figure 2. Aerial Photograph of the Northern Section of the Study Area Figure 3. Aerial Photograph of the Central Section of the Study Area Figure 4. Aerial Photograph of the Southern Section of the Study Area

Wetland Resource Areas

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Appendix K Historical Aerial Photograph of Peggotty Beach (Coastal Zone Study for Scituate, MA 1976)
Appendix L

Map of Dike Around Parking Lot Built in Salt Marsh (USGS 1965) Appendix M Town of Scituate Assessor’s Map Appendix N Shore and Bank Repairs and Modifications Appendix O Executive Summary from the Town of Scituate Flood Hazard Mitigation Action Plan (May 2001)

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

Introduction Management of developed barrier beaches, historically, has focused more on the protection of the constructed (i.e. artificial) environment than the natural environment. Between 1936 and 1978 the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers assisted coastal communities in the construction of some 75 shore protection and beach restoration projects at a cost of $109 million (Ringold and Clark 1980). Despite the existence of seawalls and other coastal engineering structures (CES) intended to protect the coast, storms, erosion, floods and other hazards continue to be of overriding importance to the maintenance and evolution of developed barriers and to the people who occupy them. Because of these considerations, a developed barrier beach management program must be, first and foremost, a program that addresses natural hazards (Mitchell, 1987). Strategic retreat, facility relocation, transferal development rights, property acquisition, dune restoration and beach nourishment are examples of alternatives that are being considered in contemporary and progressive beach management plans, in contrast to the historic use of hard CES. Our general approach to this feasibility study is based on a fairly broad study area (Appendices AD) and the incorporation of scientific and planning data/information. Since one of the most important functions of a barrier beach is to protect inland areas from flooding and storm damage, the Scituate Study Area includes the Kent Street marshes, the roads that provide access to Peggotty Beach and the adjacent development. Peggotty Beach itself will be studied in three sections. The north section includes access from Peggotty Beach Road into the parking lot, the town-owned beach and a row of existing homes protected by a natural dune ridge. The central section includes the north end of Town Way Extension, several existing homes and a broad, flat area of dunes that have progressively moved into the marsh. The south section includes access from Town Way, the end of a stone revetment protecting Third Cliff and a cobble-dominated overwash area. This is not an engineering design study. Its purpose is 1.) to collect and evaluate technical information characterizing the natural resources and the existing land uses; 2.) to assess strategies for adapting to natural changes in the barrier beach system; and 3.) to recommend actions that will require detailed surveys, engineering designs, permitting and construction contracts in the future.

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

Interaction of Human Uses and Natural Resources
Understanding the historic and present conditions of the project area is important to management procedures that will help guide future actions. As a developed barrier beach, both man-made and natural conditions must be taken into account with respect to the dynamic changes that are inherent in this classic Peggotty barrier beach system. Peggotty Beach, once an undeveloped barrier beach primarily used for mossing during the summer months, changed into a developed beach as numerous winterized homes with solid concrete foundations were built. Following destructive storms in 1978 and 1991/1992, many of the homes were destroyed, voluntary sales to the government occurred and, for those homes that were rebuilt, open-pile foundations became a requirement. The dynamic changes of the barrier beach system which impacted the development characteristics of Peggotty included shoreline retreat, beach erosion, overwash sedimentation and dune migration, all of which have been and continue to be exacerbated by a lack of sediment supply from Second and Third Cliffs, whose armoring over the years interfered with the natural sediment drift. Today, each of the sections (northern, central, and southern) of Peggotty Beach differs with regard to a natural resource and human use perspective (see Appendix D, Figures 2, 3 and 4). As a result, frequent references are made to these different sections in the following characterization of Peggotty. Natural Resources and Coastal Processes

1.

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The glacial history of New England and Massachusetts, in particular, has provided a physical setting that makes Scituate, and Peggotty Beach in particular, very unique. Over 15,000 years ago, with about a mile thick layer of ice covering the area, the glacier pushed masses of silt, sand cobbles and boulders (called till) into areas that are now referred to as First, Second, Third and Fourth Cliffs. With the melting and retreat of the glacier, the sea level rose and the Cliffs were affected by waves and tides which caused erosion of these landforms. The Cliff sediment was then transported and deposited between the Cliffs to form narrow, low-lying landforms called barrier beaches which, in general, are composed of beaches and dunes. These barrier beaches buffered and protected the mainland from the high wave energy of the ocean and allowed marshes to develop in tidal areas immediately behind the barriers. As a result, Peggotty Beach and the Kent Street marshes define the barrier beach system that is the subject of this management study. Along with the natural development of any barrier beach system, biological and ecological conditions and characteristics evolve. Habitats for shellfish, finfish and shorebirds are amongst the most critical in need of identification and protection. As a means of establishing a foundation for this Management Plan, the physical, biological and ecological characteristics of the area under consideration are described below (see Appendices A and D, figure 1).

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

1.1 1.1.1

Physical and Biological Processes Surficial Geology Peggotty Beach can be divided into three different sections (north, central and south) based on the difference in sediment grain size The coastal dunes on the northern half of the barrier beach are primarily dominated by medium and coarse grained tan sands. A distinct primary dune ridge rises to an elevation of approximately 18 feet above mean sea level. Wind- and wave-deposited material has formed these dunes. The eroded coastal dune on the southern half of the barrier beach is comprised of a mix of coarse grained sand, pebbles, small cobbles and concrete debris from storm damage. Dune elevations in the central and southern sections of Peggotty range from 15 to 12 feet, respectively. These dunes have formed as a result of overwash or wave deposition. The depth of these sediments, which overlie the former salt marsh, is estimated to range from several feet near the active marsh to the west to just over 20 feet under the primary dune ridge. Beach sediments in the central and southern sections are comprised of a mix of coarse grained sand, pebbles and small cobbles. A large increase in pebbles and cobbles is evident on the southern half of Peggotty Beach. Large scattered concrete chunks from the remains of former foundations and seawalls are also occasionally evident on the southern half of the barrier beach. In addition, a few confined areas of displaced riprap that historically protected homes exist along the remains of Town Way Extension. Occasionally exposed areas of peat and dislodged chunks of peat are visible in the intertidal zone at the northern end of Peggotty Beach. Artificial fill (af) deposits overlie marsh deposits throughout the paved parking lot that was constructed in the 1930’s (see Appendix L). Adjacent Glacial Deposits Peggotty is attached to glacial deposits located to the north and south. To the north is a drumlin deposit referred to as Second Cliff. By definition it is an oval streamlined hill composed mostly of till. To the south is a ground moraine deposit referred to as Third Cliff. This deposit is also defined as till but it is a nonsorted, unstratified mixture of material that ranges in size from clay to boulders generally 1 to 20 feet thick. In many places loose gravelly till a few feet thick, probably an ablation deposit, is underlain by hard compact till, probably lodgement till. This appears to overlie, and partly incorporate, unconsolidated glauconite-bearing sand and fine gravel Coastal Plain deposits. At this time these deposits are unavailable as a sediment supply to adjacent and downdrift beaches because they are protected by large stone revetments.

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1.1.2

1.1.3

Nearshore Bathymetry According to the NOAA nautical chart for Scituate, the ocean floor slopes moderately to steeply to a depth of approximately 30-40 feet below MLW at a distance between 50-100 feet from MLW. The substrate is very rocky and inhabited by a moderate lobster population.

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1.1.4

Shoreline Change Existing conditions of Peggotty Beach were partially examined by collection of beach profiles in three sections (Appendix E). The exposed salt marsh peat on the beach face at low tide and the overwash fans that inundate the Kent Street marshes exemplify the changing natural conditions of Peggotty Beach. Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management (MCZM) shoreline change data indicate the beach has had a moderate long-term erosion rate of between 1 and 2 feet per year since 1887 (Appendix F). Since 1887, the southern half of Peggotty Beach has essentially shifted west approximately 150200 feet and widened substantially into the westerly salt marsh system. The northern half of the beach, on the other hand, has lost approximately 100-150-feet of beach area to erosion. The backside of the beach has remained stationary due to the elevated primary ridge in this area and the ability to remove sand that overwashes into the parking lot. Most recently, the South Shore Coastal Hazards Classification Atlas was completed through MCZM and provides graphic summaries of various data related to physical characteristics and processes. The armoring of shorelines on both the north and south ends of Peggotty have interfered with sediment supply to the beach resulting in an isolated littoral cell with a near finite amount of sediment.

1.1.5

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Vegetation and Wildlife Habitat Utilization

Currently the majority of Peggotty Beach is either sparsely vegetated or lacks any vegetation altogether, especially on the southern half along Town Way Extension. Existing vegetation on the southern half of the barrier beach is dominated by beach grass (Ammophilia breviligulata) and scattered unidentified grasses and herbaceous vegetation. The sparse vegetation and the associated wildlife habitat on the southern half of the beach have been degraded by storm events which have intermittently eroded and lowered the dune system. The northern half of the barrier beach is elevated slightly higher then the southern half and, consequently, the dune system on the northern half contains areas that are moderately to densely vegetated by beach grass and occasional clusters of shrubs such as rugosa rose (Rosa rugosa), bayberry (Myrica pensylvanica) and eastern red cedar saplings (Juniperus virginiana). The boundaries of vegetation and pedestrian access ways are not all marked clearly, due to a lack of snow fencing. As a result moderate damage to vegetation, especially beach grass, is evident on the northern half of the barrier.

1.1.6

Rare Species Habitat The common tern (Sterna hirundo) is the only rare species found in the vicinity of Peggotty Beach (Appendix G). This finding may have regulatory impacts as described in Section 1.4.9.

1.1.7

Essential Fish Habitat The 1996 amendments to the Magnuson-Stevens Act empowered the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Regional Fishery Management Councils to protect and conserve the habitat of marine, estuarine, and anadromous finfish, mollusks, and crustaceans. This habitat is

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termed "essential fish habitat (EFH)" and is broadly defined to include "those waters and substrate necessary to fish for spawning, breeding, feeding, or growth to maturity." NMFS consults with federal permitting agencies, including the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), on all activities authorized, funded, or undertaken that may adversely affect EFH. Essential fish habitat has been documented for various lifestages of twenty-eight (28) species within the 10 min. x 10 min. grid square of latitude and longitude that contains the nearshore waters of Peggotty Beach (NMFS Habitat Conservation Division 2008). Of those 28 species only ten (10) include life stages described to include depth ranges less than five meters in the nearshore zone: little skate (Raja erinacea), pollock (Pollachius virens), red hake (Urophycis chuss), windowpane flounder (Scopthalmus aquosus), ocean pout (Macrozoarces americanus), Atlantic mackerel (Scomber scombrus), summer flounder (Paralicthys dentatus), scup (Stenotomus chrysops), black sea bass (Centropristus striata), and surf clam (Spisula solidissima). 1.2 1.2.1 Tidal, Wave and Current Regime Mean Low Water, Mean High Water, Spring High Tide and One Year Flood According to the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) New England Coastline Tidal Flood Survey (1988) and the use of the National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD), the elevation of Mean Low Water (MLW) in the vicinity of Peggotty Beach is approximately -4.1 feet. The elevation of Mean High Water (MHW) is approximately 4.9 feet and the mean spring high tide elevation is approximately 5.7 feet. The approximate elevation associated with a one-year flood storm event is 7.35 feet.

1.2.2

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Non-Storm Wave Conditions Currents

Non-storm wave conditions in the vicinity of Peggotty Beach range from a gentle shore break and uprush on the beach to collapsing waves and an undertow that can be dangerous to small children. Waves associated with onshore swells form off Second Cliff to provide a recreational area for surfers, wave-riding and kayaking. 1.2.3

Wave dominated currents characterize the area. Typically these will run in the opposite direction of the wave approach. The exception to this would be waves refracting around Second Cliff. In addition, northerly current speeds can be accelerated by waves reflecting off the revetment that protects Third Cliff. 1.3 1.3.1 Coastal Flood Hazards Storm History and Effects Many unnamed storm events have periodically eroded Peggotty Beach; two major named storm events, the Blizzard of 1978 and the Perfect Storm of 1991, directly caused major impacts in the last ±30 years. Following these two events, a federal buy out program was initiated to purchase high risk properties in coastal areas. ±22 private homes/parcels along Town Way Extension were bought & transferred to the state and/or the town (See Appendices H and I). Currently all of these parcels are owned by the town. The southern portion of the barrier beach has been flattened by

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

storm events and the entire barrier has migrated into the Kent Street marsh. Periodic annual storm events overwash the dune and fill up and block flow in the adjacent tidal creeks. The amount of exposed salt marsh peat on the seaward face of the beach is increasing. Utility structures, such as telephone poles, are dislodged and/or damaged after storms. The ocean is getting closer to the existing homes along the remains of Town Way Extension. The septic systems for most of the homes built prior to 1991 have not been exposed but are vulnerable to flooding. Existing cesspools and septic systems are vulnerable to erosion. Water quality, both for swimming and for fish, has likely been affected by impacts to the septic systems. On the northern portion of the beach, the major coastal impacts include the recurrent flooding of the beach parking lot from the marsh side and storm overwash through the primary dune from the ocean side. The beach area has eroded substantially and has become steeper as a result of the storms. The dimensions of the vegetated dune system on the northern portion of the beach were historically much greater than today. In addition, the bank adjacent to the corner of Peggotty Beach Road has eroded extensively and is currently unstable. As in the southern portion of the beach, the salt marsh peat is exposed in the public beach area. 1.3.2 FEMA FIRMS (Past and Present)

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Another indicator of the increased susceptibility to flood hazard is a comparison of the mapping provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in the form of their Flood Insurance Rate Maps (FIRM). Elevations for the predicted 100-year flood storm have increased by at least 4 feet and waves greater than 3 feet high can be expected across Peggotty and over the Kent Street marsh.

According to the July 2, 1992 FEMA FIRM for the Town of Scituate (Community Panel 0002 D), the seaward side of Peggotty Beach was located within a Zone V2 (the 100-year flood zone), areas of coastal flood with velocity hazard (wave action); base flood elevations determined (Elevations 15, 16) (Appendix B). The western/inland side of the barrier was located in a Zone AO (depth 1-foot): areas of 100-year shallow flooding where depths are between 1-3 feet; average depths of inundation are shown, but no flood hazard factors are determined. On the October 16, 2003 FEMA dFIRM for the Town of Scituate (Community Panel 250282 0004 E and 250282 0006 E), the barrier beach is located with a Zone VE (the 100-year flood zone), areas of coastal flood with velocity hazard (wave action); base flood elevations determined (Elevations 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20). 1.3.3 Projected Impacts and Sea Level Rise Climate change and associated sea-level rise are generally affecting coastal areas with increased flooding and erosion and will likely continue to impact these areas. In Massachusetts relative sea level rise also includes land subsidence. A worse-case scenario projects a rise of 1.57 feet between 1980 and 2025 (Geise, Aubrey and Zeeb, 1987). If the relative sea level continues to rise at its current rate, or if the sea level rises at an increased rate, both flooding and erosion will be exacerbated.

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1.4

Wetland Resource Areas Protectable under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (WPA, M.G.L., c. 131, s. 40) and its implementing Regulations (310 CMR 10.00), several Wetland Resource Areas are located on or are immediately adjacent to the site, including Barrier Beach, Coastal Beach, Coastal Dune, Coastal Bank, Land Subject to Coastal Storm Flowage (LSCSF), Riverfront Area, Salt Marsh, Land Under the Ocean (LUO) and Estimated Habitat of Rare Wildlife. The definitions according to the Regulations are provided below along with a brief description of the Resource Areas (see Appendix J- Wetland Resource Areas).

1.4.1

Barrier Beach According to 310 CMR 10.29 (2), a Barrier Beach is a narrow low-lying strip of land generally consisting of coastal beaches and coastal dunes extending roughly parallel to the trend of the coast. It is separated from the mainland by a narrow body of fresh, brackish or saline water or a marsh system. A barrier beach may be joined to the mainland at one or both ends. According to the Massachusetts Barrier Beach Inventory Project (December 1982), and the Mass GIS Barrier Beach data layer, Peggotty Beach is a Barrier Beach (Unit St-8). The Barrier Beach is attached on both sides to glacial deposits known locally as Third Cliff and Second Cliff.

1.4.2

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Coastal Dune

Coastal Beach

Coastal Beach is defined in 310 CMR 10.27(2) as unconsolidated sediment subject to wave, tidal and coastal storm action which forms the gently sloping shore of a body of salt water and includes tidal flats. Coastal beaches extend from the mean low water line landward to the dune line, coastal bankline or the seaward edge of existing man-made structures, when these structures replace one of the above lines, whichever is closest to the ocean. Coastal Beach extends landward from Mean Low Water (MLW) of the Atlantic Ocean to the toe of Coastal Dune. The Coastal Beach consists of an unconsolidated mix of medium-coarse grained, tan sand with pebbles and cobbles.

1.4.3

Coastal Dune is defined in 310 CMR 10.28 (2) as any natural hill, mound or ridge of sediment landward of a coastal beach deposited by wind action or storm overwash. Coastal dune also means sediment deposited by artificial means and serving the purpose of storm damage prevention or flood control. The Coastal Dune extends landward from the Coastal Beach to the Salt Marsh and/or parking lot to the east. The Coastal Dune consists of an unconsolidated mix of medium-coarse grained sand, dominated by clusters of beach grass (Ammophila breviligulata) and a variety of herbaceous vegetation. On the southern half of the beach, there are more pebbles, cobbles and stones.

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1.4.4

Land Subject to Coastal Storm Flowage (LSCSF) LSCSF is defined in 310 CMR 10.04 and FWR 10.38 (2) (a)1. as land subject to any inundation caused by coastal storms up to and including that caused by the 100-year storm, surge of record or storm of record, which ever is greater. According to the October 16, 2003 dFIRM for the Town of Scituate (Community Panel 250282 0004 E and 250282 0006 E), Peggotty Beach is located within a Zone VE (the 100-year flood zone), areas of coastal flood with velocity hazard (wave action); base flood elevations determined (Elevations 16, 17, 18, 19 and 20 exist on or adjacent to the beach. Therefore, the entire barrier lies within LSCSF.

1.4.5

Riverfront Area Riverfront Area is defined in 310 CMR 10.58 (2) (a) as the area of land between a river’s mean annual high-water line and a parallel line measured horizontally. The riverfront area may include or overlap other resource areas or their buffer zones. In tidal rivers, the mean annual high-water line is coincident with the mean high-water line determined under 310 CMR 10.23. According to 310 CMR 10.23, mean high-water line means the line where the arithmetic mean of the high water heights observed over a specific 19-year metonic cycle (the National Tidal Datum Epoch) meets the shore and shall be determined using

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hydrographic survey data of the National Ocean Survey of the U.S. Department of Commerce.
1.4.6 Salt Marsh

According to the Massachusetts DEP Mouth of Coastal River Map (March 1, 2005) and the USGS Topographic Map, the unnamed tidal river east of the beach is considered perennial and, therefore, a 200-foot Riverfront Area is associated with the stream.

According to 310 CMR 10.32 (2) Salt Marsh means a coastal wetland that extends landward up the highest high tide line, that is, the highest spring tide of the year, and is characterized by plants that are well adapted to or prefer living in saline soils. Dominant plants within salt marsh are salt meadow cord grass (Spartina patens) and/or salt marsh cord grass (Spartina alterniflora). A salt marsh may contain tidal creeks, ditches and pools. A vast Salt Marsh system exists west of Peggotty Beach. The Kent Street Salt Marsh system extends to Scituate Harbor to the north and is dominated by typical Salt Marsh vegetation such as salt meadow cord grass and salt marsh cord grass. 1.4.7 Land Containing Shellfish According to 310 CMR 10.34(2) Land Containing Shellfish means land under the ocean, tidal flats, rocky intertidal shores, salt marshes and land under salt ponds when any such land contains shellfish. According to the Town of Scituate Shellfish Warden, there is probably no significant shellfish population on the seaward side of Peggotty Beach. However, shellfish are likely present in the

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larger tidal creeks within the Salt Marsh system west of the beach. Additionally, the MA Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) Shellfish Suitability Areas maps do not indicate the area of Peggotty Beach as habitat suitable for any of the commercially valuable shellfish species (MassGIS 2008). 1.4.8 Land Under the Ocean Land Under the Ocean according to 310 CMR 10.25 (2) and Section 2.01 of the Bylaw means land extending from the mean low water line seaward to the boundary of the municipality’s jurisdiction and includes land under estuaries. Land Under the Ocean exists on the eastern portion of Peggotty seaward of Mean Low Water. 1.4.9 Estimated Habitat of Rare Wildlife According to the 12th edition of the Massachusetts Natural Heritage Atlas (effective October 1, 2006) published by the Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program (NHESP), Estimated Habitat of Rare Wildlife and Priority Habitat of Rare Species is mapped within the Salt Marsh system west of the barrier beach (Appendix C). In addition, Estimated Habitat and Priority Habitat coincide with the shoreline on the ocean-side to the east. No Certified Vernal Pools occur within the vicinity of the beach. As stated in NHESP’s January 18, 2008 letter (Appendix F), the common tern (Sterna hirundo) has been found in the vicinity of Peggotty Beach. It is listed by the NHESP as a species of Special Concern. Human Uses

2.

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Past History Public Lands

The private and public use of Peggotty beach has changed dramatically in the past ±40 years. The following provides a brief description of past and current uses of the beach.

2.1 2.1.1

The northern portion of the beach has been the primary recreational area for the public. The major historical change associated with the public beach is the reduction in its size. The vegetated dune system on the northern portion of the beach was historically wider and larger and the space for recreational use was much larger, extending approximately 100-150 feet east, according to MCZM data. A historical map from 1937 depicts a comfort station on the public beach. The public beach was likely accessible from Peggotty Beach Road at one time. It was during the 1930’s that a desire was expressed for a large parking area; several land acquisitions made this possible; also as a result there was a considerable loss of wetlands. Based on field observations and Department of Public Works records, the parking lot area was partially, if not entirely, salt marsh. According to historical maps, the parking lot was built in the mid-1900’s and the public has been using it since then (Appendix L). Historically, the southern portion of the beach included very little town-owned beach/dune area. However, due to the recent shifting of the beach to the west, coupled with land acquisitions, the

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town appears to own much of the southern half of the barrier beach except for the 10 remaining actively used private parcels (Appendix M). 2.1.2 Private Property Both year round and seasonal dwellings exist on the beach. Acquisition of storm-damaged properties after the ’78 Blizzard and the Perfect Storm in 1991 exemplifies the human impact on Peggotty Beach. The majority of the land along Town Way Extension was occupied by privatelyowned single-family dwellings. The majority of these were destroyed by a combination of the Blizzard of 1978 and the Perfect Storm of 1991. Shortly following these storm events, the ownership of the majority of the parcels along Town Way Extension was transferred to the state and/or the Town of Scituate. According to Assessor’s Records, the town is currently listed as the owner of all the unoccupied parcels. There are six homes located along Inner Harbor Road and four off Peggotty Beach Road. 2.2 2.2.1 Present Conditions Public Lands According to Assessor’s records, the majority of the barrier beach is owned by the town except for 20 relatively small parcels, nineteen of which are improved single family dwellings. The primary public use area is confined to the northern portion of the barrier, as it was also used in the past. Public use of the southern half of the beach today is not especially attractive to the public, due to the predominantly gravelly and stony conditions and the long walk from the parking lot. The uses of the existing public lands on the southern half of the beach are not clearly established. Minimal parking is available at the end of Dickins Row. The town has received suggestions that the exposed peat be removed from that area because it is slippery and dangerous for children. This indicates the exposed peat is not protected from human access and may be damaged at faster than natural rates, thus decreasing the erosion buffer the peat provides. The Board of Health (BOH) closes the beach more than any other beach in town due to high bacteria levels. Weekly water testing is conducted by the BOH. According to the BOH, septic systems, untreated stormwater, and other things such as dog waste likely contribute to the high bacteria levels in the water. The town incurs considerable expense and responsibility in trying to stabilize the study area (please see Appendix N). Town Way Extension has been historically maintained by the town, but the roadway is essentially being eroded by the ocean and its future use in accessing the existing dwellings and beach area is in question. Currently, the Way’s maintenance consists of plowing the overwash material, sometimes as much as 3-4 feet deep, off the road, adding a layer of crushed stone and grading it for passage. The majority of the parking lot appears to be owned by the town. According to the Assessor’s Map the parcels occupied by 8 and 10 Peggotty Beach Road may extend slightly into the eastern portion of the parking lot. The parking lot is in poor condition, as described below in section 2.1.

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2.2.2

Private Property As previously mentioned, 20 relatively small Parcels are located on the beach, 19 of which are improved by single family dwellings. A fire in 2007 destroyed the dwelling at 15 Town Way Extension, but it may be redeveloped in the near future since the pile foundation is still intact, according to the Building Department. General lot sizes and locations are depicted in Appendix H. The parcels currently located along Town Way Extension were historically bordered by Salt Marsh creeks to the west. The beach has shifted approximately 150-200 feet to the west in the last 100years or so. Therefore, the current parcel boundaries along Town Way Extension are unclear in the field and may require parcel specific surveys and research of records to confirm and mark these boundaries in the field. Based on historical aerial photographs, a large portion of 15 Town Way Extension appears to have been Salt Marsh, which has become coastal dune. The ownership of the coastal dune lands (historical salt marsh) on 15 Town Way Extension and portions of other parcels located west of Town Way Extension is unclear and may require further investigation. However, the other nine privately owned parcels along Town Way Extension appear to have gained very little coastal dune lands, as the western property lines of these parcels appear to have abutted the historical limit of salt marsh (see Appendices D, E and H). The privately owned parcels located on Inner Harbor Road extend west into the salt marsh. This roadway has a sign at the entrance that designates it as a Private Drive. The majority of the dune system to the east of these dwellings appears to be owned by the town; parcel specific surveys and research of records would be needed to confirm and mark these boundaries in the field.

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Maintenance of the dune and beach surrounding these dwellings varies from one property to the next. Landowners along Harbor Road have allowed the town to remove overwash material from the road and relocate it to the beach and dune front area after storms. Snow fencing and vegetative plantings have been put in place in an effort to restore and stabilize the dunes that protect these dwellings. Along Town Way Extension, landowners routinely move unvegetated dune material away from foundations, build it up under others, and have not actively fenced or planted the dune

3.

Summary: Interaction of Human Uses and Natural Resources The private and public use of Peggotty beach has changed dramatically in the past ±40 years. Essentially all of these changes are due to storm events and associated erosion and flooding. Understanding the dynamic nature of Peggotty Beach and clarifying the historical and current uses are important to guide the direction for sustaining future public and private interests associated with the beach.

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

Assessment of Land Use Change Alternatives
1. Regulatory Compliance Sustaining private and public uses within such an environmentally sensitive yet dynamic area will require compliance with several environmental laws and regulations, as well as local zoning. The most important controls on activities above the high tide line exist under the state Wetland Protection Act and the local Wetlands Bylaw. Almost any activity (i.e. filling, removing and altering) that is associated with maintaining, relocating, restoring and enhancing the natural landforms and human uses on Peggotty Beach will require oversight by the Conservation Commission and permitting under the aforementioned Regulations. However, once the Management Plan is formulated and adopted, the process to approve these activities can be streamlined because of the previously vetted Plan. In addition to the above-mentioned regulations, a list of environmental laws that may be affect work proposed on Peggotty Beach is provided below. 1.1 Zoning and Building The Town of Scituate Zoning Bylaws will be applicable to most work proposed on or adjacent to the beach. According to the Town of Scituate Zoning Map, the beach and adjacent marsh area are zoned as Floodplain and Watershed Protection District. The existing single-family dwellings or cottages located on the barrier beach are all nonconforming, according to the Building Department. Currently 10,000 square feet of upland are required to conform to local Zoning. The lots on the beach have no upland areas, because they are all in the floodplain and in a wetland resource area. The Zoning associated with the town-owned portion of the beach is unclear. 1.2 Wetlands Depending on the scope and particular location of proposed work activities on or adjacent to the beach, certain local, state and federal regulations may apply. Following is a list of the principal regulations that may apply to work on or adjacent to Peggotty Beach. 1.2.1 Local The Town of Scituate Wetlands Protection Rules and Regulations (Section 30770, the Bylaw) governs all the wetland resource areas on or adjacent to Peggotty Beach. In some instances the Bylaw is more stringent than the Wetlands Protection Act. Essentially any work activity on or adjacent to the beach would be subject to the Bylaw.

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

1.2.2

State Proposed work activities on or adjacent to the beach will likely require review under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (WPA, M.G.L., c. 131, s. 40) and its implementing Regulations (310 CMR 10.00), which are administered by the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Scituate Conservation Commission. Any proposed project within the Estimated Habitat is subject to review by the NHESP under the WPA. Therefore, work proposed in the Salt Marsh or the parking lot would require NHESP review under the WPA. In addition, such work and work within Priority Habitat would require NHESP review under the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act (MESA, M.G.L.c. 131A) and its implementing regulations (321 CMR 10.00). Despite the fact that the beach itself is excluded from the mapped Estimated or Priority Habitat and therefore work confined to the beach may not be subject to review by the NHESP, it would be prudent for the town to contact and/or notify the NHESP prior to proposing any work on the barrier. If work is proposed below or seaward of the High Tide Line (HTL), under the Federal Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1344) and the provisions of the 401 Water Quality Certification Regulations (314 CMR 9.00) such work may require a 401 Water Quality Certification from the DEP. “This law gives states the authority to review projects that must obtain federal licenses or permits and that result in a discharge to state waters, including excavating and fill in wetlands.” If proposed work is even partly located below the Mean High Water (MHW) line, it is subject to the Public Waterfront Act (M.G.L. Chapter 91) and its implementing Regulations (310 CMR 9.00). If required, an Application for a Chapter 91 Permit would need to be filed and reviewed by the DEP. If particular thresholds within Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act (MEPA) and associated Regulations (301 CMR 11.00) are surpassed, an Environmental Notification Form (ENF) and, potentially, an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) might be required by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EOEEA). In order to be subject to the law, the project must be undertaken, funded or permitted by a state agency and exceed certain thresholds. The MEPA review thresholds can be viewed at http://www.mass.gov/envir/mepa/thirdlevelpages/thresholds.htm. Work proposed below the MHW elevation is also typically subject to review by the Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF). The Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management (MCZM) may require a Federal Consistency Review of certain projects that also require a federal permit.

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1.2.3

Federal Proposed work may be subject to review by the Army Corps of Engineers (ACOE) under the Massachusetts Programmatic General Permit (PGP) under the Federal Clean Water Act (Section 401 and Section 404 regulations). One pertinent activity that would trigger this certification is beach nourishment. An Order of Conditions for nourishment above MLW satisfies the Section

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

401 regulations; however, a separate certification is required for nourishment below MLW if it covers an area greater than 5,000 sq. feet. Work proposed below the High Tide Line (HTL) elevation and within Salt Marsh are examples of work activities that could require ACOE PGP permits. The PGP has three different categories that apply depending on the extent of the work. The PGP information can be viewed at http://www.nae.usace.army.mil/reg/mapgp.pdf. 2. Strategy for Maintaining or Relocating Human Uses A variety of human uses on Peggotty Beach have had an impact on the condition and characteristics of the barrier beach. These include the large town parking lot, beach access from the parking lot, dune maintenance, vehicular access, utilities and seasonal/year-round residential dwellings. A brief description of these uses and some considerations for their improvement are presented below. 2.1 Parking Lot As previously mentioned, the majority of the parking lot appears to be owned by the town. However, according to the Assessor’s Map, the parcels occupied by 8 and 10 Peggotty Beach Road may extend slightly into the eastern portion of the parking lot. The existing parking lot is currently in very poor condition: limits of pavement are not clearly marked; the pavement itself is in poor condition; parking spaces are not clearly marked; signage is inadequate; certain high tides inundate portions of the parking area; and the parking lot exists partially, if not fully, within an area comprising historical Salt Marsh (Appendix L). The problems with the parking lot should be addressed as a priority. Significant improvement would be made by: • • • 2.2 reducing the size of the lot to allow restoration of a substantial area of Salt Marsh; raising the parking lot to reduce the frequent flooding; and improving stormwater management.

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Public Beach Access

Footpaths and areas for recreational use should be clearly marked and maintained between public parking and the beach. Consideration should be given for extending use of the southern half of the beach for recreational purposes as a way to reduce the very heavy use on the northern half of the beach. Designation of the town-owned land on Peggotty Beach as Open Space may be an option. Pedestrian access from the northern to the southern half of the beach is not clearly marked. Signage and a marked foot path between the northern tip of Town Way Extension and the public beach may be a means to guide the public away from private property. Dune nourishment would likely be needed to make this option viable.

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

2.3

Dune Maintenance Access to vegetated portions of the dune system should be prevented and/or reduced by both signage and fencing. Management of the pathways within the dunes between the Inner Harbor Road dwellings and the beach should be addressed. This would require cooperation of the town and landowners and a determination of parcel boundaries. Rebuilding or increasing the width of the dunes seaward of Inner Harbor Road will require a wider beach as well. Rebuilding or increasing the dune height along Town Way Extension could be beneficial landward of the road.

2.4

Vehicular Access Currently Inner Harbor Road contains signage that designates it as a Private Drive. The Town of Scituate has historically maintained Town Way Extension. However, the options related to this activity have been complicated by the continued erosion of sections of the historical roadway location. Currently, access to existing dwellings may be more practical from the landward side of the homes. The town and the homeowners will need to agree on • • • • designating the access road as private and/or public; locating the roadway; installing signage; material to be used; and

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• how to demarcate the limits of the access road. 2.5 Utilities

One of the priorities mentioned in the Town of Scituate Flood Mitigation Action Plan is the repair of seawalls and revetments as recommended in the five-year capital plan including Peggotty Beach Road. The northern tip of Peggotty Beach is eroding in the location where it adjoins the corner of Peggotty Beach Road. This area will require stabilization to protect the roadway and to help protect the adjacent homes along Peggotty Beach Road. Expansion of the beach to the east in this area and repair of the eroded bank could also include an access point to the beach for wrack or seaweed removal.

According to the Department of Public Works (DPW), both Town Way and Peggotty Beach Road were recently connected to sewer by the town, and 4 Peggotty Beach Road was included. According to the Board of Health, most dwellings on the beach are assumed to have cesspools, and only five have Title 5 Compliant Septic Systems (see Appendix G). Maintaining Town Way Extension and the utilities in their current location is the most challenging management issue in light of continuing and possibly accelerating beach erosion and dune migration. Currently Town Way Extension is serviced by water and electricity. According to the Bay State Gas Co. maps 47 and 48 Town Way Extension are connected to gas service. Inner Harbor Road is serviced by gas, electric and water.

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

Telephone poles extend along the current location of Town Way Extension and are vulnerable to erosion. The telephone poles would need to be relocated to the west, if the roadway is moved. A new water line was recently placed at a greater depth than had been the pre-existing line. The concern for exposure of the trunk lines that are tied to the mainline relates to increased beach and dune erosion. 2.6 Residential Dwellings Several dwellings along Town Way Extension are becoming increasingly vulnerable to erosion and flooding. Maintenance of and access to these structures require ongoing efforts to move or keep the sand and cobbles out of the way. One option that is receiving more attention as a viable solution for Flood Hazard Mitigation efforts involves relocating private residences or performing buy-outs. According to Recommendations for Management of Risk from Coastal Hazards in Massachusetts, dated May, 2007, prepared by the Massachusetts Coastal Hazards Commission, V- and A-zones in coastal areas are generally subject to repeated storm damage, which can result in loss of life and property, increased public expenditures for storm recovery activities, taxpayer subsidies for flood insurance and disaster relief, and risks for personnel involved in emergency relief programs.

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3. Strategy for Maintaining and Enhancing Natural Landforms

According to the Town of Scituate Flood Mitigation Action Plan, dated May 2001, several high hazard coastal areas, including Peggotty Beach, were identified based on flood zone designations, local and federal repetitive loss information and local knowledge provided by Flood Mitigation Committee members (Appendix O). Priorities mentioned in this report include: developing specific criteria for properties to be purchased or relocated by the Town; encouraging local or federal buy-out of high hazard coastal areas; identifying appropriate funding sources for buy-out options.

Historically, Second and Third Cliffs provided a sediment source for Peggotty Beach. The lack of a sediment source from these cliffs and the funneling of waves between the two cliffs during storm events have essentially leveled the coastal dune on the southern half of the barrier beach and created an unstable barrier beach. In addition, the salt marsh is being increasingly degraded and lost to dune overwash on the landward side of the beach. 3.1 Coastal Beaches Beach nourishment is the artificial placement of sediment to rebuild the beach to dimensions it once had, or to some other configuration. Depending on the goals for the level of flood and erosion protection, the goals for recreational use, and/or the limits placed on it by one or more regulatory agencies, nourishment could be done to different extents on different sections of Peggotty. The nourishment materials could come from a dredging project, from a land-based quarry or pit, or from a combination of sources. Nourishment of the beach would also enable

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

nourishment or rebuilding of the dunes. Dune nourishment without beach nourishment would not be as effective or long-lasting. Seaweed wrack should be kept on the beach as much as possible because the wrack material helps stabilize the beach sediments and contains food for shorebirds, crabs, and other creatures. Moreover, means used to remove wrack materials inadvertently remove sediments and alter existing beach contours as well. An effort should be made to balance the negative effects of wrack on recreational use (i.e. smell) with the benefits to wildlife and dune stabilization. According to the BOH, the DPW currently cleans the beach of wrack because of beachgoers complaints about odors and bacterial growth. 3.2 Coastal Dunes Town Way Extension (southern portion) Extensive dune nourishment with moderate to heavy planting of both beach grass and native shrubs would enhance wildlife habitat, reduce some storm damage and improve opportunities for recreational use of the southern half of the beach. Dune nourishment could also lead to more extensive impacts from overwash into the adjacent salt marsh caused by very large storm events. However, the overtopping of the barrier as the result of storms and the subsequent maintenance required to clean out the Salt Marsh tidal creeks would likely be reduced if nourishment were to take place. (The DPW has to regularly maintain the flow within the tidal creeks, in part to control mosquitoes). Another possible measure would involve burying one or more zigzag rows of sand drift fence to aid in stabilizing the dune by trapping windblown sand and also by reducing wave energy during some storms. Management of the pathways within the dunes between the Inner Harbor Road dwellings and the beach would require cooperation of the town and landowners. A more carefully managed dune system would provide additional protection and habitat, especially if it were expanded to the east. Hard-engineered shore protection measures and CES on the barrier beach are probably not feasible because they are very expensive and would be very difficult to permit. As a result, Peggotty Beach is likely always to be vulnerable during large storm events, with some erosion always likely to be one of the results. This will probably be the cased regardless of any soft engineering shore protection measures that are implemented. Parking Lot and Inner Harbor Road (northern portion) Currently the northern half of the beach is the more heavily used part. Efforts to reduce and prevent damage to existing vegetation should be a priority. Areas of native dune vegetation should be clearly marked and protected from encroachment by fencing on all sides. Small gaps may be maintained to provide corridors for wildlife passage if deemed important for rare or abundant animal species currently utilizing the area. Signage explaining the protection of the area would provide the public with important information.

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

3.3

Land Under the Ocean and Land Containing Shellfish Beach nourishment that includes areas below the MLW line would involve placement of materials in Commonwealth Tidelands. These projects would need to be designed to minimize adverse impacts on marine fisheries habitat and wildlife. Field surveys would likely be required to document the presence and density of sea grasses, shellfish, and other invertebrates. The NMFS might require an Essential Fish Habitat consultation in conjunction with the PGP review. Time of year restrictions could be required for activities that might be harmful to spawning of various species present. Sediment analyses would be required to document the relative mixture of sediment grain sizes present on the beach so similar donor material could be acquired. The goal would be to use material that is free from toxic materials and significant quantities of fine sediments that are easily re-suspended and could remain in the water column for long periods of time and thereby increasing water turbidity. Proposals to create CES such as groins, breakwaters, and reefs would also require field surveys to document the presence and density of seagrasses, shellfish, and other invertebrates. A variety of these structures have been suggested as means to decrease storm impacts and erosional forces on Peggotty. These structures would likely require modeling to show how water circulation would be altered and to ascertain, to the extent possible, that there would be no unintended impacts. Because of the direct physical impacts to marine wildlife habitat and alterations to water circulation patterns the CES alternatives would require the most layers of permitting and would receive the highest degree of scrutiny; as a result, this would be the most costly path in seeking stabilization for Peggotty. Salt Marsh The Kent Street salt marsh receives sediments from Peggotty beach and its associated dune system. The tidal creek adjacent to the coastal dune requires maintenance to remove sediments and wrack materials that clog the creek. The original tidal creek has shifted west as a result of encroachment by the coastal dune and current maintenance regimes. The original location of the creek extended to the current location of the dune between dwellings at 15 and 21 Town Way Extension (see Appendix H and Appendix K) and possibly to a location that currently is Land Under the Ocean. One possibility for stabilizing the current location of the tidal creek would involve placing a culvert within the current creek channel that would allow water flow but prevent its being impacted by overwash sediments. Although this option would have permitting and construction costs, maintenance costs for the creek would be reduced as long the culvert system included the means to keep it from clogging. Another option would be to widen and maintain one of the landward creeks while allowing the dune to continue shifting landward and filling in the presently maintained creek.

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3.4

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Peggotty Beach Management Plan Peggotty Beach Scituate, Massachusetts

Recommended Future Actions

To be completed in a future version of this report.

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Literature Referenced

Bigelow, H.B. and W.C. Schroeder. 1953. Fishes of the Gulf of Maine. Fisheries Bulletin, United

States Fish and Wildlife Service, 74(53).
Chute, Newton E. 1965. Geologic Map of the Scituate Quadrangle Federal Emergency Management Agency Flood Insurance Rate Maps, Town of Scituate (Community Panels 2502820004E and 2502820006E ) October 16, 2003. Giese, G.S.. Aubrey, D.G and Zeeb, P. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA. Passive Retreat of Massachusetts Coastal Upland Due to Relative Sea-Level Rise. Massachusetts Coastal Zone Management, December 1982. Massachusetts Barrier Beaches. Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Wetlands and Waterways 1995. Delineating Bordering Vegetated Wetlands Under the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act, A Handbook. 89 pp. Massachusetts Erosion and Sediment Control Guidelines for Urban and Suburban Areas, A Guide for Planners, Designers and Municipal Officials. www.mass.gov/dep/water/laws/policies.htm#storm.

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MassGIS data viewer (Oliver). Shellfish Suitability Areas layer. http://maps.massgis.state.ma.us/massgis_viewer/index.htm . Accessed 2/27/2008. MADEP 401 Water Quality Certification Guidance (July, 2001)

Massachusetts Natural Heritage Atlas, 12th Edition. Natural Heritage & Endangered Species Program, Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, Route 135, Westborough, MA 01581, www.state.ma.us/dfwele/dfw/nhesp.

Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act (M.G.L. c. 131, §. 40) and its implementing Regulations (310 CMR 10.00), www.state.ma.us/dep.

Mitchell, J.K. 1987. A management-oriented, regional classification of developed coastal barriers. In Platt, R.H., Pelczarski, S.G. and Burbank, B.K.R. editors, Cities on the Beach, Chicago: University of Chicago Department of Geography Research paper 224, 143-54. National Marine Fisheries Service, Habitat Conservation Division. Summary of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) and General Habitat Parameters for Federally Managed Species. http://www.nero.noaa.gov/hcd . Accessed 2/27/2008. New England Hydric Soils Technical Committee. April 2004, 3rd ed., Field Indicators for Identifying Hydric Soils in New England, New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission, Wilmington, MA.

Literature Referenced
Reed, P.B. 1988. National List of Plant Species that Occur in Wetlands: 1988 Massachusetts. U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service. NERC-88/18.21. Ringold, P.L. and J. Clark, 1980 The Coastal Almanac. W.H. Freeman, San Francisco. Town of Scituate Wetlands Protection By-Law. United States Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, in cooperation with Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station, Soil Survey for Plymouth County, Massachusetts, issued July 1969.

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LAND UNDER THE OCEAN

COASTAL BEACH

N
COASTAL DUNE

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COASTAL BEACH SALT MARSH COASTAL DUNE

TIDAL CREEK

SALT MARSH

(MassGIS), Commonwealth of Massachusetts Executive Office

Office of Geographic and Environmental Information

Entire Barrier Beach is located within Land Subject to Coastal Storm Flowage. A 200-Foot Riverfront Area is associated with the main tidal creek within the Salt Marsh.

of Environmental Affairs

Wetland Resource Areas

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3 2 4

1

Approximate Location of Privately Owned Land

5 6 7 8

Existing Single Family Dwellings
9
(Please refer to Appendix I for assessed property values according to Assessor's Office records.)

10
1. 4 Peggotty Beach Road Map 55, Lot 9A 3,659 square feet 11. 47 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 43 6,970 square feet Cess Pool Concrete Block 12. 48 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 1 6,850 square feet Cess Pool Wood Pilings 13. 46 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 2 6,621 square feet Cess Pool Wood Pilings 43 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 41 6,000 sqaure feet Cess Pool Wood Piles 15. 39 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 37 6,250 square feet Title 5 Wood Piles 16. 31 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 33 6,425 square feet Cess Pool Concrete Shearwall 17. 27 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 31 4,250 sqaure feet Cess Pool Concrete Shearwalls 18. 25 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 30 6,200 sqaure feet Cess Pool Concrete Shearwall 19. 21 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 28 5,350 square feet Cess Pool Concrete Shearwall

11

12 13

Sewered Wood Pilings (partiallly enclosed) 2. 6 Peggotty Beach Road Map 55, Lot 9 12,000 square feet

14

15

Title 5 Wood Pilings 3. 8 Peggotty Beach Road ? Map 55, Lot 8 6,882 square feet

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Wood Pilings 4. 10 Peggotty Beach Road 14.

16

Cess Pool

17

Map 55, Lot 7

18

8,291 sqaure feet Cess Pool

Wood Pilings 5. 26 Inner Harbor Road Map 55, Lot 6 16,000 square feet Title 5 Wood Pilings 6. 28 Inner Harbor Road Map 55, Lot 5 11,064 square feet

19

20

Cess Pool Solid Concrete 7. 30 Inner Harbor Road Map 55, Lot 4 4,800 square feet Cess Pool Concrete Block 8. 34 Inner Harbor Road Map 55, Lot 3 14,767 square feet Title 5 Wood Pilings 9. 36 Inner Harbor Road Map 55, Lot 2 12,545 square feet Title 5 Solid Concrete and Concrete Block (w/small foundation windows) 20. 10. 38 Inner Harbor Road Map 55, Lot 1 8,059 square feet Cess Pool Concrete Block/Solid Concrete (w/small windows)

15 Town Way Extension Map 55, Lot 26 26,200 square feet Title 5 Wood Pilings (Recently Burned Down)

* All septic systems not Title 5 compliant are assumed to have cesspools according to the Town of Scituate Board of Health.

Office of Geographic and Environmental Information (MassGIS), Commonwealth of Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs

Existing Privately Owned Residences on Peggotty Beach

N

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