ONS-NCA Street Outreach Report Card by mmcsx

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									                         ONS/NCA Street Outreach Report Card
                                   2010 Monthly
         Legion               2010 Output                    May   Y-T-D
1 “Intervention” with     # of ONS Focus Group youth
validated fire-arm        and young adults engaged by
offenders                 ONS NCA’s while facilitating        51   290
                          Street Outreach Activities
2 “Intervention” with     # of total street level
validated fire-arm        CONTACTS with ONS Focus
offenders                 Group                              295   1,085
3 “Intervention” with     # of hours logged by ONS
validated fire-arm        NCA’s while facilitating street
offenders                 outreach activities in “problem    271   855
                          areas” or “hot spots” with ONS
                          Focus Group
4 “Prevention” with       # of youth and young adults at-
non-focus group           risk of gun violence engaged
members                   by ONS NCA’s while                 167   794
                          facilitating Street Outreach
                          Activities
5 “Prevention” with       # of total street level
non-focus group           CONTACTS with youth and
members                   young adults at-risk of gun        342   1,311
                          violence
6 Total CONTACTS          # of total street level            637   2,396
with ALL participants     CONTACTS
7 Total HOURS             # of total hours logged
logged with ALL           facilitating street outreach
participants              activities in “problem areas” or   609   1,795
                          “hot spots”
8 “Intervention”          # of unduplicated service
related referrals for     referrals on behalf of ONS
validated fire-arm        Focus Group                         23   134
offenders
9 Total                   # of total unduplicated service
UNDUPLICATED              referrals made
referrals for ALL                                             46   303
participants
10 “Intervention” with    # of Attention Intensive            10    60
validated fire-arm        Mentoring administered to
offenders                 ONS Focus Group
11                        # of Parolees Assisted              15   53
12                        # of Probationers Assisted          23   130
13 Fire-arm related       # of Street level fire arm
assaults/shootings        mediations/interruptions by
where ONS engaged         ONS NCA’s                           8     75
one or both sides of
the conflict
14                        # of Life Skills classes            22    70
                          facilitated
15 Unduplicated           # of youth and young adults        123   386
                          participated in Life Skills
May 2010


STREET OUTREACH COVERAGE/ACTIVITY BY GEOGRAPHY
NORTH – 27%
CENTRAL – 30%
SOUTH – 32%
OTHER/PARCHESTER VILLAGE – 11%

                       Referral Partners

NHNR                         CCC FAMILY SUPPORT SERVICES
GRIP                         RPAL
IMPACT                       BAY AREA LEGAL AIDE
ONE RICHMOND INITIATIVE      RICHMOND RESCUE
CCC SOCIAL SERVICES          CCC CHILD SUPPORT DIVISION
RUBICON                      EAST BAY WORKS
LANEY COLLEGE                AJ TRUCKING
LABOR READY                  GOODWILL INDUSTRIES
MASK                         KHADAFY FOUNDATION
COR E & T                    SASCA
J. COLE RECOVERY HOME        ANKA BEHAVIROAL HEALTH
STAND                        ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS
DAWN CENTER – DUI SCHOOL     EMPLOYMENT & HUMAN SERVICES
ST. VINCENT DE PAUL          DIABLO VALLEY RANCH – MEN’S TX
FREDERIC OZANAM CENTER – WOMEN’S TX
THE WILLIAMS GROUP           LOS MEDONOS COLLEGE
THE STRIDE CENTER            RICHMOND FAMILY INSTITUTE
JOYFUL RECOVERY              PAROLE OUTPATIENT UNIT
FIRST 5 CENTER               THE HAWKINS CENTER
CONTRA COSTA COLLEGE         BAY AREA RESCUE MISSION


                 INTERVENTIONS @ SCHOOLS
                      Kennedy High School
                      Gompers High School
                      De Anza High School
                     El Cerrito High School
                     Portola Middle School
                      Coronado Elementary
                       Chavez Elementary
                     Alvarado Adult School
                      Contra Costa College
                        ONS MONTHLY HIGHLIGHTS


California Cities Gang Prevention Network Meeting

City of Richmond Police Chief Chris Magnus and Neighborhood Safety Director
DeVone Boggan joined mayors, police chiefs and other California city leaders in
Sacramento for a meeting of the California Cities Gang Prevention Network.

The California Cities Gang Prevention Network seeks to reduce gang-related
violence and victimization through cross-city peer learning, identifying and
implementing best practices, and initiating state and federal policy changes to
support local practice. Participating network cities include Richmond, Fresno,
Los Angeles, Oakland, Oxnard, Sacramento, Salinas, San Bernardino, San
Diego, San Francisco, San José, Santa Rosa and Stockton.

Meeting participants learned how a balanced and collaborative approach utilizing
prevention, intervention and enforcement can successfully reduce gang
violence. They also explored the role of state and federal governments in
supporting municipalities’ gang reduction efforts, including ways to make funding
streams more flexible for local gang prevention efforts.

US Attorney General Eric Holder also addressed the group on emerging federal
policies and intergovernmental partnerships for reducing gang violence in cities.

The 13-city Network is sponsored by the National League of Cities’ (NLC)
Institute for Youth, Education and Families and the National Council on Crime
and Delinquency and is supported by grants from the California Wellness
Foundation and the California Endowment, with earlier support from the Evelyn
and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund, the East Bay Community Foundation and the
Richmond Children’s Fund. Kaiser Permanente provided additional support for
this meeting.

Office of Neighborhood Safety Activities

Lifeskills Graduation

On May 17th, the Office of Neighborhood Safety (ONS) in partnership with the
IMPACT Program and Project Pride facilitated its first Life Skills Training
graduation in the City of Richmond. Fifteen program graduates, family and
friends attended the ceremony held in North Richmond at the Project Pride
community facility where the 20 weeks of life skill training were held. ONS staff,
IMPACT facilitators, Project Pride staff, IMPACT board member Lesa Macintosh,
and City of Richmond Mayor Gayle McLaughlin were in attendance.
Lifelines to Healing Initiative Conference

ONS participated in the Lifelines to Healing Initiative Conference held in Oakland
where the focus was on the community impact of urban violence and the role of
clergy and congregations to stem the tide of this violence.


ONS TESTIMONIAL

David Benjamin

It was my second week on the job, as a neighborhood change agent when I met
David. David, a 20-year old at risk young adult who I struck up a conversation. I
was shadowing my colleague in a part of central Richmond that is known to be a
dangerous part of the neighborhood.

I immediately started speaking with this young man. Though he seemed very laid
back he didn’t hold back what he wanted to do with himself, he just hadn’t really
done anything to do it. He was definitely at risk and could be one of those who
could get caught in the crossfire. He told me that he had “way too much time
hanging out.” He said, “it’s almost like the streets call you.” Today I guess my call
was stronger.

Upon learning more as we spoke for a good length of time, David had been
staying at his grandparents, helping his grandmother take care of his sick
grandfather. He shared how he hadn’t finished school but the only thing he really
was interested in was computers. The longer we talked the more he became
interested in the resources I offered him. It wasn’t long after that I referred him to
the STRIDE center, Project Richmond. They administered and assessment and
he was granted a full scholarship to start school there. He had some additional
needs that the Office of Neighborhood Safety quickly fulfilled for him.

Today David is thriving in school. He is at the top of his class. He enjoys school
and looks forward to going everyday. He stated it keeps him out of the streets
and he now focuses on school and what they have to offer. He stated that he
now has a goal to accomplish, a career in the computer field and he works hard
everyday towards his goal. He is grateful to the Stride Center and all the
resources and classes they have taught him. He has gotten a lot out of it all.

He was also grateful to the ONS. He said he had no ideal that the day we met
would lead to where he is now. He appreciates all the support, weekly check-in’s,
phone calls, supportive services and encouragement that I continue to offer. He
told me he appreciates that whatever I have said I have kept my word to him and
have done whatever I could to see that he gets what he needs to keep him on his
path to successfully complete his goals.
What time he has left in the day he spends rehearsing for a play he is in. He said,
I have less time to be in the streets hanging out, I have things that are positive to
do.” I believe that one youngster at a time that we can keep off the streets, even
from just hanging out we can protect. David has potential and he is committed. I
see it and I know he sees it as a long term commitment that will have a huge
affect on his life…whether he is acting it out on stage or in real life.

Submitted By: Kim MacDonald, ONS Neighborhood Change Agent

								
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