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USDA Community Food Projects Grant Outline

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USDA Community Food Projects Grant Outline Powered By Docstoc
					[NOTE: this document does not include the full proposal. The narrative starts on page 11.]

Table of Contents
                                           Southside Community Land Trust

Part I – Project Summary
Part II – Project Description
   1   Community to be Served
  1-4 Organizations Involved
  4-6 Project Goals
  4-6 Activities to Achieve Goals
  6-9 Timeline
   9   Relationship to Program Objectives
 9-10 Evaluation
   10 Self-sustainability
Part III – References
   11 Economics in Upper South Providence
   12 Economics in Lower South Providence
   13 Economics in Elmwood
   14 Economics in West End
   15 Economics in Washington Park
Part IV – Key Personnel
   16 Resume for Project Director, Patrick McNiff
 17-18 Resume for Authorized Organizational Representative, Jane E. Jellison
   19 Job Description for Farm Manager
   20 Job Description for Incubator Manager
Part V – Letters of Commitment
21-51 Hing Sok through Indian Council
Part VI – Conflict of Interest List Form
  52    Non-applicable
Part VII – Budget
  53 3-year budget
  54 1st year
  55 2nd year
  56 3rd year
57-59 Narrative
Part VIII – Matching Documentation
60-74 Hing Sok through Indian Council
Part IX – Current and Pending Support
  75
Part X – Assurance Statement
  76
Part XI – Compliance with National Environmental Policy Act
  77
Part XII – Page B, Proposal Cover Page
             UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
        COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION                                                                                                                                                   OMB Approved 0524-0039
                                                                                                                                                                                                                    Expires 03/31/2004
                              SERVICE
                       PROPOSAL COVER PAGE
1.     LEGAL NAME OF ORGANIATION TO WHICH AWARD SHOULD BE MADE                                                     3. NAME AND TITLE OF AUTHORIZED ORGANIZATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE (AOR)
2. Southside Community Land Trust                                                                                       Jane E. Jellison
ADDRESS (Give complete mailing address and Zip Code)                                                               3.      a. Telephone No.:                            b.      Fax Number:               c.      E-mail Address:
                                                                                                                        401-273-9419                                     401-273-5712 sclt@ids.net
109 Somerset Street                                                                                                5. ADDRESS OF AOR (If different from Item 2.)
Providence, Rhode Island 02907


6a. TYPE OF PERFORMING ORGANIZATION (Choose 1 only)                                                                                              6b. In addition, PLEASE CHECK ANY OF THE FOLLOWING THAT
                                                                                                                                                 APPLY:
01     USDA Agency                                                                        08    Private For-Profit
                                                                                                                                                     Alaska Native-Serving Institution
02     Other Federal Agency/Department                                                    09 X Private Non-Profit
                                                                                                                                                     Cooperative Extension Service
03     1862 Land-Grant University                                                         10    Public Secondary School                              Native Hawaiian-Serving Institution
04     1890 Land-Grant University (including Tuskegee Univ.)                              11    State, Local or Tribal Government                    Hispanic-Serving Institution
05     1994 Land-Grant University                                                         12    Individual                                           Historically Black College or University (other than 1890)
06     Private University of College                                                      13    Other                                                School of Forestry
                                                                                                                                                     State Agricultural Experiment Station
07     Non-Land-Grant Public University or College
                                                                                                                                                     Tribal College (other than 1994)
04     1890 Land-Grant University                                                                                                                    Veterinary School or College


7. TITLE OF PROPOSED PROJECT (140-character maximum, including spaces)
Shared Harvest Farm Project
8. PROGRAM TO WHICH YOU ARE APPLYING (Include Program Area and Number: Refer to Federal                                               9. TAX IDENTIFICATION NO. (TIN)                      10. CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT NO.
    Register announcement or program solicitation where applicable)
                                                                                                                                      05-0394224                                            RI 2nd District
     Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program

11. DUNS NO. (Data Universal Numbering System)                                                                                        12.     PROPOSED START DATE                          13. DURATION REQUESTED (No. of
                                                                                                                                       October 2002                                        months)    36 months
14. TYPE OF REQUEST (Check only one)                                                                                                                                                       15. FEDERAL FUNDS REQUESTED
                                                                                                                                                                                           (From Form CSREES-2004)
X New                 Renewal                       Supplement                       Resubmission                             Resubmitted Renewal

     Continuing Increment                           PD Transfer                 [PRIOR USDA Award No. ___________________________________]

16. PROJECT DIRECTOR (PD)                                                                                                             17.     PD BUSINESS ADDRESS (INCLUDE DEPARTMENT/ZIP CODE)
Patrick McNiff                                                                                                                         109 Somerset Street
                                                                                                                                       Providence, Rhode Island 02907
18. a. PD Phone No.:                                   b. PD Fax No.:                           c. PD E-mail Address:
401-273-9419                                           401-273-5712                             sclt@ids.net
19. CO-PD(s) NAME                                                                                                                                TELEPHONE NUMBER                                         E-MAIL ADDRESS




20. IF THIS IS A RESEARCH PROJECT, WILL IT INVOLVE RECOMBINANT DNA, HUMAN SUB-                                                        21. WILL THIS PROJECT BE SENT OR HAS IT BEEN SENT TO OTHER FUND-
    JECTS, OR LIVING VERTEBRATE ANIMALS?                                                                                                  ING AGENCIES, INCLUDING OTHER USDA AGENCIES?

X No                Yes (If yes, complete Form CSREES-2008)                                                                                 No            Yes (If yes, list Agency acronym(s) & program(s))
By signing and submitting this proposal, the applicant is providing the required certifications set forth in 7 CFR Part 3017, as amended, regarding Debarment and Suspension and Drug-Free Workplace;
and 7 CFR Part 3018 regarding Lobbying. Submission of the individual forms is not required. (Please read the Certifications included in this booklet before signing this form.) In addition, the applicant certifies that the information
contained herein is true and complete to the best of its knowledge and accepts as to any award the obligation to comply with the terms and conditions of the Cooperative
State Research, Education and Extension Service in effect at the time of the award.

SIGNATURE OF PROJECT DIRECTOR(S) (All PDs listed in blocks 16 or 19 must sign if they are to be included in award documents.)                                                              DATE
                                                                                                                                                                                           March 20, 2002
                                                                                                                                                                                           DATE
SIGNATURE OF AUTHORIZED ORGANIZATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE (Same as Item 3)
                                                                                                                                                                                           March 20, 2002
                                                                                                                                                                                           DATE
SIGNATURE (OPTIONAL USE)



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is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control number.
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                                                                                                                                                      Page A




                                                                                                                                   OMB Approved 0524-0039
                                                                                                                                        Expires 03/31/2004


         Place this form after the last page of the signed original proposal only. Do not attach to the copies of the proposal!!!

                                                                   PERSONAL DATA ON
PROJECT DIRECTOR
  The Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) has a continuing commitment to
  monitor the operation of its review and award processes to detect--and deal appropriately with--any instances of
  real or apparent inequities with respect to age, sex, race, or ethnicity of the proposed project director.
      To provide CSREES with the information it needs for this important task, complete the form below and attach it after the last
      page of the signed original of the application. Do not attach copies of this form to the duplicated copies of the application.

      Upon receipt of the application by CSREES, this form will be separated from the application. This form will not be duplicated,
      and it will not be a part of the review process. Data will be confidential. CSREES requests Social Security Numbers for
      accurate identification, referral, and for management of CSREES programs. Provision of the Social Security Number is
      voluntary. No individual will be denied any right, benefit, or privilege provided by law because of refusal to disclose his or her
      Social Security Number. All analyses conducted on the date of birth and race and/or ethnic origin data will report aggregate
      statistical findings only and will not identify individuals. CSREES requests the Social Security Number under 7 U.S.C. 3318.

      If you decline to provide this information, it will in no way affect consideration of your application.

      Your cooperation will be appreciated.



  Project Director/Co-Project Director(s) (Last, First, Middle):                             Date of Birth        Gender        Social Security No.

  McNiff, Patrick, John                                                                    11/13/74            Male




If additional space is needed for more co-PDs, please attach an additional sheet.

The following information refers only to the primary Project Director.


  Race of PD - Check all that apply (for statistical purposes only).         Ethnicity of PD (for statistical purposes only).
     American Indian or Alaska Native                                               Hispanic or Latino
     Asian                                                                   x Not Hispanic or Latino
     Black or African American
     Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
  x White
     Check here if you do not wish to provide some or all of the above information.
According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a
valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0524-0039. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to
average 3.00 hours per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and
reviewing the collection of information.

Form CSREES-2002 (12/2000)                                                                                                                            Page B
                                                                                                                                             U
           UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE                                                                                          OMB Approved 0524-0039
      COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION                                                                                    Expires 03/31/2004

                            SERVICE

                                                                                                                                          PROPOSAL TYPE

 Project Director(s) (PD):                                                                                                        For National Research Initiative
                                                                                                                              Competitive Grants Program Proposals Only
                                                                                                                              [ ] Standard Research Proposal
 PD          Patrick McNiff                                  Institution Southside Community Land Trust
                                                                                                                              [ ] Conference
                                                                                                                              [ ] AREA Award
 CO-PD       Farm Manager (to be hired)                      Institution Southside Community Land Trust                          [ ] Postdoctoral
                                                                                                                                 [ ] New Investigator
 CO-PD       Incubator Manager (to be hired) Institution Southside Community Land Trust                                          Strengthening:
                                                                                                                                 [ ] Career Enhancement
 CO-PD                                                       Institution                                                         [ ] Equipment
                                                                                                                                 [ ] Seed Grant
                                                                                                                                 [ ] Standard Strengthening

 Project Title:        Shared Harvest Farm Project, Providence                                                                        For Higher Education Program
                                                                                                                                             Proposals Only:
                                                                                                                              Need Area:

                                                                                                                              Discipline:
 Key Words:

 Southside Community Land Trust (SCLT) is seeking three year funding from USDA’s CFPCGP to facilitate the
 establishment of a new-entry farmer incubator program, support creation of a Farmers’ Market, and help estab-
 lish a Community Supported Agriculture Program all targeted to serve low income, urban residents in the City of
 Providence, RI. The RI DEM will be giving SCLT a 50-acre farm located, only 8 miles from our South Provi-
 dence community, in the neighboring City of Cranston. On this land, we will offer up to 15 new farmers the op-
 portunity to start their own agricultural businesses, providing them with technical support, marketing and busi-
 ness planning, and farm equipment for them to use cooperatively. Once they have established their businesses,
 we will work with area Land Trusts to place the new farmers on larger tracts of land so they can increase their
 size and profits. New farmers will move onto our farm to establish themselves as the previous farmers move on.
 These new farmers will come primarily from the Southside neighborhood and are immigrant, low-income urban
 residents who have come from an agricultural background in their native lands. We learned of the need for such
 a resource when several of our community gardeners approached us in search of additional land on which to
 grow food to sell to local restaurants, markets and neighbors. To help with their success, in addition to putting
 them in touch with various state, federal and local resources, they will have the opportunity to take part in the
 Broad Street Farmers’ Market that SCLT is opening this summer in the heart of Southside. The Market will offer
 fresh locally grown produce from area farms, a resource not found in this neighborhood, and the foods will also
 include culturally acceptable choices for residents who represent a wide variety of ethnicities and cultures. This
 Market will also provide nutrition information in the form of cooking demonstrations sponsored by the State and
 a local culinary university to educate people who attend. The Market serves the need for access to local produce
 within this neighborhood while providing an outlet for sales by the neighborhood farmers. The inclusion of EBT
 unites at this market will also make this market more attractive to local residents. As another option for urban
 residents, SCLT will be starting a Community Supported Agriculture Program geared toward lower income par-
 ticipants. Our incubator farmers will also contribute to the CSA. SCLT piloted a CSA program 2 years ago with
 10 families, experimenting with various payment structures to make CSA an affordable option for low income
 residents. It was very well received and the reason we stopped was for lack of land on which to grow the food.
 That will no longer be a factor. Payment structures include the use of food stamps, institutional shares and work
 shares. Nutrition and educational components will also be included in the CSA.
According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays
a valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0524-0039. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to
average .50 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and re-
viewing the collection of information.
                              UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
                                                                                                                                                               OMB Approved 0524-0039
                     COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE                                                                                   Expires 03/31/2004
BUDGET
                                                                                                              USDA AWARD NO.
                    Southside Community Land Trust
ORGANIZATION AND ADDRESS
                                                                                                                DURATION            DURATION           Non-Federal      Non-federal Cost-
109 Somerset Street Providence, Rhode Island 02907                                                              PROPOSED            PROPOSED          Proposed Cost-    Sharing/Matching
                                                                                                                 MONTHS:           MONTHS: _____         Sharing/       Funds Approved
                                                                                                                  __36___                             Matching Funds       by CSREES
PROJECT DIRECTOR(S)                                                                                                Total                               (If required)      (If Different)
                                                                                                                                   Funds Approved
Patrick McNiff                                                                                                Funds Requested        by CSREES
                                                                                                                by Proposer          (If different)

A. Salaries and Wages ........................                            CSREES-FUNDED WORK MONTHS
1. No. Of Senior Personnel                                                Calendar   Academic   Summer
a. _3___ (Co)-PD(s) ...............................................

                                                                                                                    $130,000
                                                                            84                                                                                $60,000
b. _1___ Senior Associates .....................................                                                                                              $16,800
                                                                            7.2                                        $6,000
2. No. of Other Personnel (Non-Faculty)
a. _____ Research Associates/Postdoctorates .....................

b. _4___ Other Professionals ..................................
                                                                            48                                                                                $23,000
c. __2__ Paraprofessionals .....................................
                                                                                                                     $13,500

d. __6__ Graduate Students ....................................                                                                                               $10,500
e. __21_ Prebaccalaureate Students........................                                                                                                    $12,105
f. __3__ Secretarial-Clerical ..................................                                                      $3,000                                   $3,440


g. __13__...................... Technical, Shop and Other                                                                                                    $139,877
     Total Salaries and Wages ...........................                                                          $152,500                                 $265,722
B. Fringe Benefits (If charged as Direct Costs)                                                                      $14,000                                  $14,000


C. Total Salaries, Wages, and Fringe Benefits (A plus B)                                                           $166,500                                 $279,722
D. Nonexpendable Equipment (Attach supporting data. List items and dollar amounts
   for each item.)                                                                                                    $46,100
E. Materials and .Supplies                                                                                             $6,000
F. Travel
G. Publication Costs/Page Charges                                                                                      $5,000
H. Computer (ADPE) Costs
I. Student Assistance/Support (Scholarships/fellowships, stipends/tuition, cost of education,
     etc. Attach list of items and dollar amounts for each item.)

J. All Other Direct Costs (In budget narrative, list items and dollar amounts, and provide sup-
     porting data for each item.)                                                                                      $9,000
K. Total Direct Costs (C through J) ...............                                                                $232,600
L. F&A/Indirect Costs (If applicable, specify rate(s) and base(s) for on/off campus activity.
     Where both are involved, identify itemized costs included in on/off campus bases.)

M. Total Direct and F&A/Indirect Costs (K plus L) 
N. Other.............................................................                                                                                       $200,000
O. Total Amount of This Request ...................                                                                $232,600                                 $479,722

P. Carryover -- (If Applicable)Federal Funds: $                                        Non-Federal funds: $                     Total $
Q. Cost-Sharing/Matching (Breakdown of total amounts shown on line O)
                                                                                                                                                             $85,180
         Cash (both Applicant and Third Party) 
- Non Cash Contributions (both Applicant and Third Party)
                                                                                                                                                             $394,542
AME AND TITLE (Type or print)                                                                                 SIGNATURE (required for revised budget only)              DATE
Project Director
 Authorized Organizational Representative

 Signature (for optional use)

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a
person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control
number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0524-0039. The time re-
quired to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1.00 hour per response, includ-
ing the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the
data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information.
                               UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
                      COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE                                                                               OMB Approved 0524-0039
                                                                                                                                                                      Expires 03/31/2004
 BUDGET
                                                                                                               USDA AWARD NO.
                     Southside Community Land Trust
 ORGANIZATION AND ADDRESS
                                                                                                                 DURATION            DURATION           Non-Federal        Non-federal
 109 Somerset Street Providence, Rhode Island 02907                                                              PROPOSED            PROPOSED          Proposed Cost-         Cost-
                                                                                                                  MONTHS:           MONTHS: _____         Sharing/      Sharing/Matching
                                                                                                                  __12___                              Matching Funds   Funds Approved
 PROJECT DIRECTOR(S)
                                                                                                               Funds Requested      Funds Approved      (If required)      by CSREES
 Patrick McNiff                                                                                                  by Proposer          by CSREES                           (If Different)
                                                                                                                                      (If different)
                                                                                                                   Year 1


 A. Salaries and Wages ........................                            CSREES-FUNDED WORK MONTHS
 1. No. Of Senior Personnel                                                Calendar   Academic   Summer
 a. _3___ (Co)-PD(s) ...............................................
                                                                             28                                        47,000                                  20,000

 b. _1___ Senior Associates .....................................
                                                                            2.4                                          2,000                                  5,600
 2. No. of Other Personnel (Non-Faculty)
 a. _____ Research Associates/Postdoctorates .....................

 b. _2___ Other Professionals ..................................             24                                                                                11,000
 c. ____ Paraprofessionals .....................................
 d. __4__ Graduate Students ....................................                                                                                                9,900
 e. __17_ Prebaccalaureate Students........................                                                                                                    11,765
 f. __1__ Secretarial-Clerical ..................................                                                        1,000                                  1,080
 g. __9__ Technical, Shop and Other.......................                                                                                                     61,745
      Total Salaries and Wages ...........................                                                             50,000                               $121,090
 B. Fringe Benefits (If charged as Direct Costs)                                                                         5,000                                  4,000
 C. Total Salaries, Wages, and Fringe Benefits (A plus B)                                                              55,000                               $125,090
 D. Nonexpendable Equipment (Attach supporting data. List items and dollar amounts
    for each item.)                                                                                                     45,500
 E. Materials and Supplies                                                                                               2,500
 F. Travel
 G. Publication Costs/Page Charges                                                                                       2,500
 H. Computer (ADPE) Costs
 I. Student Assistance/Support (Scholarships/fellowships, stipends/tuition, cost of education,
      etc. Attach list of items and dollar amounts for each item.)

 J. All Other Direct Costs (In budget narrative, list items and dollar amounts, and provide sup-
      porting data for each item.)                                                                                       4,500
 K. Total Direct Costs (C through J) ...............                                                                 110,000
 L. F&A/Indirect Costs (If applicable, specify rate(s) and base(s) for on/off campus activity.
      Where both are involved, identify itemized costs included in on/off campus bases.)

 M. Total Direct and F&A/Indirect Costs (K plus L) 
 N. Other.............................................................                                                                                      $200,000
 O. Total Amount of This Request ...................                                                                 110,000                                $325,090

 P. Carryover -- (If Applicable)Federal Funds: $                                        Non-Federal funds: $                     Total $
  Q. Cost-Sharing/Matching (Breakdown of total amounts shown on line O)
                                                                                                                                                                          $30,680
           Cash (both Applicant and Third Party) 
  - Non Cash Contributions (both Applicant and Third Party)
                                                                                                                                                                        $294,410
  AME AND TITLE (Type or print)                                                                                 SIGNATURE (required for revised budget only)                               DATE
  Project Director                                                                                                                                                                                 3/20/02

  Authorized Organizational Representative                                                                                                                                                         3/20/02

  Signature (for optional use)

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control
number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0524-0039. The time required to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1.00 hour per response, including
the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information.
                                UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
                       COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE                                                                                              OMB Approved 0524-0039
                                                                                                                                                                                      Expires 03/31/2004
  BUDGET
                                                                                                                USDA AWARD NO.
                      Southside Community Land Trust
  ORGANIZATION AND ADDRESS
                                                                                                                   DURATION               DURATION                  Non-Federal               Non-federal
  109 Somerset Street Providence, Rhode Island 02907                                                               PROPOSED               PROPOSED                 Proposed Cost-                Cost-
                                                                                                                    MONTHS:              MONTHS: _____                Sharing/             Sharing/Matching
                                                                                                                     __12___                                       Matching Funds          Funds Approved
  PROJECT DIRECTOR(S)
                                                                                                                Funds Requested           Funds Approved            (If required)             by CSREES
  Patrick McNiff                                                                                                  by Proposer               by CSREES                                        (If Different)
                                                                                                                                            (If different)
                                                                                                                      Year 2


  A. Salaries and Wages ........................                            CSREES-FUNDED WORK MONTHS
  1. No. Of Senior Personnel                                                Calendar   Academic   Summer
  a. _3___ (Co)-PD(s) ...............................................        28                                            45,000                                             20,000
  b. _1___ Senior Associates.....................................            2.4                                              2,000                                            5,600
  2. No. of Other Personnel (Non-Faculty)
  a. _____ Research Associates/Postdoctorates .....................

  b. _1___ Other Professionals ..................................             12                                                                                               6,000
  c. __1__ Paraprofessionals .....................................                                                            9,000
  d. __1__ Graduate Students ....................................                                                                                                                 300
  e. __2_ Prebaccalaureate Students........................                                                                                                                       170
  f. __1__ Secretarial-Clerical ..................................                                                            1,000                                            1,180
  g. __2__ Technical, Shop and Other.......................                                                                                                                   39,066
       Total Salaries and Wages ...........................                                                                57,000                                          $72,316
  B. Fringe Benefits (If charged as Direct Costs)                                                                             5,000                                            5,000
  C. Total Salaries, Wages, and Fringe Benefits (A plus B)                                                                 62,000                                          $77,316
  D. Nonexpendable Equipment (Attach supporting data. List items and dollar amounts
     for each item.)
  E. Materials and Supplies                                                                                                   2,500
  F. Travel
  G. Publication Costs/Page Charges                                                                                           1,500
  H. Computer (ADPE) Costs
  I. Student Assistance/Support (Scholarships/fellowships, stipends/tuition, cost of education,
       etc. Attach list of items and dollar amounts for each item.)

  J. All Other Direct Costs (In budget narrative, list items and dollar amounts, and provide sup-
       porting data for each item.)                                                                                           2,500
  K. Total Direct Costs (C through J) ...............                                                                      68,500
  L. F&A/Indirect Costs (If applicable, specify rate(s) and base(s) for on/off campus activity.
       Where both are involved, identify itemized costs included in on/off campus bases.)

  M. Total Direct and F&A/Indirect Costs (K plus L) 
  N. Other............................................................. 
  O. Total Amount of This Request ...................                                                                      68,500                                          $77,316

  P. Carryover -- (If Applicable)Federal Funds: $                                        Non-Federal funds: $                         Total $
 Q. Cost-Sharing/Matching (Breakdown of total amounts shown on line O)
                                                                                                                                                     27,250
         Cash (both Applicant and Third Party) 
 - Non Cash Contributions (both Applicant and Third Party)
                                                                                                                                                $50,066
 AME AND TITLE (Type or print)                                                                        SIGNATURE (required for revised budget only)             DATE
 Project Director                                                                                                                                                     3/20/02

 Authorized Organizational Representative                                                                                                                             3/20/02

 Signature (for optional use)

According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, an agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a
person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control
number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0524-0039. The time re-
quired to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1.00 hour per response, includ-
ing the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the
data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information.
                              UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
                     COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE                                                                       OMB Approved 0524-0039
                                                                                                                                                             Expires 03/31/2004
 BUDGET
                                                                                                      USDA AWARD NO.
                     Southside Community Land Trust
 ORGANIZATION AND ADDRESS
                                                                                                        DURATION          DURATION           Non-Federal          Non-federal
 109 Somerset Street Providence, Rhode Island 02907                                                     PROPOSED          PROPOSED          Proposed Cost-           Cost-
                                                                                                         MONTHS:         MONTHS: _____         Sharing/        Sharing/Matching
                                                                                                         __12___                            Matching Funds     Funds Approved
 PROJECT DIRECTOR(S)                                                                                                                         (If required)        by CSREES
                                                                                                      Funds Requested    Funds Approved
 Patrick McNiff                                                                                         by Proposer        by CSREES                             (If Different)
                                                                                                                           (If different)
                                                                                                          Year 3


 A. Salaries and Wages ........................                        CSREES-FUNDED WORK MONTHS
 1. No. Of Senior Personnel                                            Calendar   Academic   Summer
 a. _3___ (Co)-PD(s) ...............................................
                                                                         28                                  38,000                                   20,000

 b. _1___ Senior Associates .....................................
                                                                        2.4                                     2,000                                  5,600
 2. No. of Other Personnel (Non-Faculty)
 a. _____ Research Associates/Postdoctorates .....................

 b. _1___ Other Professionals ..................................         12                                                                            6,000
 c. __1__ Paraprofessionals .....................................                                               4,500
 d. __1__ Graduate Students ....................................                                                                                        300
 e. __2_ Prebaccalaureate Students........................                                                                                              170
 f. __1__ Secretarial-Clerical ..................................                                               1,000                                  1,180
 g. __2__ Technical, Shop and Other.......................                                                                                            39,066
     Total Salaries and Wages ...........................                                                     45,500                                $72,316
 B. Fringe Benefits (If charged as Direct Costs)                                                                4,000                                  5,000
 C. Total Salaries, Wages, and Fringe Benefits (A plus B)                                                     49,500                                $77,316
 D. Nonexpendable Equipment (Attach supporting data. List items and dollar amounts
    for each item.)                                                                                                600
 E. Materials and Supplies                                                                                      1,000
 F. Travel
 G. Publication Costs/Page Charges                                                                              1,000
 H. Computer (ADPE) Costs
 I. Student Assistance/Support (Scholarships/fellowships, stipends/tuition, cost of education,
     etc. Attach list of items and dollar amounts for each item.)

 J. All Other Direct Costs (In budget narrative, list items and dollar amounts, and provide sup-
     porting data for each item.)                                                                               2,000
 K. Total Direct Costs (C through J) ...............                                                          54,100
 L. F&A/Indirect Costs (If applicable, specify rate(s) and base(s) for on/off campus activity.
     Where both are involved, identify itemized costs included in on/off campus bases.)
 M. Total Direct and F&A/Indirect Costs (K plus L) 
 N. Other............................................................. 
 O. Total Amount of This Request ...................                                                      54,100                                $77,316

 P. Carryover -- (If Applicable)Federal Funds: $                           Non-Federal funds: $                     Total $

 Q. Cost-Sharing/Matching (Breakdown of total amounts shown on line O)
                                                                                                                                                 27,250
       Cash (both Applicant and Third Party) 
 - Non Cash Contributions (both Applicant and Third Party)
                                                                                                                                            $50,066
 AME AND TITLE (Type or print)                                                                    SIGNATURE (required for revised budget only)             DATE
 Project Director                                                                                                                                             3/20/02

 Authorized Organizational Representative                                                                                                                     3/20/02

 Signature (for optional use)

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person is not required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a valid OMB control
number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 0524-0039. The time re-
quired to complete this information collection is estimated to average 1.00 hour per response, includ-
ing the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the
data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information.



                                         INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING FORM CSREES-2004, BUDGET
  NOTE: Unless a particular program announcement provides otherwise, each application must contain a budget for
  each year of funds requested and a cumulative budget for the full term of requested CSREES support.

  BUDGET NARRATIVE: A narrative for each line item explaining both Federal and any required cost-sharing/matching
  funds along with any remarks and budget justifications must be submitted on separate pages following the budget
  form.
                                                                                                     11




      Organization Name                                             Award Number or Project Name



      Name and Title of Authorized Representative

      DO NOT SIGN THIS FORM
      CSREES-2002, "PROPOSAL COVER PAGE."



      Signature                                                                               Date




                      Community Food Projects Competitive Grants Program
                              Southside Community Land Trust

The Community to Be Served and the Needs to Be Addressed
          The Southside Community Land Trust’s community food project will focus primarily in the
neighborhoods on the Southside of Providence that include Elmwood, Washington Park, West End,
Upper South Providence, and Lower South Providence. Within these neighborhoods, 8,301 people
live below the poverty level, accounting for 32.3% of their population. The median family income is
$20,040, with a high of $30,448 in Washington Park and a low of $11,604 in Upper South Provi-
dence. The median family income for the City of Providence is $28,342. Washington Park is an old-
er neighborhood that has remained relatively stable and the Victorian homes bordering the City’s
largest park have attracted younger, two income families in recent years. In spite of this, there are
1,067 people (13.5%) below the poverty level living here and 623 food stamps cases. Of the 14,149
food stamp cases in Providence, 40% are in Southside.
         Only 50 years ago, Southside was a thriving area with well established neighborhoods and
businesses. The construction of Interstate 95 cut the neighborhoods in half, displacing many long
time residents and forcing them into other areas of the City or into the suburbs. The result is like so
many other urban areas where properties were abandoned, burned, and ultimately bought up by non-
resident speculators. There has been a resurgence in the neighborhood over the last 10 years with
new settlement of immigrant populations, renewed investment by the City and new homeowners with
a commitment to urban living. There is much work to be done however because poverty in the City
is still largely concentrated here.
          Many of the people in these neighborhoods are from South and Central America, Africa, the
West Indies and Southeast Asia, each preferring their own particular foods, yet there is little or no
access to locally grown or culturally appropriate produce in these neighborhoods. Open space is
scarce and lead levels in the soil do not allow many residents to grow their own food, although com-
munity gardens do serve 200 families in the area in lead safe lots. One small independent supermar-
ket serves the entire area and the selection of foods is small and comparatively expensive. Conveni-
ence stores are even more limited and expensive in their offerings.
                                                                                                       12


The Organizations Involved in the Project
         Southside Community Land Trust (SCLT) has been working in the targeted neighborhoods
for the last 20 years. In that time, we have reclaimed over 5 acres of abandoned lots to create 12
community gardens serving 200 families. 10 years ago, SCLT helped create a farmers’ market in the
heart of the City’s downtown. That market has now moved into one of the neighborhoods on the East
Side of the City and, though we no longer manage it, we have been a participant in that market for
several years. We sell produce, herbs and cut flowers grown on our certified organic urban farm in
Southside.
         Two years ago, we piloted a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) program with an em-
phasis on serving low to moderate-income families. 10 families took part and we experimented with
several kinds of payment schedules to meet the needs of the participants. We were unable to contin-
ue or expand the program due to lack of land on which to grow the shares and could not find a farmer
willing to take on the project. It was very well received, however, and we have had requests to re-
establish the program from those original 10 participants as well as others in the community who
have since learned about CSAs.
         A number of our community gardeners grow produce to sell to local restaurants and neigh-
bors. The amount of land allowed each of them is limited within the community garden structure that
encourages wider resident participation. We have worked with another agency in the area that clears
and maintains vacant lots for the City, and arranged for one of our gardeners to secure a lot to be used
solely for his market garden. He began working this land in mid summer last year yet still netted a
modest income from his additional sales. He is interested in acquiring a larger piece of land on which
to start on agricultural business, as are several more of our gardeners.
         In each of our endeavors, we seek out as many partners as possible to support the programs
and those who take part in them. The following are some of those with whom we have worked and
with whom we are looking forward to partnering on this project.
         Johnson & Wales University, a well-respected institute known for culinary arts and hospital-
ity management, will continue to provide undergraduate student volunteers through their community
service program to assist us with whatever needs to be done. J&W will continue to provide graduate
volunteers who will assist in developing marketing plans, conducting research, creating positive pub-
lic relations and providing technical support for the incubator business training program. J&W will
also host the Veggin’ Out cooking demos at the Broad Street Farmers’ Market that are designed to
teach cooking techniques as well as promote good nutrition. In addition, J&W staff will serve as ad-
visors to our project.
         The RI Micro-Enterprise Association will provide a 4-week micro-enterprise-training pro-
gram for members of the farm incubator. They will also provide ongoing technical support to incuba-
tor members after the training and, when needed, they will provide translation for these trainings.
They will provide student volunteers through the Entrepreneur Program at Johnson & Wales Univer-
sity who will assist with the development of the incubator program. The Equity Trust, Inc., an or-
ganization founded to promote stewardship of land and best practices for protecting the public’s in-
terest in the use of resources, will provide the capital and the technical assistance needed in setting up
a loan fund for the farm business incubator.
         From Providence College–The Feinstein Institute, we will continue to benefit from student
volunteers through PC’s service-learning classes. Student interns and federal off campus work study
staff will also support the development and implementation of our proposal. The Director of the
Feinstein Institute will serve as an advisor to this project. He will also commit to 2 half days each
month of consulting and will create and conduct an evaluation process for the activities outlined in
this grant. Providence College- Feinstein Service Corps will provide a full time staff person,
through the Feinstein Volunteer Corps, who will work directly on the projects outlined in this grant.
                                                                                                     13


The coordinator of the Volunteer Corps will provide staff support and will also actively recruit poten-
tial staff for this position.
         The Cambodian Society will publicize the farm incubator project and CSA to its members.
They will cosponsor and host meetings to recruit for the farm incubator, providing translation servic-
es and space at the Cambodian Society offices for meeting with potential Cambodian farmers. A
member of the Cambodian Society will serve on the advisory board for the farm incubator, helping to
develop programs. The Hmong Association will be involved in recruiting new incubator members
from the Hmong community. Hmong United will organize community meetings and informational
sessions with interested individuals and provide translation services during these meetings. They will
work with SCLT to publicize the Community Supported Agriculture program in the Hmong commu-
nity. A member of the Hmong Association will serve on the advisory board.
         The USDA, Farm Service Agency will be a resource for our advisory board for the farm in-
cubator, involved in developing the programs. FSA will provide technical support for the develop-
ment of the incubator loan fund that will provide loans for working capital and operational expenses.
FSA will assist with developing the business planning training component of the incubator program
and, in the future, will provide loans to incubator members once they have established their business-
es. They will provide meeting space at the USDA offices. The USDA Natural Resources Conser-
vation Service will develop a conservation plan for the Shared Harvest Farm and a plan for eliminat-
ing invasive species on the site. They will design an irrigation system that will be used for the farm
incubator, create engineering designs for an access road around the irrigation pond, and design a
composting system for the farm. They will also facilitate training workshops for incubator members
on conservation planning and soils.
         The Food Security Coalition serves as statewide advisors to assist with linking SCLT’s
projects with the food security movement in the state. They will work to identify resources that could
benefit the programs, publicize SCLT activities and programs throughout the state and among the
coalition members, and advocate on a state level for the programs SCLT is developing. The URI
Expanded Food & Nutrition Program will provide menus & recipe publications on healthy eating
for the farmers’ market and nutritional information for the farmers’ market. Nutritionists will con-
duct workshops at the market and for CSA members. The RI Department of Human Services will
provide technical support and assistance in publicizing the farmers’ market to food stamp recipients.
They will create a link between DHS jobs programs and the farm incubator project. They will serve
in an advisory capacity to the Farmers’ Market. The RI Department of Health will provide publici-
ty and outreach for the Broad Street Farmers’ Market to WIC participants through mailings and cor-
respondence with recipients. Training of the market manager and farmers on procedures and regula-
tions for accepting WIC coupons will also be offered. They will support the Veggin’ Out cooking
demonstration program at the Broad Street Farmers’ Market and provide nutritional guides on pur-
chasing and preparing fresh produce.
         The Small Business Development Center will provide business plan training and ongoing
technical support to members of the farm incubator, assisting with developing a business and market-
ing plan for the for-profit ventures. They will offer a training of trainers workshop for SCLT staff
working on the incubator. Provided by SBDC and funded by the RI Division of Agriculture, a busi-
ness planning consultant will help SCLT to develop a formal business plan for both the CSA venture
and farm business incubator (consultant, John Nelson). SBDC will serve as a resource in the devel-
opment of the farm business incubator project.
         The Division of Agriculture, DEM is providing the funding ($500,000) and legal services to
acquire the Shared Harvest Farm. Technical support will be offered regarding permitting for wetlands
at the farm and for an on-farm composting facility. They will provide equipment to mow and prepare
the fields at the farm and offer consulting services for becoming certified organic and for meeting
                                                                                                      14


Good Agricultural Practices. They have funded the development of a business plan for the Shared
Harvest Farm by SCLT. A representative will serve as a member of the advisory board for Shared
Harvest Farm. They will promote the Broad Street Farmers’ Market, advertising in the newspaper,
bus shelters, the weekly wholesale report, and brochures distributed throughout the state noting the
locations of farmers’ markets. They will provide technical support for running the farmers’ market
and funding for the advertising and the EBT program at the Broad Street Farmers’ Market. Division
of Agriculture staff will provide technical assistance and training for incubator members. They will
design and run workshops of various agricultural topics, workshops in risk management, and provide
funding to SBDC to run business and market planning workshops and one-on-one consulting oppor-
tunities for incubator members. They will offer train the trainers workshops to SCLT staff and incu-
bator members.
        Hing Sok is a member of the SCLT farm incubator program. He has been involved in the
planning of the incubator project from the beginning and is currently working to develop an incubator
management cooperative that will be in charge of further developing the policies for the incubator
program. He will provide translation services for the Cambodian members of the incubator. Mike &
Polly Hutchison will serve as mentor farmers to members of the farm business incubator, assisting
them in developing their businesses by sharing their experience and expertise in farming and busi-
ness. They are consultants to the Shared Harvest Farm project and have developed a farm production
and business plan for both the CSA and the Farm Business Incubator. They will provide technical
assistance in the development of on-farm systems and practices.
        Tufts University is serving as an advisor to the Farm Incubator Program. They will provide
agriculture training workshops for incubator members through the New Entry Sustainable Farming
Project and translation services at those workshops. They will assist with connecting regional agri-
cultural experts to the farm incubator program and offer technical assistance in developing the incu-
bator’s programs. They will provide funding resources to support the incubator program.
        The RI Indian Council is providing SCLT with the site for the farmers’ market, Algonquin
House, and will provide electrical and phone hook up for EBT units at the market.
Project Goals & Purposes
        The goal of the project is to deliver fresh, locally grown, culturally acceptable produce to low-
income inner city residents. This will be done through the creation of a farm business incubator for
inner city residents who wish to start or expand an agricultural business who will then sell their pro-
duce back into the neighborhoods. A Farmers’ Market will be started in the heart of the neighborhood
to allow for additional access to fresh produce. CSA Program will be developed to offer residents
access to fresh produce throughout the growing season. Both the CSA and the Farmers’ Market will
serve as outlets for the incubator farmers’ crops. The goals and purposes for each of these projects is
as follows:
Farm Business Incubator
 To create a farm business incubator for recent immigrants and low-income individuals who wish
    to develop a profitable farm venture. The incubator will provide, at one time, up to 10 prospective
    farmers with the land, technical training, loan capital and equipment needed to create successful
    farm business.
 75% of incubator farmers will eventually move off the farm incubator and establish commercial
    agricultural business in Rhode Island. As incubator members move off they will be replaced by
    the next generation of incubator farmers who are on a waiting list for the program.
 Incubator farmers will sell produce within their community to local restaurants and markets as
    well as participate in the Broad Street Farmers’ Market.
                                                                                                    15


ACTIVITIES TO ACHIEVE THE GOALS
 Working with SBDC and the RI Micro-enterprise Association we will create a training program
   for incubator members to create business and marketing plans for the farm ventures. Both part-
   ners will also provide ongoing technical support and follow-up workshops.
 Incubator members will form an incubator management cooperative with SCLT and additional
   partners to oversee the development of policies and programs for the farm incubator.
 Working with Tufts University’s New Entry Sustainable Farming Project (they are already run-
   ning workshops and we will take part in many of them), USDA, RI Division of Agriculture, RI
   Center for Commercial Agriculture and mentor farmers, the incubator will offer a series of work-
   shops that addresses the agricultural training needs of its members.
 We will work with Equity Trust to develop a small loan fund for the incubator. The incubator
   members will work with SCLT staff and Equity Trust to craft the terms and servicing for the loan
   fund.
 We will create a tools lending bank for incubator farmers that offers the tools and equipment they
   need. The incubator management cooperative will create the terms for lending.
 Working with farm consultants (Mike & Polly Hutchison) the incubator will prepare the fields
   that will be used for the program. This will also be done in accordance with the Conservation
   Plan the USDA- Natural Resources Conservation Service is preparing for the farm. Included in
   this plan is the installation of an irrigation system throughout the farm.
 We will continue meeting with local land trusts, like the West Bay Land Trust, to develop strateg-
   ic partnerships to connect incubator farmers with larger pieces of land onto which they can transi-
   tion their business.
 Beyond the initial community residents who have been working on this project for two years we
   will recruit additional incubator members with the support of the Hmong Association, Cambodian
   Society, Socio Economic Development Corporation for Southeast Asians and Oasis International.
   These groups will host informational meetings and one-on-one interview sessions with individu-
   als who are identified through their organizations.
 Members of the American Culinary Federation will develop and implement a marketing work-
   shop with incubator members to guide them on how to sell to restaurants.
 We will fully document the process, successes and failures.
GOALS & PURPOSE
Broad Street Farmers’ Market
 To create a farmers’ market in the Southside of Providence to benefit the low-income residents
   who live in the community. The market will provide residents with several different methods of
   paying for food sold at the market, including Food Stamps (through EBT units installed at each
   market stall), WIC farmers’ market coupons and cash sales.
 To offer cooking and nutrition demonstration each week at the farmers’ market
 To serve as an outlet for produce grown by incubator farmers.
 To offer farmers in RI the option of having produce sold cooperatively at the Broad Street Far-
   mers’ Market. Youth from the Southside community will work with the market manager to sell
   produce as part of SCLT summer youth garden program.
ACTIVITIES TO ACHIEVE THE GOALS
 We have already created a business and marketing plan for the market. SCLT staff completed the
   business plan and business graduate students from Johnson & Wales University created the mar-
   keting plan.
 We will work with the RI Department of Health to publicize the market to WIC recipients
                                                                                                    16


 We will work with the RI Department of Human Services to publicize the market to Food Stamp
  recipients.
 We will work with Johnson & Wales to offer the Veggin’ Out cooking and nutrition program.
 We will create a farmers’ market advisory group made up of SCLT staff and the growers selling
  at the market.
 We will provide market stalls for incubator farmers to sell their produce
 We will follow the activities outlined in the Johnson & Wales marketing plan.
 We will continue to develop the procedures for the cooperative activities at the market
 We will continue to develop the usage of the EBT units at the market.
 We will create a campaign to publicize the market, working with SBDC and graduate students
  from the Johnson & Wales University business school.
 We will conduct a targeted mail campaign to the community surrounding the market
 We will develop a program for the youth that will be facilitating the cooperative component of
  the market as part of the summer youth program at City Farm.
GOALS & PURPOSE
CSA
 To create a low-income Community Supported Agriculture on the 50 acre Shared Harvest Farm
  site that will provide families with enough ethnically diverse produce to feed a family of four
  each week for 22 weeks.
 To offer both family and institutional shares to residents in the low-income community of South-
  side Providence.
 To offer a payment plan for a family to afford the CSA shares using one or a combination of the
  following: the food stamp program, through work shares, subsidies shares and through scheduled
  payment plans.
 To grow a diverse selection of crops that represent the different ethnic groups that are represented
  in the CSA membership.
 To host cooking and nutrition classes as a component of the CSA program
 To provide CSA pick up options at the Broad Street Farmers’ Market or at City Farm (SCLT’s
  certified organic urban farm)
 A percentage of the food produced for the CSA will be grown at SCLT’s certified organic urban
  farm in addition to produce grown at Shared Harvest Farm.
ACTIVITIES TO ACHIEVE THE GOALS
 We will build on our experience from running a pilot low-income CSA project two years ago.
 We have already conducted a feasibility study in the community.
 Two local CSA farmers have created a farm and business plan for running the CSA. They will be
  available to provide technical assistance on all aspects of the project.
 We will sign up past members of the original pilot CSA and work with them to recruit new mem-
  bers from their communities.
 We will redesign our CSA brochure and have it translated into multiple languages.
 SCLT will create an outreach plan and present it to partners’ members, i.e., the Hmong Associa-
  tion, the Cambodian Society, Oasis International, Genesis Center, and International Institute
 We will form a CSA core community group from the interested individuals to work with SCLT to
  further refine the CSA program components.
 Using the business and farm plan created by our consultants and SBDC, we will work with the
  core group to set the prices for the family shares.
                                                                                                   17


  We will meet with local emergency food shelters to decide on the final cost and distribution tech-
   nique of the institutional share program of the CSA. We will also conduct outreach in the phi-
   lanthropic community to solicit funds to support these institutional shares.
 We will hire a farm manager to prepare the fields and oversee CSA farm production.
 We will hire a CSA coordinator to work with community groups to publicize and recruit for the
   CSA (VISTA position).
 Once CSA share members have been recruited for the season, we will conduct surveys to tailor
   the produce grown to their preferences.
 We will host distribution at City Farm or/and the Broad Street Farmers’ Market.
 Work shares will be offered by serving at City Farm. Work share members can decrease the cost
   of their share by contributing a certain amount of hours.
 We will create a share scholarship fund to support low-income members that will be supported
   through the market rate shares.
Timeline - Year 1
Farm incubator
 Summer & Fall 2002 – prepare incubator land, property infrastructure and install irrigation.
 Meet with Incubator Management Cooperative monthly
 Hire incubator coordinator
 Summer 2002 and Spring 2003: Work with partners to develop and begin workshop for business
   and market planning. All incubator members will have a business and marketing plan for the
   2003 growing season.
 Continue recruiting new incubator farmers through partnering agencies
 Develop the loan fund conditions and servicing procedures working with the incubator coopera-
   tive and Equity Trust.
 Begin purchasing equipment for the cooperative tool & equipment bank. Create a lending policy
   for the bank with the management cooperative.
 Create a series of workshops on production agriculture topics for members, partnering with
   NESFP and local agricultural organizations.
 2-4 incubator farmers recruited and starting work for 2003 growing season
 Continue discussions with local land trusts to identify land onto which incubator farmers can
   eventually move their businesses.
Farmers’ Market, 2003
 Over 200 people attend the market each week.
 10 farmers at the market
 3 incubator members take part in the market
 Host 2 Veggin’ Out cooking/nutrition workshops
 Second season of using EBT units – worked out all the bugs and have an effective process for us-
   ing the units.
 5 month long market
 Marketing campaign – includes print media, radio, on-street promotional displays, community
   bulletin boards, and targeted mailings.
 Farmers realize 10% profit from their market sales
CSA
 Hire a Feinstein Volunteer Corps staff as the CSA coordinator
 Hire a Farm Manager to prepare the farm for the CSA
                                                                                                 18


  Implement an organizing strategy and develop brochure (translated into multiple languages) for
   recruiting CSA members – work with partnering organizations to design the strategy.
 Enroll 15 low-income family shares and 2 institutional shares, serving multiple low-income fami-
   lies, and 10 market rate shares to the CSA for the first year.
 Begin the share scholarship fund to support low-income members.
Year 2 -Timeline
Farm incubator
 Continue improving incubator land and property infrastructure.
 Meet with Incubator Management Cooperative monthly
 With partners continue to run workshop for business and market planning
 Continue recruiting new incubator farmers through partnering agencies. Develop an active wait-
   ing list
 Kick off the loan fund for incubator members.
 Have a majority of the equipment for the cooperative tool & equipment bank acquired – lending
   and fee policies will be in place
 Continue hosting workshops on production agriculture topics for members- partnering with
   NESFP and local agricultural organizations.
 6 incubator farmers on site
 Begin creating a formalized pool of available farmland from local land trusts.
 3-5 farmers are selling at the Broad Street Farmers’ Market
Farmers’ Market, 2004
 Over 200 people attend the market each week.
 10 farmers at the market
 3-5 incubator members take part in the market
 Host 2 Veggin Out cooking/nutrition workshops
 5 month long market
 Increase marketing campaign
 Farmers realize a profit from their market sales
CSA
 Begin CSA program
 Organizing and outreach strategy in place and CSA brochures developed
 Offer cooking and nutrition classes to CSA members
 Offer a weekly newsletter to CSA members containing recipes, news, etc.
 Enroll additional low-income family shares, increase institutional shares, serving multiple low-
   income families, and market rate shares to the CSA.
 Continue share scholarship fund to support low-income members.
Year 3 - Timeline
Farm incubator
 Continue improving incubator land and property infrastructure.
 Meet with Incubator Management Cooperative monthly
 Continue to run workshop for business and market planning
 Continue recruiting new incubator farmers through partnering agencies – develop an active wait-
   ing list
 Loan fund running – members have begun to establish a credit history through the fund.
 Cooperative tool & equipment bank running effectively. Continue hosting workshops on produc-
   tion agriculture topics for members- partnering with NESFP and local agricultural organizations.
                                                                                                     19


   6-8 incubator farmers on site
   Begin creating a formalized pool of available farmland from local land trusts.
   Incubator farmers continue to see profits from their businesses.
   3-5 farmers are selling at the Broad Street Farmers’ Market
   2-3 farmers will begin negotiations to move their businesses to a new farm site. They are creating
    a new business plan for the move from the incubator to their own stand alone farm business.
CSA
 Organizing and outreach strategy in place and CSA brochures developed
 Continue offering cooking and nutrition classes to CSA members
 Expand weekly newsletter to CSA members including recipes, news, etc.
 Increase low-income family shares, institutional shares, and market rate shares to the CSA.
 Continue share scholarship fund to support low-income members.
Farmers’ Market, 2005
 Over 300 people attend the market each week.
 12 farmers at the market
 4-5 incubator members take part in the market – as sole or cooperative members
 Host 2 Veggin Out cooking/nutrition workshops
 Marketing campaign – includes print media, radio, on-street promotional displays, community
    bulletin boards, targeted mailings.
 Farmers continue to realize a profit from their market sales
 Offer more variety at the market, fish, meat, baked goods
Relationship to Program Objectives
        Our proposal meets all three objectives of the Community Food Project. The creation of the
Farmers’ Market alone will bring in fresh produce that is now lacking in Southside neighborhoods.
With the additional option of EBT units and WIC coupons for payment the market is especially tar-
geted for low-income people. We will be offering not only fresh produce, but culturally acceptable
items which are usually difficult to find even when they are not fresh. By offering to sell the produce
cooperatively, we will attract more farmers to the market who might otherwise be unable to partici-
pate so the selection and quality at the market will be increased. The cooperative component also
allows for the hiring and training of neighborhood youth, teaching them skills for their futures and
incorporating them into the life of their community. The Veggin’ Out program will provide useful
nutritional information. The new recipes and methods of cooking will add to the knowledge of resi-
dents, encouraging them to include more fresh produce in their diets and may get them to experiment
with produce that might not be familiar to them.
        The CSA will deliver fresh produce to inner city residents at prices they can afford. Food
stamps and scheduled payment plans are two of the possibilities to make CSA a viable option for
low-income families. For those unable to pay, institutional shares will be offered to agencies to buy
shares on behalf of their clients. CSA can include a work component for participants to contribute to
the purchase of their share by helping to harvest the food. Because transportation can be a problem in
the neighborhoods, CSA members will have the option of picking up their shares at either the Far-
mers’ Market or SCLT’s City Farm.
        The incubator program all by itself meets the three objectives. Food needs of low-income
people are met through the labor of their neighbors who grow the food at the Shared Harvest Farm
and sell the produce back in the City. The farmers can sell through the CSA, take part in the Broad
Street Farmers’ Market, or sell directly to local restaurants and markets that serve the neighborhood.
Because these new entry farmers are themselves recent immigrants and low-income individuals, their
work is increasing the community’s ability to provide for its own food. The beauty of this program
                                                                                                     20


lies in the fact that we are preserving farm land, feeding low-income urban residents, and creating
new business opportunities for inner city individuals who want to develop a profitable farm venture.
The incubator will provide, at one time, up to 15 prospective farmers with the land, technical training,
loan capital and equipment needed to create a successful farm business. 75% of incubator farmers
will eventually move off the farm incubator and establish commercial agricultural business in Rhode
Island. As incubator members move off they will be replaced by the next generation of incubator
farmers who are on a waiting list for the program. The ability to continually introduce new farmers
into agricultural businesses provides sustainability for producing and delivering fresh food to the
neighborhoods.
Evaluation: The evaluation for these programs will be designed and implemented by the Feinstein
Institute for Public Service at Providence College. Dr. Keith Morton, Director of the Feinstein Insti-
tute, will oversee the evaluation process for the next three years. The Feinstein Institute and Dr. Mor-
ton have been intimately involved with this project from the beginning. The evaluation team will
consist of student volunteers from the Feinstein Institute, college interns, Dr. Morton and other pro-
fessional associates of the college, and interested members of the various programs run by SCLT.
The evaluation will have three dimensions:
1. A literature review to identify benchmarks established for similar programs nationally and inter-
     nationally.
2. Qualitative collection of objective data that can be used to describe the work of the project (such
     as land cultivated, amount of produce grown, sold and/or consumed, revenue generated by incu-
     bator members, demographic data).
3. Patterned interviews conducted with the stakeholders of the various projects. Staff, community
     members in the programs, students and other SCLT volunteers will be trained to conduct these in-
     terviews on an ongoing basis. The interviews will provide systematic narrative information about
     the programs.
     The three dimensions will be reviewed collectively on a quarterly basis to identify successes, help
solve problems and point the direction for future efforts. The evaluation team will also have the
community members engaged in the various programs craft the evolution of the evaluation process.
Self-Sustainability: We have great faith that this one time grant to support the Farmers Market, build
a CSA and create the incubator project will get these programs to a point that they are self-sustaining.
The need in the neighborhood is great for the products we can offer through the incubator. The Far-
mers Market is the perfect vehicle for this produce located right in the heart of the neighborhood. We
have done surveys of neighbors, local merchants, and local agencies to assess the need and interest in
a market. We have done the traffic count at that location on a Saturday morning and over 900 people
go past the site either by bus, in cars, on bicycles or on foot. It is on the most heavily traveled bus
route in the state. We have a commitment from 8 farmers at present to be part of the market when it
opens this July and more are calling with interest every day. Farmers Markets are successful in other
parts of the city and state, but this one will stand out as having the most interesting produce, cooking
demonstrations, music by local musicians, and the opportunity for residents to sell their wares as
well. The Farmers’ market will be supported through the City Council and the start up capital costs
will be paid through the grant. After 3 years of success in the market, the farmers’ rentals will no
longer be subsidized increasing profitability to the market. Division of Agriculture and the Depart-
ment of Health and Human services will continue to advertise and promote the market. DEM will as-
sist in providing continued funding for the market.
         The incubator will be sustaining because of the people involved. Those gardeners who have
so far shown an interest come from agricultural backgrounds and have been earning additional money
from the crops they are currently growing in vacant lots in the city. They want to be farmers, the
land is available, the technical assistance is at hand, the support of the state and federal governments
                                                                                                       21


is great and the desire to farm is inherent. The market is ready and additional land is available for the
incubator farmers to expand. The Intervale Foundation has a similar incubator system that is profita-
ble and we will base much of our structure on their success. Initial capitalization through the grant
will provide for long term sustainability. Fees for the incubator members although on a sliding scale,
will generate funds. It is also a tremendous opportunity for additional fundraising for SCLT since
institutional shares will help us develop funds from private sources.
         We see many families being served through the CSA once we start and see the potential for
growth. We have good community partners to assist in finding the families and helping to market the
program. They will also take institutional shares for their clients who cannot afford the CSA them-
selves. CSA shares will eventually hit a break even point and become profitable. Most of the initial
funding is for capital equipment. Once those purchases are made, the expenses of the program will
be reduced.
         Each of these programs will do tremendous good in lessening the food insecurity of the South
Providence neighborhoods. And they are structured so that new jobs will be created and low income
families are well served with fresh local produce at prices they can afford. These programs will suc-
ceed because it is the people of the neighborhood who will be providing the food.

Budget Narrative

Salary and Wages:
1. Number of Senior Personnel: We plan on hiring a full time Farm Manager to prepare the farm
   for and then manage the CSA. This person will reside in a house on the farm property that will be
   considered part of the compensation package. We will also be hiring an Incubator/Farmers’ Mar-
   ket Coordinator. The Project Director will spend one-third of his time managing these programs.
   The amounts reflect full time wages for each of the new hires and one-third of the PD’s salary.
   The Senior Associate is the Executive Director who will spend about one-fifth of her time in
   coordination of this project, working with the PD and staff on all facets of the program. The
   amount requested reflects one-fifth of her time.
2. Number of Other Personnel: The two professionals indicated reflect the services of the Rhode
   Island MicroEnterprise Association (RIMA) and the Larry Friedman International Center for En-
   trepreneurship (LFICE) at Johnson & Wales University, and Keith Morton, Director of the Feins-
   tein Institute for Public Service at Providence College. RIMA will deliver a 4-week microbusi-
   ness training program to members of the farm incubator and provide ongoing technical assistance
   to incubator members following the completion of their training. The estimated in-kind value of
   these services for 3 years is $6,000. Keith Morton has committed to contributing 2 half days of
   consulting per month, he will serve on our advisory committee, and he will provide the evaluation
   design and implementation. Keith’s break-down of charges is: evaluation design, 40 hrs at $35/
   hour for $1400, consulting work at 8 hours/month at $35/hour, $3,360, and advisory committee at
   2 hours/month for $840 for a total of $5,600 for the first year. The graduate Students will come
   from Johnson & Wales providing expertise in business, accounting, management, strategic plan-
   ning, marketing, and professional communications to the incubator farmers. One graduate stu-
   dent’s time is valued at $300 a semester. The other graduate position comes from Providence
   College. They will fund a post graduate study participant to work for SCLT for a year at a cost of
   $9,000. Prebaccalaureate students will also come from J&W and PC. J&W will send a minimum
   of 2 per year for the next three years, and PC will send 6 students per semester for 30 hours each
   at $6/hour. Interns at 2 per year for 120 hours at $6/hour and off-campus work study at 3 a year,
   300 hours each at $6.15/hour and 1 student this summer at 400 hours at $6.15 an hour for a total
   of $11,595. This is a commitment for one year, but we have experienced this support for each of
                                                                                                     22


the last three years and have confidence that it will continue after the first year even though that is
not reflected in the budget. Secretarial costs account for one-fifth of the time our office manager
will give to the administrative details of this program. The technical support will be provided by
many organizations and individuals. The Hmong United Association will have a role on the advi-
sory board, will recruit incubator farmers, organize community meetings and informational ses-
sions for interested individuals, and publicize the CSA to its community. They value these ser-
vices at $1,500. The Cambodian Society will serve on the advisory board, publicize the incubator
and CSA projects to its membership, hold community meetings to recruit for the incubator, pro-
vide translation services for those meetings and provide meeting space at their offices for the
meetings. They value these services at $1,200 for each of three years. RI DEM has committed to
promotional, advertising and technical support for the Farmers Market, technical support and
permitting for pond expansion and stream crossing at the farm, technical support and certification
of Shared Harvest Farm as organic and employing good agricultural practices, technical support
and permitting for on-farm composting, provide grant funding to SBDC to provide business plan-
ning, risk management education for farm incubator members, and train the trainers programs for
SCLT staff. They will also provide grant funding to the SBDC to develop the business plan for
Shared Harvest Farm and assist in linking incubator members in the state with farmers that are
willing to serve as mentors. They will also serve as members of the advisory board. These con-
tributions are estimated to be worth $25,000 a year for each of the three years. The Equity Trust
will donate approximately $5,000 in consulting services as we work to set up a revolving loan for
the benefit of incubator farmers. They will consider a loan to SCLT of up to $50,000 to establish
this fund when the time is right. This $50,000 is not reflected in the budget. The West Bay Land
Trust will offer their time to establish the linkage between for profit private farmers and their
businesses with the Shared Harvest farmers. They will also help in organizing, planning, grow-
ing, clerical and entrepreneurial areas. They will assist in negotiating lease arrangements with
landowners once our incubator farmers “graduate” to a larger farm and they will serve on our ad-
visory board. Their contribution is valued at $20,000 over the next three years. Hing Sok is one
of our potential incubator farmers. He will provide translation services for Cambodian members
of the incubator for workshops, in correspondence and in the field. He will conduct farm tours
for schools, residents and potential members as well as other agricultural professionals. He will
provide training on different agricultural growing techniques for members of the incubator and
serve as a member of the incubator management cooperative. His services are valued at $1,200
per year. Oasis International will serve on the advisory board. They will help to publicize the in-
cubator and CSA within the African community, convening meetings and informational sessions.
They will also help in determining what crops should be grown to satisfy their community’s
wishes. They value these contributions at $5,000 per year. Project Outreach was an original
member of our pilot CSA and will advise us on how to further design and develop the CSA pro-
gram. They will promote the Broad Street Farmers’ Market to its members and will take trips
with their families to Shared Harvest farm for work days. They will also look into buying institu-
tional shares for the CSA. They value their assistance at $1,000. The Rhode Island Food Securi-
ty Coalition commits to working as a state-wide advisory committee regarding food security is-
sues, acting as liaisons to link SCLT with other related food projects around the state. They will
work to identify and connect resources to the projects and will actively publicize the programs
through its extensive list serve and mailing list of food security activists throughout the state.
These services are valued at $1,000. Mike and Polly Hutchison, the managers of Casey Farm in
Saunderstown, Rhode Island, commit to providing technical assistance to SCLT staff and incuba-
tor farmers in developing on-farm systems and advise on cultural practices. They will also serve
                                                                                                     23


     as mentor farmers assisting growers with their concerns over land use, growing their business,
     and networking. The value of these services will be $2,000.
3.   Fringe Benefits: Are figured at 18% of salary stated.
4.   Nonexpendable Equipment: The equipment for which we are seeking funding includes a tractor
     with attachments, a truck for conveyance of crops from the farm to the Southside, and an irriga-
     tion pump and equipment. We have not requested the entire amount for the tractor or the truck but
     are seeking additional amounts from other sources. The truck we have in mind is available to us
     from Rizzo Ford for $25,000.
5.   Materials and supplies: We will require 9 EBT units for the Farmers Market and phone lines for
     each of the EBTs. We also need a cash register and a grill for the cooking demonstrations. For
     the CSA we will need tables, containers, produce bags, 4 scales and 2 tents. The hand tools re-
     quired, knives, pruners, etc. will be shared cooperatively among the incubator farmers, as will the
     harvesting equipment of scales, washing equipment, cooler, and salad spinners.
6.   Publication costs: We will be providing materials for workshops, as well as a CSA newsletter, a
     farmers market nutrition brochure, and materials chronicling our project.
7.   All other Direct costs: Public relations and advertising will cost between $1,000 and $1,500. We
     will have the cost of training consultants from the SBDC at a value of $3,900 for their basic
     business seminar, business planning seminar, marketing seminar, accounts and records seminar,
     and farm viability seminar.
8.    Other: The State of Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, Agriculture Divi-
     sion will be giving to SCLT a 50+ acre farm only 8 miles from our offices. The value of the
     property is $500,000 in total and the State’s share is $200,000.
                                                                                                    24


Proposal No.: 2002-04192 Project Title: Shared Harvest Farm
Project Directors: Patrick McNiff & Jane Jellison
Organization: Southside Community Land Trust
Address: Providence, Rhode Island 02907
Recommended Funding: $220,000 Project Duration: 36 months



  Southside Community Land Trust (SCLT) is seeking three year funding from USDA’s CFPCGP to facilitate the
  establishment of a new-entry farmer incubator program, support creation of a Farmers’ Market, and help estab-
  lish a Community Supported Agriculture Program, all targeted to serve low income, urban residents in the City
  of Providence, RI. The RI DEM will be giving SCLT a 50-acre farm located, only 8 miles from our South Prov-
  idence community, in the neighboring City of Cranston. On this land, we will offer up to 15 new farmers the op-
  portunity to start their own agricultural businesses, providing them with technical support, marketing and busi-
  ness planning, and farm equipment for them to use cooperatively. Once they have established their businesses,
  we will work with area Land Trusts to place the new farmers on larger tracts of land so they can increase their
  size and profits. New farmers will move onto our farm to establish themselves as the previous farmers move on.
  These new farmers will come primarily from the Southside neighborhood and are immigrant, low-income urban
  residents who have come from an agricultural background in their native lands. We learned of the need for such
  a resource when several of our community gardeners approached us in search of additional land on which to
  grow food to sell to local restaurants, markets and neighbors. To help with their success, in addition to putting
  them in touch with various state, federal and local resources, they will have the opportunity to take part in the
  Broad Street Farmers’ Market that SCLT is opening this summer in the heart of Southside. The Market will offe
  fresh locally grown produce from area farms, a resource not found in this neighborhood, and the foods will also
  include culturally acceptable choices for residents who represent a wide variety of ethnicities and cultures. This
  Market will also provide nutrition information in the form of cooking demonstrations sponsored by the State and
  a local culinary university to educate people who attend. The Market serves the need for access to local produce
  within this neighborhood while providing an outlet for sales by the neighborhood farmers. The inclusion of EBT
  units at this market will also make this market more attractive to local residents. As another option for urban res
  idents, SCLT will be starting a Community Supported Agriculture Program geared toward lower income partici-
  pants. Our incubator farmers will also contribute to the CSA. SCLT piloted a CSA program 2 years ago with 10
  families, experimenting with various payment structures to make CSA an affordable option for low income resi-
  dents. It was very well received and the reason we stopped was for lack of land on which to grow the food. That
  will no longer be a factor. Payment structures include the use of food stamps, institutional shares and work
  shares. Nutrition and educational components will also be included in the CSA.
                                                                                                                                                         25


                               UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
                      COOPERATIVE STATE RESEARCH, EDUCATION, AND EXTENSION SERVICE                                                                        OMB Approved 0524-00
                                                                                                                                                               Expires 03/31/20
BUDGET
                                                                                                          USDA AWARD NO.
                    Southside Community Land Trust
ORGANIZATION AND ADDRESS
                                                                                                            DURATION          DURATION           Non-Federal         Non-federal
109 Somerset Street Providence, Rhode Island 02907                                                          PROPOSED          PROPOSED          Proposed Cost-          Cost-
                                                                                                             MONTHS:         MONTHS: _____         Sharing/       Sharing/Matchin
                                                                                                             __36___                            Matching Funds    Funds Approve
PROJECT DIRECTOR(S)                                                                                                                              (If required)       by CSREES
                                                                                                          Funds Requested    Funds Approved
Patrick McNiff                                                                                              by Proposer        by CSREES                            (If Different)
                                                                                                                               (If different)
                                                                                                              Year 3




A. Salaries and Wages .......................                              CSREES-FUNDED WORK MONTHS
1. No. Of Senior Personnel                                                 Calendar   Academic   Summer
a. _3___ (Co)-PD(s)...............................................                                                                                      60,000
                                                                                                                 130,000
                                                                             84
b. _1___ Senior Associates ....................................
                                                                            7.2                                     6,000                               16,800
2. No. of Other Personnel (Non-Faculty)
a. _____ Research Associates/Postdoctorates .....................

b. _2___ Other Professionals .................................

                                                                             48                                                                         23,6 00
c. __1__ Paraprofessionals.....................................                                                     4,500
d. __1__ Graduate Students ...................................
                                                                                                                                                           300
e. __2_ Prebaccalaureate Students .......................                                                                                                  170
f. __1__ Secretarial-Clerical ..................................                                                    3,000                                3,440
g. __2__ Technical, Shop and Other ......................                                                                                               39,066
     Total Salaries and Wages ...........................                                                         45,500                              $72,316
B. Fringe Benefits (If charged as Direct Costs)                                                                     4,000                                5,000
C. Total Salaries, Wages, and Fringe Benefits (A plus B)                                                          49,500                              $77,316
D. Nonexpendable Equipment (Attach supporting data. List items and dollar amounts
   for each item.)                                                                                                     600
E. Materials and Supplies                                                                                           1,000
F. Travel
G. Publication Costs/Page Charges

                                                                                                                    1,000
H. Computer (ADPE) Costs
I. Student Assistance/Support (Scholarships/fellowships, stipends/tuition, cost of education,
     etc. Attach list of items and dollar amounts for each item.)

J. All Other Direct Costs (In budget narrative, list items and dollar amounts, and provide sup-
     porting data for each item.)                                                                                   2,000
K. Total Direct Costs (C through J) ................                                                              54,100
L. F&A/Indirect Costs (If applicable, specify rate(s) and base(s) for on/off campus activity.
     Where both are involved, identify itemized costs included in on/off campus bases.)

M. Total Direct and F&A/Indirect Costs (K plus L) 
N. Other ............................................................. 
O. Total Amount of This Request ...................                                                               54,100                              $77,316
                                                                                                                                   26

P. Carryover -- (If Applicable)Federal Funds: $             Non-Federal funds: $                  Total $

Q. Cost-Sharing/Matching (Breakdown of total amounts shown on line O)
                                                                                                                                  27,250
     Cash (both Applicant and Third Party) 
- Non Cash Contributions (both Applicant and Third Party)
                                                                                                                             $50,066
AME AND TITLE (Type or print)                                                      SIGNATURE (required for revised budget only)            DATE
Project Director                                                                                                                              3/20/0

Authorized Organizational Representative                                                                                                      3/20/0

Signature (for optional use)

				
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