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					Division of Epidemiology and
Community Health
MPH, MS, and PhD Degree Programs




2008-2009 Faculty Guidebook
Welcome to the University of Minnesota School of Public Health!



All students are responsible for knowing the rules and policies that govern their academic
program. To this end, we are providing you with this guidebook which covers your specific
academic program requirements. Please keep it with you and refer to it often.



In addition, you are responsible for knowing University of Minnesota and School of Public Health
policies and procedures that pertain to all students. Links to these policies/procedures can be
found by clicking on the "Current Students" link at www.sph.umn.edu <http://www.sph.umn.edu/> .




The University of Minnesota is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to its programs,
facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status,
disability, public assistance status, veteran status, or sexual orientation.


This publication can be made available in alternative formats for people with disabilities. Direct requests to Students
Services Center, School of Public Health, MMC 819 Mayo, 420 Delaware St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455; 612-626-
3500 or 800-774-8636; sph-ssc@umn.edu.




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School of Public Health Directory
Note: All phone numbers are in area code “612”.

Dean’s Office ...............................................................................................................624-6669
John Finnegan Jr., PhD, Dean.....................................................................................625-1179 ........... finne001@umn.edu
Judith Garrard, PhD, Sr. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Research ........625-8772 .............jgarrard@umn.edu
William Riley, PhD, Associate Dean for Student Affairs ............................................625-6750 ............ riley001@umn.edu
Debra Olson, MPH, RN, Associate Dean for Public Health Practice Education. .....625-0476 .......... olson002@umn.edu

Student Affairs Office.................................................................................................626-3500 .......... sph-ssc@umn.edu
Carol Francis, Asst Director of Student & Acad Services ..........................................624-6952 ...........franc004@umn.edu
Lori Herzong, Assistant for Student Recruitment .......................................................624-2494 ..........herzo086@umn.edu
Micaela Kucinski, Principal Office and Administrative Specialist ..............................624-7660 .......kuci0005@@umn.edu
Barbara Laporte, Assistant Director and Counselor, Career Services......................626-5443 ...........lapor006@umn.edu
Melvin Monette, Director of Student Recruitment.......................................................624-0601 .........monet008@umn.edu
Kristina Pearson, Principle Operations & Student Services Specialist .....................626-8908…….....pearson@umn.edu
Guy Piotrowski, Coordinator of Applications and Admissions ...................................624-1991 ............ piotr005@umn.edu

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health
Division Head – Bernard Harlow, PhD, MPH..............................................................626-6527 ...............harlow@umn.edu
Director of Graduate Studies, Clinical Research – Russell Luepker, MD.................624-6362 .......... luepk001@umn.edu
Director of Graduate Studies, Epidemiology – Pamela Schreiner, PhD ...................626-9097 .......... schre012@umn.edu
Major Chair, Community Health Education – Deborah Hennrikus, PhD...................626-8646 ..........hennr001@umn.edu
Major Chair, Epidemiology – James Pankow, PhD, MPH .........................................624-2883 ......... panko001@umn.edu
Major Chair, Maternal & Child Health – Wendy Hellerstedt, PhD, MPH ...................626-2077 ........... helle023@umn.edu
Major Chair, Public Health Nutrition – Jamie Stang, PhD..........................................626-0315 .......... stang002@umn.edu
Major Coordinators (general)....................................................................................626-8802 ......... epichstu@umn.edu
Andrea Kish – Senior Coordinator (Clinical Research MS and Epi PhD) .................626-9989 ...................kish@umn.edu
Shelley Cooksey – Major Coordinator (Epi MPH and PubH Nutrition MPH) ............626-8803 ......... cooks001@umn.edu
Kathryn Schwartz – Major Coordinator (CHE MPH and MCH MPH) ........................626-2247 .........schwa139@umn.edu




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1. DIVISION OF EPIDEMIOLOGY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH
1.1 Welcome
Epidemiology and Community Health is one of four Divisions that make up the School of Public Health at the
University of Minnesota. The Division of Epidemiology and Community Health is home to six majors in the School of
Public Health:
   Clinical Research MS
   Community Health Education MPH
   Epidemiology MPH
   Epidemiology PhD
   Maternal and Child Health MPH
   Public Health Nutrition MPH
The Division Head is Bernard Harlow, PhD.
The Major Coordinators are here to assist students in the Division. Students are invited to contact any one of them
with questions or concerns.
Shelley Cooksey                    Andrea Kish                      Kathryn Schwartz
E-Mail ................epichstu@umn.edu
Phone................612-626-8802
Fax ....................612-624-0315
Campus Mail.....WBOB, #300, Delivery Code 7525
US Mail .............1300 South Second Street, Suite 300, Minneapolis, MN 55454


1.2 The West Bank Office Building (WBOB)
                                                                                     nd
The offices are located in the West Bank Office Building (WBOB) at 1300 South 2           Street in Minneapolis. Students
can find directions to WBOB at http://www.epi.umn.edu/about/directions.shtm .
Epi Shuttle
Students can travel back and forth between the East Bank campus and WBOB by using the Epi Shuttle. The shuttle
route starts on the hour and half- hour at WBOB and travels to the main entrance of the Mayo Building on the East
Bank and leaves for the return trip to WBOB at quarter past, and quarter to, the hour. Once each morning and
afternoon the shuttle does take a trip to the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH). Please check the schedule to
see when those trips occur. The schedule will be emailed to students, staff and faculty. The Summer schedule is
usually less frequent.
Parking Options for WBOB
       Park on the East Bank and use the EpiCH shuttle.
       Affordable ramp parking (approximately $5 day) is available across from Guthrie Theatre located just blocks
        from WBOB.
       Meter parking is available on South 2nd St for $.50 - $.75 per hour with a limit of 8 hours. These meters are
        enforced from 8:00 a.m. until 10:00 p.m.
       Parking is also available in the public parking lot attached to WBOB at $2.50 per hour or portion thereof. This lot
        is also available after hours, on weekends, and holidays free of charge. The booth is staffed between the hours
        of 7:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Students who will be in WBOB after dark are encouraged to move their car to this lot for
        security purposes.
Student Mailboxes
Students who have RA and/or TA positions will have mailboxes located near the receptionist on the third floor.
Students who do not have RA or TA positions will be able to receive mail in the folders located next to Shelley
Cooksey's cubicle (398E). Students who work on campus and have trouble getting to WBOB should email
epichstu@umn.edu for alternative ways to get their mail. Student mail can be sent to a campus mail address, but

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cannot be sent via regular U.S. Mail. Most information is distributed via e-mail using your U of M student e-mail
account.
Forms
We have PDF versions of forms at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm. All forms needed for student
degree programs are also available on the wall rack outside of cubicle 398B on the third floor of WBOB. Microsoft
Word documents of all the forms are also available upon request. Contact the Major Coordinators at
epichstu@umn.edu to obtain the Word documents via e-mail.
Evening and Weekend Access
Division graduate students who do not have a paid appointment in the Division can have access to the student
computer lab and student mailboxes after work hours and on weekends. Students obtain access by filling out a form
to have their UCard programmed for access to the third and forth floors of WBOB. Students are given the option to
sign up for building access at Orientation. After orientation, contact a Major Coordinator for information.
NOTE: There is approximately a one-week turnaround time to get a student’s UCard programmed, so please plan
accordingly.
Computer Lab
The Division computer lab in WBOB includes four PC's available for student use. The computer lab is located in
cubicle 397F, at the north end of WBOB. The general policy for use of these computers is that they are for Division
graduate students for work pertaining to their degree program. All four of the computers have SAS and two of them
have STATA. Printers are available.
Copier and Fax Access
The Division does not allow copy machines or fax machines to be used for personal use. Personal copies can be
made for a cost at various locations throughout campus. Unfortunately, there is not a copier for use in WBOB.


1.3 Division Communication with Students
The Division communicates information to students in the following ways:
     E-mail: Students should read their e-mail daily or at a minimum twice a week. We cannot stress enough how
      important e-mail has become. Communication between the Major Coordinators and students regarding changes
      in programmatic requirements or announcements, as well as advisor, faculty, and student-to-student contacts is
      usually through e-mail. Further, the University of Minnesota has expanded technological capacity to allow
      access to your account for up to five years after your graduate. To keep the account active, you must access it
      at least every six months. If you let it go dormant, you can reactivate it through the Alumni Association for a fee.
     My U Portal: This is a form of communication and information exchange within the University. Students are
      expected to check their portal regularly. Access to the portal is available at https://www.myu.umn.edu/ .
     Weekly SPHere: A weekly electronic publication for students. This publication contains important deadline
      reminders as well as updates on students and faculty research and activities.
     Division Newsletter: The Division administrative staff produces a more extensive monthly newsletter titled
      EpiCHNews. EpiCHNews is available on the Epi web site at http://www.epi.umn.edu/news/epichnews.shtm
     Student Mailbox: All students have access to a mail folder where print materials are distributed; see section 1.2
      for mailbox locations in WBOB.
     Bulletin Boards: There is a student bulletin board to the right of the reception desk on the third floor of WBOB.
     School/University News: The School of Public Health distributes a monthly electronic newsletter. The
      University of Minnesota student newspaper is called The Daily and is available campus-wide.


1.4 Seminars
The Division of Epidemiology and Community Health sponsors weekly scientific seminars between September and
June to exchange ideas and research findings pertinent to the field. Because the Division has a large faculty, staff and
student body, the seminar provides a forum for exchange of information among people who may not otherwise meet
or work together. All faculty and students are strongly encouraged to attend regularly.


                                                                                                                      5
Division faculty members and other scientific staff are asked to present at least one seminar every two years. Each
year, the seminar brings in about 10 scientists from outside the Division.
Weekly notices are posted in the Division's third floor reception area as well as sent out electronically. Most seminars
are held 10:00-11:00 a.m., Fridays, in Room 364 of WBOB. Seminars by visiting scientists may be at other times.
Students having questions or comments about the seminar series should contact David Jacobs, Seminar Director, at
612-624-4196. Students can also check the EpiCH Web site for seminar information by going to
http://www.epi.umn.edu/news/seminars.asp,


1.5 Academic Credit for Independent or Directed Coursework
Independent and directed coursework can be taken to fulfill elective credits and can take many forms depending upon
the student's interests and needs. All independent/directed coursework needs the support of a faculty member who
agrees to serve as an "instructor/advisor" for the independent or directed course. The expectation is that the student
has something specific to propose prior to approaching a faculty member.
To fulfill the course requirements, the student and instructor should agree on the type, scope, and length of a final
academic "product" whether it is a paper(s), an annotated bibliography, curriculum, training modules, media piece(s),
etc. It is expected that the faculty member and student will meet regularly during the term.
It is very unusual for students to take more than four credits total of independent or directed coursework (over and
above any credits earned for the field experience or master’s project/thesis requirement). Students are expected to
fulfill the majority of their elective credits through regularly-scheduled courses.
Examples of Independent and Directed Coursework
1.       Students interested in a theory, an evaluation method, or a skill not covered in depth in a specific course could
         arrange for an independent study course with a faculty member knowledgeable in that area and/or willing to work
         with the student.
2.       The student wants to attend a conference, workshop, or mini-course, but there is no academic credit involved.
         The student must find a faculty member willing to work with the student to develop academic work over and above
         the actual event to fulfill some elective credits. This must be arranged ahead of time, not after the event has
         occurred.
Additional comments
Arranging an independent/directed course depends upon the student putting together an academically rigorous
proposal and finding a faculty member to serve as an instructor. The faculty instructor does not have to be the
student's academic advisor or master's project advisor. The instructor must be a member of the major associated with
the course number; see below.
The student should also receive prior approval from their academic advisor to count the independent/directed work as
an elective course.
Choosing Course Numbers
Independent study, directed study, and readings courses are available within the Division of Epidemiology and
Community Health. The student and instructor should agree on the course number/title that most closely matches the
work being proposed. Course options are:
     PubH 7091
                   Independent Study: Community Health Education (only CHE faculty can serve as instructor)
     PubH 7391
                   Independent Study: Epidemiology (only Epi MPH or Epi graduate faculty can serve as instructor)
     PubH 7392
                   Readings in Epidemiology (only Epi MPH or Epi graduate faculty can serve as instructor)
     PubH 7691
                   Independent Study: Maternal and Child Health (only MCH faculty can serve as instructor)
     PubH 7991
                   Independent Study: Public Health Nutrition (only PubH Nutr faculty can serve as instructor)
     PubH 8392
                   Readings in Clinical Research (only Clinical Res. graduate faculty can serve as instructor)
     PubH 8393
                   Directed Study: Clinical Research (only Clinical Res.graduate faculty can serve as instructor)
NOTE: Other majors in the School of Public Health may have independent/directed coursework opportunities in their
areas. Check with the Divisions of Environmental Health Sciences, Health Policy Management, and/or Biostatistics.
You could also do an independent/directed course with another graduate-level program. Remember that your
academic advisor has to approve it as an elective.
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Procedures
1.   Student meets with the faculty member to discuss the requirements for the independent/directed course.
2.   Student fills out an Independent/Directed Study Contract form outlining the requirements for the course and has
     the form signed by their academic advisor and Independent/Directed Study instructor. This information is vital to
     receive proper credit for this course (i.e., a grade). The instructor needs to agree to work with the student and
     both need to agree on the requirements. The form can be downloaded from the web at
     http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.
3.   Student gives the completed/signed Independent/Directed Study Contract to a Major Coordinator. She then
     enters in electronic permission enabling students to register for the course.
4.   At the end of the semester, the instructor assigns a final grade. The grade will then be entered on the official
     transcript. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that all requirements are completed so a grade can be
     submitted.


1.6 Division Resources and Policies
Incomplete Grades
For MPH students, all required courses (with the exception of field experience, internship, or master's project/thesis
credits) must be completed during the term of registration. Students must complete all course requirements by the
end of the registered term so that faculty can submit a grade by the appropriate due date. A grade of incomplete "I"
shall be assigned at the discretion of the instructor when, due to extraordinary circumstances, the student was
prevented from completing the work of the course on time. The assignment of an incomplete grade requires a written
contract between the instructor and student specifying a deadline by which the student will complete the course
requirements. The student must contact a Major Coordinator to receive the required contract. In no event may the
written agreement allow a period of longer than one year to complete the course requirements. If the instructor
submits an "I" without a written contract a hold will be placed on the student record, barring the student from
registering. If the requirements of the contract are not met by the contract deadline, a hold will be placed on the
student's record unless a new deadline has been renegotiated. Field experience, internship, and master's projects
that are not completed by the end of the term of graduation will receive a grade of "K" indicating "work in progress."
PhD Students only: The symbol “I” may be assigned by an instructor to indicate “incomplete,” in accordance with the
provisions announced in class at the beginning of the semester, when in the instructor’s opinion there is a reasonable
expectation that the student can successfully complete the work of the course. An “I” remains on the transcript until
the instructor replaces it with a final A-F or S-N grade. Course instructors are encouraged to establish a time limit for
the removal of incomplete grades.

Six Credit Minimum Exemption
The University of Minnesota has a policy that students must register for a minimum of six credits in order to hold a
graduate assistant position. The policy states that "exemption from [this requirement] is determined on a semester by
semester basis" and that "eligibility criteria are to be determined by each graduate program...these criteria will be well
publicized and administered equitably among all Graduate Assistants in the program."
The Division Training Committee (DTC) approved the following policy: “Students will almost always be granted a one
semester exemption so they can finish their work toward the end of their degree program, but must petition the DTC
for more than one semester's exemption and this would be given under only extraordinary, extenuating
circumstances. Extending coursework in order to remain a graduate assistant will not be sufficient reason.” Students
who wish to request an exemption should contact Andrea Kish. It may take several weeks for this request to be
reviewed so please submit your request at least one month prior to the start of the term.
Graduate Assistants who wish to be exempt from FICA withholding must register for at least three credits per term
(one credit for PhD candidates working on a dissertation).

Sitting in on a Class
Students are not permitted to attend a class for which they are not registered. This means that if you are unable to
register for a class before it begins for any reason you may not attend the class.



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Support for Student Travel
The current Division policy is as follows:
1. The Division will provide up to $800 per student in a 12 month period [a maximum of $3,200 available for all
   students during the fiscal year] for travel to a scientific meeting under the following conditions:
       The student is currently enrolled in the Epi PhD/MS/MPH, CHE MPH, MCH MPH, PubH Nutr MPH, or Clinical
        Research MS program and must be the presenter of the paper or poster.
       The meeting is at a national or international level and has scientific relevance to the student's field of study.
       There are no other sources of support specifically allocated for such travel. For example, whenever a training
        grant provides funds for travel for its fellows, those fellows will not be eligible for travel support under this
        policy. However, students whose work was supported by a research grant with no funds specifically for
        student travel will be eligible for travel support under this policy. Principal Investigators are encouraged to
        provide support for student travel from their grants since their grants benefit as well as the students.
2. All requests for travel support must be in writing. The request should be addressed to the Chair of the Division
   Training Committee and given to a Major Coordinator, who will process the request. The request should include:
       The dates, location and purpose of the meeting and describe the student’s role.
       A copy of the abstract and letter of acceptance must be attached to the request. In addition, a letter from a
        member of the Division’s faculty indicating that he/she is familiar with the student’s work, judges it to be of
        good quality, and supports the student’s request.
       The request must be made in advance of the scientific meeting. Since the DTC only meets once per month, it
        is suggested that complete requests be submitted at least six weeks prior to the scientific meeting.
       A summary of the travel expenses (cost of air fare, hotel price, registration fees, etc).
3. Allocations under this policy will of course be subject to the availability of funds for this purpose.

Payment for TA English Program
If a nonnative English-speaking Division student is required by their degree program to fulfill a teaching assistantship
position (i.e. Epidemiology PhD students), the Division will pay one-half the cost of instruction the first time the student
takes the course (the University's Office of Academic Affairs pays the other half). Students not passing the exam must
pay the costs of any additional instruction.

SAS Access
Students can purchase the SAS program for a fee if it is necessary for them to complete research. Additional
information on ordering the software is available http://www1.umn.edu/adcs/site/sasWinMac.html. Please note that all
4 of the computers in the student computer lab (397F WBOB) have SAS.
One computer (the one furthest to the East) has the SAS Learning Edition 4.1 (an easy to use personal learning tool).
The book, The Little SAS Book for Enterprise Guide 4.1 is a guide to a point-and-click interface that is part of the
Learning Edition. Using Enterprise, you generate SAS code without writing it. It is available for checkout from Laurie
Zurbey, in cube 398C.
For additional help with SAS, you can schedule an appointment with Judy Baxter, an experienced SAS programmer.
Judy is available a few days a month and sends out a monthly schedule of the exact days via email to all current
students with instructions on how to schedule an appointment. You may contact Judy at baxte003@umn.edu.

J.B. Hawley Student Research Award
The Division has established the J.B. Hawley Student Research Award, a small grant mechanism to support research
projects. This is a wonderful opportunity for students and post-doctoral fellows to obtain funds for their research, gain
experience in grant proposal writing, and receive faculty feedback on their ideas. During the academic year, we will
have two separate award categories. The standard award is open to all students and post-doctoral fellows; we
anticipate two rounds of requests for proposals (one per semester). The doctoral award is only open to doctoral
students in Epidemiology; we anticipate one request for proposals in the fall semester. The chair of the Research
Awards Committee will distribute an e-mail announcement with further details.




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STANDARD AWARD
Who May Apply?
Students currently enrolled in degree programs in Epidemiology, Community Health Education, Maternal and Child
Health, Clinical Research, or Public Health Nutrition or post-doctoral fellows in Epidemiology. Proposed projects do
not have to be thesis or masters projects, and may be for any research that involves the applicant (e.g., evaluation of
a program for a field experience). Those who have received previous funding from a Hawley Award will not be eligible
for further support until they have submitted the required one-page report for their prior award (see below).
How Much?
$3,500 maximum, including fringe benefits when applicable.
How Can It Be Used?
The award may be used to support research activities including supplies and equipment. It cannot be used for
stipends or salary support for the applicant.
Please note that before making any expenditure with the award (i.e., ordering, purchasing, hiring, or contracting for
services) the applicant must meet with accounting personnel in the Division to ensure that procedures are followed.
How Long?
Normally projects are funded for one year.
What is the Format for the Proposal?
1. Cover Letter
   Please indicate in the letter whether the project will help support a master’s project, master’s thesis, PhD thesis,
   or field experience.
2. Face Page (1 page)
        a. Title
        b. Investigator information, including name, address, telephone, and e-mail address
        c. Collaborating investigators (faculty, staff, students), if any
3. Research Proposal (4 pages maximum; font: 12-point Times or larger)
        a. Background and Significance (1 page maximum):
             Describe the background and justification for the study and state the research questions/hypotheses.
        b. Research Methods (2 pages maximum):
             Describe the study design and detailed methods. Be sure to include information on each of the following
             issues (and others, as appropriate):
                   Study population
                   Sample selection and recruitment
                   Measurements
                   Data analysis plan (required for both quantitative and qualitative research)
                   Timeline
                   Sample size (justified by formal statistical calculations or other means)
        c. Human Subjects (no page limit):
             All proposals must address protection of human subjects and have the project approved by the University
             of Minnesota's Institutional Review Board (IRB) prior to receiving funds. However, a project will be
             reviewed by the Research Awards Committee prior to receiving final IRB approval.
4. Detailed Budget (1 page maximum):
   The proposed budget should include precise amounts requested in various categories (e.g., postage, supplies,
   printing, personnel, etc.). Provide a brief justification for the amount requested in each category and state why
   these funds are needed to conduct the proposed research. The budget should clearly itemize and justify
   expenditures. If the request is part of a larger project, the proportion to be supported by this award and the
   rationale and need for this funding mechanism, should be specified clearly.
   The following items are NOT allowed: computer purchase, publication costs (e.g., page charges, reprints), and
   presentation costs (e.g., travel to a conference, conference fee).
5. Letter of Support from Faculty Advisor (1 page):
   A primary or adjunct faculty member in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health must provide a brief
   letter to accompany the proposal, specifically endorsing the applicant’s request. Applicants are strongly
   encouraged to discuss their proposals with a faculty advisor, who should review the proposal before it is
   submitted.
6. Appendices, if needed (no page limit)
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Submission
Submit your proposal to the Chair of the Research Awards Committee (TBA), Division of Epidemiology and
Community Health, Suite 300, 1300 South Second Street, Minneapolis, MN 55454-1015
Review Process
All applications will be reviewed by the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health Research Awards Committee,
which includes faculty members representing the major fields. Each proposal will be evaluated according to its
scientific and technical merits and public health implications.
If you have questions regarding preparation of a proposal, please contact the Chair of the Research Awards
Committee Chair. Information regarding the status of human subjects (IRB) applications must be provided to the
Committee. Award funds will not be released until Division of Epidemiology and Community Health Accounts
Administration has received notification of Human Subjects Committee approval.
Final Report
A one-page report to the Research Awards Committee on progress and outcome is due on the one-year anniversary
date of the award.
DOCTORAL AWARD
Who May Apply?
Students currently enrolled in the doctoral program in Epidemiology. Proposed projects do not have to be thesis
projects, and may be for any research that involves the applicant. Those who have received previous funding from a
Hawley award will not be eligible for further support until they have submitted the required one-page report for their
prior award (see below).
How Much?
$7,000 maximum, including fringe benefits when applicable. There will be one award available in 2007-08.
How Can It Be Used?
The award may be used to support research activities including supplies and equipment. It cannot be used for
stipends or salary support for the applicant.
Please note that before making any expenditure with the award (i.e., ordering, purchasing, hiring, or contracting for
services) the applicant must meet with accounting personnel in the Division to ensure that procedures are followed.
How Long?
Normally projects are funded for one year.
What is the Format for the Proposal?
The Chair of the Research Awards Committee will distribute an e-mail announcement with detailed instructions.
Submission
Submit your proposal to the Chair of the Research Awards Committee (TBA), Division of Epidemiology and
Community Health, Suite 300, 1300 South Second Street, Minneapolis, MN 55454-1015
Review Process
All applications will be reviewed by the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health Research Awards Committee,
which includes members of the graduate faculty. Each proposal will be evaluated according to its scientific and
technical merits and public health implications.
If you have questions regarding preparation of a proposal, please contact the chair of the Research Awards
Committee Chair. Information regarding the status of human subjects (IRB) applications must be provided to the
Committee. Award funds will not be released until Division of Epidemiology and Community Health Accounts
Administration has received notification of Human Subjects Committee approval.
Final Report
A one-page report to the Research Awards Committee on progress and outcome is due on the one-year anniversary
date of the award.

Other Division Awards and Scholarships
The Division of Epidemiology and Community Health also has several other awards that are granted each year:




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     The Colleen Berney Scholarship is given to an incoming first-year student in the Maternal and Child Health
      major who has demonstrated a strong academic background and an interest in child welfare. The scholarship
      consists of a $2,000 award.
     The Henry Blackburn Award recognizes the writing and presentation of scholarly work among students in the
      Master’s programs within the Division. The recipient of the award will receive a certificate and a check for
      $1,000.
     The Lester Breslow Award is awarded to a public health student(s) pursuing a graduate degree in the Division
      of Epidemiology and Community Health who has demonstrated academic excellence in the area of health
      promotion and disease prevention. The recipient of the award will receive a plaque and a check for $1,000.
     The Betty J. Hallstrom Award is awarded to a graduating nurse in the Maternal and Child Health major who
      had demonstrated research competence by completing a project in an MCH area and has displayed innovative
      and creative planning for MCH care. The recipient of the award will receive a certificate and check.
     The Marguerite J. Queneau Research Assistantship (25% appointment for one year) is awarded to incoming
      public health nutrition students who portray the characteristics of Marguerite Queneau, a nationally and
      internationally accomplished nutritionist.
     The Ruth Stief Award recognizes a current Public Health Nutrition student for her/his leadership qualities,
      academic excellence and potential for an exemplary career in public health. The recipient of the award will
      receive a certificate and a $500 check.
     The Ruth Stief Research Assistantship (25% appointment for one year) is awarded to incoming public health
      nutrition students.
     The Henry Taylor Scholarship is awarded to help support the expenses of students who are attending the
      American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology. Students presenting papers at this conference are
      encouraged to apply for this financial support. One student will be selected to receive a $400 stipend to attend
      this meeting.
     The Robert ten Bensel Scholarship is awarded to a full-time incoming Maternal and Child Health student that
      has demonstrated leadership, human equity, and social justice in MCH.

Research Grants
An up-to-date listing of current and pending grants is available upon request, or at
http://www.epi.umn.edu/research/index.asp.

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health Student Support Policies
Doctoral Student Support Policy, for those matriculating Fall 2003 or later
1. Students can be accepted to the program with varying levels of support including no guaranteed support,
   guaranteed support for the initial year, or support for multiple years.
2. Support levels will be set at the level of an NIH Pre-Doctoral Fellow or, if not an NIH Fellow, not more than 50%
   RA/TA position. This means that those who accept a pre-doctoral fellowship may not also accept an RA or TA
   position in the Division. Scholarship or block grant awards are not included.
3. Students on fellowships perform their TA requirement as part of the fellowship, with terms to be negotiated with
   the training director.
4. Requests may be made to the DGS for levels of RA/TA support up to 75% for students who have passed their
   preliminary examinations and are working on their thesis. These requests are required to show that such
   additional work does not delay the thesis defense and graduation.
5. Physicians who are licensed to practice medicine in the United States will have an RA/TA stipend set at the
   doctoral level. Those who are not licensed to practice will be paid at the Masters level RA/TA position stipend.
6. There is no limit on the number of years of support; however, adequate progress toward degree completion is
   required for continued support.
7. Students may increase support to 75% during the Summer term.
8. This policy only applies to positions held within the Division. For example, a student with a 50% research
   assistantship in the Division would also be able to hold a 25% research assistantship in the Medical School.
   Approved 7/1/03, revised 06/08



                                                                                                                    11
Doctoral students matriculating prior to Fall 2003 should see a Major Coordinator to discuss their student
support policy.
Master’s Student Support Policy
No one may hold a graduate assistantship of more than 50% (75% in the Summer) in the Division of Epidemiology
and Community Health. Adopted 12/17/03, and applies to students matriculating Fall 2004 and after. This policy only
applies to positions held within the Division. For example, a student with a 50% research assistantship in the Division
would also be able to hold a 25% position in Medical School because that is not in the Division.
Policy for Graduate Assistant Pay Scale for Post-Baccalaureate Professional Students
Post-baccalaureate professional students in doctoral-level programs (e.g. dental, medical, law, veterinary students)
who have completed two years of their professional studies will be paid at the rate of those who have completed a
master’s degree. Those who have not completed the first two years will be paid at the rate of those whose highest
degree is a bachelor’s degree. This policy is effective beginning Spring semester, 2004. Adopted 12/17/03.

Division of Epidemiology and Community Health Websites
EpiCH website....................................................................................................................... http://www.epi.umn.edu
EpiCH Student Guidebook and Forms .....................................http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm
EpiCH course grid ......................................................................http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/coursegrid.shtm
Course syllabi....................................................................................http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/syllabi.shtm
Job Tip Sheet .........................................................................http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/pdf/jobtipsheet.pdf
EpiCH faculty information .................................................................................www.epi.umn.edu/people/index.asp
EpiCH seminar .....................................................................................http://www.epi.umn.edu/news/seminars.asp
EpiCH telephone directory ..................................................................... http://www.epi.umn.edu/people/index.asp
Grant writing information ....................................................................http://www.epi.umn.edu/support/grants.shtm


1.7 Division Advising Information
Guidelines for Faculty/Student Interactions
Faculty members often develop close working relationships with students, especially advisees. Often a relationship is
formed that provides benefits to both the faculty member and the student. Faculty should be cognizant of the power
differential in these types of relationships and set appropriate boundaries. Although faculty members may not intend
that a request of a student be an obligation, they should be aware that such requests might place a student in a
difficult position. Some students are intimidated by faculty members and may not feel free to decline such requests.
Since faculty/student interactions often are situations that are ambiguous, included below are examples to help you
think through a variety of situations that you may encounter:
     Asking a student to drive you somewhere, including the airport, home, or main campus. Such a request
      does not fall under a student’s duties. A situation when this may be acceptable is when the student has the
      same destination.
   Asking student to work extra hours or late hours. Students should be expected to work the hours for which
      they are paid. Students may volunteer to work extra hours to gain more experience (e.g. grant writing), gain
      authorship on a paper or help meet a deadline – but you should not expect a student to work these extra hours.
   Asking an advisee to housesit, take care of your children or pets, or help you move. While some students
      may not mind house sitting, taking care of children or pets, or helping someone move, others may only agree to
      do these jobs because they feel obligated or worry that saying no will somehow affect their relationships with
      faculty members. To avoid problematic situations, a faculty member may post a flyer requesting a sitter or
      mover for pay without the faculty member’s name attached to the request – ensuring that respondents really
      want the job.
Faculty members who are uncertain about the appropriateness of requests they have for students should consult with
the DTC Chair. Students should talk with their Major Chair, DGS, or Major Coordinator if they have concerns about
the appropriateness of requests from faculty members.


12
The University of Minnesota’s Board of Regents policy on Nepotism and Consensual Relationships (including student
and faculty relationships) can be found at www1.umn.edu/regents/policies/humanresources/Nepotism&Personal.html .

Confidentiality
Student records—Including materials related to advisees—are protected under Federal Educational Rights and
Privacy Act (FERPA) (20 U.S.C. § 1232g; 34 CFR Part 99; 1974) and the Student Data Privacy Act. Student
information should be secure – not left in an unlocked location. If advisors have a concern about a particular student,
only student support staff, appropriate Major Chair/DGS, or DTC Chair should discuss the situation and have access
to records. Any confidential information shared by a student with a faculty member must remain confidential – whether
the student approaches you as an advisor, instructor, Major Chair, DGS, or DTC Chair. Talking about individual
students in hallways and other public areas should be avoided.
If a faculty member feels he/she must consult with another faculty member about a student, consider talking about the
issue without providing the name of the individual student. If the student’s name must be shared, tell the student
ahead of time that you intend to talk with the Major Chair (or other appropriate person) about the issue in question.
Some issues, such as sexual harassment, are governed by law and require faculty members to report the problem to
the Division Head. In these situations, explain to the student that you are required to report the incident/problem.

Guidelines for Changing Advisors
Master’s Students
At the master's level, students may change academic advisors if they have serious personality or other conflicts with
their assigned advisor. In that case, they should discuss their reasons and their preferences for a different advisor
with the program chair. The program chair will then consult with both faculty members (new and old advisors) to
obtain agreement before approving the change. The program chair will notify the Division Major Coordinators of the
change.
PhD Students
Many PhD students shift their courses of study and focus over their graduate careers, but doing so does not
necessarily require a change in advisors. Faculty advisors can facilitate students’ academic development, by working
directly with them or by encouraging them to gain experience with other faculty members (e.g., through research or
teaching assistantships or grant-writing opportunities). Sometimes students work more closely with one (or more)
members of their committees than with their advisors. Faculty advisors can also suggest changes in committee
membership to accommodate a change in dissertation focus.
Once PhD students have begun work on their dissertation, changing advisors should be rare, and limited to
circumstances of personality conflicts, major ethical problems, or substantial shifts in areas of interest. Students
wishing to change graduate advisors should consult with the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS). Likewise, faculty
who are considering a change in their role as an advisor should consult with the DGS. Changes in graduate advisors
should be approved by the DGS and forwarded to the Division’s Major Coordinators who will file the change with the
Graduate School.

Student Guide to Mission, Definitions and Expectations of Advising
Mission Statement
The School of Public Health strives to provide advising that promotes collaboration among students, staff and faculty
to enhance students’ academic and professional development in the field of public health. The School’s goal is
educational and experiential excellence that prepares students for successful careers improving the health of
populations.
Defining Advising
The School of Public Health is committed to creating and sustaining high quality advising in the following four areas:
1. Administrative Advising: advising on course planning and scheduling, policies, procedures and benchmarks of
   the degree program/major, SPH, and the University.

2. Academic Advising: general guidance on topics related to program/major including, but not limited to program
   focus (may include identifying appropriate course work options), project selection and career planning.

3. Field Experience/Internship/Practicum Advising: specific and targeted advising for field
   experience/internship/practicum development, placement and completion.
                                                                                                                   13
4. Masters Project/Thesis/Plan A&B/Dissertation Advising: specific and targeted direction on a master’s project
   or a PhD dissertation including, but not limited to development, completion and in some cases publication.
Advising Expectations for Students
SPH students are expected to…
     •   Regularly read and respond to University email (ideally once per day); email is the official mode of
         communication at the University of Minnesota
     •   Review program objectives and educational documents at least once per semester, (i.e. Student Guidebook,
         etc.), or when directed by major coordinator or major chair/DGS; students are responsible for knowing the
         requirements of the degree program
     •   Actively contribute to a welcoming and supportive SPH climate
     •   Initiate meetings with advisor(s) at least once per semester; regularly communicate with faculty advisor(s)
         and/or major coordinator about program progress
     •   Respond to inquiries from faculty or staff in a timely manner (ideally within 5 – 7 business days)
     •   Behave in a professional and courteous manner; fulfill educational and advising commitments, such as
         appointments, project deadlines, etc.

Faculty Guide to Mission, Definitions and Expectations of Advising
Mission Statement
The School of Public Health strives to provide advising that promotes collaboration among students, staff and faculty
to enhance students’ academic and professional development in the field of public health. The School’s goal is
educational and experiential excellence that prepares students for successful careers improving the health of
populations.
Defining Advising
The School of Public Health is committed to creating and sustaining high quality advising in the following four areas:
1. Administrative Advising: advising on course planning and scheduling, policies, procedures and benchmarks of
   the degree program/major, SPH, and the University.

2. Academic Advising: general guidance on topics related to program/major including, but not limited to program
   focus (may include identifying appropriate course work options), project selection and career planning.

3. Field Experience/Internship/Practicum Advising: specific and targeted advising for field experience
   /internship/practicum development, placement and completion.

4. Masters Project/Thesis/Plan A&B/Dissertation Advising: specific and targeted direction on a master’s project
   or a PhD dissertation including, but not limited to development, completion and in some cases publication.
Advising Expectations for Faculty
Faculty advisors are expected to…
     •   Refer advisee to Major Coordinator for course planning/scheduling, policy and procedural information
     •   Review program objectives and educational documents at least on an annual basis, (i.e. Student Guidebook,
         etc.), or when directed by major coordinator or major chair/DGS
     •   Actively contribute to a welcoming and supportive SPH climate
     •   Initiate meetings with advisee at least once per semester; regularly communicate with students on program
         progress
     •   Respond to student inquiries in a timely manner (ideally within 5 – 7 business days)
     •   Provide reasonable office hours and/or appointments and be generally available to student inquiries;
         communicate with students about extended absences or travel
     •   Serve as a model and example of respectful behavior
     •   Provide referrals to school and university resources when appropriate (e.g. Student Mental Health Services)




14
1.8 Division Courses 2008-2009
Number   Title                                                    Credits   Offered       Instructor(s)

60xx     Obesity and Eating Disorders: Treatment, Prevention &     2.0      Spring        Pereira/French
         Policy
6000     Topics: E-Public Hlth: On-line Interventions              3.0      Fall          Rosser and Others
6015     HIV/AIDS: Epi & Pub Hlth Interventions                    2.0      Fall          Rosser
6020     Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science             3.0      Fall          T. Nelson
6020     Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science (web        3.0      Fall/Spring   Multiple Instructors
         course)                                                            /Summer
6034     Program Evaluation For Public Health Practice             3.0      Spring        Harwood
6035     Applied Research Methods                                  3.0      Fall          Hennrikus
6040     Dying and Death in Contemporary Society                   2.0      Spring        Rothenberger
6045     Skills for Policy Development                             1.0      Spring        Toomey
6049     Legislative Advocacy Skills for Public Health             3.0      Spring        Forster/Toomey
6050     Community Health Theory and Practice I                    3.0      Fall          Lytle
6051     Community Health Theory and Practice II                   3.0      Spring        Toomey
6055     Social Inequalities in Health                             3.0      Spring        Jones-Webb
6060     Motivational Interviewing                                 1.0      May ‘09       Patterson
6066     Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for    2.0      Fall          Axtell
         Community Health Work
6074     Mass Communication and Public Health                      3.0      Spring        Ijzer
6078     Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy             2.0      Spring        Forster
6080     Seminar: Policy/Politics/Ethics of PubH Decision          2.0      Spring        Humphrey
         Making
6085     Prevention and Control of Tobacco and Alcohol             3.0      Fall          Jones-Webb
         Problems
6301     Fundamentals of Clinical Research                         3.0      Fall          Luepker/Hirsch
6303     Clinical Research Project Seminar                         2.0      Spring        Luepker/Thomas
6305     CR: Introductory Seminar for Health Professionals         2.0      Spring        Luepker
6309     Clinical Research Career Development                      1.0      Fall/Spring   Luepker
6320     Fundamentals of Epidemiology (web course)                 3.0      Summer        Anderson
6320     Fundamentals of Epidemiology                              3.0      Fall          Lazovich
6320     Fundamentals of Epidemiology (web course)                 3.0      Fall/Spring   Punyko
6325     SAS Programming for Data Management                       1.0      Fall/Spring   Oakes
                                                                            (January)
6333     Human Behavior I                                          2.0      Fall          Lytle
6334     Human Behavior II                                         2.0      Spring        Hennrikus
6336     Adv. Seminar in Infectious Disease Epidemiology           1.0      Fall          Ehresmann
6341     Epidemiologic Methods I                                   3.0      Fall          Flood/Spector
6342     Epidemiologic Methods II                                  3.0      Spring        Pankow/Munoz-Zanzi
6343     Epidemiologic Methods III                                 4.0      Fall          Duval/Schreiner
6344     Epidemiologic Methods IV                                  2.0      Fall          Steffen/Yuan
6348     Writing Research Grants                                   2.0      Fall          Luepker/Harlow
6355     Pathophysiology of Human Disease                          4.0      Fall          Oberg/Crow
6360     Obesity & Eating Disorders: Etiology/Epidemiology         2.0      Fall          French
6363     Community Trials                                          3.0      Spring        Oakes/Hannan
6381     Genetics in Public Health                                 2.0      Fall          Demerath
6385     Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases           2.0      Spring        Lifson
6386     Public Health Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease           2.0      Fall          Folsom

                                                                                                                 15
 6387   Cancer Epidemiology                                       2.0   Spring        Anderson
 6389   Nutritional Epidemiology                                  2.0   Fall          Harnack
 6390   Topics: Social Epidemiology                               2.0   Spring        Oakes
 6600   Topics: Global Reproductive Health                        2.0   Fall          Hellerstedt
 6605   Reproductive and Perinatal Health                         2.0   Spring        Hellerstedt
 6606   Children’s Health: Issues, Programs & Policies            2.0   Summer        Oberg
 6606   Children’s Health: Issues, Programs & Policies (web       2.0   Spring        Oberg
        course)
 6607   Adolescent Health: Issues, Programs & Policies            2.0   Spring        Hellerstedt
 6617   Practical Methods – Secondary Data Analysis               3.0   Fall          Oakes
 6627   Sexuality Education: Criteria, Curricula, & Controversy   1.0   Fall/Spring   Bretl/Turnham
 6630   Foundations of Maternal and Child Health Leadership       3.0   Fall          Oberg
 6634   Advocacy and Children’s Rights                            2.0   Spring        Oberg
 6650   Community-Based Participatory Research                    1.0   May           Hellerstedt/Call
 6655   Principles and Programs in MCH (web course)               2.0   Summer        Patterson
 6673   Grant Writing for Public Health                           1.0   May           Toomey
 6901   Public Health Nutrition: Principles & Programs            2.0   Fall          Stang/Story
 6902   Maternal and Infant Nutrition                             2.0   Fall          Stang
 6902   Maternal and Infant Nutrition (web course)                2.0   Summer        Stang
                                                                        ‘09
 6903   Child and Adolescent Nutrition                            2.0   Fall          Story
 6904   Nutrition and Aging                                       2.0   Sum           TBD
 6905   Human Nutrition and Health                                2.0   Fall          Nelson, M.
 6906   Global Nutrition                                          2.0   Spring        Himes
 6910   Critical Review of Research in Public Health Nutrition    1.0   May           Pereira
 6914   Community Nutrition Intervention                          3.0   Spring        Neumark-Sztainer
 6915   Nutrition Assessment                                      2.0   Spring        Himes/Harnack/Gross
 6933   Nutrition and Chronic Diseases                            2.0   Spring        Robien
 6945   Child/Adolescent Obesity                                  1.0   May           Stang/Nelson, M.
 8377   Seminar: Chronic Disease and Behavioral Epi               1.0   Fall/Spring   Jacobs/Harlow




16
2.      CLINICAL RESEARCH MS DEGREE PROGRAM
2.1     Fall 2008 Program Curriculum

38 semester credits minimum
 Course       Notes    Title                                                           Offered              Credits
 PubH 6301             Fundamentals of Clinical Research                               Fall                     3
 PubH 6303             Clinical Research Project Seminar                               Spring                   2
 PubH 6341             Epidemiologic Methods I                                         Fall                     3
 PubH 6342             Epidemiologic Methods II [6341, 6450 are prerequisites]         Spring                   3
 PubH 6450             Biostatistics I                                                 Fall                     4
 PubH 6451             Biostatistics II [6450 is prerequisite]                         Spring                   4
 PubH 7420             Clinical Trials: Design, Implementation and Analysis            Spring                   3
 PubH 6348             Writing Research Grants (S/N only; Dr. Luepker’s section)       Fall                     2
 PubH 6742            Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy                    Fall/Spring/Sum          1
 Electives            See sample electives below                                      Any Term                 3
 PubH 8777            Thesis Credits: Master’s                                        Any Term                 10
 In addition to PubH 6742, students must complete Parts 1 and 2 of the University of Minnesota Responsible
  Conduct of Research course. At this time, Part 1 is only in-person, but Part 2 is available online. Information on
  when these sessions are scheduled is available at www.research.umn.edu/first/ (this training is validated by
  ORTTA).
  Students must also complete the “Protecting Human Subjects” online training available at
  www.research.umn.edu/first/. Under “What’s Inside,” click on “Additional Courses” and then “Protecting Human
  Subjects.” Contact A. Kish if you have trouble accessing these sites.
Students who are also K12 (CAPS) scholars have additional requirements that they should take as elective
courses.
 Students must have their thesis examining committee formed and approved, and a proposal for their thesis
  approved, by their thesis advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS) prior to registering for thesis credits.
  Once approval is given, the student can take all the thesis credits in one term or spread them out, as financial
  needs warrant. See section 2.5 for further information.

Sample Electives
The potential electives are many and are found in the schools of the Academic Health Center. Students may also
choose to do independent work for academic credit under PubH 8392 or 8393; see section 1.5.
Recommended Electives
PubH 6570 Management for Clinical Research (Fall) [Note: register for section 003]
PubH 6343 Epidemiologic Methods III (Prerequisites: PubH 6342, 6451; Fall)
PubH 7400 Topics in Biostatistics: Statistics for Translational and Clinical Research (Spring)
Public Health
PubH 6000 Topics: Community Health Education: Obesity and Eating Disorders: Treatment, Prevention and Policy
PubH 6336 Advanced Seminar in Infectious Disease Epidemiology
PubH 6360 Obesity and Eating Disorders: Etiology/Epidemiology
PubH 6381 Genetics in Public Health
PubH 6385 Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases
PubH 6386 Public Health Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease
PubH 6387 Cancer Epidemiology
PubH 6389 Nutritional Epidemiology

                                                                                                                      17
PubH 7407 Analysis of Categorical Data
PubH 7430 Statistical Methods for Correlated Data
PubH 7435 Latent Variable Models
PubH 7440 Introduction to Bayesian Analysis
PubH 7445 Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology
PubH 7450 Survival Analysis
Note: PubH 6305 is not an appropriate elective for CR MS student because the content is too basic.
Nursing
Nurs 5808     American Indian Health and Health Care
Nurs 8124     Family Health Theory
Nurs 8140     Moral and Ethical Positions in Nursing
Nurs 8152     Scholarship in Health Care Ethics
Nurs 8171     Qualitative Research Design and Methods
Nurs 8172     Theory and Theory Development for Research
Nurs 8173     Principles and Methods of Implementing Research
Nurs 8175     Quantitative Research Design and Methods
Nurs 8181     Protection of Research Subjects
Dentistry/Oral Biology*
Dent 8090    Evidence-based Clinical Pediatric Dentistry
Dent 8100    Topics in Advanced Periodontology: Literature Review
Dent 8121    Current Literature in TMJ and Craniofacial Pain
Geri 7100    Oral Health Services for Older Adults Seminar
OBio 8021    Oral Microbiology
OBio 8022    Oral Neuroscience
*Please contact the course director for times courses are taught
Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology*
ECP 5620     Drug Metalbolism and Disposition
ECP 8100     ECP Seminar
ECP 8220     Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology
ECP 8400     Pharmacometrics
EPC 8900     Advanced Topics: Pharmacometric Methods in Modeling and Simulation
EPC 8992     Readings in ECP
*Please contact Professor Brundage prior to electing one of these courses, as they are not offered every year.
Veterinary Medicine
VMed 5080 Problems in Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health
VMed 5165 Surveillance of Foodborne Diseases and Food Safety Hazards (cross-listed with 5181)
VMed 8090 Epidemiology of Zoonoses and Diseases Common to Animals and Humans
VMed 8360 Evidence-Based Medicine
Other
Kin 5435                Advanced Theory and Techniques of Exercise Science




18
Table 1. Summary of competency areas/skills that guide the Clinical Research curriculum and courses that address
these competency areas.


Clinical Research Competencies
Competency Area Skills                                                      How Acquired                        How Measured

Ability to conceptualize and design clinical research of high     PubH 6301, 6303, 6341, 6348,        • Classroom exams
quality and scientific integrity                                  7420, 8777                          • Demonstrated knowledge
                                                                                                      • Faculty evaluation of written
                                                                                                        assignments
                                                                                                      • Presentation of student projects
                                                                                                        in the classroom setting
Ability to plan and manage clinical research studies              PubH 6342, 6780                     • Formal exams required for all
                                                                                                        courses
                                                                                                      • Graded exercises include those
                                                                                                        on planning and management of
                                                                                                        clinical studies
                                                                                                      • MS thesis: student must
                                                                                                        demonstrate that he/she is able
                                                                                                        to develop, implement and
                                                                                                        analyze a clinical research study
Ability to perform data collection, management, analysis and      PubH 6342, 6780, 6450, 6451         • Formal exams required for all
interpretation of clinical research findings and to report them                                         courses
at professional meeting and in the peer-reviewed literature                                           • Graded exercises include those
                                                                                                        on planning and management of
                                                                                                        clinical studies
                                                                                                      • MS thesis: student must
                                                                                                        demonstrate that he/she is able
                                                                                                        to develop, implement and
                                                                                                        analyze a clinical study
Thorough understanding of human subjects’ protection and          PubH 6742, 6301, 6348               • Examinations, which include
the responsible conduct of research                                                                     questions on the ethics
                                                                  • Responsible Conduct of
                                                                                                        associated with research in
                                                                    Research: The students are
                                                                                                        human beings
                                                                    designed to attend a one-half
                                                                                                      • Students write application to the
                                                                    day course in this area and
                                                                                                        IRB for a human study, to be
                                                                    complete a web-based
                                                                                                        graded by faculty
                                                                    program
Ability to write competitive research grants and obtain           PubH 6348, 6303                     • Written applications and public
research funding for the projects                                                                       presentations graded; feedback
                                                                                                        and constructive suggestions for
                                                                                                        improvement provided to each
                                                                                                        student
Ability to work with multidisciplinary teams to accomplish        • The clinical research program     • Outcome will only be determined
clinical research projects                                          involves students from              when students enter their
                                                                    different clinical disciplines:     research positions. (Before that,
                                                                    medicine, nursing and               we have only the ability to
                                                                    pharmacy. These are brought         answer content questions in this
                                                                    together in this class and          area and get a sense of the
                                                                    lectures come from the many         students' appreciation of
                                                                    disciplines represented by the      multidisciplinary work.)
                                                                    Academic Health Center.




                                                                                                                                          19
2.2     Sample Standard Schedules

Full-Time In 1.5 Years
Fall Semester Year One
       Course       Title                                                                      Credits
                     Fundamentals of Clinical Research (see Part-Time in 2 years for class
       PubH 6301                                                                                 3
                     times)
       PubH 6450     Biostatistics I (all labs will work in class schedule)                      4
       PubH 6341     Epidemiologic Methods I (either section fits schedule)                      3
                     Elective(s)                                                                 3
Spring Semester Year One
       PubH 7420     Clinical Trials                                                             3
       PubH 6451     Biostatistics II (PubH 6450 is prerequisite)                                4
       PubH 6303     Clinical Research Project Seminar                                           2
       PubH 6342     Epidemiologic Methods II (PubH 6341, 6450 are prerequisites)                3
Summer Session Year One
       PubH 8777     Thesis Credits: Master’s                                                    8
Fall Semester Year Two
                     Ethics in PubH: Research and Policy (can take other terms, in class or
       PubH 6742                                                                                 2
                     online)
       PubH 6348     Writing Research Grants                                                     2
       PubH 8777     Thesis Credits: Master’s                                                    2

Part-Time In Two Years
Fall Semester Year One
       Course       Title                                                                      Credits
       PubH 6301     Fundamentals of Clinical Research (Th 10:10 – 1:10)                         3
                     Biostatistics I (Lecture and lab required; all labs will work in class
                     schedule. Lecture is T/Th 1:25 – 3:20. One lab is required and there
       PubH 6450                                                                                 4
                     are six options; you may not get your 1st choice of lab so please plan
                     accordingly.)
                     Epidemiologic Methods I (T/Th; one section is 3:35 – 4:50, the other is
       PubH 6341                                                                                 3
                     4:15 – 5:30)
Spring Semester Year One
                     Epidemiologic Methods II (PubH 6341, 6450 are prerequisites) (T/Th
       PubH 6342                                                                                 3
                     4:00 – 5:15)
       PubH 6451     Biostatistics II (PubH 6450 is prerequisite) (M/W 10:10 – 12:05)            4
Summer Session Year One
     PubH 6742    Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy (online or take another           1
                  term in class or online)
Fall Semester Year Two
       PubH 6348     Writing Research Grants (M 3:35 – 5:30)                                     2
                   Elective(s)                                                                   3
                   term)
Spring Semester Year Two
       PubH 6303     Clinical Research Project Seminar (M 2:30 – 4:25)                           2
       PubH 7420     Clinical Trials (T/Th 9:45 – 11)                                            3
       PubH 8777     Thesis Credits: Master’s                                                    5
May or Summer Session Two
       PubH 8777     Thesis Credits: Master’s                                                    5

20
Part-Time In Three Years
Fall Semester Year One
       Course         Title                                                                   Credits
                      Fundamentals of Clinical Research (see Part-Time in 2 years for class
       PubH 6301                                                                                 3
                      times)
       PubH 6450      Biostatistics I (all labs will work in class schedule)                     4
Spring Semester Year One
                      Biostatistics II (PubH 6450 is prerequisite). [If you can’t take PubH
       PubH 6451                                                                                 4
                      6450 in Fall, then take now and take PubH 6451 in Spring, Year Two]
Summer Year One
     PubH 6742       Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy (offered in class and          1
                     online most terms, take when convenient)
Fall Semester Year Two
       PubH 6341      Epidemiologic Methods I (either section fits schedule)                     3
                   Electives (or in Fall, Year Three)                                            3
                   either
Spring Semester Year Two
       PubH 6342     Epidemiologic Methods II (PubH 6341, 6450 are prerequisites)                3
       PubH 7420     Clinical nin
                     either in Trials                                                            3
May or Summer Year Two
                      No class scheduled
Fall Semester Year Three
       Course       Title
       PubH 6348      Writing Research Grants                                                    2
Spring Semester Year Three
        PubH 6303     Clinical Research Project Seminar                                          2
       PubH 8777      Thesis Credits: Master’s                                                  10




2.3     Program Requirements, Resources and Policies

Graduate School
Clinical Research students should read the Graduate School Catalog for general policies pertaining to all MS students
in addition to the School of Public Health Clinical Research program requirements listed below. The Graduate School
Catalog can be found at www.catalogs.umn.edu/grad.

Grade Point
The program requires a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00 for graduation. The Graduate School requires a minimum
GPA of 2.8, but individual major fields have the option of setting higher graduate requirements. Regular meetings with
advisors and reviews by the Director of Graduate Studies and a Major Coordinator will evaluate student progress.

S-N Credits
Clinical Research MS students are Graduate School students. Graduate School students can take up to one-third of
course credits (not thesis credits) for a grade of S-N (satisfactory/non-satisfactory). Note that the one-third limit does
include courses that are available only S-N. For most CR MS students who take 28 course credits, a maximum of nine
credits are allowed S-N.

Transfer Credits (Bringing in courses taken prior to matriculation)
Master’s of Science degree students are required by the Graduate School to complete at least 60 percent of
coursework for their official degree programs (excluding thesis credits) as registered University of Minnesota
Graduate School students. The total number of course credits—not including thesis credits--for Clinical Research MS
                                                                                                                     21
students is 28 semester credits. Therefore, Clinical Research students can transfer in a maximum of 11 credits; see
Andrea Kish for details on the process to transfer in a course.

Time Frame
All requirements for the MS degree must be completed, and the degree awarded, within seven years. The seven-year
period begins with the earliest coursework included on the student’s official degree program form, including any
transfer work.
The Clinical Research MS major is flexible, allowing part-time status and up to four years to complete degree work.
Some students may choose to complete the degree full-time, in approximately 18 months or less, especially if they
have already earned a few credits transferable to the degree program. With no prior coursework, it will likely take one
and one-half to two years to complete the degree. However, many students have simultaneous clinical duties--for
those students completing the program in two to four years is reasonable.

Thesis/Oral Examination
Students are required to complete a thesis and oral examination. See sections 2.5 through 2.7 for detailed
information.

Official Program Form For Degree completion
Students are required to submit a Graduate School Degree Program Transmittal Form. Students list all coursework,
completed and proposed, that will be offered in fulfillment of degree requirements, including any transfer work. They
also list their thesis committee members. Please see the “Checklist” in section 2.8 for details on completing the
Clinical Research MS degree. Andrea Kish, Major Coordinator, will help you complete the form. Students must turn in
the form at least one term prior to scheduling the oral defense. Turning in the form later than one term prior to the
defense may delay the oral defense date.

Residency
All Graduate School students are required to register in the Graduate School *every fall and spring term* to maintain
their active status. Active status is required for students to be able to register for courses, take exams, submit official
forms, file for graduation, or otherwise participate in the University community as a Graduate School student. Students
who do not register for a fall or spring term must fill out a Change of Status/Readmission Application form. These
forms are available in the Graduate School Admissions office at 316 Johnston Hall; 612.625.3490; and online at
www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/forms/. The form needs to be completed and a readmission fee paid.
Readmitted students will be required to register the term for which they are readmitted and every subsequent fall and
spring term until they graduate.

Graduate School Active Status
Grad 999 is a free, zero-credit, non-graded registration mechanism for Graduate School students who must register
solely to meet the Graduate School's registration requirement. Remember: Grad 999 meets only the Graduate
School's registration requirement. It does not meet registration requirements established by departments/agencies
within or outside the University (which include, but are not restricted to, registration required to hold an assistantship,
maintain legal visa status, obtain financial aid, or defer loans). Students can find the class number for registration for
Grad 999 under the Graduate School listing in the class schedule online.

Thesis Credits
Prior to registering for thesis credits, students must (1) have their thesis examining committee formed and approved,
and (2) get the approval for their thesis proposal from their thesis advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS).
Students should consider how to spread out the registration of the 10 credits to best suit their financial needs.
Students can register for all ten at once or spread them out over two or more terms. If a department, fellowship, or
business is paying for tuition, students may want to figure out the most economical way to register for the credits.
Note that as long as they keep their active status by registering for Grad 999 in Fall and Spring terms, students do not
have to be registered for thesis credits or course credits in the term in which they hold their oral defense.
Students who plan to work on their thesis over a longer period--more than one year--should remember that the
Graduate School has specific residency requirements; see Residency in this section.




22
Informational Notice
The Academic Health Center (AHC) Research Services Organization (RSO) distributes a brief newsletter focusing on
Clinical Research issues via e-mail each month. The newsletter is at the RSO web site at www.ahc.umn.edu/rso/.


2.4     Graduate Faculty
The Graduate Faculty in Clinical Research has been established according to Graduate School rules. Additional
faculty will be added as the program needs grow and specific skills are required. Please note that all academic and
thesis advisors must have Clinical Research Graduate Faculty status and all members of the thesis examining
committee must have Graduate Faculty status at the University. Please see a Major Coordinator to verify graduate
faculty status of all committee members.


 CR Faculty/Home Department          Email                      Research Interests
 Jasjit Ahluwalia, MD, MPH, MS       jahluwal@umn.edu           Pharmacotherapy and behavior change for chronic disease,
 Office of Clinical Research                                    including nicotine addiction, obesity, nutrition and physical
                                                                activity
 K. Scott Baker MD, MS               baker084@umn.edu           Long-term complications in survivors of childhood cancer or
 Hematology/Oncology; Pediatrics                                after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
 Gregory Beilman, MD, FACS           beilm001@umn.edu           Tissue energetics in hemorrhagic and septic shock; new
 Surgical Critical Care; Surgery                                monitoring strategies in the ICU; Novel treatments of sepsis;
                                                                outcomes in ICU and surgical infections
 Alan Berger, MD                     berge063@umn.edu           Acute coronary syndromes and interventional catheterization.
 Cardiology: Medicine with an                                   Utilization of reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial
 Adjunct Appointment with                                       infarctions.
 Epidemiology and Community
 Health
 Carole Bland, PhD                   bland001@umn.edu           Individual and institutional characteristics of research
 Family Practice/Community                                      productivity, faculty development and educational program
 Health; Medical School                                         evaluation
 Donna Bliss, PhD, RN, FAAN          bliss@umn.edu              Effects of dietary fiber therapies on fecal incontinence;
 Nursing                                                        nutrition support - dietary fiber, tube feeding and diarrhea;
                                                                prevention of perineal dermatitis associated with incontinence
 Hanna Bloomfield, MD, MPH           bloom013@umn.edu           Health services and outcomes research, chronic disease,
 General Internal Medicine; VA                                  cardiovascular disease prevention and clinical trials
 Medical Center
 Paul Bohjanen, MD, PhD              bohja001@umn.edu           T Lymphocyte mRNA Stability. Research focuses on the role
 Microbiology Department                                        of mRNA decay in regulating T lymphocyte activation and
                                                                function.
 Linda Burns, MD                     burns019@umn.edu           Clinical trials research; hematopoietic stem cell
 Hematology, Oncology,                                          transplantation; hematologic malignancies; immunotherapy
 Transplantation; Medicine
 Linda F, Carson, MD                 carso001@umn.edu           Clinical interests are vulvar cancer, cervical cancer,
 Obstectrics & Gynecology;                                      endometrial cancer and ovarian cancer; premalignant and
 Medicine                                                       malignant conditions of the lower genital tract, gestational
                                                                trophoblastic disease, and nutrition and cancer.
 Jay N. Cohn, MD                     cohnx001@umn.edu           Congestive heart failure diagnosis and treatment, hypertension,
 Cardiovascular Division,                                       early detection of CV disease, arterial compliance
 Rasmussen Center for
 Cardiovascular Disease Prevention
 Allan Collins, MD                   acollins@cdrg.org          Observational studies using large registry databases for kidney
 Renal Diseases and Hypertension;                               disease patients; causes and consequences of anemia and other
 Medicine; Director, Chronic                                    complications of end-stage renal disease
 Disease Research Group,
 Minneapolis Medical Research
 Foundation
 Tracie Collins, MD, MPH             tcc@umn.edu                Epidemiology, process of care, and outcomes for patients with
 Medicine/General Internal                                      peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Long-term goals are 1) to
 Medicine; Medicine                                             improve outcomes for patients with PAD, 2) to eliminate racial
                                                                disparities in outcomes, and 3) improve self-management
                                                                behavior among patients with PAD and other chronic diseases.

                                                                                                                                23
 Daniel Duprez, MD, PhD                dupre007@umn.edu            Clinical trials cardiology, primary and secondary prevention,
 Cardiology; Medicine                                              arterial stiffness, lipid disorders, arterial hypertension,
                                                                   peripheral vascular disease, cardiovascular risk scores. New
                                                                   techniques for early detection of cardiovascular disease
 Susan Duval, PhD                      duval002@umn.edu            Cardiovascular and diabetes epidemiology, biostatistical
 Division of Epidemiology and                                      methods, meta-analysis, publication bias, statistical consulting
 Community Health; Public Health
 Maurice Dysken, MD                    maurice.dysken@med.va.gov   Clinical trials with Alzheimer patients for treatment of
 Psychiatry; GRECC Program, VA                                     cognitive impairment and/or behavioral problems: delirium
 Medical Center                                                    assessment and prevention
 Kristine Ensrud, MD, MPH              ensru001@umn.edu            Epidemiology of chronic diseases with focus in osteoporosis
 Epidemiology/Medicine; VA                                         prevention and treatment, management of menopausal
 Medical Center                                                    symptom, sleep disorders
 Patricia Fontaine, MD, MS             fonta002@umn.edu            Cervical cancer screening. Perinatal and newborn care,
 Family Practice/Community                                         including pain management for labor. Practice-based research
 Health; Medical School                                            networks.
 Steven S. Fu, MD, MSCE                Steven.Fu@va.gov            Improving outcomes for minority smokers
 Director, General Internal Medicine
 Fellowship Program; VA Medical
 Center
 Michael Garwood, PhD                  gar@umn.edu                 To apply theoretical formalism to describe the magnetic
 Department of Radiology; Medical                                  response phenomenon; in particular, the interaction between
 School                                                            nuclear spins and a radiofrequency field having a variable
                                                                   amplitude and frequency in time. To exploit the unique
                                                                   properties of these frequency-modulated RF techniques to
                                                                   enhance sensitivity and data quality in MRI and MRS. To
                                                                   expose molecular properties of cancers using MRI and MRS,
                                                                   and to use these for making diagnoses and for evaluating and
                                                                   guiding cancer treatments, all non-invasively.
 Edward Greeno, MD                     green048@umn.edu            Clinical trials involving prevention of thrombosis and in active
 Hematology, Oncology,                                             treatment of solid tumor malignancies
 Transplantation; Medicine
 Richard Grimm, MD, PhD                grimm001@umn.edu            Clinical trials on hypertension, lipids, CV risk; women’s
 Berman Center; Hennepin County                                    Health and complementary and alternative medicine
 Medical Center
 Pankaj Gupta, MD                      gupta013@umn.edu            Treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes and gastro-intestinal
 Division of Hematology/Oncology;                                  malignancies. Examining the role of heparan sulfate
 VA Medical Center                                                 proteoglycans (HSPG) and glycosaminologycans (GAGS) in
                                                                   stem cell biology
 Dorothy Hatsukami, PhD                hatsu001@umn.edu            Behavioral pharmacology and treatment of nicotine addiction;
 Psychiatry; Medical School                                        toxicity of tobacco products
 Bernhard J. Hering, MD                bhering@umn.edu             To innovate, improve, and implement cell-based therapies to
 Department of Surgery                                             restore normoglycemia and insulin independence in
                                                                   individuals in whom diabetes is complicated by frequent acute
                                                                   or progressive chronic complications.
 Alan T. Hirsch, MD                    hirsc005@umn.edu            Epidemiology of peripheral arterial disease (PAD); clinical
 Vascular Medicine and Cardiology;                                 trials of PAD pharmacotherapies, endovascular interventions,
 Epidemiology and Community                                        and tobacco cessation interventions to improve non-coronary
 Health; School of Public Health;                                  vascular outcomes; clinical trials of lipid and hypertension
 Medical School; and Minneapolis                                   cardiovascular risk reduction interventions; evaluation of
 Heart Institute Foundation                                        quality-of-life in vascular diseases; health economics of PAD.
 Hassan Ibrahim, MD, MS                ibrah007@umn.edu            Clinical research in progressive renal disease, diabetic
 Renal Diseases and Hypertension;                                  nephropathy and chronic renal transplant rejection
 Medicine
 Ajay Israni, MD, MS                   israni001@umn.edu           Molecular epidemiology and renal transplantation, outcomes
 Renal Division, Department of                                     in renal transplantation and end-stage renal disease
 Medicine
 Mike T. John, DDS, MPH, PhD           johnx055@umn.edu            Investigation of the etiology, diagnosis and classification of
 Diagnostic/Biological Sciences;                                   temporomandibular disorders and the assessment of outcomes
 School of Dentistry                                               of common oral treatments using the concept oral health-
                                                                   related quality of life



24
James R. Johnson, MD                   johns007@umn.edu           Molecular pathogenesis of urinary tract infections, with an
VA Medical Center, Infectious                                     emphasis on the virulence properties, ecology, and
Disease Section                                                   phylogenetic aspects of uropathogenic E. coli; molecular
                                                                  epidemiology of antibiotic resistance in E. coli; virulence
                                                                  factors and molecular epidemiology of enterococci, including
                                                                  VRE.
Jeffrey Kahn, PhD, MPH                 kahnx009@umn.edu           Bioethics, including ethics of human subject research, ethics
Center for Bioethics                                              and genetics, ethics and biotechnology, ethics and public
                                                                  health
Robert Kratzke, MD                     kratz003@umn.edu           Molecular abnormalities in lung cancer and mesothelioma,
Medicine, Hematology Office                                       focusing primarily on cell cycle regulator genes and their loss
                                                                  of function in cancer.
Mary Jo Kreitzer, PhD, RN,             kreit003@umn.edu           Optimal healing environments; complementary therapies and
FAAN                                                              healing practices; mindfulness-based stress reduction
Center for Spirituality and Healing;
School of Nursing
Frank A. Lederle, MD                   frank.lederle@med.va.gov   Management of abdominal aortic aneurysms, evidence-based
Medicine; VA Medical Center                                       medical decision-making, clinical trial methodology
John Look, DDS, MPH, PhD               lookj@umn.edu              Temporomandibular joint disorders
Diagnostic and Biological Sciences
Russell Luepker, MD, MS                luepker@epi.umn.edu        Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and clinical trials
Epidemiology and Community
Health; Public Health
Robert D. Madoff, MD                   madof001@umn.edu           Analintraepithelial neoplasia, fecal incontinence, benign
Colon/Rectal Surgery                                              colorectal disease, colorectal cancer
Philip McGlave, MD                     mcgla001@umn.edu           Experimental therapy for malignant and non-malignant
Medicine                                                          hematologic disorders including stem cell transplantation,
                                                                  immunotherapy, and gene transfer.
Jeffrey S. Miller, MD                  mille011@umn.edu           How undifferentiated stem cells develop into functioning NK
Division of Hematology, Oncology                                  cell lymphocytes; How to manipulate NK cells to treat or
and Transplantation; Medicine                                     prevent cancer relapse. A major emphasis is on natural killer
                                                                  (NK) cell development. Pre-clinical and clinical studies to
                                                                  develop effective anti-tumor immunotherapies.
Antoinette Moran, MD                   moran001@umn.edu           Diabetes mellitus/cystic fibrosis
Endocrinology; Pediatrics
James Neaton, PhD                      jim@ccbr.umn.edu           Randomized clinical trials - HIV treatment, hypertension, and
Biostatistics; Public Health                                      heart failure trials
Joseph Neglia, MD, MPH                 jneglia@umn.edu            Long-term effects of cancer therapy. Occurrence of second
Pediatrics, Division of                                           malignancies following childhood cancer.
Hematology/Oncology/Bone
Marrow Transplantation
Dennis E. Niewoehner, MD               niewo001@umn.edu           Principal academaic effort in recent years has involved the
VA Medical Center                                                 initiation, design, and execution of clinical trials that evaluate
                                                                  preventative and treatment measures for chronic obstructive
                                                                  pulmonary disease (COPD), as increasingly important public
                                                                  heath problem.
Mark Paller, MD, MS                    palle001@umn.edu           Clinical trials management; clinical research in acute renal
Renal Diseases and Hypertension;                                  failure, renal and electrolyte disorders
Medicine
Bruce Peterson, MD                     peter001@umn.edu           Clinical research/Hematologic malignancies
Hematology, Oncology,
Transplantation; Medicine
Anna Petryk, MD                        petry005@umn.edu           Mammalian development and the molecular mechanisms
Department of Pediatrics                                          underlying tissue differentiation and organogenesis.
                                                                  Endocrine late effects in long term survivors of cancer and/or
                                                                  bone marrow transplantation,
Julie Ross, PhD                        ross@epi.umn.edu           Molecular epidemiology and etiology of malignancies in both
Division of Pediatric Epidemology                                 children and adults, particularly in the area of leukemia
& Clinical Research; Department
of Pediatrics
David Rothenberger, MD                 rothe002@umn.edu           Rectal cancer; Familial Colorectal cancer; Clinical research in
Department of Surgery;                                            a managed care environment
Colon/Rectal Surgery
                                                                                                                                  25
 Timothy Schacker, MD                 schacker@lenti.med.umn.edu   HIV transmission and nature history of Hepes Simplex Virus
 Infectious Diseases and                                           Infection
 International Health; Medicine
 S. Charles Schulz, MD                scs@umn.edu                  Schizophrenia, borderline personality disorder, psychiatric
 Department of Psychiatry                                          illnesses in adolescents, brain imaging
 Elizabeth Seaquist, MD               seaqu001@umn.edu             Diabetes and diabetes complications
 Endocrinology and Diabetes;
 Medicine
 Alan Sinaiko, MD                     sinai001@umn.edu             Blood pressure/hypertension in children and adolescents.
 Pediatrics
 Julia Steinberger, MD, MS            stein005@umn.edu             Metabolic syndrome in youth
 Pediatrics, Division of Cardiology

 Marie E. Steiner, MD                 stein083@umn.edu             Coagulation disturbances in the critically ill pediatric patient.
 Pediatrics
 David E.R. Sutherland, MD,           dsuther@umn.edu              Immunology and Transplantation Biology and Transplantation
 PHD                                                               for Metabolic Diseases
 Department of Surgery
 William Thomas, PhD                  will@biostat.umn.edu         Clinical trials
 Biostatistics; Public Health
 Carolyn Torkelson, MD, MS            tork0004@umn.edu             Complementary/alternative medicine, women’s health,
 Family Medicine and Community                                     nutrition, probiotics
 Health
 Todd Tuttle, MD                      tuttl006@umn.edu             Clinical trials evaluating therapies for breast cancer,
 Surgery, Oncology                                                 melanoma, and gastrointestinal malignancies
 Beth A. Virnig, PhD, MPH             virni001@umn.edu             Access and quality of end-of-life care, cancer care and
 Division of Health Services                                       differences in care between the Medicare Fee-for service and
 Research and Policy; Public Health                                managed care systems.
 Daniel Weisdorf, MD                  weisd001@umn.edu             Clinical bone marrow transplantation and management of
 Hematology, Oncology,                                             hematologic malignancy
 Transplantation; Medicine
 Tim Whelan, MD                       whela011@umn.edu             Diagnosis and treatment of interstitial lung diseases
 Division of Pulmonary and Critical
 Care Medicine; Medicine
 Mark Yeazel, MD, MPH                 yeazel@umn.edu               Colorectal cancer screening, Childhood cancer survivors,
 Family Practice/Community                                         Clinical research related to cancer prevention and detection
 Health; Medical School
 Douglas Yee, MD                      yeexx006@umn.edu             Breast cancer: on insulin growth factors (IGF) in breast cancer,
 Hematology, Oncology,                                             including their signaling pathways and receptors
 Transplantation; Medicine




2.5      Thesis
The thesis project for students in the Clinical Research MS program is in the form of a written product that is orally
defended. It demonstrates the student's ability to do quantitative analyses utilizing data collected by the student or
obtained from another source. The thesis must demonstrate the student’s familiarity with the design and conduct of
clinical research. The thesis may include materials that the student has published while enrolled in the Clinical
Research program, provided the research was conducted under the direction of the Clinical Research Master’s
graduate faculty member and approved by the student’s advisor for incorporation into the thesis. Such publication is
welcomed as the best demonstration of quality in a student's research.
The thesis must reflect work on the design, implementation, and analysis of a research project. It is recognized that
the time period of training may not permit the development and completion of a research project from start to finish,
however the thesis project must minimally include a detailed protocol for a study and either the collection and
summary of preliminary/pilot data or the analysis of a data set in support of the research project. The protocol must
include a literature review, a clear statement of objectives, a discussion of sample size considerations, a data
collection plan (including forms design), and an analysis plan. The thesis must demonstrate the student's knowledge
in how to carry out the research project. Students who have never done quantitative analysis outside of normal

26
coursework are strongly encouraged to do a project that includes quantitative analysis. Examples of quantitative
analysis projects – in addition to a detailed protocol – include collection, analysis, and interpretation of data collected
by the student, or secondary analysis and interpretation of data collected by a research project, or data from a public
access source.

Human Subjects Information
All students at the University of Minnesota who conduct any research using human subjects are required to submit
their research proposal to the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board for approval prior to conducting their
study.

Forming a Thesis Examining Committee
The thesis committee consists of three faculty members; all three must hold a Graduate School official graduate
faculty membership in order to serve on the committee. Graduate faculty memberships are separate from other
faculty ranks (such as assistant, associate and full professor) and are affiliated with a Graduate School degree
program. Thus, not all faculty, including Medical School clinical faculty, are necessarily members. To check on a
specific faculty member, students can either check with Andrea Kish, Major Coordinator, or go to
http://www.grad.umn.edu/faculty_rosters/ and click on “Graduate Faculty Rosters” and then select Clinical Research
from the Program list.
The thesis advisor must be a member of the Clinical Research MS graduate faculty, and should assist the student in
forming the thesis examining committee. The second member must also hold a Clinical Research MS graduate
faculty appointment. The third member must hold a graduate faculty appointment in a group other than Clinical
Research. Examples include Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Nursing, Pharmacology, Veterinary Medicine, Dentistry, etc.
The Graduate School does allow someone to serve as the third member if they hold graduate faculty appointments in
both Clinical Research and a second field, as long as the faculty person is serving as an expert in the other field for
the purpose of the thesis committee. For example, Drs. Will Thomas and James Neaton have served as the third
member of several CR MS thesis committees--they have graduate faculty appointments in both Biostatistics and
Clinical Research. For the committees, they served primarily as experts in biostatistics.
If you wish to work with a faculty member either as a thesis advisor or second committee member, and they are not a
current CR MS graduate faculty member, please read on. First, s/he must be a University of Minnesota faculty
member, have a strong background in this field, and be interested in joining the graduate faculty in order to serve on
your committee and possibly other committees. If these criteria fit, then please talk to Dr. Russell Luepker, DGS, and
Andrea Kish, Major Coordinator, as soon as you are aware about the situation. The process of adding someone to
the graduate faculty may take six to eight weeks, so plan accordingly. We cannot add someone to a graduate faculty
body other than Clinical Research, so we cannot get someone on a different graduate body to serve as the third
member. Please keep in mind that if a faculty member doesn’t wish to join the graduate faculty, or the rules won’t
allow it, you can always have someone involved as a co-author and they can attend your oral defense, as long as
your thesis advisor agrees. That person just would not be a formal member of the thesis committee and sign off on
the Graduate School paperwork.
Remember that the thesis advisor must approve a student’s thesis committee and proposal before a student can
register for thesis credits. It is also required that the DGS approve the student’s thesis proposal before the student
registers. The program strongly recommends that other committee members also approve the scope of the project
before it begins. This provides an opportunity for all committee members to have input on the thesis at its genesis,
and minimizes any last minute work needed to satisfy all committee members as the thesis nears completion.

Costs Associated with the Thesis
Students are responsible for costs associated with completing their master's thesis. These costs are sometimes offset
in part by the organization with which the student is working. Funds may also be available from programs associated
with the Clinical Research MS or available from the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health by applying for
the J. B. Hawley Student Research Award; see section 1.6 for further information.
There are also resources available for statistical computing. The Division will provide MS students working on
research projects free access to the Division's research computers. This policy is addressed to those students who
need computer access for faculty-sponsored research that is part of their Master's thesis. The following rules apply:
   A sponsoring faculty member should initiate access for the student and specify the time period that access is
    needed.


                                                                                                                        27
    Access beyond the initial time period is renewable at the request of the faculty member and subject to approval by
     the Computer Resources committee.
    To be courteous, the student should run only one job at a time.
    The computer may not be used for other coursework.
    This access is limited to the main research computers and does not necessarily include exclusive use of a PC or
     Mac (the student is assumed to need access to the specialized analysis software only available on the Epi main
     system).
    Any problems should be reported to the faculty sponsor, not the computer support staff.
Other departments in the Academic Health Center associated with the Clinical Research MS may also have computer
support for students.


2.6      Published Work and the Thesis
The Graduate School stipulates that a master's thesis may include materials that an individual has published while a
University of Minnesota graduate student. The following information indicates that an acceptable alternative to the
traditional dissertation format is to publish a series of papers on a related theme and combine these with a summary
paper reviewing the studies to form the basis of the dissertation. Several issues are involved, including the basic
structure of this alternative format, the number of papers, authorship, acceptable journals and the role of the
committee.

Clinical Research Program Model
At least one first-authored manuscript suitable for a peer-reviewed journal must be combined with a summary paper.
The manuscript does not have to be published nor accepted for publication (although it is deemed desirable for the
manuscript to be submitted for publication), but rather judged by the thesis examining committee to be ready to submit
to a peer-reviewed journal. Individuals seeking this alternative approach to the traditional thesis should present their
program plan to their committee members, and they will decide the number of manuscripts and authorship necessary
to satisfy requirements. Please note that all students in the CR MS program must have approval for their thesis
proposal from the DGS and their thesis advisor prior to embarking on their thesis work.

Graduate School Requirements
The thesis may include materials that have published while a University of Minnesota graduate student. A letter
authorizing use of this material must be obtained from the publisher. A copy of this letter must be included as the last
page of your thesis.
If all or part of your thesis is initially in a form appropriate for submission to a professional journal, the following apply:
1. The research must have been carried out under the direction of the graduate faculty and approved by the
   student’s advisor for incorporation into the thesis.
2. Advisor(s) must notify the Graduate School in writing of the intention to publish a part of the material (the
   Graduate School’s approval is not required).
3. The student must be listed as the sole author of the thesis. Editorial or substantive contributions with general
   significance made by others should be acknowledged in the preliminary materials; more specific contribution
   should be acknowledged by footnotes where appropriate.
4. Students whose manuscripts include more than the student’s research must make their contribution clear in the
   thesis.
5. A suitable introduction is required, as well as transition sections that might not ordinarily be included in the
   published manuscript.
6. Where appropriate, a comprehensive literature review, not usually permitted by journals, should be part of the
   submitted thesis.
7. Appendices should be added to the manuscript as necessary to provide the comprehensiveness not ordinarily
   permitted by scholarly journals.
8. Use of reprints of the manuscripts or the published articles themselves is acceptable if they are satisfactorily (and
   legally) reproduced and conform to all the formatting specifications described in this document.


28
Traditional Master’s Thesis Format
Students who are not following the alternative published work format, but rather are completing their MS thesis in a
more traditional format, must follow the format requirements as specified by the Graduate School. These guidelines
can be found on the web at www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/forms/masters.html under Preparation of the
Thesis/Project or by contacting Andrea Kish, Major Coordinator, at kish@umn.edu or 612.626.9989.
Note: The Graduate School stipulates that, "Theses must be normally written in English or in the language of
instruction."


2.7     Oral Examination
The following are guidelines for the oral examination for the Clinical Research Major; some of the information is taken
directly from the Graduate School Catalog.

Material Covered
The oral examination is comprehensive and covers the following:
   Master's Thesis
   Course materials and seminars (including both major field and related fields)
   Application of knowledge to practical use.

Committee
The thesis examining committee is governed by both Graduate School rules and additional policies specific to the
Clinical Research major. See the detailed information in section 2.5.

Notification Interval
Please remember faculty must be given sufficient time to read the thesis and decide whether it is ready for defense.
Thus, students must notify their advisor and other members of the committee at least two weeks in advance that the
thesis will be delivered on a specific date. It is also required that all members of the committee must have at least two
weeks to read the thesis after it is delivered.

Date, Time, and Location
The student must coordinate a date and time (approximately two hours) for the exam, and must arrange for a
conference room to meet in, and any audio-visual (AV) equipment needed. The program does not cover the cost for
any special AV equipment required. The student is also required to contact Andrea Kish, Major Coordinator, at least
two weeks prior to the oral exam and provide the following information:
1. Name of the student;
2. Day, Date, time and location of the 30-minute presentation;
3. Title of the talk and an abstract.
This is necessary so that the 30-minute public presentation can be announced via email to all students and Clinical
Research MS Graduate Faculty.

Format of Oral Examination
The final oral examination for the masters' degree will include a 30-minute public presentation followed by a closed
examination (approximately 1.5 hours), attended only by the student and the thesis oral examining committee. The
chair of the student’s examining committee, who is usually the thesis advisor, coordinates final examinations. All
committee members must be present at the examination; the absence of any member results in an invalid
examination. Note: some CR MS students are required or expected to give a half-hour or one hour seminar on their
thesis results as part of their fellowship or as part of other professional obligations. If this fits your situation, please
talk with A. Kish to see if (and how) your oral examination can be part of this professional presentation.

Grading
A majority vote of the committee, all members present and voting, is required to pass the examination. The results of
the examination are reported to the Graduate School on the final examination report form. A student who fails the
examination may be terminated from the graduate program or may be allowed, on unanimous recommendation of the

                                                                                                                         29
examining committee, to retake the examination, provided the re-examination is conducted by the original examining
committee.

Required Paperwork
The Degree Program Form must be completed and turned in at least one complete semester prior to the thesis oral
examination. Students should also make sure they've completed and turned in the Application for Degree form.
Students should pick up (or order via the web) the Graduation Packet from the Graduate School as it contains forms
necessary to proceed in scheduling their thesis oral exam, as well as instructions for the preparation of the thesis,
including format specifications. Please see the Checklist for Completing Degree for the website.
The student must notify Andrea Kish, Major Coordinator of the oral exam date at least two weeks prior to the
scheduled time, and email her the required announcement information.
Finally, two copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Graduate School. One additional unbound, unstapled copy
of the thesis must be provided to Andrea Kish.


2.8       Checklist for Completing Degree
 Step and Deadline                                                                                        Check when
                                                                                                           complete
 1. Register for coursework before late fee kicks in.
   Deadline: First day of each term.
   Note: Some courses, or sections of a course, may fill up quickly so you are encouraged to register
   for your courses as soon as you are able to register. The registration “queue” is available at
   www.onestop.umn.edu.
 2. If you took any CR MS coursework prior to matriculating, see Andrea Kish, Major Coordinator, to
   transfer any coursework into the Clinical Research MS program.
   Deadline: End of October – year one.
 3. Set up an appointment with your advisor to discuss potential thesis advisors. There is an extensive
   list of CR MS graduate faculty and their research interests in section 2.4. Also, Andrea Kish keeps
   all Graduate Faculty member CV’s. Students can make an appointment to review them to find a
   potential advisor. A list of Clinical Research MS graduate faculty members can be found at
   www.grad.umn.edu/faculty_rosters/.
    Deadline:
     If completing the program in 18 months – October of year one.
     If completing the program in 24 months – April of year one.
     If completing the program in 36 months – December of year two.
     If less than 18 months or longer than 36 months – arrange with DGS and Andrea Kish.
 4. Begin developing a thesis proposal with your thesis advisor, discussing the format of the thesis
    (either a publishable form or a traditional format as stipulated by the Graduate School - detailed
    information later in this section), and forming a thesis-examining committee.
    Deadline:
    If completing the program in 18 months – October of year one.
    If completing the program in 24 months – April of year one.
    If completing the program in 36 months – December of year two.
    If less than 18 months or longer than 36 months – arrange with DGS and Andrea Kish.
 5. Complete the following:
     Establish your thesis examining committee.
     Have your thesis proposal reviewed by the committee, either in a meeting, or, more efficiently, by
      getting comments from individual members and then reviewing all comments with your thesis
      advisor.
     Check to see if you will need human subjects approval from the University of Minnesota
      Institutional Review Board (and this will almost certainly be the case) and/or a criminal
      background check.


30
   Submit your proposal to the DGS for approval to proceed.
   Deadline: Prior to embarking on your thesis research
6. Register for thesis credits.
  Deadline: Once you have completed all the steps in #5 above.
7. Contact Andrea Kish to make an appointment with her to complete the Graduate School Degree
    Deadline: Prior to embarking on must be submitted to
   Program form. Note that the form your thesis research the Graduate School at least one term prior
   to scheduling the oral exam. A delay in completing and submitting the form may cause a delay in
   scheduling the final oral defense.
   Deadline:
     If completing the program in 18 months – January of year one.
     f completing the program in 24 months – July of year two.
     If completing the program in 36 months – March of year two.
     If less than 18 months or longer than 36 months – arrange with DGS and Andrea Kish.
8. Get the Graduate School Graduation Packet--it contains important forms that allow you to proceed
   with your thesis oral examination. Once the Graduate School approves your Degree Program plan
   form it allows you to request the packet. You can either pick up a packet in person at the Graduate
   School (Johnston Hall) or you can request one via the web at
   www.grad.umn.edu/gsss/forms/masters.html. Click on “Graduation Packet Request.” Complete
   everything in the packet per the Graduate School’s deadlines. This includes the Application for
   Degree and Reviewer’s Report forms; see #10 below.
   Deadline: About 6 weeks prior to the final oral thesis examination.
9. Schedule your oral defense with your committee; depending on how busy they are, this can take
   some work and advance notice. After the time and day are set, find a room in which to hold the
   defense. A conference room in the West Bank Office Building can be used if available (find out by
   calling the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health receptionist at 612-624-1818). You may
   find it more convenient to have it in a room near your department. Remember, the first half-hour of
   the defense is public, so the room must be large enough for an audience. Students need to arrange
   for any equipment; see Andrea Kish regarding how to order it if you do not have equipment easily
   available through your department.
   Deadline: It is recommended that the student plan ahead one to two months to arrange for a
   specific time and date.

10. A) Submit the Application for Degree form to 200 Fraser Hall.
   Deadline: On or before the first working day of the month the student wishes to graduate.
   B) Get the Reviewer’s Report Form (in your Graduation Packet), have it signed by your committee
   members and submit to the Graduate School (316 Johnston Hall).
   Deadline: About a week before the Final Oral exam date. Then the Graduate School will issue a
   Final Examination Report form.
11. Email Andrea Kish with the exact day, time, and location when you have scheduled your oral
   examination with your committee. Also, please email her the title of the talk and a brief abstract of
   your presentation.
   Deadline: Either at the time the date/time/location is finalized with the committee (preferred) or no
   later than two weeks prior to the defense. The first half-hour of your final oral defense is public and
   it is required that this public presentation be announced to all Clinical Research MS students and
   faculty.




                                                                                                             31
 12. Notify your committee that they will be receiving your final thesis draft.
    Deadline: At least two weeks prior to the date the thesis is sent. The Graduate School requires
    that faculty must (a) be given two week's notice before receiving the final draft and (b) have at
    least two weeks to read the thesis and decide whether it is ready for defense. This process
    requires students to notify the committee a month ahead of the date set for their oral thesis
    exam.
    After the committee has read the thesis and unanimously agreed that it is ready for the defense,
    they must sign off on the Master's Thesis/Project Reviewers' Report form (in the Graduation
    Packet), which you must return to 316 Johnston Hall to obtain the Examination Report form. You
    must have the Examination Report form with you at your examination. Your committee will indicate
    their vote on the form and you should return it to 316 Johnston along with two copies of your
    thesis. You also submit a check for $10 made payable to the University of Minnesota to cover
    binding costs.
 13. Complete all academic requirements including:
    Deadline: By the last working day of the month you want to graduate.

     Coursework
     Any independent credits
     Finish any incompletes
     Hold your thesis oral exam
     Make any changes, edits, etc. to your thesis as requested by the committee
     Turn in one unbound, unstapled copy of your final thesis, after it has been approved by your
        thesis committee following the defense
 Note: The Graduate School clears students for graduation only once per month.




32
2.      COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION MPH DEGREE PROGRAM
2.1     Fall 2008 Program Curriculum
48 Semester Credit Minimum
The Community Health Education major requires the following courses be taken on an A-F grading basis: both Community
Health Theory and Practice courses; one course each from Health Behavior and Policy Interventions, Assessment Methods,
and Recommended Competencies and Electives. All of the Public Health Core courses must be taken on an A-F grading
basis. Please pay close attention to the following notes to assist you with your course planning. Please also note that all of
the Public Health Core Courses are offered online at least once each academic year.
 Offered in alternate academic years.
 The course number for topics courses may change in subsequent semesters.
 For students entering with strong quantitative skills and/or who are considering a doctoral-level degree, the advanced
biostatistics track of PubH 6450/6451 can be taken in place of PubH 6414/6415. Depending on the sequence chosen,
either 6414 or 6450 is included as part of the Public Health Core.
 For those students entering with strong quantitative skills and/or who are considering a doctoral-level degree, the
advanced epidemiology course PubH 6341 may be taken in place of PubH 6320.

 Theory (6 credits)
 Course           Notes      Title                                                  Offered          Credits
 PubH 6050                   Community Health Theory and Practice I                 Fall                 3
 PubH 6051                   Community Health Theory and Practice II                Spring               3
 Health Behavior and Policy Interventions (Minimum of 8 credits required)
 Course            Notes     Title                                                  Offered          Credits
 PubH 6000                  Topics: Obesity and Eating Disorders: Treatment,       Spring               2
                             Prevention and Policy
 PubH 6000                  Topics: e-Public Health: Online Intervention Design    Fall                 3
 PubH 6015                   Topics: HIV/AIDS Epidemiology and Public Health        Fall                 2
                             Interventions
 PubH 6045                   Topics: Skills for Policy Development                  May Session          1
 PubH 6049                   Legislative Advocacy Skills for Public Health          Spring               3
                             (prerequisite 6078)
 PubH 6055                   Social Inequalities in Health                          Spring               2
 PubH 6066                   Building Communities, Increasing Health:               Fall                 2
                             Preparing for Community Health Work
 PubH 6074                   Mass Communication and Public Health                   Spring               3
 PubH 6078                   Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy          Spring ‘09           2
 PubH 6085                   Prevention and Control of Tobacco and Alcohol          Fall                 3
                             Problems

 PubH 6123                   Violence Prevention and Control: Theory,               Spring               2
                             Research and Application
 PubH 6281                   Immigrant Health Issues (online course)                Fall                3-4
 PubH 6605                  Reproductive and Perinatal Health                      Spring ‘09           2
 PubH 6606                   Children’s Health: Issues, Programs and Policies       Summer               2
 PubH 6607                  Adolescent Health Issues: Issues, Programs, and        Spring ‘09           2
                             Policies
 PubH 6627                   Sexuality Education: Criteria, Curricula and           Fall/Spring          1

                                                                                                                         33
                           Controversy
 PubH 6634                 Advocacy and Children’s Rights                       Spring              2
 PubH 6902                 Maternal and Infant Nutrition                        Fall                2
 PubH 6903                 Child and Adolescent Nutrition                       Fall                2
 PubH 6914                 Community Nutrition Intervention                     Spring              3
 SW 8505                   Advanced Community Organizing and Advocacy           Fall                2
 Assessment Methods (9-10 credits)
 PubH 6034                 Program Evaluation for Public Health Practice        Spring              3
 PubH 6035                 Applied Research Methods (PubH 6034                  Fall                3
                           prerequisite)
 PubH 6415                 Biostatistical Methods II                            Spring              3
 or
 PubH 6451                 Biostatistics II                                     Spring              4
 Public Health Core (11-12 credits)
     Note: Courses designated as part of the Public Health Core must be taken for a letter grade
                                              (A/F)
 PubH 6101 or              Environmental Health                                 Fall/Spring         2
 PubH 6102                 Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health      Spring/Summ         2
                                                                                er
 PubH 6320 or             Fundamentals of Epidemiology                         Fall/Spring/Su      3
 PubH 6341                 Epidemiologic Methods I                              mmer                3
                                                                                Fall
 PubH 6414 or             Biostatistical Methods I                             Fall/Spring/Su      3
 PubH 6450                 Biostatistics I                                      mmer                4
                                                                                Fall/Spring
 PubH 6741 or              Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and   Fall/Spring/Su      1
 PubH 6742                 Policy                                               mmer                1
                           Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy         Fall/Spring/Su
                                                                                mmer
 PubH 6751                 Principles of Management in Health Services          Fall/Spring         2
                           Organizations

 Field Experience and Master’s Project (2-4 credits)
 PubH 7094                 Master’s Project (see section 2.4)                   Fall/Spring/Su      2
                                                                                mmer
 PubH 7096                 Field Experience (see section 2.5)                   Fall/Spring/Su      2
                                                                                mmer
 Electives [to total 48 credits]


Recommended Competencies and Electives
Electives are to be approved by your academic advisor; they must be graduate level courses with a 5xxx number or higher.
Under some circumstances, 4xxx - level courses can also be applied toward a MPH degree when they are taught by a
member of a graduate faculty and are approved by the Major Chair. Students are not restricted to School of Public Health
courses, but are responsible for meeting all prerequisites of the desired electives.
The CHE faculty strongly recommends that CHE students consider taking elective coursework in the five CHE competency
areas (theory, health behavior and policy interventions, assessment methods, cultural competency, and
leadership/management). You can also focus on competency areas as part of your master’s project and/or field experience.
Please refer to Table 1 for more information on courses meeting the competency areas.
The competency areas are very broad; students can therefore choose elective courses that:

34
        Are relevant to target groups (e.g. youth, aging, ethnic and/or minority populations, maternal and child health), health
         behaviors (e.g. nutrition, alcohol/drug problems, mental health, human sexuality and AIDS), or advanced courses in
         epidemiology, biostatistics, etc.
        Are relevant to the Master's Project (e.g. courses in statistics, program evaluation etc.)
        Expand professional skills by providing practical experience in a variety of public health-related proficiency areas.
         These could include: personal computer methods and statistical computing, formative and process evaluation (such
         as questionnaire development, needs assessments, and qualitative research methods), program planning, grant
         writing, teaching skills, advocacy skills, intervention material development, management and leadership training,
         media communication, cross-cultural experience.
        Apply to one of the Public Health Interdisciplinary Concentrations which include Global Health, Complementary and
         Alternative Medicine, Public Health Policy, and Health Disparities. Additional concentrations may be approved
         throughout the year. A complete list of concentrations is available at www.sph.umn.edu.
Table 1. Summary of competency areas/skills that guide the CHE curriculum and courses that address these
competency areas.
                                                                                                                                 Other Departments With
COMPETENCY AREA SKILLS                                            How Acquired                      How Measured
                                                                                                                                   Possible Courses *
Theory                                                           PubH 6050, field          Course evaluations, student          AdEd, CAPy, EdPA, EPsy,
                                                               experience, master’s        grades, student and preceptor         Gero, Jour, Mgmt, Psy,
                                                                      project              evaluations of field experience,        SW, WHRE, WoSt
                                                                                           master’s project
Uses theories of behavior and social change to inform the
planning and evaluation of health interventions
Health Behavior and Policy Interventions                    PubH 6051,6000, 6049,          Course evaluations, student          AdEd, CAPy, CI, EdPA,
                                                            6055, 6061, 6066, 6078,        grades, student and preceptor        EPsy, FE, FPCH, FsoS,
                                                            6082, 6123, 6281, 6606,        evaluations of field experience,     HRD, InMd, Jour, Nurs, PA,
                                                            6607, 6627, 6634, 6645,        master’s project                     Pol, PubH, Rhet, Soc,
                                                            6903, 6914, SW 8505, field                                          Spch, SW, WHRE, YoSt
                                                            experience, master’s
                                                            project
Identifies individual, community, and policy level
interventions that are effective in promoting healthy
behaviors and social conditions
Designs and implements effective individual, community,
and policy level interventions for a variety of health
behaviors
Assessment and Analytical Methods                           PubH 6034, 6035, 6320,         Course evaluations, student          EPsy, FsoS, Geog, Jour,
                                                            6341, 6101, 6102, 6414,        grades, student and preceptor        PA, PubH, Rhet, Stat,
                                                            6450, 6415, 6451, field        evaluations of field experience,     WHRE
                                                            experience, master’s           master’s project
                                                            project
Assesses the health status of individuals and
communities

Utilizes appropriate data collection strategies and
qualitative and quantitative methods to evaluate health
interventions

Cultural Competency                                         PubH 6021, 6055, 6281,         Course evaluations, student          Afro, Chic, CI, CSpH,
                                                            field experience, master’s     grades, student and preceptor        EdPA, EPsy, HMed, InMd,
                                                            project                        evaluations of field experience,     Nurs, PA, PubH, Rhet,
                                                                                           master’s project                     SW, WHRE, WoSt
Identifies the role of cultural, social, and behavioral
factors in influencing health behaviors and status
Develops and adapts approaches to problems that take
into account cultural differences
Leadership and Management                                   PubH 6034, 6049, 6066,           Course evaluations, student        CMBA, EdPA, EngC, EPsy,
                                                            6741, 6742, 6751, field          grades, student and preceptor      HRD, Law, Nurs, OMS, PA,
                                                            experience, master’s project     evaluations of field experience,   Phil, PubH, Rhet, SW
                                                                                             master’s project
Communicates health information effectively both in
writing and orally
Advocates for public health programs and resources
Collaborates with public health agencies and other
constituency groups
Coordinates and manages health programs/services


                                                                                                                                                   35
Relates ethical considerations and values to one’s
professional practice

* This column lists departments that may have courses that will meet the competency area. Please use the University class schedule at
onestop.umn.edu to search the course listings for these departments. Departments not included in this column may also have courses
that could meet the desired competencies so students are encouraged to look at other departments that may have relevant courses.


2.2       Other MPH Degree Requirements

Public Health Core Area Requirements
Students working towards an MPH degree must satisfy competency requirements in the six core areas of public
health – administration, behavioral science, biostatistics, environmental health, epidemiology, and ethics – by
completing one of the following in each core area:
       Satisfactorily pass one of the pre-approved courses in the core area (see pre-approved course list below); OR
       Pass an equivalency exam in the core area. OR
       Pass an advanced course in the core area as approved by the respective division head or the Educational
        Policy Committee, OR
       Complete a graduate level course, with a grade of B or better, at an accredited university or college that meets
        the competencies defined by CEPH. The Educational Policy Committee, upon petition of the student, will
        determine acceptance of a course for transfer.

Pre-approved Courses Meeting Public Health Core Area Requirements
Administration
PubH 6751 Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations – 2 cr.

Behavioral Science
PubH 6050 Community Health Theory and Practice I – 3 cr.

Biostatistics
PubH 6414          Biostatistical Methods I – 3 cr.
PubH 6415          Biostatistical Methods II – 3 cr.
PubH 6450          Biostatistics I – 4 cr.
PubH 6451          Biostatistics II – 4 cr.

Environmental Health
PubH 6101 Environmental Health – 2 cr.
PubH 6102 Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health – 2 cr.

Epidemiology
PubH 6320 Fundamentals of Epidemiology – 3 cr.
PubH 6341 Epidemiologic Methods I – 3 cr.

Ethics
PubH 6741          Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy – 1 cr.
PubH 6742          Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy – 1 cr.

Registration Requirement
Students are required to register for at least 2 semesters and 15 credits in the School of Public Health.

Course Numbers and Graduate Credit
5xxx, 6xxx, 7xxx and 8xxx-level courses are considered graduate-level. 1xxx and 3xxx-level courses are for
undergraduates and will not receive approval for graduate credit. Under some circumstances – with approval of the
student’s Major Chair – 4xxx-level courses may also be applied toward a MPH degree as long as they are taught by a
member of the graduate faculty.



36
SPH Grading Policies
Grade Point Average
Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of no less than 3.0 (B) across their entire program to receive
an MPH degree.
S-N Grade Option
MPH students may take no more than 20% of their coursework on an S-N grading basis, exclusive of those topics,
seminars, and field experience courses offered only on an S-N basis.
Public Health Core Courses
Courses designated as part of the public health core must be taken for a letter grade (A-F). Students will be required
to achieve no less than a B- grade in each course taken on an A-F basis. Students may retake public health core
courses at their own expense until they achieve a grade of B- or better. However, a retaken course may be counted
only once toward degree requirements in the student’s study plan.
Each public health major may require higher levels of achievement for its own students in public health core courses
that are also core to the major. This may include restrictions on retaking public health core courses that are also core
to the major, or requiring more than a B- performance level. Students should consult their Major Coordinator for
documentation of these requirements.

Field Experience
All students matriculating in a MPH program must complete a formal, supervised fieldwork experience; see section
2.5.

MPH Study Plan
Students are required to submit a completed MPH Study Plan to their Major Coordinator at least one semester prior to
their anticipated completion of coursework. Earlier submission (e.g. in the second to last semester) is suggested to
allow the Major Coordinators to review the study plan and notify students if they are missing any requirements prior to
their last term of study.

Master’s Project
MPH students must complete a master’s project; see section 2.4.

Comprehensive Examination
MPH students must complete a written and/or oral examination as specified by the major; see section 2.6.

Time Frame
The maximum time allowed by the School of Public Health for completion of an MPH degree is seven years. The
seven year period begins with the first term of enrollment after admission to a degree program within the School.

Course Transfer Credits
Effective with students entering the program in Fall 2007, a student may seek transfer of no more than 40% of their
total graduate or professional program credits taken prior to the MPH program matriculation at the University of
Minnesota or at another college or university. Course credits may be used to satisfy public health core or other
program requirements as jointly approved by the Major Chair and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. No course
credits older than 5 years from the date of the student’s matriculation will be accepted for transfer. A grade of “B” or
better is required for each course requested for transfer credit.
MPH students who have completed graduate-level coursework at the University of Minnesota or another college or
university may petition to transfer those courses toward their MPH degree. To be considered for transfer, graduate
level coursework must have been taken at an accredited graduate institution. Students must:
  1.    Meet with their advisor to discuss the petitioning process. If the petition is acceptable to the advisor, the
        student will complete and sign the Petition form, attach an official transcript on which the final grade has been
        posted.
  2.    Submit the Petition form to the Major Coordinator for processing. The Petition form can be found at
        http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm


                                                                                                                     37
  The Major Coordinator will forward the petition to the major chair and then to the Associate Dean for final evaluation
  and/or approval.

Course Substitutions and Waivers
  All student requests that deviate from the degree curriculum requirements outlined in this Guidebook must be made
  on a Petition form. The Petition form can be obtained at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.
  Students should note that the process for approving a course substitution or waiver could take up to one month, so
  plan accordingly.
Course Substitution Procedures:
The following process should be followed when requesting that a course substitute for a required course in your
degree program. Students should apply for approval before they take the course whenever possible as permission
could be denied. Students should:
1. Gather the course syllabi of the required course in your degree program and the proposed substitute course and
   a transcript on which the proposed course grade has been posted (if the proposed course has already been
   completed).
2. Complete the Petition form with the following information in each section:
    REQUEST SECTION: describe the course requested for substitution including the course title, number of
     credits, term and year taken, and the name of the institution offering the course. Also list the
     course/requirement in your degree program for which you are asking for the substitution.
    REASON/EXPLANATION SECTION: Indicate what skills and/or content overlaps between the required
     course(s) and the proposed substitute course(s).
3. Compile the above materials and have the request reviewed by the advisor. S/he will complete the Department
   section of the Petition form and indicate whether or not s/he approves of the request.
4. After the advisor has made his/her recommendations, the student should submit these materials to the Major
   Coordinator who will forward it to the appropriate Credentials Committee for review. The student will be notified
   via e-mail of the committee’s decision.
5. If the substitute course is to replace a School of Public Health Core course (administration-PubH 6751/6752,
   behavioral/social science-PubH 6020, biostatistics-PubH 6414/6450, environmental health-PubH 6101/6102,
   epidemiology-PubH 6320/6341, ethics-PubH 6741/6742), there is an additional step to get School level approval.
   To complete this next step, provide two additional copies of the above materials. All of those materials should be
   submitted to your Major Coordinator. Upon receipt of those materials, the Major Coordinator will review the
   request with the Major Chair and then if approved by the Major Chair, all copies of the request will be forwarded to
   the Student Service Center to be presented to the appropriate SPH Educational Policy committee members. The
   student will be notified via e-mail of the committee’s decision. If the Major Chair does not approve of the request,
   the Major Coordinator will inform the student that the request will not be forwarded to the SPH Educational Policy
   Committee for review.

Application for Degree
MPH students are required to complete an Application for Degree form. There are strict deadline dates before a
student can be cleared for graduation. Copies of this form can be obtained from the Major Coordinator, the Student
Services Center or downloaded from http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm. Students are encouraged to
submit the form in their first semester of matriculation.


2.3     Standard Sample Schedule
Students are strongly encouraged to meet with their academic advisors each term prior to registration. Doing so
will ensure that you are on track for graduation and that any complications are resolved in a timely manner.
NOTE: part-time schedules are available upon request from one of the Major Coordinators. Careful planning must be
considered when attending part-time to make sure courses that are sequential in nature are taken in the appropriate order.
Contact Kathryn Schwartz at Schwa139@umn.edu for assistance with your schedule.




38
Full-Time in Two Years [48 credits]
 Fall Semester I
         Course                 Title                                                                                              Credits
            PubH 6050           Community Health Theory and Practice I                                                                 3
                                                               st
            PubH 6101           Environmental Health (1 half of the semester)                                                          2
                                                                                                                 nd
                                Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations (2                          half
            PubH 6751                                                                                                                  2
                                of the semester)
            PubH 6414           Biostatistical Methods I                                                                               3
            PubH 6741           Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice & Policy                                                1
 Spring Semester I
            PubH 6051           Community Health Theory and Practice II                                                                3
            PubH 6034           Program Evaluation for Public Health                                                                   3
            PubH 6320           Fundamentals of Epidemiology                                                                           3
            PubH 6415           Biostatistical Methods II                                                                              3
 May/Summer Session I
            PubH 7096           Field Experience                                                                                       2
                                1 Elective Course                                                                                      2
 Fall Semester II
            PubH 6035           Applied Research Methods                                                                               3
                                2 Intervention Courses *                                                                               4
                                2 Elective Courses *                                                                                   4
 Spring Semester II
           PubH 7094            Master’s Project **                                                                                    2
                                2 Intervention Courses *                                                                               4
                                2 Elective Courses *                                                                                   4
* Many course options are available to meet Intervention and Elective requirements. For planning purposes, we have assigned two credits for each
   Intervention, but this is flexible.
**Sign up for PubH 7094 after you have a master’s project advisor lined up and have completed the Master’s Project Approval form. Most students do not
   complete their master’s project credits in the same semester that they register for 7094. The credits remain a “K” for “work in progress” on your transcript
   until you complete your project and pass your oral exam.


Other Curriculum Suggestions
Theory Coursework
The core foundation courses should be taken in the first year, in sequential order.
Health Behavior and Policy Interventions and Electives
These courses will make up the majority of the coursework in the second year. Keep in mind that some courses are offered
every other year.
Assessment Methods
   PubH 6414 should be taken in fall semester first year; and PubH 6415 spring semester first year, (full- or part-time).
   PubH 6034 should be taken in the spring semester of the first year (or second year if part-time).
   PubH 6035 should be taken in the fall semester of the second year (or third year if part-time).
NOTE: Students with a very strong background in research methodology should discuss their biostatistics options with their
advisor; coursework options may include more advanced biostatistics, epidemiology and/or research methods coursework.
Public Health Core
   Full-time students should take their epidemiology course in the first year; part-time students should take it by the fall
      semester, second year.
   PubH 6101/6102 and 6751/6752 are offered in fall and spring semesters, and can be taken anytime during the
      course of the program.
   Public Health core classes are offered online throughout the year.



                                                                                                                                                           39
2.4 Master’s Project
All CHE students must complete a master’s project. Additionally, depending on which master’s project option you select, you
may also need to complete a supervised field experience. There are two strategies available to students to meet these
requirements. Remember, you only need to select one strategy. Professional experience prior to enrolling in the CHE
program will not exempt students from this requirement. Work on research projects, including data collection, data analysis,
or intervention for the project, carried out in conjunction with a unit of the University of Minnesota or some other research
institution, will not fulfill the fieldwork requirement for the CHE program. If you want to conduct work with a unit of the
University of Minnesota for your Masters Project, you must choose Strategy Two.
      Strategy One
      This strategy allows students to complete both their master’s project and field experience requirements by doing a
      needs assessment, a program evaluation, or a program development project (project options one or two from the list
      below) within an organization other than the University of Minnesota. This is the most efficient way for students to
      complete degree requirements. However, this option may not be appropriate for students desiring an internship
      opportunity or those students wanting to acquire research or data analysis skills. Students completing strategy one
      register for PubH 7094: Master’s Project for 2 credits.
      Example: Phoung entered the CHE program with over 4 years experience working in a public health organization. She
      does not think an internship is necessary, and her advisor concurs. Phoung also has well-developed research and data
      analysis skills and feels she would be best served by doing Strategy One to complete both her field experience and
      master’s project. After discussing this choice with her advisor, they agree that this option would be best for Phoung.
      Phoung elects to do a needs assessment in a non-profit family clinic and complete both her field experience and
      master’s project requirements with this one project.
      Strategy Two
      The second choice is to complete 120 hours of field experience in addition to a master’s project. Only students who
      complete a separate field experience may do the research or data analysis project format of the master’s project.
      Students choosing this option can also elect to complete the other master’s project options. Students choosing Strategy
      Two register under PubH 7096 for 2 credits for the field experience credits, and PubH 7094 for 2 credits for Master’s
      Project credits.
      Example: Al has little experience with data analysis and recognizes that this skill set is valuable to his future career as
      a public health professional. While some data analysis training is provided in the CHE curriculum, Al’s advisor explains
      that doing a master’s project that concentrates on data analysis would be a good idea for him. Al completes an
      internship with an non-profit community health clinic, and then goes on to do a master’s project analyzing an existing
      data set to research the effectiveness of a new smoking cessation program being run by an HMO.

Purpose
The master's project serves as a capstone or culminating experience to demonstrate the student's ability to integrate and
apply skills and knowledge from several areas of course work and can take several forms, as described below. The choice
of the form of the master's project is to determined by the student and master’s project advisor, depending on the student’s
interests, skills, experience, and goals. Only students who have fulfilled the field experience requirement using Strategy Two
may choose to carry out a Research or Data Analysis Project.
Before starting their project, students can gain a perspective on the depth, breadth, and length expected in the master's
project as well as some ideas about potential subjects and/or community agencies by viewing completed master’s projects.
Copies are located outside of 398E in WBOB – ask a Major Coordinator for access to the file cabinet.

Project Options
Students are encouraged to think about topics for their project early. The summer after the first year (for full-time students)
is a good time to identify topics and evaluate their feasibility.
1. Needs Assessment or Program Evaluation Project
Students who select either of these options must:
       Identify an existing community group or agency that has an existing or planned program for which they would like a
        needs assessment or program evaluation. The selected agency must agree to collaborate on the evaluation
        methodology, provide access to program participants and controls, if appropriate, and help in the logistics of the
        evaluation. Students are responsible for working with their master’s project advisor to identify a suitable topic and
        public health organization or community agency with which to work.
       Describe the population and/or program to be evaluated, or the needs assessment to be conducted, including the
        health topic or disease involved, targeted group, behavior change sought, and health education modality used. A

40
       theoretical model should be chosen which will guide the needs assessment or program evaluation process. A
       description of the public health importance of this project should be written, based on available data and literature.
      Review the methodologies and outcomes of other needs assessments or evaluations of programs related to the
       topic.
      Develop the evaluation plan. This includes an acceptable and feasible study design, sample selection, control group,
       questionnaires, and analysis methods. Students will present and defend their study designs, evaluation instruments,
       and reliability and validity data for the instruments. A needs assessment using qualitative data analysis techniques is
       also acceptable.
      Conduct the needs assessment or evaluation by actual implementation of the questionnaires with program
       participants and controls, if appropriate, according to the study design.
      Analyze the evaluation data and write recommendations. The needs assessment or evaluation methods should also
       be critiqued, based on their usefulness, areas of weakness, and suggested changes for future evaluations.
2. Program Development Project
Students who select a development project should have a primary interest in program design. Students will:
     Select a topic based on interest, skills, and needs. Students are responsible for working with their master’s project
      advisor to identify a suitable topic and public health organization or community agency with which to work. The topic
      should relate to:
       A specific health topic or disease (e.g. AIDS, heart disease, alcoholism),
       A targeted group (youth, elderly, poor, minority),
       An identified behavior (eating, smoking, drug use), and
       A particular health education modality (mass media, direct education, health policy, community organization,
          correspondence, environmental change).
       As described above, this should be done in conjunction with an organization or agency that has identified a need
          for such a program and is willing to help arrange pilot study sites.
     Write a rationale or defense of the topic selected, based on available data and literature.
     Review existing evaluated programs related to the topic.
     Develop the educational program. This includes the selection or adaptation of a theoretical model to guide program
      design, review of the already available materials on the topic, and the actual development of program materials.
      Students will have a training manual, education materials, media productions, etc. that are ready for implementation.
     Conduct a pilot study, including the actual implementation of the program, with a group from the target audience in
      the community, and quantitative and/or qualitative evaluations of the program materials. The program should be
      evaluated, based on its adherence to components of the theoretical model, receptivity or change by the pilot study
      participants, and its potential for broader implementation. Students will critique the developed program and suggest
      changes in future revisions.
3. Research or Data Analysis Project
Students who have interests in research and analysis may choose this option. They will also need to complete Strategy Two
to fulfill their field experience requirement. Students can design an original research project and collect their own data, or
design a question to be answered using data from another source, such as a research project within the Division of
Epidemiology and Community Health.
The research question should be relevant to a community health education intervention problem or issue. Students who
select this option will need to:
      Develop a research proposal which defines an original research question,
      Identify the resources required to address the question, and
      Implement data collection and analysis methods necessary to answer research questions.

Master's Project Advisor
All students must have an advisor to guide and approve the steps in the master’s project process. The project advisor does
not have to be the same faculty member as the student's academic advisor. However, the project advisor must be a
member of the CHE faculty (see section 8.8 for a list of CHE faculty members). Because of the extensive time commitment
involved in advising master's projects, the CHE faculty suggests students seek a match of academic interests, community
contacts and/or personal compatibility with a project advisor. Students who do not have a specific faculty member in mind by
the time they are ready to start on the project should discuss potential project advisors with fellow students, the Major
Coordinators, their academic advisor, and/or the CHE Major Chair.
When a faculty member agrees to serve as their project advisor, students should inform their academic advisor of the name
of the project advisor and the subject or working title of their master's project. The role of the master's project advisor varies

                                                                                                                              41
with the project. Advisors should negotiate with students the appropriate scope and amount of work/credits for the project.
Students can expect their project advisor to:
      Be available for consulting with the student at all stages of the project.
      Review and approve all project protocols and methods.
      Provide guidance about the format and content of the final report.

Master’s Project Committee
The master’s project and oral examination committee must include at least three faculty members:
1. The master's project advisor, who must be a CHE faculty member, will chair the committee;
2. The student’s academic advisor must be the second member. If the academic advisor is the master’s project advisor,
   then the second committee member must be some other CHE faculty member, and
3. One outside faculty person; this person must be a regular or adjunct faculty member from within the University, but
     outside the CHE Major. This person is selected by the project advisor and the student.
A list of CHE faculty members is available in section 2.8; any of the individuals on this list may serve as a project advisor for
a CHE student. Students having questions about any faculty member’s appointment should contact one of the Major
Coordinators for clarification. If a student wishes to have someone from an outside agency or organization sit on the
committee, that is permissible, but that person would not sign the student’s official Study Plan form and will not be
considered an official committee member. Students should meet with committee members to outline the scope of the
project before it begins to minimize the amount of ‘last minute’ work needed to satisfy all committee members as the project
nears completion.

Approval Process and Registration
Students are required to submit a 1-2 page proposal describing their project's objectives, research questions or hypotheses,
design, and implementation. Plans for analyzing data from the project should also be included and stated in general terms.
The proposal should reflect the agreement between student and project advisor on the project scope and tasks to be
accomplished.
The number of credits, 2-5, is determined by the scope of the work, and is negotiated between the student and project
advisor. Almost all students register for two credits; however, more credits may be used as electives. Students can choose
either the S-N or A-F grading option, which also must be approved by their project advisor and should be decided before
registering.
The proposal and Master’s Project Approval Form should be submitted to the project advisor for approval prior to initiating
work on the project. The form can be found at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm. Students must have this
form completed and submitted to Kathryn Schwartz, Major Coordinator, before they can start work on their master’s project.
Students also need permission to register and will not be issued permission until Kathryn has this form. The outline should
include a detailed description of the scope of the master’s project. A timeline would also be helpful to include in the
description; however, it is not required. Students then register for master's project credits under PubH 7094.

Human Subjects Information
All students at the University of Minnesota who conduct any research using human subjects are required to submit their
research proposal to the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board (IRB) for approval prior to conducting their
study. The approval process can take up to two months. This time must be accounted for when developing the proposal
timeline. No contacts with potential or actual study participants, including recruitment or other research, may occur until final
IRB approval. For forms and information about IRB applications, go to http://www.research.umn.edu/irb/.

Project Completion
Upon completion of the master’s project, each student is expected to submit a report. The report can take several forms
depending upon the type of project and the audience for the report:
    A report to the agency or organization with which you collaborated,
    A manuscript for publication, or
    A more traditional thesis-type report.
In each case, the report should include:
      A thorough literature review;
      A statement of the problem;


42
       A complete description of the target population, intervention goals, theoretical model, and intervention (where
        appropriate);
    A description of all intervention, data collection and analysis methods used in the project;
    Detailed results of the project, including appropriate data presentation; and
    A discussion of the implications of the results, limitations of the study, and recommendations to the organization
        (where appropriate).
Detailed guidelines for preparation of the report and the final presentation are available at
http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm. Students should review these guidelines prior to beginning work on their
project.
The final report should include a copy of the approval letter for the project from the University of Minnesota Institutional
Review Board. Copies of former students’ research projects are located near cubicle 398E on the third floor of WBOB.
Students may browse through these but cannot take them from the student study area. A list of master’s research project
titles is available on-line at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/mstrproj.shtm
Students should prepare the report in consultation with their project advisor and submit it to their committee members for
review at least two weeks before the oral exam. Kathryn Schwartz, Major Coordinator, (schwa139@umn.edu) must also be
notified of the date, location, and project title at least two weeks before the oral exam. A final copy (unbound and unstapled)
of the report must be submitted to Kathryn Schwartz after revisions suggested during the oral exam are incorporated.

Costs Associated with the Master’s Project
Students are responsible for costs associated with completing their master's projects. Costs are sometimes offset in part by
the organization with which the student is working. Funds may also be available from the Division of Epidemiology and
Community Health by applying for the J. B. Hawley Student Research Award; see section 2.6. Students who choose the
data analysis option may find the research project with which they are associated can cover the costs of their project. There
are also resources available for statistical computing. The Division of Epidemiology and Community Health will provide their
MPH, MS and PhD students working on research projects free access to the Division's research computers. This policy is
addressed to those students who need computer access for faculty-sponsored research that is part of their Master's or PhD
Project. Computers with SAS and STATA can be found in 397F WBOB.
The following rules apply if students need access to the specialized analysis software available only on the Epi main
system:
      A sponsoring faculty member should initiate access for the student and specify the time period that the access is
       needed.
      Access beyond the initial time period is renewable at the request of the faculty member and subject to approval by
       the Computer Resources committee.
      To be courteous, the student should run only one job at a time.
      The computer may not be used for other coursework.
      This access is limited to the main research computers .
      Any technical problems should be reported to the faculty sponsor, not the computer support staff or Major
       Coordinators.
      Detailed guidelines for the Master’s Project and Field Experience can be found at
       http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.


2.5     Field Experience
An additional field experience is required if students choose Strategy Two.

Goals of the Field Experience
The goals of the field experience (sometimes referred to as an internship) are that students will gain one or more of the
following:
      Experience in application of theory to current problems in the field;
      Exposure to organizational settings for community health education practice;
      An understanding of community health education and how it relates to other professions and public health;
      New skills relating to practice and professional development;
      The ability to apply theoretical, practical, and methodological skills in a practice setting;
      Knowledge concerning the opportunities and constraints of settings in which the health education profession is
       practiced;

                                                                                                                            43
      Experience in working with professionals from other fields and nonprofessional groups and individuals on public
       health problems; and
    An identity as a public health education professional.
The student’s role should be to help the organization assess the need for, define, plan, develop, implement and/or evaluate
some programmatic aspect of their public health-related work. The experience should reflect an expressed need of the
organization. The student or the organization can initiate the consultation/collaboration, but the student should not work
independently of the direction of the organization. The consultation/collaboration process is integral to the field experience.

How to Register and Complete the Field Experience
1. Identify a faculty advisor. The field experience faculty advisor must be a CHE faculty member but does not have to be
   your academic or project advisor (see section 2.8 for a list of eligible faculty members).
2. Once a potential placement is identified, the student should make contact with the organization to define a specific
   project or area, determine the time commitment, and establish a site preceptor. The site preceptor will supervise the
   field experience. The site preceptor does not have to have a doctoral level degree but should have at least a MPH or
   equivalent-level degree.
3. The Field Experience/Internship Contract form must be completed, approved (with signatures) by all parties and
   submitted to Kathryn Schwartz, Major Coordinator. Electronic completion of the form is available at
   www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp/. Once the Field Experience/Internship Contract form has been submitted, Kathryn
   Schwartz will issue electronic permission to register for PubH 7096. Students are expected to make copies of the
   signed contract for their advisor, site preceptor and themselves.
4. Certain facilities are required by Minnesota law to submit paperwork for a criminal background check for all personnel
   with direct, unsupervised client contact. If their fieldwork, master's project, or dissertation is in such a facility, students
   may be asked by the institution to submit paperwork.
5. Some agencies may ask students to sign agreements concerning confidentiality of data or other data practices. This
   may be especially true in those settings where students will have access to personal identifiers.
6. Upon completion of their field experience both the preceptor and student will need to complete evaluations. These
   evaluations are available at www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp/. A grade will not be submitted until both evaluations have
   been completed.


2.6      Oral Examination
The following are guidelines for the MPH examination for the Community Health Education Major. The oral examination is
required for all CHE students. Detailed instructions on the oral exam and the forms mentioned below can be found at
http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.

Material Covered
The material covered in the oral examination is comprehensive and includes:
1. Master’s project;
2. Course materials and seminars;
3. Issues of practical application.

Before the exam
Students need to complete Part I of the Study Plan at least one semester before completion of their coursework. The form
can be found at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm. Students should complete Pages 1 & 2 of the Study Plan
and then turn in the Study Plan to Kathryn Schwartz (cube 398D WBOB), Major Coordinator, who will then make sure the
advisor and Major Chair sign it before the form is placed in the student’s file. Students are urged to keep a copy of their
Study Plan for their own files.
Students are responsible for scheduling the oral exam with the committee members, reserving a small conference room for
a minimum of two hours. Students are also responsible for arranging for any audio-visual equipment needed for the
presentation through Kathryn.
     To schedule a room in the West Bank Office Building (WBOB), call 612-624-1818.
     To schedule a room in Mayo Building, call 612-626-3500.
It is a good idea to reserve the room starting 30 minutes prior to the time that you want to start your presentation. Allowing
that additional 30 minutes will ensure that any audio-visual equipment reserved has been set up and your presentation
44
works as you anticipate that it will. To reserve an LCD projector and/or laptop, please notify Kathryn at least two weeks in
advance. These arrangements can usually be accommodated in WBOB conference rooms with at least two weeks notice.
At least two weeks prior to the exam, students must forward a copy of their final project to their committee members for
review, and notify Kathryn (schwa139@umn.edu), of the date of the oral exam so that the proper paperwork can be
forwarded to the project advisor. Please note that students cannot show up on the day of the oral and expect the paperwork
to be prepared with no advance notice. If this happens, the student would hold their oral but the committee would not have
the paperwork to sign. It would be the project advisor’s responsibility to get the required committee signatures after the
paperwork is prepared.

During the exam
At the oral exam, the student presents for roughly 20-30 minutes. When the presentation is complete and all questions
have been answered, the committee will ask the student to leave the room so the committee can decide if the student
passed. The committee will ask the student to re-join them, and the student is given the committee’s decision. If the student
passes, the committee signs the study plan. If the student did not pass, the committee explains what steps are necessary
before they will approve the student’s project. The MPH will not be conferred until the exam committee is satisfied with both
the quality of the presentation and the Master’s Project.

After the exam
The project advisor is responsible for returning (a) the student’s file with the signed study plan to the Major Coordinators,
and (b) submitting a grade change for the master’s project research credits.
Once any necessary changes or corrections to the master’s project have been completed, students must submit one
unbound, unstapled copy of their master’s project paper and abstract to a major coordinator.


2.7     Graduate Follow-up Survey
Students must submit the Graduate Follow-Up Survey prior to receiving their degree or certificate. Students may complete
the process online at the appropriate link on the current student Web page
http://sphsdb.ahc.umn.edu/gradsurvey/gs_login.cfm. Upon submitting the electronic survey, the student’s relevant major
coordinator will be notified by e-mail. Coordinators may opt to have the student complete a paper copy, and then enter the
information for the student using the online form.
All graduates will receive a three-month and six-month e-mail message asking them to update survey information (e.g.,
employment). This is through secure access and coordinators will not be able to input on students’ behalf.


2.8     Program Faculty List
   PRIMARY FACULTY
 Name                              Phone          E-mail                       Research Expertise
 Sonya Brady, PhD             626-4026            ssbrady@umn.edu              Health risk behavior during adolescence and
                                                                               young adulthood; Developmental influences on
                                                                               risk taking; Mechanisms linking stressful life
                                                                               circumstances to health risk behavior and
                                                                               factors promoting resiliency; Promotion of
                                                                               health protective behavior; Public policies
                                                                               affecting adolescent health.
 John Finnegan, Jr., PhD          624-5544        finne001@umn.edu             Media communication and public health;
                                                                               community campaigns; the “Knowledge Gap” and
                                                                               health outcomes; digital information technology
                                                                               and its impact on public health
 Jean Forster, PhD                626-8864        forst001@umn.edu             Public health policy as a prevention strategy;
 (on sabbatical January                                                        Community-based strategies for chronic disease
 2008- January 2009)                                                           prevention; Tobacco policy
 Simone French, PhD               626-8594        frenc001@umn.edu             Social and environmental influences on eating
                                                                               and physical activity behaviors; Community-
                                                                               based strategies for eating behavior change;
                                                                               Adolescent nutrition and physical activity
 Eileen Harwood, PhD              626-1824        harwo002@umn.edu             Social Epidemiology; Health Program and Policy
                                                                               Evaluation Alcohol; Tobacco and Illicit Drugs
 Deborah Hennrikus, PhD           626-8646        hennr001@umn.edu             Smoking cessation; Reducing environmental
                                                                               tobacco smoke exposure; Health education in
                                                                               clinical settings
                                                                                                                            45
 Keith Horvath, PhD           624-9556   horva018@umn.edu    Internet-based Public Health Interventions; HIV
                                                             Prevention Interventions; Online Survey
                                                             Methodology; Minority Sexual Health
 Robert Jeffery, PhD          626-8580   jeffe001@umn.edu    Health behavior change; Dietary intervention;
                                                             Obesity epidemiology; treatment, and prevention
 Rhonda Jones-Webb, DrPH      626-8866   jones010@umn.edu    Alcohol studies; Alcohol policy as a prevention
                                                             strategy; Minority health issues; Behavioral
                                                             epidemiology
 Harry Lando, PhD             624-1877   lando001@umn.edu    Global issues in tobacco reduction; Smoking
 (on sabbatical June 08-May                                  cessation; Treatment of medically compromised
 09)                                                         smokers
 Jennifer Linde, PhD          624-0065   linde074@umn.edu    Obesity prevention and intervention; Weight
                                                             control behaviors; Weight loss goals; Public
                                                             health messages
 Russell Luepker, MD, MS      624-6362   luepk001@umn.edui   Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and
                                                             prevention; Health behavior; Community trials;
                                                             Clinical trials
 Leslie Lytle, PhD            624-3518   lalytle@umn.edu     Planning and evaluating eating behavior change
                                                             interventions in children; Youth health promotion
                                                             research; Theories of health behavior
 Toben F. Nelson, ScD         626-9791   tfnelson@umn.edu    Health policy; organizational change; health
                                                             behavior during developmental transitions;
                                                             influence of sports participation on health; social
                                                             determinants of health; program evaluation;
                                                             prevention of alcohol-attributable harm; physical
                                                             activity promotion; obesity prevention; motor
                                                             vehicle safety
 Dianne Neumark-Sztainer,     624-0880   neuma011@umn.edu    Adolescent health and nutrition; Obesity and
 PhD, MPH                                                    eating disorder prevention; Health behavior
                                                             change; Nutrition education program design and
                                                             evaluation
 J. Michael Oakes, PhD        624-6855   oakes007@umn.edu    Quantitative Methods; Social Epidemiology;
                                                             Research Ethics
 Joän Patterson, PhD          624-1394   jasu@umn.edu        Adolescent – parent comanagement of diabetes;
                                                             Behavioral risk factors among youth with cystic
                                                             fibrosis; Impact of cancer on families; Child and
                                                             family adaptation to childhood chronic illness and
                                                             disability; Prevention of mental health problems in
                                                             children; Family health promotion
 Simon Rosser, Ph.D.,         624-0358   rosser@umn.edu      HIV/STI prevention; sexual health; sex; male
 M.P.H., L.P.                                                homosexuality; prevention for HIV+ persons;
                                                             religious and sexual identity formation; Internet
                                                             sex; Internet-based-Public Health surveys and
                                                             interventions; virtual community health
 James Rothenberger, MPH      625-5692   rothe001@umn.edu    Undergraduate health education; AIDS; Chemical
                                                             use and dependency; Dying and death
 John Sirard, PhD             626-1733   sirar001@umn.edu    Assessment of physical activity; the role of
                                                             physical activity in the prevention and treatment
                                                             of obesity in children and adolescents
 Mary Story, PhD              626-8801   story001@umn.edu    Child and adolescent nutrition; Obesity
                                                             prevention; Eating behaviors
 Traci Toomey, PhD, MPH       626-9070   toome001@umn.edu    Policy research; Community organizing;
                                                             Prevention of alcohol and tobacco-related
                                                             problems; Intentional and unintentional injury
                                                             prevention




46
 ADJUNCT FACULTY
 Name                            Phone         E-mail                      Research Expertise
                                625-4489       axtel002@umn.edu            Community organizing
 Sara Axtell, PhD
 Donald B. Bishop, PhD        651- 281-9839    don.bishop@health.state.m   Diabetes; obesity; asthma; physical activity;
                                               n.us                        nutrition; tobacco use
 Marla Eisenberg, Sc.D,         626-2492       eisen012@umn.edu            Influences on adolescent sexual behaviors;
 MPH                                                                       health issues of gay, lesbian and bisexual youth;
                                                                           body image and weight control behaviors; teasing
                                                                           and bullying
 Edward Ehlinger, MD,           625-1612       ehlin003@umn.edu            Health of college students; Urban health
 MSPH
 Dana Farley, MS                625-5917       farle006@umn.edu            Prevention of alcohol and drug problems; Health
                                                                           behavior of college students; Mental health
 Judith Garrard                 625-9169       jgarrard@umn.edu            Behavioral geriatrics; pharmacoepidemiology;
                                                                           Research methods
 Cheryl Robertson, PhD,         624-5412       rober007@umn.edu            Refugee family health; trauma, stress and coping;
 MPH, RN                                                                   community-based interventions
 Nancy Sherwood, PhD            624-4173       sherw005@umn.edu            Childhood obesity
 Michelle van Ryn, PhD,         625-9105       vanry001@umn.edu            Characteristics of formal and informal social
 MPH                                                                       relationships as they influence the quality and
                                                                           success of health interventions; Health behaviors,
                                                                           and health outcomes; Provider behavior;
                                                                           Race/ethnicity disparities in treatments received;
                                                                           Quality of cancer care




2.9     Graduation Checklist

General steps for all MPH majors
1. Student submits completed Study Plan at least one semester prior to the anticipated completion of coursework;
    see section 2.6.
2. Student files the Application for Degree form (see section 2.2) at 200 Fraser Hall by the end of the first business
    day of the month in which they intend to graduate.
3. Student completes all coursework and requirements by noon on the last business day of the month in which they
    wish to have their degree conferred.
4. Student completes and circulates the Master’s Project paper and schedules the oral exam at least two weeks
    before the scheduled oral examination date; see section 2.6.
5. Student notifies Kathryn Schwartz (schwa139@umn.edu) of the date of the oral exam at least two weeks
    prior to the exam so that their study plan can be forwarded to the project advisor; see section 2.6.
6. After the oral exam, project advisor returns the student’s study plan to the Major Coordinator; see section 2.7.
7. Student submits one unbound, unstapled copy of the Master’s Project paper and abstract to Kathryn Schwartz.
    See section 2.6.
8. Student submits the Graduate Follow-up Survey. See section 2.7

All Division of Epidemiology and Community Health students who fulfill, or anticipate fulfilling, the above requirements
and deadlines for Fall 2008 through Summer Session 2009 are eligible to participate in the School of Public Health
commencement ceremony on May 18, 2009. We encourage you to attend!
It is considered highly unethical and inappropriate to use or include in your title or professional signature any degree
that you have not completed. This means you cannot use the MPH title prior to completing all your degree
requirements and your degree has been conferred. The School does not recognize or confer the title “MPH
Candidate”.


                                                                                                                           47
2.      EPIDEMIOLOGY MPH DEGREE PROGRAM
2.1     Fall 2008 Program Curriculum
      Standard Program [48 credit minimum]
      Accelerated Program [42 credit minimum] for students who have a prior-earned doctoral level degree
Guide to Curriculum Notes
Some courses have very specific grade and grading basis requirements. For this reason, please pay close attention
to the following notes.
 Epidemiology MPH students must take these courses on an A-F grade basis.
 Epi MPH students must earn a minimum grade of B- in the following courses: 6341, 6342, 6343, 6344, 6450 and
  6451. Students who get less than a B- in these courses are required to repeat the course and cannot graduate until
  they earn at least a B-. The Major Chair of Epidemiology may override this rule based on evidence of exceptional
  circumstances, such as illness or family emergencies.

Epidemiology Courses [18 credits]
Course        Notes    Title                                                                   Offered                  Credits
PubH 6341            Epidemiologic Methods I                                                 Fall                        3
PubH 6342            Epidemiologic Methods II                                                Spring                      3
PubH 6343            Epidemiologic Methods III                                               Fall                        4
PubH 6344            Epidemiologic Methods IV                                                Fall                        2
PubH 7394              Epidemiology Master’s Project Credits (see section 2.6)                 Any Term                    2
PubH 7396                      Field Practice: Epidemiology (see section 2.5)                  Any Term                    2
Choose one of the following:
PubH 6385                     Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases                 Spring                      2
PubH 6386                     Public Health Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease                 Fall                        2
PubH 6387                     Cancer Epidemiology                                             Spring                      2
Biostatistics Courses [8 credits]
PubH 6450               Biostatistics I                                                      Fall                        4
PubH 6451               Biostatistics II                                                     Spring                      4
Public Health Core [8 credits]

       Note: Courses designated as part of the Public Health Core must be taken for a letter grade (A/F)
PubH 6020                      Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science                   Fall/Spring/Summer          3
PubH 6101 or                   Environmental Health                                            Fall/Spring                 2
PubH 6102                      Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health                 Spring/Summer               2
PubH 6741 or                   Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy       Fall/Spring/Summer          1
PubH 6742                      Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy                    Fall/Spring/Summer          1
PubH 6751                      Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations       Fall/Spring/Summer          2
Basic Science Course [4 credits]
Not required for students with a prior-earned doctorate in a health-related discipline. Nurses or other health professionals
may be exempt; see section 2.4.
PubH 6355                     Pathophysiology of Human Disease                                  Fall                        4
Electives [8-10 credits]
10 credits required for the standard program.
8 credits required for the accelerated program.


48
Recommended Competency Areas and Electives
Table 1. Summary of competency areas/skills that guide the Epidemiology MPH curriculum and courses that
address these competency areas.



   I. Descriptive Epidemiology
   Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired           How Measured
    •   Produce descriptive epidemiology of a given condition                     • PubH 6341, 6342      • Examinations
    •   Calculate measures of incidence, morbidity and mortality                  • Field experience     • Assignments
    •   Calculate measures of excess risk                                                                  (exercises and
                                                                                                           papers)
    •   Make appropriate comparisons by person, place and time
                                                                                                         • Field experience
    •   List strengths and limitations of descriptive data                                                 preceptor
    •   Identify data from existing national and international sources                                     assessment
   II. Biology
   Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired           How Measured
    • Describe models of disease etiology and control                             • PubH 6341, 6342,     • Examinations
    • Describe pathophysiology of major diseases                                    6355                 • Assignments
                                                                                                           (exercises and
                                                                                                           papers)
   III. History of the Discipline
   Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired           How Measured
    •   Describe general history of epidemiology                                  • PubH 6341, 6342,     • Examinations
    •   Recognize major epidemiologic studies of selected diseases                  6387, 6385, 6386     • Assignments
    •   Identify major chronic and infectious diseases, leading causes of death                            (exercises and
                                                                                                           papers)
    •   Recognize importance of epidemiology for informing scientific, ethical,
        economic and political discussion of health issues
   IV. Principles of Screening and Surveillance
   Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired           How Measured
    •   Describe conditions suitable for population screening                     • PubH 6341, 6342,     • Examinations
    •   Evaluate validity and reliability of screening tests                        6343                 • Assignments
    •   Recognize types of bias that affect validity of screening evaluations     • Field experience       (exercises and
                                                                                                           papers)
    •   Describe study designs for evaluation of effectiveness of screening
                                                                                                         • Field experience
    •   List types of surveillance systems and approaches used in disease                                  preceptor
        surveillance                                                                                       assessment
   V. Problem Conceptualization
   Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired           How Measured
    •   Search the literature                                                     • PubH 6341, 6342,     • Examinations
    •   Review and critically evaluate the literature                             • Other courses that   • Assignments
    •   Synthesize available information                                            require literature     (exercises and
                                                                                    reviews                papers)
    •   Make appropriate causal inferences from available information
                                                                                  • Field experience     • Field experience
                                                                                  • Master’s project       preceptor
                                                                                                           assessment
                                                                                                         • Master’s project




                                                                                                                              49
     VI. Study Design
     Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired          How Measured
      • Describe each study design                                                  • PubH 6341, 6342,    • Examinations
      • Understand the advantages and limitations of each study design, including     6343                • Assignments
        practical aspects of their use and trade-offs                               • Field experience      (exercises and
      • Select the most appropriate and efficient design for a specific problem     • Master’s project      papers)
      • Calculate sample size                                                                             • Field experience
                                                                                                            preceptor
      • Identify and minimize sources of bias                                                               assessment
      • Describe the direction and magnitude of bias and effect on measures of                            • Master’s project
        association
     VII. Data Collection and Monitoring
     Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired          How Measured
      •   Identify instruments appropriate for the research question                • PubH 6342,          • Examinations
      •   Identify presence and magnitude of measurement error                      • Field Experience    • Assignments
      •   Monitor the conduct of data collection                                    • Master’s project      (exercises and
                                                                                                            papers)
      •   Design and assess quality assurance and control measures
                                                                                                          • Field experience
                                                                                                            preceptor
                                                                                                            assessment
                                                                                                          • Master’s project
     VIII. Data Analysis
     Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired          How Measured
      • Use statistical computer packages to calculate and display descriptive      • PubH 6343, 6344,    • Examinations
        statistics                                                                    6450, 6451          • Assignments
      • Analyze categorical data                                                    • Field experience      (exercises and
      • Perform multivariate regression                                             • Master’s project      papers)
      • Examine data for confounding and effect modification, and handle                                  • Field experience
        appropriately                                                                                       preceptor
                                                                                                            assessment
                                                                                                          • Master’s project
     IX. Interpretation
     Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired          How Measured
      • Interpret research results                                                  • PubH 6341, 6342,    • Examinations
      • Make appropriate casual inferences based on results                           6343, 6344, 6450,   • Assignments
                                                                                      6451                  (exercises and
                                                                                    • Field experience      papers)
                                                                                    • Master’s project    • Field experience
                                                                                                            preceptor
                                                                                                            assessment
                                                                                                          • Master’s project
     X. Communication
     Competency Area Skills                                                           How Acquired          How Measured
      • Communicate research results orally and in writing to scientists and non-   • PubH 6343, 6344     • Examinations
        scientists                                                                  • Field experience    • Assignments
      • Present data in tabular and figure formats                                  • Master’s project      (exercises and
                                                                                                            papers)
                                                                                                          • Field experience
                                                                                                            preceptor
                                                                                                            assessment
                                                                                                          • Master’s project




50
   XI. Ethics
   Competency Area Skills                                                         How Acquired         How Measured
    • Understand concepts of human subjects protections and confidentiality     • PubH 6742          • Examinations
    • Apply this understanding as evidenced in design and conduct of research   • Field experience   • Assignments
                                                                                • Master’s project     (exercises and
                                                                                                       papers)
                                                                                                     • Field experience
                                                                                                       preceptor
                                                                                                       assessment
                                                                                                     • Master’s project




Sample Electives
5000-level or greater in courses related to health science or statistics; courses at the 4000-level may be allowed as
electives but there are specific guidelines related to their approval. Contact a Major Coordinator prior to registering for
a 4000-level elective. See section 2.2 for more information.
       Public Health [PubH]
        Including coursework in epidemiology,
        biostatistics, environmental health, health
        services research and policy. Note: Due to
        content overlap, Division students taking both
        6325 and 6420 may only use one of the courses
        for degree credit. Due to the content overlap, Epi
        MPH students cannot use PubH 6320 as an
        elective if they are taking PubH 6341
       Veterinary Medicine, Graduate [VMed]
       Health Informatics [HInf]
       Educational Psychology [EPsy]
        Methods courses
       Statistics [Stat]
       Philosophy [Phil]
        Philosophy of science courses
       Biochemistry (BioC)
       Writing Studies (WRIT)
       Molecular, Cellular, Dev Biology and Genetics
        [MCDG]
       Genetics, Cellullar and Developmental Biology
        [GCD]
       Microbiology [MicB]
       Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology
        [MICa]




                                                                                                                          51
2.2     Other MPH Degree Requirements

Public Health Core Area Requirements
Students working towards an MPH degree must satisfy competency requirements in the six core areas of public
health – administration, behavioral science, biostatistics, environmental health, epidemiology, and ethics – by
completing one of the following in each core area:
     Satisfactorily pass one of the pre-approved courses in the core area (see pre-approved course list below); OR
     Pass an equivalency exam in the core area. OR
     Pass an advanced course in the core area as approved by the respective division head or the Educational
      Policy Committee, OR
     Complete a graduate level course, with a grade of B or better, at an accredited university or college that meets
      the competencies defined by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH). The School of Public Health
      Educational Policy Committee, upon petition of the student, will determine acceptance of a course for transfer.

Pre-approved Courses Meeting Public Health Core Area Requirements
Administration
PubH 6751 Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations – 2 cr.

Behavioral Science
PubH 6020 Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science – 3 cr.

Biostatistics
PubH 6414       Biostatistical Methods I – 3 cr.
PubH 6415       Biostatistical Methods II – 3 cr.
PubH 6450       Biostatistics I – 4 cr.
PubH 6451       Biostatistics II – 4 cr.

Environmental Health
PubH 6101 Environmental Health – 2 cr.
PubH 6102 Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health – 2 cr.

Epidemiology
PubH 6320    Fundamentals of Epidemiology – 3 cr.
PubH 6341 Epidemiologic Methods I – 3 cr.

Ethics
PubH 6741       Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy – 1 cr.
PubH 6742       Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy – 1 cr.

Registration Requirement
Students are required to register for at least 2 semesters and 15 credits in the School of Public Health.

Course Numbers and Graduate Credit
5xxx, 6xxx, 7xxx and 8xxx-level courses are considered graduate-level. 1xxx and 3xxx-level courses are for
undergraduates and will not receive approval for graduate credit. Under some circumstances – with approval of the
student’s Major Chair – 4xxx-level courses may also be applied toward a MPH degree as long as they are taught by a
member of the graduate faculty.

SPH Grading Policies
Grade Point Average
Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of no less than 3.0 (B) across their entire program to receive
an MPH degree.


52
S-N Grade Option
MPH students may take no more than 20% of their coursework on an S-N grading basis, exclusive of those topics,
seminars, and field experience courses offered only on an S-N basis.
Public Health Core Courses
Courses designated as part of the public health core must be taken for a letter grade (A-F). Students will be required
to achieve no less than a B- grade in each course taken on an A-F basis. Students may retake public health core
courses at their own expense until they achieve a grade of B- or better. However, a retaken course may be counted
only once toward degree requirements in the student’s study plan.
Each public health major may require higher levels of achievement for its own students in public health core courses
that are also core to the major. This may include restrictions on retaking public health core courses that are also core
to the major, or requiring more than a B- performance level. Students should consult their Major Coordinator for
documentation of these requirements.

Field Experience
All students matriculating in a MPH program must complete a formal, supervised fieldwork experience; see section
2.5.

MPH Study Plan
Students are required to submit a completed MPH Study Plan to their Major Coordinator at least one semester prior to
their anticipated completion of coursework. Earlier submission (e.g. in the second to last semester) is suggested to
allow the Major Coordinators to review the study plan and notify students if they are missing any requirements prior to
their last term of study.

Master’s Project
MPH students must complete a master’s project, demonstrating familiarity with the tools of research or scholarship in
the major, the capacity to work independently, and the ability to present the results of the investigation effectively; see
section 2.6.

Comprehensive Examination
MPH students must complete a written and/or oral examination as specified by the major; see section 2.6.

Time Frame
The maximum time allowed by the School of Public Health for completion of an MPH degree is seven years. The
seven year period begins with the first term of enrollment after admission to a degree program within the School.

Course Transfer Credits
Effective with students entering the program in Fall 2007, a student may seek transfer of no more than 40% of their
total graduate or professional program credits taken at the University of Minnesota or at another college or university
prior to the MPH program matriculation. Course credits may be used to satisfy public health core or other program
requirements as jointly approved by the Major Chair and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. No course credits
older than 5 years from the date of the student’s matriculation will be accepted for transfer. A grade of “B” or better is
required for each course requested for transfer credit.
MPH students who have completed graduate-level coursework at the University of Minnesota or another college or
university may petition to transfer those courses toward their MPH degree. To be considered for transfer, graduate
level coursework must have been taken at an accredited graduate institution. Students must:
        1. Meet with their academic advisor to discuss the petitioning process. If the petition is acceptable to the
           advisor, the student will complete and sign the Petition form, and attach an official transcript on which the
           final grade has been posted.
        2. Submit the Petition form to the Major Coordinator for processing. The Petition form can be found at
           http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm
        3. The Major Coordinator will forward the petition to the Major Chair and then to the Associate Dean for
           Academic Affairs for final evaluation and/or approval.



                                                                                                                       53
  Course Substitutions and Waivers
  All student requests that deviate from the degree curriculum requirements outlined in this Guidebook must be made
  on a Petition form. The Petition form can be obtained at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.
  Students should note that the process for approving a course substitution or waiver could take up to one month, so
  plan accordingly.
  Course Substitution Procedures:
  The following process should be followed when requesting that a course substitute for a required course in the
  degree program.
     1. Gather the course syllabi of the required course in your degree program and the proposed substitute course
        and a transcript on which the proposed course grade has been posted (if the proposed course has already
        been completed).
     2. Complete the Petition form with the following information in each section:
     •  REQUEST SECTION: describe the course requested for substitution including the course title, number of
        credits, term and year taken, and the name of the institution where the course was taken. Also list the
        course/requirement in your degree program for which you are asking for the substitution.
     • REASON/EXPLANATION SECTION: Indicate what skills and/or content overlaps between the required
        course(s) and the proposed substitute course(s).
     3. Compile the above materials and have the request reviewed by your academic advisor. He/she will complete
        the Department section of the Petition form and indicate whether or not they approve of the request.
     4. After the advisor has made his/her recommendations, the student should submit these materials to the Major
        Coordinator who will forward it to the appropriate Credentials Committee for review. The student will be
        notified via e-mail of the committee’s decision.
     5. If the substitute course is to replace a School of Public Health Core course (administration-PubH 6751,
        behavioral/social science-PubH 6020, biostatistics-PubH 6414/6450, environmental health-PubH 6101/6102,
        epidemiology-PubH 6320/6341, ethics-PubH 6741/6742), there is an additional step to get School level
        approval. To complete this next step, provide two additional copies of the above materials. All of those
        materials should be submitted to your Major Coordinator. Upon receipt of those materials, the Major
        Coordinator will review the request with the Major Chair and then if approved by the Major Chair, all copies of
        the request will be forwarded to Guy Piotrowski to be presented to the appropriate SPH Educational Policy
        committee members. The student will be notified by Guy Piotrowski via e-mail of the committee’s decision. If
        the Major Chair does not approve of the request, the Major Coordinator will inform the student that the
        request will not be forwarded to the SPH Educational Policy Committee for review.

Application for Degree
MPH students are required to complete an Application for Degree form. There are strict deadline dates before a
student can be cleared for graduation. You must turn in the form by the end of the first business day of the month in
which you want your degree cleared. Copies of this form can be obtained from
http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.


2.3      Standard Sample Schedules
Students are strongly encouraged to meet with their academic advisors each term prior to registration. Doing so will
ensure that you are on track for graduation and will ensure that any complications are resolved in a timely manner.
Note: Part-time schedules are available upon request from one of the Major Coordinators. Careful planning must be
considered when attending part-time to make sure courses that are sequential in nature are taken in the appropriate
order. Contact a Major Coordinator at gradstudies@epi.umn.edu for assistance with your schedule.
Full-Time Standard Program Option [48 credits]
 Fall Semester I
         Course       Title                                                                          Credits
                                             st
         PubH 6101    Environmental Health (1 half semester)                                            2
         PubH 6341    Epidemiologic Methods I                                                           3
         PubH 6355    Pathophysiology of Human Disease                                                  4
54
         PubH 6450         Biostatistics I                                                                       4
                                                                                         nd
         PubH 6751         Principles of Management in Health Service Organizations (2        half semester)     2
 Spring Semester I
         PubH 6342         Epidemiologic Methods II                                                              3
         PubH 6451         Biostatistics II                                                                      4
                           2 Elective Courses                                                                    4
 May or Summer Session I
         PubH 7396         Field Experience                                                                      2
 Fall Semester II
         PubH 6020         Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science (on-line or in-class)                   3
         PubH 6343         Epidemiologic Methods III                                                             4
         PubH 6344         Epidemiologic Methods IV                                                              2
         PubH 6386         Public Health Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease*                                      2
 Spring Semester II
         PubH 6742         Ethics in Public Health: Research & Policy (online course)                            1
         PubH 7394         Master’s Project: Epidemiology                                                        2
                           3 Elective Courses                                                                    6
* This course is only one of three options

Full-Time Accelerated Program Option [42 credits]
 Fall Semester I
         Course            Title                                                                               Credits
         PubH 6101         Environmental Health (1st half semester)                                              2
         PubH 6341         Epidemiologic Methods I                                                               3
         PubH 6450         Biostatistics I                                                                       4
                                                                                         nd
         PubH 6751         Principles of Management in Health Service Organizations (2        half semester)     2
                           2 Elective Courses                                                                    4
 Spring Semester I
         PubH 6342         Epidemiologic Methods II                                                              3
         PubH 6387         Cancer Epidemiology*                                                                  2
         PubH 6451         Biostatistics II                                                                      4
         PubH 6742         Ethics in Public Health: Research & Policy                                            1
                           1 Elective Course                                                                     2
 May or Summer Session I
         PubH 6020         Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science (on-line)                               3
         PubH 7396         Field Experience                                                                      2
                           1 Elective Course                                                                     2
 Fall Semester II
         PubH 6343         Epidemiologic Methods III                                                             4
         PubH 6344         Epidemiologic Methods IV                                                              2
         PubH 7394         Master’s Project: Epidemiology                                                        2
* This course is only one of three options




                                                                                                                         55
2.4      Waiver Request for Pathophysiology of Human Disease
Students with a prior-earned doctorate in a health-discipline are not required to take PubH 6355 Pathophysiology of
Human Disease and do not need to request an exemption. The following procedures apply for students wishing an
exemption from the course. It is the student's responsibility to:
1. Request the waiver at least two weeks prior to the start of the term the course is taught; and
2. Provide the Major Coordinator, Shelley Cooksey, with a copy of the syllabus (syllabi) of the course(s) already
     taken with equivalent content. The student also must supply a copy of their transcript(s). If the transcript was part
     of the application packet, the student can ask a Major Coordinator to make a copy. Shelley will forward the
     syllabus (syllabi) and transcript(s) to the course instructor(s) for approval.
The instructor(s) will then review the course packet to verify that previous course work fulfills the learning objectives
for Pathophysiology of Human Disease. If, upon inspection, the instructor affirms the course content is similar, he/she
will grant the waiver and provide the Major Coordinator with documentation for the student's file either approving or
rejecting the request for exemption.
The granting of an exemption from 6355 does not reduce the total number of credits required in the student's
program. However, it allows the student to take other elective credits.
Note: PubH 6355, Pathophysiology of Human Disease, is taught Fall semester. The deadline to provide materials to
Shelley Cooksey is Friday, August 8, 2008.


2.5      Field Experience

Goals
School policy requires all MPH students to complete a supervised field experience consisting of at least 90 hours. The
purpose of the field experience is to provide students with the opportunity to practice and apply their epidemiological
knowledge and skills in a practice-based setting. The goals of the epidemiology field experience are to apply
epidemiologic skills in the following areas:

1.   Review scientific literature
2.   Assist with proposal development
3.   Design data collection forms
4.   Collect epidemiologic data
5.   Create databases/enter epidemiologic data
6.   Analyze epidemiologic data
7.   Write scientific reports
8.   Participate in other community-based public health activities where epidemiologic skills are needed
The field experience must involve a project with defined objectives and evaluation criteria. The field experience should
complement the epidemiology training and therefore must be done after completion of Epidemiologic Methods I and II.
Students must develop a plan for the field experience with the consent of their academic advisor. For some students,
the field experience may include aspects of study design and/or data collection and management. For other students
with experience in data collection and management, it may be desirable to choose a field experience with greater
emphasis on data analysis or grant preparation. However, the field experience must be independent from the
master’s project and can not be started until the contract has been approved.

Field Experience Requirements
1. A member of the Epidemiology MPH faculty must agree to act as the student's faculty field experience advisor.
   This faculty member need not be the student's academic advisor or master’s project advisor. The Epidemiology
   faculty member can be either primary or adjunct faculty; see section 2.9 for a list of faculty.
2. The site preceptor, who will supervise the field experience, must be an epidemiologist or other public health
   professional approved by the academic advisor, the faculty field experience advisor, or the Epidemiology Major
   Chair. The site preceptor does not have to have a doctoral level degree but should have at least a MPH or
   equivalent level degree. For example, someone in a Health Department who has an Epidemiology MPH could be
   the field preceptor. The site preceptor must be outside of the University of Minnesota.

56
3. The field experience must consist of at least 90 hours. Students must register to receive graduate credits (90
   hours equals two semester credits). Depending on the length of the experience (i.e., more than 90 hours) and the
   faculty field experience advisor’s evaluation of the scope of the work, an additional 1-3 credits (up to a maximum
   of five credits) may be earned. These additional credits can be applied to the total credit requirement for the MPH
   degree, resulting in a net reduction of elective credits needed to complete the degree. Students must register
   under PubH 7396: Field Experience. This course is graded on an S-N basis only. Students will be allowed to
   register after they have submitted a complete Field Experience/Internship Contract (see How To Register below).
4. Timing of the field experience is flexible. However, because the intent is to reinforce concepts learned in the
   classroom, students must complete their first full year of coursework (the epidemiology and biostatistics
   core sequences) before beginning the field experience. Students may wish to consider summer session as
   the most feasible period in which to complete the field experience requirement due to the time involved.
5. The responsibility of arranging for the field experience rests with the student. Although a paid field experience is
   permitted, students should not expect such arrangements as the norm.
6. If permission from the Human Subjects Committee (Institutional Review Board) is necessary based on the
   proposed field experience work scope, the student must secure such permission before beginning. The faculty
   field experience advisor should be consulted for direction.
7. Although students are responsible for arranging their own field experience, there are a number of resources
   available to help:
   • Epidemiology faculty;
   • The School of Public Health Career Center;
   • The School of Public Health Alumni Society;
   • The Minnesota Department of Health (http://www.health.state.mn.us/);
   • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (http://www.cdc.gov/);
   • American Cancer Society (http://www.cancer.org/);
   • American Heart Association (http://www.americanheart.org).
   • Students who are interested in opportunities outside Minnesota are encouraged to network with Health
       Department officials in their hometowns, or in areas in which they eventually hope to work. International field
       experience is allowed;
   • There are additional opportunities to work with local health-related industries, including managed care
       organizations, hospital research units, and other industries with a health emphasis.

How to Register and Complete the Field Experience
1. Identify a faculty advisor. The faculty field experience advisor must be a Epi MPH faculty member but does not
   have to be your academic advisor (see section 2.9 for a list of faculty members eligible to serve as a faculty field
   experience advisor).
2. Once a potential placement has been identified, the student should make contact with the organization to identify
   and define a specific project or area, time commitment, and a site preceptor.
3. The Field Experience/Internship Contract form must be completed on-line, approved (with electronic signatures)
   by all parties and submitted to the Major Coordinator. The form is available at:
   http://www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp/. The contract must be submitted on-line before students will be given
   information on how to register and be eligible to begin the field experience. Once the signed Field
   Experience/Internship Contract form is submitted on-line, a Major Coordinator will contact the student via e-mail
   with specific registration information for PubH 7396.
4. Certain facilities are required by Minnesota law to submit paperwork for a criminal background check for all
   personnel with direct, unsupervised client contact. If their field experience, master's project, or dissertation is in
   such a facility, students may be asked by the institution to submit paperwork.
5. Some agencies may ask students to sign agreements concerning confidentiality of data or other data practices.
   This may be especially true in those settings where students will have access to personal identifiers.
6. Upon completion of the field experience the student and the site preceptor are required to submit an evaluation
   form on-line via the SPH Field Experience Portal at http://www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp/. Once the evaluation
   forms have been reviewed by the faculty advisor a grade change will be submitted.

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Relationship Between Field Experience and Master’s Project
The master’s project and field experience should represent separate activities, though they may be related. The
master’s project should involve more independent work than the field experience. A master’s project could evolve
from a field experience with an organization, but should be defined separately; the same work cannot be counted for
both. If they are related, careful consideration must be given in wording the contract to differentiate the requirements
of the field experience from the master's project.
We suggest that students do an internship at one organization, and their master’s project with a different organization.
While it is not required, doing them with different organizations has several advantages. It gives the student an insight
into two organizations, expands the number of people the student can use for future references for jobs, and
increases the number of places they may turn for job opportunities.


2.6       Master’s Project

Purpose
The purpose of the master’s project is to enable students to demonstrate:
      •    Familiarity with the tools of research and scholarship in the field of Public Health;
      •    The ability to work independently;
      •    The ability to plan and carry out a systematic investigation related to a public health issue; and
      •    The ability to effectively present, in written form, the results of their investigation.

Project Options
The master's project for students in the Epidemiology MPH program may take one of three forms:
      •    A written report, often in the form of a manuscript suitable for publication in a peer-reviewed journal, that
           demonstrates the student's ability to do quantitative analyses, utilizing data collected by the student or
           obtained from another source. This option is chosen by the vast majority of students.
      •    A literature review, of publishable quality, which demonstrates the student's ability to critically review the
           literature and synthesize published findings on a medical or public health topic.
      •    A grant proposal to the National Institutes of Health (NIH).
Students who have never done quantitative analysis outside of normal coursework are strongly encouraged to do a
written report that includes quantitative analysis. Examples of quantitative analysis projects might include the
collection, analysis, and interpretation of data collected by the student, or secondary analysis and interpretation of
data collected by a research project within the Division or data from a public access source such as NHANES.
Examples of literature reviews include those articles published in epidemiologic review journals and other peer-
reviewed journals. A review should follow guidelines for systematic review as developed by the following groups:
      • Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews http://www.cochrane.org/resources/handbook/
      • Human Genome Epidemiology Network(HuGENet)Handbook of Systematic Reviews
            http://www.genesens.net/_intranet/doc_nouvelles/HuGE%20Review%20Handbook%20v11.pdf
      •    World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research Systematic Literature Review
           Specification Manual http://www.wcrf.org/research/research_pdfs/slr_manual_15.doc

An excellent example of a systematic review:
    Flodmark CE, Marcus C, Britton M. Interventions to prevent obesity in children and adolescents: a systematic
      literature review. Int J Obesity 2006; 30:579-589. PMID: 16570086

A grant application that includes a literature review and/or quantitative analyses also could serve as a master's
project.

Choosing a Topic
When choosing a topic, students should seek a balance between interests, project feasibility, and skills to be gained.
      •    Interest in the topic: the project requires independent effort and self-motivation. Students who have a
           strong interest in the topic they choose will be more likely to complete the project in a timely fashion.


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        •     Feasibility (availability of data, timeline): it is reasonable to expect that the project will require at least a full
              semester to finish (see timeline below), but there is substantial variability. For example, projects that
              require primary data collection may take longer to complete. Before embarking on the project, students and
              advisors should be aware of any potential factors that may slow or delay the project.
        •     Skills required or to be gained: The masters project is both a learning opportunity and an opportunity to
              demonstrate mastery of core competencies in epidemiology. It may provide an opportunity to develop new
              skills that may be useful in a career as an epidemiologist and public health professional.

Finding an Advisor/Project
All students must have a faculty advisor to guide and approve the steps in the masters project process. This project
advisor does not have to be the same person as the student's academic advisor. However, the project advisor must
be an Epidemiology MPH faculty member; see section 2.9 for a list of eligible faculty.
Because of the extensive time commitment involved in advising masters projects, it is suggested that students seek a
match of academic interests, community contacts and/or personal compatibility with a project advisor. It may take
several months to identify a project advisor and topic that provide a good match for the student’s interests and goals.
Students who do not have someone in mind by the time they are ready to write the proposal should discuss potential
project advisors with their academic advisor, the Major Chair, fellow students and/or the Major Coordinators.
Students can expect their project advisor to: (A) Be available, with reasonable advance notice, for consulting with the
student at all stages of the project; (B) Review and approve all project protocols and methods; and (C) Provide
guidance about the format and content of the final product.
There are a variety of strategies that students might use to find a project and project advisor.
    •       Find faculty working in your area of interest: make an appointment with a faculty member who may share
            your interests or introduce yourself to faculty who provide guest lectures in courses that you are taking.
    •       Identify research projects in your area of interest: There are many ongoing research projects both in and
            outside the Division that might provide the opportunity that you are seeking.
    •       Identify topics in connection to a research assistant position: Many students who have the opportunity to
            work as a research assistant are able to develop a research question within the context of a study with which
            they are working.
    •       Seek help from your academic advisor: Your advisor may be able to put you in touch with individuals working
            in your area of interest.
    •       Utilize the MPH Project Directory: This directory is on the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health
            web site at http://www.epi.umn.edu/academic/pdf/mphprojectdir2007.pdf . This document is updated each
            year and provides a list of primary and adjunct faculty with ongoing research that might lend itself to a
            masters project. If you are interested in working with someone who is not primary or adjunct faculty for the
            Epidemiology MPH program, be sure to discuss it with the major coordinator or major chair.

When a faculty member agrees to serve as the project advisor, the student should complete and submit the Masters
Project Approval Form. Students must have this form approved and submitted to Shelley Cooksey, Major
Coordinator before they can start work on their masters project. Students will not be allowed to register for PubH 7394
Masters Project: Epidemiology until this form is turned in to Shelley.

Authorship
Choosing a topic that may lead to a publishable paper is a potential benefit for both the student and the faculty
members who work with them. Although not all projects will result in a publication, it is a good idea for students and
project advisors to discuss authorship issues early in the process, preferably before embarking on the project.
Issues that should be discussed include:
    •       Publications procedures and policies that may exist for a given study
    •       Whether or not the student will be first author on the paper submitted for publication
    •       Expectations regarding co-authorship for members of the masters project committee
    •       Expectations regarding co-authorship for study investigators not on the masters project committee
    •       Whether or not the student will be responsible for submitting the paper to a journal, making revisions and
            handling responses to reviewers, and reviewing proofs
    •       Expectations for timely submission to a journal and contingency plans if timelines are not met


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Forming the Master's Project Committee
The examination committee must include at least three faculty members:
1. The master's project advisor, who must be an Epidemiology MPH faculty member, will chair the committee.
2. The student's academic advisor must be the second member, and that person is always an Epidemiology MPH
   faculty member as well. If the academic advisor is also the master's project advisor, then the second committee
   member must be another Epidemiology MPH faculty member.
3. The third faculty member on the committee must be from "outside" the student's major--this is a School of Public
   Health policy. The third member can have either a primary or official adjunct appointment with the University, but
   the third faculty member cannot be an Epidemiology MPH faculty; see section 2.9 for a list of faculty. If they are
   not on the list but have a University faculty appointment, they are eligible to be the "outside" member. Once the
   initial committee membership is put together, the student is strongly encouraged to check with the Major
   Coordinators to confirm the faculty members' roles. Note that exceptions are rare, and usually only given for
   adjunct faculty if the student exhausts all other possibilities. An Epidemiology MPH faculty with a primary
   appointment can never serve as an "outside" member.

Working with the Project Advisor and Committee
It is important for students to develop a strong working relationship with their committee and to keep them updated on
their progress. To ensure that the process goes smoothly, student should consider the following:
     •       Reach an agreement with the project advisor on the appropriate scope and amount of work for the project
             before beginning the project.
     •       Meet with each committee member to learn about his/her expectations for the masters project. For example,
             some members will expect to review interim data analyses or early drafts of the written document. Others
             may wish to wait until there is a relatively polished version of the document to provide feedback.
     •       Get approval of methods section and data tables from all committee members before writing the results and
             discussion
     •       Allow sufficient time PRIOR to the 2-week deadline for oral exam to get comments from committee members
             so that revisions can be made; plan for multiple revisions.
     •       Recognize that the masters project is not ready to defend until the committee says it is ready.

Costs Associated with the Master's Project
Students are responsible for costs associated with completing their master's projects. These costs are sometimes
offset in part by the organization with which the student is working. Funds may also be available from Division of
Epidemiology and Community Health by applying for the J. B. Hawley Student Research Award; see section 1.6.
Students who choose the data analysis project option may find the research project with which they are associated
can cover the costs of their project. There are also resources available for statistical computing. The Division of
Epidemiology and Community Health will provide MPH, MS and PhD students working on research projects free
access to the Division's research computers. This policy is addressed to those students who need computer access
for faculty-sponsored research that is part of their Master's or PhD project. The following rules apply:
         •    A sponsoring faculty member should initiate access for the student and specify the time period that the
              access is needed.
         •    Access beyond the initial time period is renewable at the request of the faculty member and subject to
              approval by the Computer Resources committee.
         •    To be courteous, the student should run only one job at a time.
         •    The computer may not be used for other coursework.
         •    This access is limited to the main research computers and does not necessarily include exclusive use of a
              PC or Mac (the student is assumed to need access to the specialized analysis software only available on
              the Epi main system).
         •    Any problems should be reported to the faculty sponsor, not the computer support staff or the Major
              Coordinators.

Human Subjects Information
All students at the University of Minnesota who conduct any research using human subjects are required to submit
their research proposal to the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board (IRB) for approval prior to conducting
their study. The approval process can take up to two months. This time must be accounted for when developing the

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proposal timeline. No contacts with potential or actual study participants, including recruitment or other research, may
occur until final IRB approval. Please consult with your project advisor for information on IRB procedures.

Timeline
Although there are no formal data on the length of time students have taken to complete their masters project,
experience indicates that they should plan for a minimum of one semester (four months). The actual length of the
project will depend on a number of factors, including:


    •   Type of project: Projects requiring primary data collection, substantial data management activities, or
        sophisticated data analyses may require more time.
    •   External factors beyond student's control: Projects may be delayed because students have to obtain
        approval from parent study administrators, wait for access to data, or work around faculty schedules.
    •   Student's level of motivation and discipline
    •   Other obligations such as coursework, jobs, family, etc.

Students are generally too optimistic about the amount of time it will take to complete their project. It is best to be
conservative and plan by working backwards from expected finish date. Here are some reasonable timelines for
some of the important milestones, although the length of each step varies substantially, depending on the project:
    •   Finding project and project advisor (2-3 months)
    •   Reading research literature to determine research questions (1-2 months)
    •   Obtaining human subjects approval (1 month)
    •   Obtaining parent study approval, if necessary (1 month)
    •   Obtaining and preparing data set for analysis (1-2 months)
    •   Conducting analyses (1-2 months)
    •   Writing first draft of document (1-2 months)
    •   Obtaining feedback from committee members and making revisions (usually repeated multiple times) (1-2
        months)
    •   Distributing final project to committee members (at least 2 weeks before oral exam)


Project Outline
There is no mandatory format for writing masters projects. Many take the form of manuscripts prepared for
publication; a grant proposal would follow the specific format required by the NIH. Copies of former students’ master’s
projects are located near cubicle 398E on the third floor of WBOB. Students may browse through these but cannot
take them from the student study area. A list of master’s project titles is available on-line at
www.epi.umn.edu/academic/mstrproj.shtm.


A written report usually includes four main sections: introduction, methods, results, and discussion. Journals often
place strict word or page limits on articles submitted for publication. By contrast, the masters project has no upper
page limit and may be longer than a standard published article because students need to provide enough detail to
convince their committee members that they have thoroughly reviewed the literature, understand the methods that
they have used, and have conducted a systematic data analysis. A random survey of masters projects recently
submitted for the epidemiology MPH found that the median length excluding references, tables, figures, and
appendices was 20 pages, double spaced, with a range of 13-44 pages.
For projects reporting results from observational research, guidance on format and content can be found in the
Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement: guidelines for reporting
observational studies (Epidemiology 2007; 18: 800-804).
The Introduction often includes:
    •   Statement of the problem
    •   Brief summary of evidence to date
    •   Gaps in evidence to be addressed by project
    •   Statement of purpose of project or hypotheses


                                                                                                                          61
Common subsections of the Methods include:
     •   Study description
             o Design of parent study, if applicable
             o Study design for project research question, if different from parent study design
     •   Description of participants
             o How identified and recruited
             o Response rates
             o Inclusions/exclusions
             o Final sample size
     •   Data Collection procedures
             o Methods of data collection
             o Types of data collected
     •   Definition of exposure/confounders/outcome
     •   Description of statistical analysis

The Results section typically provides:
     •   Basic description of study participants (e.g., Table 1)
     •   Description of results of each analysis

The Discussion usually will:
     •   State main findings
     •   Compare findings to current literature
     •   Discuss limitations and how limitations could affect interpretation of results
     •   Provide conclusions about contribution of project to current state of evidence


Writing
Many students have little experience with technical writing and find completing the masters project paper to be a
greater challenge than previous writing activities, such as term papers or other academic exercises. Students should
consider the following tips:
     •   Break the writing into manageable parts, e.g., by focusing on one section at a time. For example, some
         epidemiologists will first decide on the content and format of tables and figures, then write the results,
         methods, introduction, and discussion, in that order.
     •   Create a reasonable plan for writing: don’t expect to be able to draft the whole document in one session.
     •   Keep track of ideas for the discussion section: Because the discussion is often the last section written, it is
         helpful to develop a list of discussion points that can be expanded later.
     •   Use active rather than passive tense
     •   Do not worry about perfection on the first draft, but make the best use of the committee’s time by allowing
         them to focus on the science of the project and not forcing them to correct pervasive spelling, grammatical,
         and formatting problems. The project advisor is a good guide as to when the document is ready to distribute
         to other committee members.
     •   Follow-through on revisions provided by committee members: Committee members will become frustrated if
         they think that the student is ignoring their comments and suggestions.
     •   Avoid use of jargon; write in plain English


Study plan
     •   Students need to complete Part I (pages 1 & 2) of the Study Plan at least one semester before completion of
         their coursework. The form can be found at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm.
     •   Part II of the Study Plan (page 3) can be left blank and will be filled in by a Major Coordinator upon completion
         of the degree program.
     •   Turn in the completed Study Plan to Shelley Cooksey (cubicle 398E WBOB), who will then review it to
         account for all degree requirements.
     •   Students are strongly urged to keep a copy of their Study Plan for their own files.


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Scheduling the oral examination
    •   Students are responsible for scheduling the oral exam with their committee members. Because faculty have
        busy schedules, it is best to do this well in advance.
    •   Students also need to reserve a small conference room for a minimum of two hours. It is a good idea to
        reserve the room starting 30 minutes prior to the time that the presentation is to begin. Allowing that additional
        30 minutes will ensure that any audio-visual equipment reserved has been set up and the presentation works
        as anticipated.
            o To schedule a room in the West Bank Office Building (WBOB), call 612-624-1818.

    •   Students need to arrange for audiovisual equipment that they may need for their presentation. To reserve an
        LCD projector and/or laptop, please notify Shelley Cooksey at least two weeks in advance. These
        arrangements can usually be accommodated in WBOB conference rooms with at least two weeks notice.
    •   At least two weeks prior to the exam, students must notify Shelley Cooksey, 612-626-8803, of the date of the
        oral exam so that the proper paperwork can be forwarded to the project advisor. Please note that students
        cannot show up on the day of the oral and expect the paperwork to be prepared with no advance notice. If
        this happens, the student would hold their examination but the committee would not have the paperwork to
        sign.
    •   Students should consider sending an e-mail to committee members the day before the exam reminding them
        of the day, time, and location of the examination.

Preparing for the Exam
    •   At least two weeks prior to the exam, students must forward a copy of their paper to their committee members
        for review.
    •   Some students may find it helpful to meet with committee members after members have had a chance to
        review their paper. This may help the student identify important issues that they should be prepared to
        discuss at the oral examination.
    •   Students should prepare a 20-30 minute audiovisual presentation that describes their project (background,
        research questions, methods, results, discussion). They may wish to have the project advisor review a
        written draft of this presentation in the days or weeks before the exam.
    •   Students should be prepared to discuss strengths and weaknesses of the methods and to interpret and
        defend the results
    •   Students should bring copies of presentation materials to distribute to committee members on the day of the
        exam.

During the exam
The material covered in the oral examination is comprehensive and includes the masters project, course materials
and seminars, and issues of practical application. However, most examinations focus primarily on the project itself.
Most exams will follow the process outlined below.
    •   The project advisor, who also serves as the chair, convenes the meeting
    •   Student initially leaves room so that committee members can review transcripts and plan for exam
    •   Student returns to the room and procedures for conducting the exam are discussed
    •   Student gives the presentation, possibly interspersed with questions from the committee if the student wishes
        to be interrupted
    •   Additional questions are asked at the conclusion of the presentation
    •   Once all questions have been asked and answered, the student leaves room so that committee members can
        discuss the outcome of the exam
    •   The committee decides whether the outcome is pass without revisions, pass with revisions, does not pass
    •   The student is invited back into room and informed of the results
    •   If the outcome is a pass or pass with revisions, the study plan is signed by the committee members
    •   If the student did not pass, the committee will explain what steps are necessary before they will approve the
        project
    •   The project advisor returns the study plan to the Major Coordinator




Finalizing the Paper

                                                                                                                     63
After successfully completing the oral examination, the student and project advisor must work together to ensure that
the final document is prepared and submitted to the Major Coordinator.

     •   After the oral exam, the student and project advisor should meet to discuss any revisions that need to be
         made to the paper. Finalizing the paper as soon as possible after the oral exam is best way to assure that
         student will complete the process.
     •   The student should make changes according to committee expectations. In some cases, a final review by the
         project advisor on behalf of the committee may be sufficient. More extensive changes may require additional
         review by all committee members. The project is not completed until the committee is satisfied with the
         quality of the oral presentation and final paper.



2.7      Graduate Follow-up Survey
Students must submit the Graduate Follow-Up Survey prior to receiving their degree or certificate. Students may
complete the process online at the appropriate link on the current student Web page
http://sphsdb.ahc.umn.edu/gradsurvey/gs_login.cfm. Upon submitting the electronic survey, the student's relevant
major coordinator will be notified by e-mail.
All graduates will receive a three-month and six-month e-mail message asking them to update survey information
(e.g., employment). This is through secure access and coordinators will not be able to input data on students' behalf.


2.8      Program Faculty List

Primary Faculty
Name                       Phone     E-Mail                     Research Expertise
Alvaro Alonso, MD, PhD    626-8597   alonso@umn.edu             Epidemiology of hypertension, nutritional epidemiology,
                                                                neuroepidemiology (multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s
                                                                disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis)
Kristin Anderson, PhD,    626-8568   ander116@umn.edu           Cancer etiology; Laboratory-based cancer epidemiology;
MPH                                                             Pancreatic cancer; Adult solid tumors
Richard Crow, MD          626-9678   crowx001@umn.edu           Preventive cardiology programs, trials and methods;
                                                                Cardiac rehabilitation and work psychology; Ambulatory
                                                                ECG recording; Computer applications
Ellen W. Demerath, PhD    624-8231   ewd@umn.edu                Body composition and obesity assessment;
                                                                Developmental determinants of cardiovascular disease
                                                                risk; Lifecourse epidemiology; Genetic epidemiology of
                                                                obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease; Biomarkers
                                                                of biological senescence
Susan Duval, PhD          624-3392   duval002@umn.edu           Cardiovascular and diabetes epidemiology; Biostatistical
                                                                methods; Meta-analysis; Publication bias; Statistical
                                                                consulting
Darin Erickson , PhD      626-0516   erick232@umn.edu           Alcohol prevention and etiology; Latent variable analysis;
                                                                Longitudinal and time series analysis
John Finnegan, Jr., PhD   624-5544   finne001@umn.edu           Media communication and public health; Community
                                                                campaigns; The "Knowledge Gap" and health outcomes;
                                                                Digital information technology and its impact on public
                                                                health
Andrew Flood, PhD         624-2891   flood009@umn.edu           Nutritional epidemiology; Cancer epidemiology with
                                                                emphasis on colorectal cancer; Insulin resistance; IGFs
                                                                and their binding proteins
Aaron Folsom, MD,         626-8862   folso001@umn.edu           Cardiovascular disease epidemiology; Heart disease
MPH                                                             surveillance and risk factors
Bernard Harlow, PhD,      626.6527   harlow@umn.edu             Clinical and population-based reproductive epidemiology;
MPH                                                             the epidemiology of reproductive cancers; data collection
                                                                methods; and influence of psychiatric disorders on
                                                                reproductive function
Lisa Harnack, DrPH, RD    626-9398   harna001@umn.edu           Nutritional epidemiology; Nutritional assessment
Eileen Harwood, PhD       626-1824   harwo002@umn.edu           Social epidemiology; Policy evaluation of alcohol, tobacco
                                                                and illicit drugs
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Wendy Hellerstedt, PhD    626-2077   helle023@umn.edu   Birth outcomes for underserved women; adolescent
                                                        reproductive health and pregnancy prevention; pregnancy
                                                        intention; relationship of parity to chronic disease and birth
                                                        outcomes, women's health, perinatal and reproductive
                                                        health, socioeconomic status and health disparities
John Himes, PhD           624-8210   himes001@umn.edu   Child growth and nutrition; Anthropometric assessment of
                                                        nutritional status; Dietary assessment; Obesity and body
                                                        composition
David Jacobs, Jr., PhD    624-4196   jacob004@umn.edu   Cardiovascular disease epidemiology; Nutritional
                                                        epidemiology
Robert Jeffery, PhD       626-8580   jeffe001@umn.edu   Health behavior change; Dietary intervention; Obesity
                                                        epidemiology, treatment, and prevention
Rhonda Jones-Webb,        626-8866   jones010@umn.edu   Alcohol studies; Alcohol policy as a prevention strategy;
DrPH                                                    Minority health issues; Behavioral epidemiology
Harry Lando, PhD          624-1877   lando001@umn.edu   Global issues in tobacco reduction; Smoking cessation;
(on sabbatical June 08-                                 Treatment of medically compromised smokers
May 09)
DeAnn Lazovich, PhD       626-9099   lazov001@umn.edu   Cancer prevention and control; Cancer epidemiology
(on sabbatical January
09-December 09)
Alan Lifson, MD, MPH      626-9697   lifso001@umn.edu   HIV/AIDS; International health; Infectious disease
                                                        epidemiology
Russell Luepker, MD,      624-6362   luepk001@umn.edu   Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and prevention;
MS                                                      Health behavior; Community trials; Clinical trials
Leslie Lytle, PhD         624-3518   lalytle@umn.edu    Planning and evaluating eating behavior change
                                                        interventions in children;
                                                        Youth health promotion research; Theories of health
                                                        behavior
Claudia Munoz-Zanzi,      626-2849   munozzan@umn.edu   Infectious disease
MV, MPVM, PhD
Heather H. Nelson, PhD,   626-9887   hhnelson@umn.edu   Cancer susceptibility and etiology using both laboratory
MPH                                                     and epidemiologic tools; gene-environment interactions;
                                                        skin cancer, mesothelioma, and other exposure-related
                                                        malignancies. Member: University of Minnesota Cancer
                                                        Center
Melissa Nelson, PhD,      624-8832   nels5024@umn.edu   Environmental and behavioral determinants of excess
RD                                                      weight gain and obesity during childhood, adolescence
                                                        and young adulthood
Ruby Nguyen, PhD          626-7559   nguy0082@umn.edu   Women’s health, etiology of reduced fertility, infertility and
                                                        later disease, intersection of genital tract infections on
                                                        reproduction, pregnancy-related morbidity, and
                                                        epidemiologic methods in studies of fertility
J. Michael Oakes, PhD     624-6855   oakes007@umn.edu   Quantitative methods; Social epidemiology; Research
                                                        ethics
Charles Oberg, MD,        625-6616   oberg001@umn.edu   Health disparities; Childhood poverty; Health care access
MPH                                                     and finance
James Pankow, PhD,        624-2883   panko001@umn.edu   Cardiovascular disease epidemiology; Genetic
MPH                                                     epidemiology; Diabetes epidemiology
Mark Pereira, MPH, PhD    624-4173   perei004@umn.edu   Nutrition and physical activity in the prevention of obesity;
(on sabbatical Fall                                     Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease
Semester 08)
Kim Robien, PhD, RD       625-8279   robie004@umn.edu   Nutrition, molecular epidemiology, cancer survivorship,
                                                        pharmacogenetics, evidence-based nutrition practice,
                                                        medical nutrition therapy, parenteral nutrition,
                                                        hematopoietic cell transplantation
Simon Rosser, PhD,        624-0358   rosser@umn.edu     HIV prevention research; Human sexuality; Sex offending
MPH                                                     and religious identity
Pamela Schreiner, PhD     626-9097   schre012@umn.edu   Etiology of cardiovascular disease particularly as it relates
                                                        to lipids, obesity, visceral fat accumulation and the
                                                        perimenopausal transition; Osteoporosis
Lyn Steffen, PhD, MPH,    625-9307   steff025@umn.edu   CVD epidemiology and prevention; Nutritional
RD                                                      epidemiology; Stroke surveillance; Diet relations with

                                                                                                                    65
                                                                 diabetes; Insulin
                                                                 resistance and obesity
Weihong Tang, PhD,       626-9140    tang0097@umn.edu            Cardiovascular disease epidemiology, genetic
MS, MD                                                           epidemiology of chronic disease with an emphasis on
                                                                 cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes,
                                                                 and obesity
Traci Toomey, PhD,       626-9070    toome001@umn.edu            Policy research; Community organizing; Prevention of
MPH                                                              alcohol and tobacco-related problems; Intentional and
                                                                 unintentional injury prevention
Jian-Min Yuan, PhD, MD   625-8056    jyuan@umn.edu               Environmental and genetic factors in the etiology of
                                                                 cancer

Adjunct Faculty
Name                       Phone        E-Mail                          Research Expertise
Bruce Alexander, PhD,     625-7934      balex@umn.edu                   Occupational and environmental epidemiology;
MS                                                                      environmental determinants of injury, cancer,
                                                                        respiratory health, reproductive health; global
                                                                        health; application of biological markers in
                                                                        epidemiological research; exposure models for
                                                                        occupational and environmental epidemiology
Jeff Bender, DVM          625-6203      bende002@umn.edu                Antimicrobial resistance; food safety; zoonoses
                                                                        and emerging diseases
Alan Berger, MD            625-9100     berge063@umn.edu                Interventional cardiology; Thrombolytic therapy
Sally Bushhouse, DVM,    651-201-5374   sally.bushhouse@state.mn.us     Cancer epidemiology and surveillance
MPH, PhD
Timothy Church, MS,       626-1494      churc001@umn.edu                Cancer screening, prevention, and causes;
PhD                                                                     Epidemiologic study design; Cardiac disease and
                                                                        medical devices
Kathleen Daly, PhD        625-3259      dalyx002@umn.edu                Epidemiology of otitis media in children; Risk
                                                                        factors for otitis-media associated hearing loss
Richard Danila, PhD      651-201-5116   richard.danila@state.mn.us      Emerging infectious diseases including foodborne
                                                                        and bacterial diseases; Preparedness for
                                                                        bioterrorism
Kristen Ehresmann, RN,   651-201-5507   Kristen.ehresmann@state.m       Immunizations
MPH                                     n.us
Kristine Ensrud, MD,      725-2158      ensru001@umn.edu                Osteoporosis; Women's health (epidemiology)
MPH
Howard Fink, MD, MPH      725-2501      howard.fink@med.va.gov          Chronic disease epidemiology; Health outcomes
                                                                        in the areas of osteoporosis and sexual
                                                                        dysfunction; Preparation, maintenance and
                                                                        dissemination of systematic reviews
Lael Gatewood, PhD        625-4909      lael@umn.edu                    Health Informatics; Micropopulation; Simulation
                                                                        Health Services Research
Richard Grimm, PhD,       347-7756      grimm001@umn.edu                Clinical trials on hypertension, lipids, CV risk;
MD                                                                      Women's health; Complementary and alternative
                                                                        medicine
Myron Gross, PhD          624-5417      gross@umn.edu                   The role of micronutrients in health and disease;
                                                                        Cancer pathobiology; Biomarkers of dietary factor
                                                                        consumption and cancer progression
Linda Halcon, PhD         626-6450      halco001@umn.edu                Adolescent health; Complementary/alternative
                                                                        healing practices; International health; Infectious
                                                                        diseases
Craig Hedberg, PhD        626-4757      hedbe005@umn.edu                Food safety and infectious diseases
Alan Hirsch, MD           863-3900      hirsc005@umn.edu                The pharmacotherapy of peripheral arterial
                                                                        disease and claudication; Thrombolysis for deep
                                                                        venous thrombosis
Neal Holtan, MD          651-266-1222   holt0231@umn.edu                History of medicine and public health;
                                                                        Public health policy
William Hueston, DVM,     625-8709      huest001@umn.edu                Epidemiology of risks and diseases affecting
MS, PhD                                                                 animals and man including transmissible
                                                                        spongiform encephalopathies, antimicrobial
                                                                        resistance; Foodborne disease; Food safety


66
Mike John, PhD, MPH,       625-6521      johnx055@umn.edu              Tempromandibular disorders
DDS
Edward Kaplan, MD          624-1112      kapla001@umn.edu              Infectious disease and pediatric cardiology with a
                                                                       special interest in streptococcal infections
                                                                       (epidemiology, microbiology, and immune
                                                                       response)
Catherine Lexau, PhD,     651-201-5283   catherine.lexau@state.mn.us   Antibiotic resistance, including methicillin resistant
MPH                                                                    Staph aureus; pneumococcal disease
Ruth Lynfield, MD         651-201-5414   ruth.lynfield@state.mn.us     Infectious disease epidemiology; emerging
                                                                       infectious diseases, antibiotic resistance
George Maldonado,          626-2104      GMPHD@umn.edu                 Epidemiologic methodology
PhD, MSPH
Karen Margolis, MD,        347-2179      margo006@umn.edu              Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and
MPH                                                                    prevention; Women's health
Joseph Neglia, MD,         626-2778      jneglia@umn.edu               Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
MPH
John Oswald, PhD,         763-797-2765   John_w_oswald@optumhealt      Health statistics
MPH                                      h.com or
                                         oswal007@umn.edu
Melissa Partin, PhD, MS     725-2000     melissa.partin@med.va.gov     Cancer prevention and control; Patient education;
                             x3841                                     Shared decision making
Judith Punyko, PhD, MS    651-201-3629   judy.punyko@state.mn.us       Epidemiologic methods and bias; disease
                                                                       surveillance systems and quality assurance;
                                                                       descriptive epidemiology in public health; chronic
                                                                       disease epidemiology in adult and pediatric
                                                                       populations; and maternal and child
                                                                       health/epidemiology – in particular health
                                                                       disparities, access to care, (most recently) autism
                                                                       and other developmental disabilities, and PRAMS
                                                                       data analyses (serve as the principal investigator
                                                                       for the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring
                                                                       System (PRAMS) in Minnesota.
Frank Rhame, MD            899-2610      rhame001@umn.edu              HIV therapy
                            (pager)
Julie Ross, PhD, MPH       625-5437      ross@epi.umn.edu              Molecular epidemiology; Childhood cancer; Adult
                                                                       leukemia
Alan Sinaiko, MD           625-8483      sinai001@umn.edu              Blood pressure/hypertension in children and
                                                                       adolescents
Randall Singer, DVM,       625-6271      singe024@umn.edu              Infectious disease epidemiology; Ecologic
MPVM, PhD                                                              approach to disease systems
Logan Spector, PhD         624-3192      spector@epi.umn.edu           Etiology of childhood cancer; Design, conduct;
                                                                       Analysis of epidemiologic studies.
Brent Taylor, MPH, PhD    612-467-4941   taylorbc@umn.edu              Clinical epidemiology, particularly related to
                                                                       chronic geriatric diseases such as osteoporosis
                                                                       and prostate cancer, and quantitative methods
Beth Virnig, PhD, MPH      624-4426      virni001@umn.edu              Administrative data for cancer surveillance and
                                                                       studies of treatment patterns


2.9     Graduation Checklist

General steps for all MPH majors
    1. Student submits completed Study Plan at least one semester prior to the anticipated completion of
       coursework; see section 2.6.
    2. Student files the Application for Degree form (see section 2.2) at 200 Fraser Hall by the end of the first
       business day of the month in which they intend to graduate.
    3. Student completes all coursework and requirements by noon on the last business day of the month in which
       they wish to have their degree conferred.
    4. Student completes and circulates the Master’s Project paper and schedules the oral exam at least two weeks
       before the scheduled oral examination date; see section 2.6.

                                                                                                                           67
     5. Student notifies Shelley Cooksey, cooks001@umn.edu, of the date of the oral exam at least two
        weeks prior to the exam so that their study plan can be forwarded to the project advisor; see section
        2.6.
     6. After the oral exam, project advisor returns the student’s study plan to the Major Coordinators; see section
        2.7.
     7. Student submits one unbound, unstapled copy of the Master’s Project paper and abstract to Shelley Cooksey.
        See section 2.6.
     8. Student submits the Graduate Follow-up Survey. See section 2.7

All Division of Epidemiology and Community Health students who fulfill, or anticipate fulfilling, the above requirements
and deadlines for Fall 2008 through Summer Session 2009 are eligible to participate in the School of Public Health
commencement ceremony on May 18, 2009. We encourage you to attend!
It is considered highly unethical and inappropriate to use or include in your title or professional signature any degree
that you have not completed. This means you cannot use the MPH title prior to completing all your degree
requirements and your degree has been conferred. The School does not recognize or confer the title “MPH
Candidate”.




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2.       EPIDEMIOLOGY PHD DEGREE PROGRAM
2.1      Fall 2008 Program Curriculum

63 Credit Minimum
Required Core Courses: 17 credits plus 24 thesis credits
Course           Notes    Title                                                               Offered          Credits
PubH 8300                 Topics: Epidemiology: Advanced Epidemiologic Methods: Concepts      Fall               3
                          Topics: Epidemiology: Advanced Epidemiologic Methods:
PubH 8300                                                                                     Spring             3
                          Applications
PubH 7401                 Fundamentals of Biostatistics Inference                             Fall               4
PubH 6348                 Writing Research Grants (S/N only) [take section 002]               Fall               2
PubH 8377                 Seminar in Chronic Disease and Behavioral Epidemiology (S/N only)   Fall or Spring     1
GRAD 8101                 Teaching in Higher Education (must take for A grade option)         All terms          3
PubH 6742                 Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy                        All terms          1
PubH 8888                 Dissertation credits                                                All terms          24


Clinical/Biological Track: 22 credits minimum
Biological Methods/Statistics: 6 credits minimum
Course           Notes    Title                                                               Offered          Credits
PubH 7420                  Clinical Trials: Design, Implementation, and Analysis (required)                      3
Choose additional biological methods/statistics credits from the following courses:
PubH 6363                  Design and Analysis of Group-Randomized Trials in Epidemiology                        3
PubH 7430                  Statistical Methods for Correlated Data                                               3
PubH 7435                  Latent Variable Measurement Models and Path Analysis                                  3
PubH 7407                  Analysis of Categorical Data                                                          3
EPSY 8268                  Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research                                  3
EPSY 8282                  Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data                                             3
PubH 8140                  Validity Concepts in Epidemiologic Research                                           2
PubH 6915                  Nutrition Assessment                                                                  2
PubH 7445                  Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology                                   3
PubH 8141                  Doctoral Seminar in Observational Inference                                           2
PubH 6355                  Pathophysiology of Human Disease                                                      4
PubH 7402                  Biostatistical Modeling and Methods                                                   4
Content area courses: 4 credits minimum
Choose from the following courses:
PubH 6386                  Public Health Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease                                       2
PubH 6387                  Cancer Epidemiology                                                                   2
PubH 6385                  Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Diseases                                       2
PubH 6381                  Genetics in Public Health                                                             2
PubH 6389                  Nutritional Epidemiology                                                              2
PubH 6140                  Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology                                           2




                                                                                                                     69
Supporting Program/Minor: 12 credits minimum
Supporting program credits to be chosen with consultation with advisor. Potential supporting program courses include the
following, or courses from the additional biological methods/statistics courses listed above not used to satisfy the biological
methods/statistics requirement. Other courses can be considered with advisor and PhD Credentials Committee review/approval
PubH 8140                   Validity Concepts in Epidemiologic Research                                                     2
PubH 6180                   Ecology of Infectious Diseases                                                                  3
PubH 7405                   Biostatistics: Regression                                                                       4
PubH 7430                   Statistical Methods for Correlated Data                                                         3
PubH 7435                   Latent Variable Measurement Models and Path Analysis                                            3
PubH 7445                   Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology                                             3
PubH 7450                   Survival Analysis                                                                               3
VMed 8090                   Epidemiology of Zoonoses                                                                        2


Social/Behavioral Track: 22 credits minimum
Behavioral Methods/Statistics: 6 credits minimum
Course           Notes     Title                                                                      Offered           Credits
PubH 6363                  Design and Analysis of Group-Randomized Trials in Epidemiology                                  3
Choose additional behavioral methods/statistics credits from the following courses:
PubH 7402                   Biostatistical Modeling and Methods                                                             4
PubH 7420                   Clinical Trials: Design, Implementation, and Analysis                                           3
PubH 7430                   Statistical Methods for Correlated Data                                                         3
PubH 7435                   Latent Variable Measurement Models and Path Analysis                                            3
PubH 7407                   Analysis of Categorical Data                                                                    3
EPSY 8268                   Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational Research                                            3
EPSY 8282                   Statistical Analysis of Longitudinal Data                                                       3
PubH 8140                   Validity Concepts in Epidemiologic Research                                                     2
PubH 6915                   Nutrition Assessment                                                                            2
EPSY 8264                   Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis                                                           3
EPSY 8267                   Applied Multivariate Analysis                                                                   3
EPSY 8221               Psychological Scaling                                                                               3
Content area courses: 4 credits minimum
PubH 6333              Human Behavior I                                                                                    2
PubH 6334             Human Behavior II                                                                                    2
Supporting Program/Minor: 12 credits minimum
Supporting program credits to be chosen with consultation with advisor. Potential supporting program courses include the
following, or courses from the additional behavioral methods/statistics courses listed above not used to satisfy the behavioral
methods/statistics requirement. Other courses can be considered with advisor and PhD Credentials Committee review/approval.
PubH TBA                    Directed Study                                                                                 1-4
PubH 7392                   Readings in Epidemiology                                                                       1-4
PubH 6381                   Genetics in Public Health                                                                       2
PubH 6385                   Epidemiology and Control of Infectious Disease                                                  2
PubH 6386                   Public Health Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease                                                 2
PubH 6387                   Cancer Epidemiology                                                                             2
PubH 6000                   Topics: Community Health Education                                                            0.5-4
PubH 6000                   Obesity: Treatment, Prevention, and Policy                                                      2
PubH 6078                   Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy                                                   2

70
PubH 6074                      Mass Communication and Public Health                                                         3
 These courses are offered in alternate years: they are offered in 2008-2009, but are not offered in 2009-2010. Please plan
        accordingly.


Other details:
   • Supporting program credits in either track may be directly applied to the PhD program or can be used to
       obtain a minor in another graduate program with the approval of the minor program’s Director of Graduate
       Studies.
   • Note that the recommended biostatistics core course (PubH 7401) may be replaced by PubH 6450 and 6451
       if the student does not have adequate quantitative training for PubH 7401. Students who need a review or
       background training in basic epidemiology concepts will be encouraged to take the first year of the core
       sequence for MPH students (Epi Methods I, PubH 6341 and Epi Methods II, PubH 6342).
   • Each track’s faculty will make recommendations regarding courses required for students entering the doctoral
       program with insufficient training in epidemiology or the behavioral sciences to successfully complete the core
       or track courses. Courses used to make up deficiencies may not be used to fill PhD-level program
       requirements.

MD/PhD Student Program Requirements
Requirements for MD/PhD students differ slightly from the standard curriculum. The following are not required of
MD/PhD students only:
         The teaching assistant experience (however Grad 8101, Teaching in Higher Education, is required)
         In the Supporting Program/Minor area, 5 credits required, not 12 credits.
         In the Content Area portion of the CBE and SBE curricula, 2 credits (one course) required, not 4 credits.

Sample Supporting Program Courses
The following are departments or colleges from which PhD students have taken elective courses—the list is not
exhaustive. Exemplary courses are listed to reflect recent course offerings that PhD students have recommended as
excellent electives.
       Public Health [PubH] (e.g., 7405 Biostatistics: Regression; 7406 Biostatistics: Anova and Design; 7407 Analysis of
        Categorical Data; 7430, Statistical Methods for Correlated Data; 7440 Introduction to Bayesian Analysis; 7450 Survival
        Analysis; 7445 Statistics for Human Genetics and Molecular Biology; 7455 Modern Nonparametrics; 7460 Advanced
        Statistical Computing; 8100, Epidemiologic Uncertainty Analysis; 8140, Validity Concepts in Epidemiologic Research;
        8141, Doctoral Seminar in Observational Inference; 7435 or 8400, Latent Variable Models; 8432 Probability Models for
        Biostatistics; 8442 Bayesian Decision Theory and Data Analysis; 8452 Advanced Longitudinal Data Analysis; 8462
        Advanced Survival Analysis)
       Biostatistics offers a two-course sequence intended for PhD students in the School of Public Health who need a
        rigorous approach to probability and statistics and statistical inference with applications to research in public health.
        PubH 7401 is required; PubH 7402,Spring term, is Biostatistical Modeling and Methods (4 cr).
       Veterinary Medicine, Graduate [VMed] (e.g.,8090 Epidemiology of Zoonoses and Diseases Common to Animals and
        Humans)
       Health Informatics [Hinf]
       Educational Psychology [Epsy] (e.g., 8264, Advanced Multiple Regression Analysis; 8266, Statistical Analysis Using
        Structural Equation Methods; 8267, Applied Multivariate Analysis; 8268 Hierarchical Linear Modeling in Educational
        Research)
       Statistics [Stat]
       Philosophy [Phil] (e.g., philosophy of science courses)
       Rhetoric [Rhet] Science writing
       English: Writing, Rhetoric and Language (EngC) (highly recommended: 5051 and 5052 Graduate Research Writing
        Practice for Non-native Speakers of English)
       Biochemistry (BioC)
       Cell Biology and Neuroanatomy [CBN]
       Molecular, Cellular, Dev Biology and Genetics [MCDG]
       Genetics, Cellular and Developmental Biology [GCD]
                                                                                                                                71
    Microbiology [MicB]
    Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology [MICa]

Competency Areas

     I. Descriptive Epidemiology
     Competency Area Skills                                                         How Acquired             How Measured
      •   Produce descriptive epidemiology of a given condition                   • PubH 8300 (Fall)       • Examinations
      •   Calculate measures of incidence, morbidity and mortality                                         • Assignments
      •   Calculate measures of excess risk                                                                  (exercises and
                                                                                                             papers)
      •   Make appropriate comparison by person, place and time
                                                                                                           •       Written
      •   List strengths and limitations                                                                     preliminary exams
      •          Identify data from existing national and international sources
     II. Biology
     Competency Area Skills                                                         How Acquired             How Measured
      • Describe models of disease etiology and control                           • PubH 8300 (Fall)       • Examinations
      • Complete coursework or equivalent in human physiology and                 • Research               • Assignments
        pathophysiology                                                             Assistantship            (exercises and
      •      Develop competence in specific content area                          • Teaching                 papers)
                                                                                    Assistantship          • Written preliminary
                                                                                  • Thesis credits           exams
                                                                                  •       Electives        •       Dissertation

     III. History of the discipline
     Competency Area Skills                                                         How Acquired             How Measured
      • Describe general history of development of epidemiology                   • PubH 6078, 8300        • Examinations
      • Recognize major epidemiologic studies of selected diseases                  (Fall), 6381, 6385,    •       Assignments
                                                                                    6386, 6387, 8377         (exercises and
      • Identify major chronic and infectious diseases, leading causes of death
                                                                                                             papers)
      •       Recognize importance of epidemiology for informing scientific,
        ethical, economic and political discussion of health issues
     IV. Principles of screening and surveillance
     Competency Area Skills                                                         How Acquired             How Measured
      •   Recognize conditions suitable for population screening                  • PubH 8300 (Fall and    • Examinations
      •   Evaluate validity and reliability of screening tests                      Spring), 6363, 7420    • Assignments
      •   Describe types of bias that affect validity of screening evaluations                               (exercises and
                                                                                                             papers)
      •   Evaluate effectiveness of screening
                                                                                                           •       Written
      •        Categorize types of surveillance systems and approaches used in                               preliminary exams
          disease surveillance
     V. Problem conceptualization
     Competency Area Skills                                                         How Acquired             How Measured
      • Search the literature                                                     • PubH 6333, 6334,       • Examinations
      • Review and critically evaluate the literature                               8300 (Fall), 6348,     • Assignments
                                                                                    8377                     (exercises and
      • Synthesize available information
                                                                                  • Supporting program       papers)
      • Make appropriate causal inference                                           courses in subject     •       Dissertation
      • Identify meaningful gaps in knowledge                                       concentration
      • Formulate an original and key hypothesis or statement of research         • Research
        problem                                                                     Assistantship
      •       Draw causal diagrams                                                •       Thesis credits




72
VI. Study design
Competency Area Skills                                                              How Acquired               How Measured
 • Describe each study design                                                     • PubH 8300 (Fall and      • Examinations
 • Understand the advantages and limitations of each study design, including        Spring), 6348, 6363,     • Assignments
   practical aspects of their use and trade-offs                                    7420, 8377                 (exercises and
 • Select the most appropriate and efficient design for a specific problem        •      Thesis credits        papers)
 • Calculate sample size                                                                                     • Written preliminary
                                                                                                               exams
 • Identify and minimize sources of bias
                                                                                                             •       Dissertation
 • Describe the direction and magnitude of bias and effect on measures of
   association
 • Design a study using any of the main study designs
 • Use basic population sampling methods
VII. Data collection and monitoring
Competency Area Skills                                                              How Acquired               How Measured
 •   Identify instruments appropriate for the research question                   • PubH 8300 (Fall),        • Examinations
 •   Identify presence and magnitude of measurement error                           6348, 8377               • Assignments
 •   Monitor the conduct of data collection                                       • Research                   (exercises and
                                                                                    Assistantship              papers)
 •   Assess quality control measures
                                                                                  • Participation in grant   •       Dissertation
 •         Design data collection instruments                                       activities
                                                                                  • Electives
                                                                                  •        Thesis credits
VIII. Data analysis
Competency Area Skills                                                              How Acquired               How Measured
 • Use statistical computer packages to calculate and display describe            • PubH 8300 (Fall and      • Examinations
   statistics                                                                       Spring), 6363, 7401,     • Assignments
 • Analyze categorical data                                                         7420                       (exercises and
 • Perform multivariate regression, survival analysis and longitudinal analysis   •      Thesis credits        papers)
 •        Examine data for confounding and effect modification, and handle                                   •       Dissertation
   appropriately
IX. Interpretation
Competency Area Skills                                                              How Acquired               How Measured
 • Interpret research results                                                     • PubH 8300 (Fall and      • Examinations
 •       Make appropriate inferences based on results                               Spring), 6363, 7401,     • Assignments
                                                                                    7420, 8377                 (exercises and
                                                                                  •      Thesis credits        papers)
                                                                                                             •       Dissertation
X. Substantive Area
Competency Area Skills                                                              How Acquired               How Measured
 • Demonstrate mastery of substantive area                                        • Electives                • Dissertation
 •     Conduct original research related to specific topic                        • Teaching                 • Participation in
                                                                                    assistantship              professional
                                                                                  • Research                   meetings through
                                                                                    assistantship              RA or grant work
                                                                                  •       Thesis credits     •       Publication in
                                                                                                               peer-reviewed
                                                                                                               journals as part of
                                                                                                               dissertation format




                                                                                                                                      73
     XI. Communication
     Competency Area Skills                                                                              How Acquired                     How Measured
      • Communicate research results orally and in writing to scientists and non-                     • PubH 8300 (Spring),            • Examinations
        scientists                                                                                      8377, 8355, 6344               • Assignments
      • Present data in tabular and figure formats                                                                                       (exercises and
      • Prepare manuscript suitable for publication in scientific journal                                                                papers)
      •       Prepare professional presentations (oral and poster format)                                                              • Dissertation
                                                                                                                                       • Participation in
                                                                                                                                         professional
                                                                                                                                         meetings through
                                                                                                                                         RA or grant work
                                                                                                                                       •       Publication in
                                                                                                                                         peer-reviewed
                                                                                                                                         journals as part of
                                                                                                                                         dissertation format
     XII. Ethics
     Competency Area Skills                                                                              How Acquired                     How Measured
      • Understand concepts of human subjects protections and confidentiality                         • PubH 6742, 8377                • Examinations
      •      Apply this understanding as evidenced in design and conduct of                           •     Thesis credits             • Assignments
        research                                                                                                                         (exercises and
                                                                                                                                         papers), particularly
                                                                                                                                         as part of grant
                                                                                                                                         writing coursework
                                                                                                                                       • IRB application for
                                                                                                                                         dissertation project
                                                                                                                                         or as part of grant
                                                                                                                                         activities
                                                                                                                                       •        Dissertation



Sample Schedules for CBE and SBE Tracks for 2008-09
The sample schedules for both tracks are at this website: http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/current.shtm. Look under
“Course Information.”


2.2       Program Requirements

The following is a summary of program requirements in Epidemiology as approved by the Graduate Faculty in
Epidemiology.

Registration Requirements
All graduate students are required to register in the Graduate School in Fall and Spring terms to keep active status.
Registration in May and Summer terms are not required by the Graduate School to keep active status. See section
2.3 for more information.

Core Curriculum/Summary of Credits/Grade Point Average Requirements
The core curriculum for the PhD is required for all epidemiology PhD students. For the remainder of the curricula, the
student’s advisor and the Epidemiology MPH/PhD Credentials Committee must approve any course substitutions or
waivers as early as possible. Any substitutions/waivers must be approved before submission of the Degree Program
form to the Graduate School.
Summary of credits
The credit minimum for the PhD will be a total of 63 credits:
       Required Core Courses .................................................................................................................... 17 credits
       Clinical/Biological or Social/Behavioral Track Credits .................................................................... 22 credits

74
     PhD-specific dissertation credits, PubH 8888................................................................................. 24 credits


Grade point average (GPA) requirements
1. Doctoral students are required to complete their coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.25.
2. Doctoral students are required to earn grades of B- or higher in each of the core courses. Core classes include:
   PubH 8300 (Fall and Spring), PubH 7401, PubH 6348, PubH 6742, PubH 8777 and GRAD 8101. In addition, a B-
   or higher must be earned in PubH 7420 Clinical Trials or PubH 6363 Group-Randomized Trials. Students who
   earn a grade below B- in these courses are required to repeat that course. Students who cannot earn a B- in two
   attempts will be terminated from the program.

Transfer of Credits
Starting with the Fall 2008 class, Epi PhD students will be allowed to transfer in a maximum of 15 credits from
previous master¹s level coursework. The 15 credits can be applied to any curriculum area. All requests for transferred
coursework need to be reviewed and approved by the student¹s advisor, and then reviewed and approved by the Epi
PhD credentials committee. The credentials committee will mandate the two new 8000-level Design and Analysis
courses be taken by all Epi PhD students as the core methods courses for the degree. Doctoral students who have
earned graduate degrees at other institutions may have taken courses that are similar to the courses required for the
PhD. If students want to pursue this option, they should discuss this with their advisor, the major coordinator and the
Director of Graduate Studies (DGS). If there is agreement to pursue this option, the student should prepare a petition.
The petition form is available at http://www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm; please contact the major
coordinator prior to filling out the request to discuss the process. The completed petition will be reviewed by the
Epidemiology MPH/PhD Credentials Committee and either approved or disapproved.

S-N Credits
Epidemiology PhD students can take up to one-third of course credits S-N (satisfactory/non-satisfactory). Note that
the one-third limit does include courses that are available only S-N, but does not include dissertation credits. This is a
Graduate School rule and cannot be petitioned for an exception.

Role of the Advisor
Requirements are specified to ensure that PhD graduates in Epidemiology have all of the basic skills necessary to
move into an academic or research career. The final shape of the program, the nature of additional courses, readings,
and the focus on particular subspecialties, are a matter for the student and advisor. Both are expected to work as a
team throughout the degree program.

Guidelines for Changing an Advisor
Many PhD students shift their course of study and focus over their graduate career, but this does not necessarily
require a change in advisors. Faculty advisors can facilitate students’ academic development by working directly with
the student or by encouraging them to gain experience with other faculty members (e.g., research or teaching
assistantships, grant writing opportunities). Sometimes students work more closely with one (or more) members of
their committee than with their advisor. Faculty advisors can also suggest changes in committee membership to
accommodate a change in dissertation focus.
Once PhD students have begun work on their dissertation, changing advisors should be limited to circumstances such
as personality conflicts, ethical problems, substantial shifts in areas of interest, or if the advisor resigns from the
University. Students wishing to change graduate advisors should consult with the DGS. Likewise, faculty who are
considering a change in their role as an advisor should consult with the DGS. Changes in graduate advisors need to
be approved by the DGS, and one of the major coordinators must be notified of the change so that the Graduate
School has the change on file.

Grant Writing Skills
In addition to completing PubH 6348: Writing Research Grants, it is recommended that students participate as a
member of a grant writing team for an NIH or comparable grant. It is also recommended that students review
examples of faculty grant applications that have been funded to prepare for Part B.




                                                                                                                                                 75
Teaching
During their PhD studies, students must serve at least one semester as a teaching assistant (TA), which includes
being available as a general resource for student learning. Students are encouraged to consider serving as a TA for
one of the Epi courses (i.e., Fundamentals of Epidemiology, Epidemiologic Methods I, II, III or IV). Teaching in these
courses can help students review core concepts prior to taking the written preliminary exam.
Note that the Center for Writing’s Teaching with Writing Program offers a two-session seminar focused on strategies
for commenting and grading student writing (in all disciplines). This is offered in August prior to the start of Fall term.
For more information, and to register, go to http://writing.umn.edu and click on “Announcements, Events and
Workshops.”
Students can also fulfill the requirement by being a TA in other courses. Any course that is assigned a paid TA by the
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health will automatically fulfill the requirement. Students will be emailed the
TA assignment list for the next academic year when it is officially approved, usually in mid-June to early July. Students
can also request the list from the major coordinator at any time once it is approved. Students can submit a written
request to the major coordinator, addressed to the DGS, for all other TA opportunities outside the Division.
Supporting materials should include a copy of the course’s syllabus and an outline of the TA’s responsibilities and
should be submitted prior to the term when the TA occurs.
Students also are required to prepare and give a course lecture to a class either as part of their teaching assistantship
or separately. This course lecture must be critiqued by at least one Epi Graduate Faculty member, and be at least 50
minutes in length. This requirement is separate from any Teaching Seminar course assignments. Non-native English
speaking students should note that they are responsible for passing the SPEAK TEST for non-native English
Speaking Teaching Assistants. Please see the major coordinator for this information. The Division's policy regarding
payment for the TA English Program's course in Classroom Communication Skills for TAs can be found in section 1.6
of this guidebook.

Examinations
Preliminary Written Examination
Students who take the new PubH 8300 (Fall and Spring) Advanced Epidemiologic Methods courses are encouraged
to take the exam within 18 months of matriculation. Students who took Epidemiology Methods I, II, and III are
encouraged to take the examination within 24 months of matriculation. Students who took Epidemiology I and II are
encouraged to write the examination within 18 months of matriculation into the PhD program. See the following
section on Milestones and the Role of the Student’s Committee. The examination consists of two parts: an
epidemiology and biostatistics exam (Part A), and a grant-writing exercise (Part B). Students must pass both parts.
See section 2.4 for guidelines.
Preliminary Oral Examination
Students should take the preliminary oral examination within six months of successfully completing the Preliminary
Written Examination (Parts and B). See the following section on Milestones and the Role of the Student’s Committee.
The oral examination, administered by the student's committee, focuses on the dissertation design and analysis.
Typically, the exam covers practical aspects of the proposal including epidemiologic principles. See section 2.6 for
expectations, guidelines, and other details. Note that no dissertation credits may be taken before passing the
Preliminary Oral Examination. Students have a maximum of five years to complete the PhD after passing the
Preliminary Oral Examination.
Final Oral Examination (Dissertation Defense)
Students make a public presentation of their dissertation followed by a closed exam with their committee. It is required
that the public exam be publicized widely and offered in a space large enough to accommodate a seminar audience.
It is the student’s responsibility to contact the major coordinator at least two weeks prior to the defense so that an e-
mail announcement can be sent to the Epi Graduate Faculty and students.
The final oral examining committee is designated on the dissertation title form. The committee chair must be a senior
member of a graduate faculty and cannot be the student's academic advisor or co-advisor; senior members from
other graduate faculty who are “outside” members can be the final oral committee chair. Students are encouraged to
consult and share their progress on the dissertation with all members of the committee well in advance of the final oral
examination.




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Research
First-Authored Manuscript for Publication
During their PhD studies, students must prepare a first-authored manuscript for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.
This manuscript should be prepared under the supervision of a member of the Epi Graduate Faculty, the student's
committee must agree that the paper is publishable, and it must be submitted for publication. Note: it does not need to
be accepted or in press to fulfill graduation requirements.
Research Ethics Training
All Graduate School students in the Health Sciences are required to have research ethics training during their doctoral
studies. To fulfill that requirement, Epidemiology doctoral students will take PubH 6742 – Ethics in Public Health:
Research and Policy.
PhD Dissertation
The process to complete a dissertation is two-fold: students must pass a preliminary oral exam (see section 2.6) and
a final oral exam. Students have two options for the dissertation:
(1) a traditional dissertation, which is an in-depth volume describing (a) theoretical background and literature to date,
(b) the methods and results of a research project, and (c) a detailed discussion of the strengths, limitations,
interpretation and significance of the findings; or
(2) a series of publishable papers, with appropriate introductory and concluding sections (see section 2.8). See
section 2.9 regarding important Human Subjects Research information.

Research Administration Experience
Students should develop experience in research administration during their program. Such experience may be gained
through regular participation in project-staff or steering committee meetings, helping to prepare or administer a grant
budget, taking an operational role in a sponsored research project, etc.

Milestones
The following progress expectations are for students who have completed the coursework for students with an MPH in
Epidemiology:
     Take written prelims within 18 months for those who take the new PubH 8300 (Fall and Spring) Advanced
      Epidemiologic Methods classes; within 24 months for those who took Epi Methods I, II, III, and within 18
      months for those who took Epidemiology I and II.
     Establish, minimally, the three internal members of their committee and begin meeting with them within one
      semester of completing written prelims;
     Take prelim orals within six months of successfully completing Parts A and B of the Written Prelim Examination;
      and
     Undertake grant writing, research, teaching, training in teaching techniques, and seminar presentation
      requirements on a schedule agreed upon with their advisor and committee.

Annual Review of Graduate Student Progress
The Graduate School constitution requires that each graduate student be provided with, minimally, an annual written
evaluation of his or her academic progress. To address this requirement, the Epi Graduate Faculty approved a
specific process for Epidemiology doctoral students. Each year, every student will complete a form summarizing
overall progress towards his or her degree. The form includes a list of classes taken thus far, progress made on the
milestone checklist, and comments on progress over the past year, including main accomplishments and/or difficulties
encountered, and a brief plan for continued progress for the following year. A review process and a review form have
been developed; the form is e-mailed to doctoral students and their advisors/co-advisors every year.


2.3     Graduate School Registration Requirements

Detailed Graduate School registration information is available at: www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/registration.

All Graduate School students are required to register in the Graduate School every fall and spring term to maintain
their active status. Active status is required for students to be able to register for courses, take exams, submit
milestone forms, file for graduation, or otherwise participate in the University community as a Graduate School
student. Students who do not register for a term in the Graduate School must fill out a Change of Status/Readmission

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Application form. This form is available in the Graduate School office at 316 Johnston Hall; 612.625.3490; and online
at www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/forms/. The form needs to be completed and a re-admission fee paid. Re-
admitted students are required to register during the semester in which they are re-admitted and every subsequent fall
and spring semester until they graduate.

Grad 999
Grad 999 is a free, zero-credit, non-graded registration mechanism for Graduate School students who must register
solely to meet the Graduate School's registration requirement. Grad 999 cannot be used to meet registration
requirements established by departments/agencies within or outside the University (which include, but are not
restricted to, registration required to hold an assistantship, maintain legal visa status, obtain financial aid, or defer
loans).
All Graduate School students with active student status are eligible to register for Grad 999. The Epi PhD program
does not have any current restrictions on Grad 999 registration.

PubH 8666: Doctoral Pre-Thesis Credits
These credits are available for doctoral students who have not yet passed their preliminary oral examination but need
to be registered in the Graduate School to meet requirements of agencies or departments outside of the Graduate
School (e.g., loan agencies). The main difference between Grad 999 and PubH 8666 is the latter can be used to meet
requirements of agencies and departments outside of the Graduate School. However, international students should
also check with the ISSS office, www.isss.umn.edu/. Doctoral pre-thesis credits are not graded.
Note: Registration for doctoral pre-thesis credits cannot be used to meet any Graduate School degree requirements.
These credits are not the same as the required PhD doctoral thesis credits. Effective Summer 2007, registration is
limited to a maximum of six credits per term. Also, registration for 8666 is limited to two times (12 credits) without
program consent. With program consent, students may register for 8666 up to four times, for a total of 24 credits.


2.4      Preliminary Written Examination Guidelines

Introduction
The Epidemiology Preliminary Written Examination is a requirement of the Epidemiology PhD degree program. It
consists of two parts, “A” and “B,” protocols, described in detail.
Purpose
The Preliminary Written Examination is a diagnostic tool intended to: (1) indicate to the Epi Graduate Faculty whether
the student is ready to engage in doctoral research, and (2) provide feedback to the student on his/her knowledge of
epidemiologic methods and analysis.
Content and Structure
There are two parts to the written examination. Both parts must be passed independently to successfully pass the
Preliminary Written Examination.
Part A is an open-note, open-book proctored exam that covers basic epidemiologic and biostatistical methods. It is
given in two sections. The entire exam consists of 11 questions. In Section One, students must select and answer
three of five theoretical epidemiology questions. In Section Two, students select and answer three of six applied
methodology questions. Section Two has five questions covering applied epidemiology and biostatistics, and one
question covering community trials. The sections are given on two separate, non-consecutive days; the exams start at
9 a.m. and end at 3:30 p.m.
Part B is an original research proposal as described, below.
Timing
The Preliminary Written Examination is taken after completion of most of the required core coursework. Before taking
Part A, students must complete specific coursework.
     •   For students entering Fall 2008 or later: two semesters of the new PubH 8300 (Fall and Spring) Advanced
         Epidemiologic Methods courses and PubH 7401. In addition, for students in the CBE track, PubH 7420,
         Clinical Trials; for students in the SBE track, PubH 6363, Group-Randomized Trials.



78
      •    For students entering Fall 2007 or earlier: Epidemiology Methods I, II and III, or Epidemiology I and II and
           Biostatistics I and II. Students in the behavioral emphasis may want to take Design and Analysis of Group-
           Randomized Trials.
Before taking Part B, students must complete Writing Research Grants. Prior to registering for each part, students are
required to consult with their advisor to discuss their readiness to take the exam. Parts A and B must both be passed
before the student can schedule his/her Preliminary Oral Examination.
Part A is offered twice a year, usually in January and June; Part B is available throughout the year. Part B is usually
taken after Part A, but Part B can be taken first with the consent of the student’s advisor and the Exam Chair.
Report of Outcome
The outcomes of Parts A and B are reported to the student (and copied to their advisor and DGS) through a personal
letter from the PhD Exam Committee Chair ("Exam Chair"). Please be aware of the following:
         A student who fails to pass either part of the Preliminary Written Examination on the first attempt is allowed the
          opportunity to take it one more time.
         The Exam Committee decisions regarding the pass/fail status of the student are final.
         A student who fails either part of the Preliminary Written Examination on the second attempt is expelled from
          the program.

Protocol for PART A of the Preliminary Written Exam
The Part A Exam Chair is responsible for preparing the exam, along with the members of the Exam Committee and
the Epidemiology Graduate Faculty. The Exam Chair and the major coordinator are responsible for organizing and
proctoring the exam. The major coordinator is responsible for the distribution of exam answers to faculty graders, and
for reporting the grades back to the Exam Chair. The Exam Chair and major coordinator are responsible for notifying
the DGS, the student, and the student’s advisor regarding the student's results on the exam.
Grading
The Exam Chair assigns at least three Epi Graduate Faculty members to grade questions from Section One; at least
two members grade questions from Section Two. Graders usually have two weeks (10 working days) to grade the
exam answers and return the exam answers to the coordinator.
If the scores assigned by the two graders for any of the Section Two questions differ by more than 10 points, the
Exam Chair will assign a third grader for that question. If the scores assigned by three graders for any question differ
by more than 15 points, the Exam Chair will direct the graders to discuss the discrepancy and re-score the question. If
the scores still differ by more than 15 points, the median (middle) score will be taken as the grade for that question,
rather than the mean.
An average will be calculated for each question answered in Part A, by the Exam Chair and coordinator.
In order to pass Part A, a student must receive an overall grade of at least 80, and an average grade of at least 80 on
at least four of the six questions they answered. In other words, a student who gets less than 80 on more than two of
the six questions cannot pass the exam. The student cannot re-write an individual exam question. If a student gets
less than 80 on one or two questions and receives a “pass" overall, the faculty advisors are strongly encouraged to
discuss these questions with the student.
The Exam Committee meets to review and approve the results of Part A as soon as they are available. The review is
blinded as to both the identity of the student and whether the student is taking the exam for the first or second time.
This review provides feedback to the Exam Committee on how the student performed on the exam and ensures that
the procedures for grading are followed.
Each student receives a special identification code prior to the start of Part A. No identifying information, with the
exception of the code number, is used in the answers. Confidentiality of the student’s identity is important to the
process of taking the Preliminary Written Examination and no one except the major coordinator will know the identity
of individual students until the grading is complete and the review process has been completed.
Study Assistance
There are several study materials available to doctoral students during the time they are studying for the Preliminary
Written Examination. There is a list of core principles for the epidemiology and biostatistics courses, there is one
sample exam, and there are sample questions with exemplary answers. All the materials are available at any time to
doctoral students, but the Exam Committee strongly encourages students to work through their own answers to the
sample questions prior to reading the exemplary answers. These materials are available from the major coordinator.
In addition, Epi Graduate Faculty are available to review answers that students write for the sample questions. The
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Exam Committee asks that all members of the Epi Graduate Faculty make themselves available for such review,
especially those involved in the core courses.

Protocol for PART B of the Preliminary Written Exam
Purpose
The examination is open-book and take-home. Part B not only indirectly tests required coursework, but also the ability
to draw on coursework and other experiences to ask and answer relevant epidemiologic research hypotheses. It can
also help students develop a depth of knowledge in one or more substantive areas.
Students are advised to carefully choose an appropriate research question and focus on the epidemiologic methods.
The student should not get bogged down in unnecessary detail (e.g., the specifics of an established laboratory
assay). The student should identify the problem, outline possible solutions, and justify choice of a solution. It is
important that the student demonstrate ability to identify problems and think about them critically.
Overview
Examination topics must be current and drawn from diverse substantive and methodological areas of epidemiologic
practice, addressing unanswered and rigorous questions.
Although Part B is modeled after a research proposal, it is intended as an examination rather than as a formal grant
proposal. Students are expected to demonstrate their competence and understanding through their approach, choice
of hypothetical or exact study populations, methods, etc., justifying these decisions through the proposal.
Part B is an examination to determine whether students are prepared to proceed with their dissertation rather than
NIH proposals. The Exam Committee focuses on the methodology proposed while bearing in mind the restrictions
under which the exam has been prepared, including that certain kinds of deficiencies in the proposal could have been
improved if collaboration was allowed, and if time and page constraints were different.
There are no sample Part B exams available for review, but grants written by Epi Graduate Faculty members can be
good preparation for the exam. Students can approach faculty they know and ask if they have a grant they can read.
Skills to Be Demonstrated
1. Conceptual
     a. Select a research question to be developed into a proposal.
     b. Review the literature and provide an epidemiologic perspective of the problem.
     c.   Provide a rationale for choice of specific research hypothesis or hypotheses.
2. Problem Solving
     a. Propose an appropriate and feasible study design for the research question.
     b. Outline an analysis plan suitable to the study design being proposed and in sufficient detail to permit a
        judgment on its methodological adequacy.
     c.   Clarify any other epidemiologic methods pertinent to your selected design.
     d. Address any issues related to feasibility and ethics of your proposed design.
     e. Discuss hypothetical outcomes, limitations, their interpretation and public health significance.
3. Writing skills will be considered among the evaluation criteria.
Selection of a Topic
The student is strongly advised to talk with the advisor and others in the general preparation for the exam and the
selection of three potential topics. Specifically, the student will talk with the PhD Exam Chair about the selection of a
topic and to be sure the examination rules are clear. The PhD Exam Chair is charged with setting the exam topic,
based on potential topics submitted by the student. The student is under no restrictions prior to turning in her/his list of
three topic areas. Thus, the student can talk to anyone and can complete the planning and preparation process in any
period of time, e.g. two weeks or two months. The topics should be partly known to the student, but not directly related
to prior work. They should advance the student’s studies and may serve as a basis of a PhD dissertation. The topics
are essentially a list of key words, which could cover, for example, areas such as disease, risk predictors, populations.
Students may not use previously written papers or grants for this exam, including those written in PubH 6348, Writing
Research Grants.

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Scheduling and Taking the Examination
The student must work with the major coordinator to select and coordinate the start date for Part B. Timing of topic
selection is important, and students are encouraged to thoroughly familiarize themselves with the topics they are
considering. Students need to be able to “hit the ground running” when they get their specific topic. Students are
given 17 calendar days to complete the proposal (usually starting on a Friday and therefore including three weekends)
after receiving their specific topic from the Exam Chair. Students may start the exam on other days, as long as the
start and end days fall on a work day, and not a University holiday.
The student and the major coordinator will work together to find a start date. The Exam Chair and the student’s
advisor both need to be available to communicate with each other during the seven days after the student turns in the
three topics in order to generate a specific topic. Therefore, students need to get their proposed start date approved
at least three weeks in advance of their start date.
Exactly seven calendar days prior to the agreed-upon start date, the student will give the major coordinator his/her list
of three broad topic areas of interest. (Note: once the student has turned in the three topics, s/he can only discuss the
exam with the Exam Chair or the major coordinator; s/he can no longer discuss the exam with anyone else including
the advisor.) During the following week, the Exam Chair and the student’s advisor will consult regarding the selection
of a specific topic. The Exam Chair will then generate a specific topic for the student and give it to the major
coordinator. On the start date, the major coordinator will get the specific topic to the student (usually via an email) and
the student can begin the exam.
Students have 17 days to write the original proposal. The variables that contribute to whether a start date will work
include how much time the student needs to prepare, the availability of the student’s advisor and the Exam Chair the
week after the student turns in his/her topics, and whether the student will be available to write a revision, if
necessary.
The student will receive an identification code when the topic is assigned. No identifying information, except the code
number, will be used in the body of the paper. While the student is taking the exam, the only people who should know
the identity of the student are the major coordinator, the Exam Chair, and the student’s advisor. Other faculty may be
included at the discretion of the Exam Chair. Maintaining student confidentiality is necessary for the Preliminary
Written Examination.
During the 17 days of the exam, only written materials may be consulted. Two exceptions are: (1) a reference librarian
– this is a legitimate way of facilitating a focused search of the literature on the topic of choice. It is not permissible to
ask an expert in the subject matter area to identify key papers or particular references; and (2) brief questions,
directed to individuals, involving factual material may be allowed with permission of the Exam Chair. Questions
germane to the main hypothesis, study design, or of a similar nature, are not permissible. Proposed questions must
be submitted to the Exam Chair, in writing, with the name of the person to be consulted. Any information obtained
from the outside source should be appropriately cited in the bibliography (e.g., Personal Communication, Dr. L. Smith,
May 21, 1999, National Laboratory for Primate Research, Austin, TX).
Assistance with editing is not permitted. Students whose first language is not English and are concerned about this
may choose to note that in the exam. Clarity of expression is a part of the testing process and all PhD students are
expected to be able to write well enough to complete the proposal.
                                                                                                           th
The paper must be submitted to the major coordinator by 12:00 p.m. (noon) on the due date, the 18 day. Students
are required to register their completed papers in two ways: a one-sided, unbound printed copy, and an electronic
word version, e-mailed to the major coordinator. Late papers will receive an automatic incomplete.
Withdraw Exception
It is recognized that because the length of time to complete the exam is 17 days, an illness or other significant
emergency during the exam could have a great impact on the student’s ability to pass the exam. Therefore, a student
taking Part B will have one (and only one) opportunity during their PhD career to withdraw at any point during the 17
days of writing the exam.
The following summarizes the major steps associated with the Exam.

STEPS                     TIMELINE                               ALLOWABLE CONSULTATION
Step 1: The student       No time limit.                         The student will consult his/her advisor and the Exam Chair, but
should begin thinking                                            may consult with anyone else. The student works with the
about potential topics;                                          major coordinator to set a specific start date; the major
eventually three topics                                          coordinator ensures that the Exam Chair is available and

                                                                                                                           81
are selected.                                                      confirms the dates of the exam.
Step 2: The student      Exactly one week prior to the             After the three potential topics are turned in, the student can
gives three potential    scheduled start date of the exam.         only discuss the topics or exam with the Exam Chair or the
topics to the major                                                major coordinator.
coordinator.
Step 3: The student is   The student is given the specific topic   The student can only consult/talk with the Exam Chair or the
assigned a specific      exactly one week after turning in the     major coordinator while writing the exam.
topic and begins         three potential topics. The student
working on the exam.     has exactly 17 days to write and
                         complete the exam
Step 4: The exam is      The exam must be turned in by noon        The student can only consult/talk with the Exam Chair or the
                                  th
turned in.               on the 18 day of the exam period.         major coordinator while writing the exam.
Step 5: The exam is                                                90 and above: Pass with no revision. 80-89: Pass with revision.
graded.                                                            79 and below: No pass, either rewrite or second attempt.



Structure and Organization of the Proposal
The format of the paper should follow the conventional guidelines of an NIH research proposal suitable for peer review. As
such it should contain, at a minimum, the following sections. Each section should not exceed the indicated number of pages:

SECTION                  REQUIREMENTS               NOTES
I. Cover Page            1 page                     Exam ID number, topic as given to student, title of Part B, and month/year.
II. Table of Contents    1-2 pages, double-
                         spaced
III. Abstract            1-2 pages, double-
                         spaced
IV. Specific Aims        1-2 pages, double-         List the broad, long-term objectives and describe concisely and realistically
                         spaced                     what the specific research described in this application is intended to
                                                    accomplish and any hypotheses to be tested.
V. Background            4-8 pages, double-          Describe the essence of knowledge related to this specific topic. Briefly
(including focused       spaced                         sketch the background to the present proposal, critically evaluate existing
literature review) and                                  knowledge, and specifically identify the gaps that the project is intended to
Significance                                            fill.
                                                     State concisely the importance of the research described in this
                                                        application by relating the specific aims to the broad long-term objectives
                                                        and to health relevance.
VI. Research Design      12-24 pages, double-        Describe the research design and the procedures to be used to
and Methods              spaced                         accomplish the specific aims of the project.
                                                     Include the means by which the data will be collected, analyzed, and
                                                        interpreted.
                                                     Describe any new methodology and its advantage over existing
                                                        methodologies.
                                                     Discuss the potential difficulties and limitations of the proposed procedures
                                                        and alternative approaches to achieve the aims.
                                                     Provide a tentative sequence or timetable for the investigation.
                                                     Point out any procedures, situations, or materials that may be hazardous
                                                        to personnel and the precautions to be exercised.
VII. Human Subjects      No page limit, double-
                         spaced
VIII. Selected           4 pages, single-spaced;    Author, title, journal, year, volume, and pages numbers must be cited in the
References               exceptions may be          references. Any unpublished and/or grant applications used as a resource
                         granted                    must be referenced.
IX. Appendices           No page limit, but         Optional. Tabular or graphic material only.
                         should be brief
Page limitations are based on typed, double-spaced text (except for the Selected References section).
The proposal must be prepared in 14-point Times or Times New Roman, or a similarly sized typeface, with one-inch
margins on all four sides, excluding the headers and page numbers. This will be strictly enforced for fairness and
consistency.

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The ability to meet the page limitations is one of the skills evaluated. Page limits are taken seriously by graders and
papers that do not meet the page limits will be returned without a grade. To assure they meet the required page limits,
students should allow extra time for editing and possible re-writing. Students should make use of appendices (limited
to non-essential content) and tabular summaries where appropriate in order to save space for prose. If the written
material exceeds the page limits, students must weigh the relative importance of the contents and make choices.
Within this framework, the organization and format of the exam paper is left to the student’s discretion. The inclusion
of tables and/or free-hand schematics and graphs is encouraged; these can be attached as an appendix.
Review
The Exam Committee explicitly uses the following criteria during their evaluation. Students are encouraged to keep
this in mind.
1. Significance
    a. Is there a strong rationale for addressing the question based on the existing literature?
    b. If the aims of the study are achieved, will scientific knowledge be advanced?
    c.   Is the study sound and logical?
2. Approach
    a. Are the conceptual framework, design, methods, and analysis adequately developed, and appropriate to the
       aims of the project? While there is no restriction on the selection of the design, the graders will evaluate the
       appropriateness of the design to the project.
    b. Does the proposal describe potential problem areas and consider alternative tactics?
3. Writing
    a. Is the proposal written clearly and is it reasonably organized?
    b. Are the questions and methods clearly described? The aims should flow clearly and logically from the
       background and the design should flow from the aims.
4. The ethics and feasibility of the research question and the study design are also considered.
Innovation and originality are considered in all evaluations. However, in many cases, an original presentation
independent of existing grant material will be reviewed more favorably than ancillary hypotheses to an existing grant.
If a student’s proposal draws upon existing grants within the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health to
address a research hypothesis, then appropriate adaptation to the particular hypothesis and additional innovation are
needed to make the proposal adequate. In addition, appropriate citation is required.
A committee consisting of at least five members will be formed to evaluate each proposal. The committee will include
Exam Committee members and ad hoc members drawn from the Epi Graduate Faculty, as needed, for expertise in
particular content areas. [Students are not involved in putting together the committee that reviews their proposal; there
is also no correlation between this committee and the committee eventually formed around the student’s dissertation,
the Preliminary and Final Oral Exam Committee.] The Exam Chair will select the ad hoc members after the research
topic has been identified. Each proposal will be assigned one primary and two secondary reviewers, but each member
of the Exam Committee will read each proposal. Primary and secondary reviewers will address the review criteria in
their written critiques.
The Exam Committee, including ad hoc members, will schedule a meeting no more than three weeks after submission
(two weeks will be the aim) to score the proposal. After the Exam Committee has scored the proposal, the student will
receive a summative letter and written critiques from the Exam Chair.
Evaluation
Each committee member will assess how well the student has met the criteria and assign a single, global score to the
proposal. They should do so with the clear understanding that these proposals are from doctoral students who have
been asked to develop a proposal on a topic that the student has had, at most, minimal exposure to, and without help
from other students or faculty. The committee will evaluate the proposal based solely on the stated criteria
(significance, approach, writing, ethics and feasibility). The Exam Chair informs the committee of the student’s
proposed topic, the given specific topic, and any contacts/questions by the student during the exam period. Also, the
importance of keeping the student’s identity blinded is reiterated to the committee.
A score of 90-100 (Pass with no revision) will be assigned to proposals that have no important weaknesses and are
judged especially strong on all of the criteria. A score of 80-89 (Pass with revision) will be assigned to proposals that
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have no important weaknesses and are judged satisfactory on all of the criteria and to acceptable proposals that have
important but no fatal weaknesses and are judged satisfactory on two of the criteria. A score of 70-79 (Not pass) will
be assigned to proposals that have important but no fatal weaknesses and are judged satisfactory on only one of the
criteria. A score below 70 (Not pass) will be assigned to a proposal that has one or more fatal weaknesses such that it
could not provide a valid answer to the proposed research question even if it were carried out exactly as proposed.
Every effort will be made to reach sufficient consensus so that the range of scores from individual committee
members is no more than 15 points. If the range of scores is greater than 15 points, the range will be announced and
the Exam Committee will re-score the proposal once. To pass the exam, a student must receive a score of 80 or
above from a majority of the committee members. If a student does not pass Part B on the first vote, that result will be
announced and the committee will have additional discussion and will re-score the proposal. The final result will be
based on the second set of scores.
On occasion, a committee member might perceive a significant conflict of interest in being a grader. The Exam Chair
will work with the committee member to resolve the conflict.
The following provide more detail about grading:
     Pass With No Revision: 90 and above
     Students who receive a score of 90 or above will have passed with no requirement for revisions. Students will be
     notified of the grade in a letter and will receive the written critiques with the letter, or shortly afterwards. Students
     are encouraged to review the written critiques and the proposal with their advisor.
     Pass with Revision: 80 - 89
     Students with a score from 80 - 89 from a majority of the committee on their original submission are required to
     complete a revision before officially passing the exam. This is the most commonly encountered scenario.
     Students are expected to begin the revision within two to three weeks of receiving their grade on the original
     proposal. Students will have 17 days for the revision. Exceptions (e.g., because of such as illness) to the start
     date of the revision will be considered in special circumstances. Students will consult with the major coordinator,
     who will consult with the Exam Chair, to select the specific revision start date.
     The purpose of the revision for a student who has passed the exam is to further the learning experience, not to do
     further testing of the student. Therefore, during the revision, the Exam Chair will choose, in consultation with the
     student, the faculty with whom the student can consult. For example, such consultants may include the reviewers
     from whom critiques were received, as well as the academic advisor and the Exam Chair. The student may
     receive substantive advice concerning the revision. The revision will consist of a point-by-point response to the
     criticisms and clear issues raised in the critiques (no page limit). If the student chooses to disagree with a
     reviewer’s suggestion, a rationale must be provided.
     Evaluation of the revision
     The Exam Chair and the initial reviewers will review the point-by-point response. For students with an initial score
     of 80 - 89 points, re-scoring the proposal is not necessary, i.e., students will not receive a score lower than 80
     points after the revision. The response needs to be deemed acceptable by the Exam Chair, who will inform the
     major coordinator that the student has officially passed. Thus, students with a score of 80 - 89 will pass the exam,
     but before their pass is officially registered, they must complete the revision process.
     Not Pass: 79 and below
     Students with a score below 80 from a majority of the committee on their original submission will not pass and
     must either revise their original proposal or undertake a second attempt (from the start) in a subsequent Part B
     exam cycle. If they choose a second attempt, they will write on a different topic. Students should consider the
     advice of the committee regarding these choices. Students will be notified of the grade in a letter.
     If the student chooses to revise, they will have 17 days for revision. Students are expected to begin the revision
     within two to three weeks of receiving their grade on the original proposal. Exceptions (e.g., because of illness) to
     the start date of the revision will be considered in special circumstances. Students will consult with the major
     coordinator, who will consult with the Exam Chair, to select the specific start date.
     The rules for the revision are similar to those for writing the original proposal. During the revision period, the
     student may discuss the revision with the reviewers from whom comments were received, as well as the Exam
     Chair. The student may NOT receive substantive advice concerning the revision, nor discuss the revision with
     his/her academic advisor nor anyone else. Thus, the student must work alone on the revision. Contacts with
     designated faculty are restricted to clarifications of the written critiques received. The student is expected to use
     his or her own resources to complete the revised exam.

84
    In addition to changes to the main body of the proposal, the revision must include an introduction of not more than
    three pages (single-spaced) that summarizes the substantial additions, deletions, and changes. The introduction
    must also include responses to the criticisms and issues raised in the critiques. If the student chooses not to
    incorporate a reviewer’s suggestion, a rationale must be provided. The substantive changes in the revised
    proposal must be clearly marked by appropriate redlining, bracketing, indenting, or changing of typography. If the
    changes are so extensive as to include most of the text, the Exam Chair should approve this exception. The
    student should not underline, shade, or italicize changes. Tracked changes would be OK if they are readable.
    Evaluation of the revision or new proposal
    The Exam Committee and the initial reviewers will review the revised or new proposals. The proposals will be re-
    scored using the same guidelines used for scoring new proposals. Students who receive a score of 80 or above
    after the revision will pass the exam. Those who do not receive at least 80 points after the revision will fail this
    attempt of the exam. If the student fails the revision of the first topic, s/he may retake the exam one more time
    with a second topic. A student who fails the exam on the second attempt, including a revision process, will be
    expelled from the program. To illustrate, the most extreme example prior to expulsion would be failure of: the first
    topic, revision of first topic, second topic, and revision of second topic.
Summary and recommendations
1. Students should allow time to think and gain perspective before committing themselves to the proposal.
2. The background should be a very concise review of the key epidemiologic factors, and of the most relevant
   research. Students should not spend too much time on the background. This section should summarize the
   literature that is relevant to the proposal.
3. Students should budget the time spent on various sections of the paper so that an appropriate balance is
   reflected in the final product. The background should summarize both the current state of knowledge as well as
   the pending questions, using these to formulate research questions.
4. A proposed study should not deviate substantially from the research question as stated. A shift in focus may be
   appropriate for certain questions, but this decision must be supported in the proposal.
5. The topic selected cannot be his/her current research area prior to the exam; but, if the student chooses it,
   research in this area could continue, even to form the topic of the PhD dissertation. Thus the PhD exam chair and
   the advisor jointly try to find a topic not entirely unfamiliar to the student, but that will take much research to flesh
   out into something innovative. Sometimes the idea is to give a question in a direction the advisor would like the
   student to go, or that the student has expressed an interest in. This should make the Part B exam process more
   pertinent to the total scheme of studies for the PhD.
6. Students should not prepare a budget nor be overly concerned about cost issues pertaining to the proposed
   research. Instead, they should consider the overall feasibility of the proposed research, not just fiscal feasibility,
   within reason. A generally unrealistic proposal will be scored poorly.
7. Typically, there is no pre-determined “right or wrong” response in this type of examination since it tests a
   combination of substantive and methodological skills, as well as personal choice and decision. Student should
   share the thinking and criteria that led to their choices of study design, protocol, and/or analysis. This should
   include the pros and cons of the research question, methodology, sample selection, etc., as well as alternatives
   considered and why they were not the final choice.
8. Students may refer to a hypothetical population that has characteristics (e.g., exposure levels, number of cases
   that accrue) similar to populations described in the literature. If desired, the proposed study may be conducted
   outside the United States, with justification for whatever study population is chosen.
9. Students should document their reasoning in the choice of the hypothesis (es), study design, and measurements.
   Similarly, the reviewer should be able to see what criteria they used in reviewing the literature and establishing
   their satisfaction with what is known and with what is not yet sufficiently well known in the field.
10. Measurement instruments should be discussed in the proposal. For example, it may be necessary to state that a
    measure has been previously validated or to note that the investigator will need to validate it, as well as how this
    is to be done, if pertinent.
11. Research applied to human subjects must consider privacy, informed consent, and ethical safeguards.
In summary, graders look for an awareness and critical understanding of the literature, a grasp of the key theoretical
issues, a defensible idea of what to do next, the appropriate methodology for the proposed research, and recognition
of the limitations of what is proposed. Throughout the proposal, students should be sure to convey their reasoning

                                                                                                                       85
and knowledge of epidemiologic concepts above and beyond generic use of terms. Note that a logical, simple
question is often the best approach.


2.5 Graduate Faculty
Primary Faculty
CBE is Clinical and Biological EPI
SBE is Social and Behavioral Epi
 Name                        Phone     E-Mail                       Track   Research Expertise

 Alvaro Alonso, MD, MPH,    626-8597   alonso@umn.edu                CBE    Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and
 PhD                                                                        neuroepidemiology

 Kristin Anderson, PhD,     626-8568   ander116@umn.edu              CBE    Cancer etiology; Laboratory-based cancer
 MPH                                                                        epidemiology; Pancreatic cancer; Adult
                                                                            solid tumors

 Henry Blackburn, MD, MS    626-9396   black002@umn.edu              CBE    Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and
                                                                            prevention and its history; Nutrition and
                                                                            chronic disease; Evolution and culture in
                                                                            mass     disease;      Epidemiology   and
                                                                            prevention in public policy

 Sonya Brady, PhD           626-4026   ssbrady@umn.edu               SBE    Health risk behavior during adolescence
                                                                            and young adulthood; Developmental
                                                                            influences on risk taking; Socioeconomic
                                                                            and ethnic disparities in consequences of
                                                                            risk taking; Mechanisms linking stressful life
                                                                            circumstances to health risk behavior and
                                                                            factors promoting resiliency; Promotion of
                                                                            health protective behavior; Public policies
                                                                            affecting adolescent health

 Richard Crow, MD           626-9678   crowx001@umn.edu              CBE    Preventive cardiology programs, trials and
                                                                            methods; Cardiac rehabilitation and work
                                                                            psychology; Ambulatory ECG recording;
                                                                            Computer applications

 Ellen Demerath, PhD        624-8231   ewd@umn.edu                   CBE    Body composition and obesity assessment;
                                                                            Developmental determinants of
                                                                            cardiovascular disease risk; Lifecourse
                                                                            epidemiology; Genetic epidemiology of
                                                                            obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart
                                                                            disease; Biomarkers of biological
                                                                            senescence

 Susan Duval, PhD           624-3392   duval002@umn.edu              CBE    Cardiovascular and diabetes epidemiology;
                                                                            Biostatistical methods; Meta-analysis;
                                                                            Publication bias; Statistical consulting

 Darin Erickson, PhD        626-0516   erick232@umn.edu              SBE    Alcohol prevention and etiology; Latent
                                                                            variable analysis; Longitudinal and time
                                                                            series analysis

 John Finnegan, Jr., PhD    624-5544   finne001@umn.edu              SBE    Media communication and public health;
                                                                            Community campaigns; Media agenda
                                                                            building; Digital information technology and
                                                                            its impact on public health

 Andrew Flood, PhD          624-2891   flood009@umn.edu              CBE    Nutritional epidemiology; Cancer
                                                                            epidemiology with emphasis on colorectal
                                                                            cancer; Insulin resistance; IGFs and their
                                                                            binding proteins

 Aaron Folsom, MD, MPH      626-8862   folso001@umn.edu              CBE    Cardiovascular disease epidemiology;
                                                                            Heart disease surveillance and risk factors

86
Jean Forster, PHD, MPH     626-8864   forst001@umn.edu   SBE    Public health policy as a prevention
(on sabbatical Jan 08 to                                        strategy; Community-based strategies for
Jan 09)                                                         chronic disease prevention; Tobacco policy

Simone French, PhD         626-8594   frenc001@umn.edu   SBE    Social and environmental influences on
                                                                eating and physical activity Behaviors;
                                                                Community-based strategies for eating
                                                                behavior change; Adolescent nutrition and
                                                                physical activity

Peter Hannan, MStat        624-6542   hanna001@umn.edu   SBE    Statistical: Group randomized trials, and
                                                                hierarchical statistical models in general;
                                                                generalized       regression;      imputation
                                                                procedures for missing values; ROC
                                                                curves,      sensitivity   and     specificity;
                                                                classification     and     regression      tree
                                                                methodology; bayesian statistical methods
                                                                (I am not *practiced* in this area); structural
                                                                equation models, latent variable models;
                                                                directed      acyclic     graphs      (DAGs).
                                                                Substantive:         accelerometry, energy
                                                                balance, healthy diet, overweight risks

Bernard Harlow, PhD,       626-6527   harlow@umn.edu     CBE/   Clinical and population-based reproductive
MPH                                                      SBE    epidemiology; the epidemiology of
                                                                reproductive cancers; data collection
                                                                methods; and influence of psychiatric
                                                                disorders on reproductive function

Lisa Harnack, DrPH, RD     626-9398   harna001@umn.edu   CBE/   Nutritional epidemiology; Nutritional
                                                         SBE    assessment

Eileen Harwood, PhD        626-1824   harwo002@umn.edu   SBE    Social epidemiology; Policy evaluation of
                                                                alcohol, tobacco and illicit drugs

Wendy Hellerstedt, PhD     626-2077   helle023@umn.edu   CBE/   Birth outcomes for underserved women;
                                                         SBE    adolescent reproductive health and
                                                                pregnancy prevention; pregnancy intention;
                                                                relationship of parity to chronic disease and
                                                                birth outcomes, women's health, perinatal
                                                                and reproductive health, socioeconomic
                                                                status and health disparities

Deborah Hennrikus, PhD     626-8646   hennr001@umn.edu   SBE    Smoking         cessation;          Reducing
                                                                environmental tobacco smoke exposure;
                                                                Health education in clinical settings

John Himes, PhD            624-8210   himes001@umn.edu   CBE/   Child growth and nutrition; Anthropometric
                                                         SBE    assessment of nutritional status; Dietary
                                                                assessment; Obesity and body composition

Keith Horvath, PhD         624-9556   horva018@umn.edu   SBE    HIV risk assessment and prevention;
                                                                Internet-based interventions for chronic
                                                                disease; Online survey design; Sexual
                                                                minority health

David Jacobs, Jr., PhD     624-4196   jacob004@umn.edu   CBE/   Cardiovascular disease epidemiology;
                                                         SBE    Nutritional epidemiology

Robert Jeffery, PhD        626-8580   jeffe001@umn.edu   SBE    Health behavior change; Dietary
                                                                intervention; Obesity epidemiology,
                                                                treatment, and prevention

Rhonda Jones-Webb,         626-8866   jones010@umn.edu   SBE    Alcohol studies; Alcohol policy as a
DrPH                                                            prevention strategy; Minority health issues;
                                                                behavioral epidemiology




                                                                                                         87
 Harry Lando, PhD             624-1877   lando001@umn.edu   SBE    Global issues in tobacco reduction;
                                                                   Smoking cessation; Treatment of medically
 (on sabbatical June 08-                                           compromised smokers
 May 09)

 DeAnn Lazovich, PhD          626-9099   lazov001@umn.edu   CBE/   Cancer prevention and control; Cancer
 (on sabbatical January 09-                                 SBE    epidemiology
 December 09)
 Alan Lifson, MD, MPH         626-9697   lifso001@umn.edu   CBE    HIV/AIDS; International health; Infectious
                                                                   disease epidemiology

 Jennifer Linde, PhD          624-0065   linde074@umn.edu   SBE    Obesity prevention and intervention,
                                                                   Weight control behaviors, Weight loss
                                                                   goals, Public health messages

 Russell Luepker, MD, MS      624-6362   luepk001@umn.edu   CBE/   Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and
                                                            SBE    prevention; Health behavior; Community
                                                                   trials; Clinical trials

 Leslie Lytle, PhD, RD        624-3518   lalytle@umn.edu    SBE    Planning and evaluating eating behavior
                                                                   change interventions in children; Youth
                                                                   health promotion research; Theories of
                                                                   health behavior

 Michael Miller, PhD, MS,     625-7836   mille444@umn.edu   CBE    Statistical analysis; Genetic and
 MPE                                                               epidemiological processes

 Claudia Munoz-Zanzi, MV,     626-2849   munozzan@umn.edu   CBE    Infectious disease
 MPVM, PhD

 Heather Nelson, PhD,         626-9887   hhnelson@umn.edu   CBE    Cancer susceptibility and etiology using
 MPH                                                               both laboratory and epidemiologic tools;
                                                                   gene-environment interactions; skin cancer,
                                                                   mesothelioma, and other exposure-related
                                                                   malignancies.

 Melissa Nelson, PhD          624-8832   nels5024@umn.edu   SBE    Environmental and behavioral determinants
                                                                   of excess weight gain and obesity during
                                                                   childhood, adolescence and young
                                                                   adulthood

 Toben Nelson, ScD            626-9791   tfnelson@umn.edu   SBE    Health policy, organizational change, health
                                                                   behavior during developmental transitions,
                                                                   influence of sports participation on health,
                                                                   social determinants of health, program
                                                                   evaluation, prevention of alcohol-
                                                                   attributable harm, physical activity
                                                                   promotion, obesity prevention, motor
                                                                   vehicle safety.

 Dianne Neumark-Sztainer,     624-0880   neuma011@umn.edu   SBE    Adolescent health and nutrition, Obesity
 PhD, MPH                                                          and eating disorder prevention, Health
                                                                   behavior change, Nutrition education
                                                                   program design and evaluation

 Ruby Nguyen, PhD             626-7559   nguy0082@umn.edu   CBE    Women’s health, etiology of reduced
                                                                   fertility, infertility and later disease,
                                                                   intersection of genital tract infections on
                                                                   reproduction, pregnancy-related morbidity,
                                                                   and epidemiologic methods in studies of
                                                                   fertility.

 J. Michael Oakes, PhD        624-6855   oakes007@umn.edu   CBE/   Quantitative methods; Social epidemiology;
                                                            SBE    Research ethics

 Charles Oberg, MD, MPH       625-6616   oberg001@umn.edu   CBE/   Health disparities; Childhood poverty;
                                                            SBE    Health care access and finance


88
 James Pankow, PhD, MPH    624-2883    panko001@umn.edu             CBE     Cardiovascular disease epidemiology;
                                                                            Genetic epidemiology; Diabetes
                                                                            epidemiology

 Mark Pereira, MPH, PhD    624-4173    perei004@umn.edu             CBE/    Nutrition and physical activity in the
 (on sabbatical Fall                                                SBE     prevention of obesity; Type 2 diabetes and
 Semester 08)                                                               cardiovascular disease

 Kim Robien, PhD, RD       625-8279    Robie004@umn.edu             CBE     Nutrition, molecular epidemiology, cancer
                                                                            survivorship, pharmacogenetics, evidence-
                                                                            based nutrition practice, medical nutrition
                                                                            therapy, parenteral nutrition, hematopoietic
                                                                            cell transplantation
 Simon Rosser, PhD, MPH    624-0358    rosser@umn.edu               SBE     HIV prevention research; Human sexuality;
                                                                            Sex offending and religious identity;
                                                                            Internet-based research; e-Public Health

 Pamela Schreiner, PhD     626-9097    schre012@umn.edu             CBE     Etiology of cardiovascular disease
                                                                            particularly as it relates to lipids, obesity,
                                                                            visceral fat accumulation and the
                                                                            perimenopausal transition; Osteoporosis

 John Sirard, PhD          626-1733    sirar001@umn.edu             SBE     Assessment of physical activity; the role of
                                                                            physical activity in the prevention and
                                                                            treatment of obesity in children and
                                                                            adolescents

 Lyn Steffen, PhD, MPH,    625-9307    steff025@umn.edu             CBE     Cardiovascular disease epidemiology;
 RD                                                                         nutritional epidemiology; surveillance of
                                                                            cardiovascular disease risk factors

 Mary Story, PhD, MS       626-8801    story001@umn.edu             SBE     Child and adolescent nutrition, Obesity
                                                                            prevention, Eating behaviors,
                                                                            Environmental and policy change related to
                                                                            healthy eating

 Traci Toomey, PhD, MPH    626-9070    toome001@umn.edu             SBE     Policy research; Community organizing;
                                                                            Prevention of alcohol and tobacco-related
                                                                            problems; Intentional and unintentional
                                                                            injury prevention

 Jian-Min Yuan, PhD, MD    625-8056    jyuan@umn.edu                CBE     Environmental and genetic factors in the
                                                                            etiology of cancer


Adjunct Faculty
 Name                      Phone      E-Mail                        Track    Research Expertise
 Bruce Alexander, PhD,    625-7934    balex@umn.edu                 CBE      Occupational and environmental
 MS                                                                          epidemiology; environmental determinants
                                                                             of injury, cancer, respiratory health,
                                                                             reproductive health; global health;
                                                                             application of biological markers in
                                                                             epidemiological research; exposure
                                                                             models for occupational and
                                                                             environmental epidemiology
 Alan Bender, PhD, DVM    651-201-    Alan.Bender@state.mn.us       CBE      Occupational epidemiology, public health
                            5882                                             surveillance; public health policy
 Jeff Bender, DVM         625-6203    bende002@umn.edu              CBE      Antimicrobial resistance; food safety;
                                                                             zoonoses and emerging diseases
 Sally Bushhouse, DVM,    651-201-    sally.bushhouse@state.mn.us   CBE      Cancer epidemiology and surveillance
 MPH, PhD                   5374



                                                                                                                        89
 Timothy Church, MS, PhD   626-1494   churc001@umn.edu              CBE   Cancer screening, prevention, and
                                                                          causes; Epidemiologic study design;
                                                                          Cardiac disease and medical devices
 Richard Danila, PhD       651-201-   richard.danila@state.mn.us    CBE   Emerging infectious diseases including
                             5116                                         foodborne and bacterial diseases;
                                                                          Preparedness for bioterrorism
 Marla Eisenberg, ScD,     626-2942   eisen012@umn.edu              SBE   Influences on adolescent sexual
 MPH                                                                      behaviors; health issues of gay, lesbian
                                                                          and bisexual youth; body image and
                                                                          weight control behaviors; teasing and
                                                                          bullying
 Lael Gatewood, PhD        625-4909   lael@umn.edu                  CBE   Health Informatics; Micropopulation;
                                                                          Simulation Health Services Research
 Richard Grimm, PhD, MD    347-7756   grimm001@umn.edu              CBE   Clinical trials on hypertension, lipids, CV
                                                                          risk; Women's health; Complementary and
                                                                          alternative medicine
 Myron Gross, PhD          624-5417   gross@umn.edu                 CBE   Antioxidants, oxidative stress and genetic
                                                                          susceptibility in coronary heart disease;
                                                                          Genetic susceptibility and DNA repair in
                                                                          breast and pancreatic cancer; role of
                                                                          micronutrients and flavonoids in aging and
                                                                          disease; Bio-markers of dietary intakes.
 Craig Hedberg, PhD        626-4757   hedbe005@umn.edu              CBE   Food safety and infectious diseases

 Anne Jurek, PhD           624-1639   jure0007@umn.edu              CBE   Epidemiologic methodology; minimizing,
                                                                          and adjusting for, systematic error in
                                                                          epidemiologic studies in pediatric health
 Robert Kane, MD           624-1185   kanex001@umn.edu              CBE   Outcomes of acute and long-term care,
                                                                          especially the effects of hospital and post-
                                                                          hospital care; epidemiology of aging;
                                                                          managed care; assessment; long-term
                                                                          care policy
 Arthur Leon, MD           624-8271   leonx002@umn.edu              CBE   Exercise science; Exercise physiology
 Catherine Lexau, PhD,     651-201-   catherine.lexau@state.mn.us   CBE   Antibiotic resistance, including methicillin
 MPH                         5283                                         resistant Staph aureus. The epidemiology
                                                                          of pneumococcal disease and the impact
                                                                          of the pneumococcal vaccine
 George Maldonado, PhD,    626-2104   GMPHD@umn.edu                 CBE   Epidemiologic methodology
 MSPH
 Marshall McBean, MD,      625-6175   mcbea002@umn.edu              CBE   Use of HCFA data for health policy
 Msc                                                                      research; access to care and quality of
                                                                          care, particularly among elderly
                                                                          Americans; cancer surveillance, treatment
                                                                          and outcomes; diabetes epidemiology and
                                                                          treatment; immunization of adolescents;
                                                                          use of health services among the elderly
                                                                          and among different racial groups
 Joseph Neglia, MD, MPH    626-2778   jneglia@umn.edu               CBE   Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
 Michael Osterholm, PhD,   626-6770   mto@umn.edu                   CBE   national leader detailing the growing
 MPH                                                                      concern regarding the use of biological
                                                                          agents as catastrophic weapons targeting
                                                                          civilian populations. After 9/11, served as
                                                                          Special Advisor to Secretary Tommy G.
                                                                          Thompson on issues related to
                                                                          bioterrorism and public health
                                                                          preparedness


90
 John Oswald, PhD, MPH       763-797-    John_w.oswald@optumhealth.        SBE     Health statistics; behavioral Health
                               2765      com                                       Survey-Based Surveillance
 Julie Ross, PhD, MPH        625-5437    rossx014@umn.edu                  CBE     Molecular epidemiology; Childhood
                                                                                   cancer; Adult leukemia
 Randall Singer, DVM,        625-6271    singe024@umn.edu                  CBE     Infectious disease epidemiology; Ecologic
 MPVM, PhD                                                                         approach to disease systems
 Logan Spector, PhD          624-3192    spect012@umn.edu                  CBE     Etiology of childhood cancer; Design,
                                                                                   conduct; Analysis of epidemiologic
                                                                                   studies.
 Michelle van Ryn, PhD,      625-9105    vanry001@umn.edu                  SBE     Characteristics of formal and informal
 MPH                                                                               social relationships as they influence the
                                                                                   quality and success of health
                                                                                   interventions, health behaviors, and health
                                                                                   outcomes; provider behavior;
                                                                                   race/ethnicity disparities in treatments
                                                                                   received; quality of cancer care
 Beth Virnig, PhD, MPH       624-4426    virni001@umn.edu                  CBE     Administrative data for cancer surveillance
                                                                                   and studies of treatment patterns




2.6     Preliminary Oral Examination Guidelines


Introduction
A student should take the preliminary oral examination after successful completion of the written examination (Parts A
and B) and, optimally, within 24 months of finishing coursework (see the section on Milestones). The purpose of the
preliminary oral examination is to confirm that the student is ready to begin work on her/his dissertation. It involves
two phases: (1) the development of a written proposal of the dissertation; and (2) its oral defense by the student. It is
the responsibility of the student to schedule the examination with his/her dissertation committee and notify the
Graduate School at least one week before the examination. This written notification is made with a form provided by
the Graduate School. To get the process started, the student contacts the Graduate School Student Services office,
specifically the “Doctoral Exam Scheduling: Preliminary Exam” office, at 612-625-4019. Also, please see section 2.9
“Human Subjects Research” before starting any dissertation work.

The dissertation committee
The dissertation committee is selected by the student and the academic advisor (and co-advisor, if applicable), and
will be the student’s committee throughout the dissertation development and completion. The committee is composed
of at least four members, one of who must be outside of the Epi Graduate Faculty. All members must have Graduate
School appointments. The Preliminary Oral Chair can be the student’s dissertation advisor if the advisor is a Senior
Member. If the advisor is not a Senior Member, the Chair will be the co-advisor. This is in contrast to the Final Oral
Examination Committee, where neither the advisor nor co-advisor can be the Chair. For that committee, another
Senior Member must be the Chair. This other Senior Member can either be from the Epi Graduate Faculty or
someone representing the supporting program/minor. It is typical for the student to meet with individual committee
members, as well as with her/his advisor, for advice throughout the dissertation process. Typically, the committee
meets as a whole only twice: once for the preliminary oral examination and once for the final oral examination.
However, the committee can meet as often as the student or the committee requires to guide the dissertation process.

The written proposal
The student is required to write a proposal that describes the aims and methods of her/his dissertation. The purpose
of the written proposal is to provide the student and the committee members with a clear understanding of the nature
of the proposed dissertation, its feasibility, and its relevance to the field. The preparation of the written proposal is an
important process for the student as it creates the opportunity to design the dissertation work and to identify possible
problems early in the process. The written proposal is also an efficient way to engage committee members as they
assist the student in articulating and meeting the dissertation goals. By preparing a written document—and by
conducting a defense of it—the student and her/his committee have a process through which they can agree upon the
                                                                                                                           91
scope of the final product (i.e., the final dissertation). The written proposal thus can insure that the student and the
committee members know what product to expect at the final dissertation defense. In many cases the dissertation will
resemble the preliminary written proposal quite closely. However, due to unforeseen circumstances or the natural
progression of the analyses, it is possible that the dissertation may differ in scope or content. It is important that the
student apprise the committee if s/he believes the dissertation will differ significantly from the written proposal
presented at the preliminary oral examination.
The exact format of the proposal is at the discretion of the dissertation advisor and the committee with input from the
student. Typically, the following content should be covered:
     The research objectives, typically described as primary and secondary aims.
     A literature review of related research, which will provide a rationale to support the proposed choice of
      variables, study design, population, etc.
     The theoretical model that will guide variable selection and analysis.
     A description of the proposed design and analytic methods, including a discussion of potential shortcomings
      and how they will be addressed.
     A description of the anticipated major results, reflecting the scientific merit of the proposed research. This
      description may include “mock tables” (i.e., no data, but rather a list of variables and row/column headings).
      Data may be presented if they are available when the student is preparing the written proposal.
     Possible limitations of the proposed research.
     References. A conventional citation style should be used consistently throughout the text.
The length of the proposal has varied historically, but a range of 30-100 double-spaced pages is typical. Because this
is an important document, the student normally will write several drafts and review them with her/his advisor, as well
as other committee members as needed, before submitting the proposal to the full committee. The student’s advisor
should give guidance as to when the proposal is sufficiently strong and is ready to defend. The program strongly
encourages students to follow the guidance of the advisor at this stage.
The student should submit the final written dissertation proposal to the full committee at least two weeks
before the preliminary oral examination unless other arrangements have been made.

The preliminary oral examination
The preliminary oral examination, administered by the student’s committee, is not a comprehensive exam. Its
purpose is to evaluate the student’s ability to conduct a feasible, cohesive and rigorous dissertation and thus focuses
on plans for dissertation design and analysis. The exam varies in terms of its length, but is usually one and a half to
two hours. Typically, the student will formally present an outline of her/his proposal and will be asked questions
about its purpose, rationale, study design, and potential to advance knowledge. Committee members will examine
the practical aspects of the proposed plan and its application of epidemiologic principles in design, analysis, and
interpretation. The committee members will vote to pass, pass with reservations, or fail, based on the quality of both
the written proposal and the oral defense. Upon successful defense of the written proposal, the student will have
agreement from his/her committee regarding the direction and focus of the dissertation, and a clear blueprint from
which to continue the dissertation work.
Please note there are very specific guidelines in the Graduate School catalog regarding the Preliminary Oral Exam,
and these can be found at www.catalogs.umn.edu/grad; click on “Introduction, General Information, and Major and
Degree Program table” link. The relevant information starts on page 21.
The Graduate School has some guidelines regarding “Failure of the Preliminary Oral Examination” which are:
“Students who fail the examination may be excluded from candidacy for the degree or may be allowed, on unanimous
recommendation of the examining committee, to retake the examination, providing the reexamination is conducted by
the original preliminary oral examining committee. In no case may the reexamination take place before 10 weeks
have passed. No more than one reexamination is allowed.” There are also specific guidelines regarding the
circumstance wherein a committee recesses without having determined whether a student has passed the
examination.




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2.7     Checklist for Completing Degree
Step and Deadline                                                                                        Check when
                                                                                                          complete
1. If appropriate, complete the process to have master’s level coursework applicable to the doctoral
   program reviewed by the Epi PhD Credentials Committee. This happens in the summer before your
   first term.
2. Register for courses promptly each term.
   Some courses, or sections of a course, fill up quickly so you are encouraged to register when your
   name appears in the registration queue. The registration queue is available at
   www.onestop.umn.edu. You must be registered by the first day of each term; if not, you will be
   “inactive” and will have to complete a form (and pay a fee) in order to be re-admitted.

  Tips:
             While most coursework should be completed before the Preliminary Oral Exam, students
              are permitted to take coursework after the Preliminary Oral Exam;
             Thesis credits cannot be taken prior to passing the Preliminary Oral Exam;
             In any given term, if you don’t register for at least 6 credits (to maintain full-time
              status), and you need 6 credits for your research assistantship or other financial loan
              reasons, please see section 2.3 for information about pre-thesis credits.
3. Preliminary Written Examination (Parts A and B)

  Tips:
             See the detailed guidelines (section 2.4) in the Student Guidebook;
             Part A is offered twice a year (January and early summer): Part B can be taken
              throughout the year

   After you successfully pass both parts of the Preliminary Written Exam, Andrea Kish will submit a
   Preliminary Written Exam Report form to the Graduate School, confirming you have passed.
   You also get a letter confirming you have passed this milestone.
4. Degree Program Plan form
   Fill out and complete the Degree Program Plan form after you have passed both parts of the
   Preliminary Written Exam. This is a two-page form that includes a list of committee members and
   all completed and anticipated coursework. Meet with Andrea Kish—she will help you complete the
   form correctly. The Graduate School states the form should be turned in at least one semester
   prior to the Preliminary Oral Exam; there is some latitude with this deadline, but a minimum of 8 –
   10 weeks is required.

  Tips for choosing a committee:
        See section 2.6 in the Student Guidebook for detailed information;
        There are specific rules about committee membership; Andrea Kish can offer specific
            advice one-on-one;
        View graduate faculty rosters at http://www.grad.umn.edu/faculty_rosters/ and click on
            Graduate Faculty Roster. You can look up individual faculty or see an entire graduate
            program’s graduate faculty list;
        If any of your committee members do not currently hold Graduate Faculty status at the
            University, the process of nominating someone to the Epidemiology graduate faculty can
            take 4 – 6 weeks or longer, so please plan accordingly.




                                                                                                                 93
 5. Preliminary Oral Examination
    Schedule the Preliminary Oral Exam: you need to find one date and time for all committee
    members to meet. All members must be present. The exam varies in length, but is usually 1.5 to 2
    hours. See section 2.6 for detailed guidelines.
     Send the final draft of the dissertation proposal to the full committee at least two weeks prior to
     the Preliminary Oral Exam meeting.
     Schedule the Preliminary Oral Exam by notifying the Graduate School and submitting the
     Doctoral Preliminary Examination Scheduling form. The form can be downloaded at:
     www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/forms/gs12.pdf. Submit the form at least one week prior,
     or as soon as the date is scheduled, whichever is first.

    This form will ensure the Graduate School sends the required form (the Preliminary Oral
    Exam form) to the Chair of the Preliminary Oral Exam committee before the oral exam. After
    the exam, you need to turn in the original Preliminary Oral Exam form directly to the
    Graduate School within 24 business hours.
 6. Thesis Proposal form
    Complete and turn in the Thesis Proposal form one term after passing the Preliminary Oral Exam.
    You can download the form at www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/forms/gs63a.pdf. The form
    requires an abstract, the working title of your dissertation, and the final committee.

     To complete the form, the student and advisor need to select three reviewers, and designate
     the Final Oral Exam chair:
     The final exam chair cannot be your advisor or your co-advisor, and the chair must hold Senior
     Membership graduate faculty status. The chair can be either a member of the Epidemiology
     graduate faculty or another graduate faculty body. For Epidemiology students, the same committee
     membership should meet both Preliminary Oral and Final Oral committee rules.

     Reviewers are selected members of the committee who sign your Thesis Reviewer’s Report form
     about one week prior to the final defense, notifying the Graduate School that you are ready to
     defend. There are specific rules about who can serve as a reviewer; Andrea Kish can help you
     correctly complete the form and select committee membership.
 7. Final Oral Examination and Preparing to Graduate
     Get a Graduate School Graduation packet In the final term before you defend (or at least 8
     weeks before your Final Oral Exam). You can pick one up in person at Johnston Hall, or request
     one at www.grad.umn.edu/current_students/degree_completion/doctoral (link to Request a
     Doctoral Grad Packet).
     Read through the Graduation Instructions carefully, and complete all paperwork by the deadlines
     outlined. The Instructions include information about completing the Graduate School Application
     for Degree form, the timing of giving your final dissertation draft to your committee, scheduling
     your final oral exam with the Graduate School, and submitting the Reviewer’s Report form.

     There are also instructions about what must be submitted after your Final Oral Exam to
     successfully graduate, and guidelines for formatting the dissertation and publishing the dissertation
     with UMI dissertation publishing. Andrea Kish has a sample packet.
     The Application for Degree form must be turned in by the first day of the month you plan to
     defend. You can turn the form in anytime earlier, but if you miss the first day of the month,
     your degree will not be cleared until the next month.
     By requesting a graduation packet, the Thesis Reviewer’s Report form will be issued. This form is
     very important because the three reviewers sign off and return the form to the Graduate School at
     least one week before the final oral, therefore clearing you to hold your Final Oral exam. The three
     reviewers were selected on the Thesis Proposal form (see #5 above). If you have any reviewers
     who might be out of town right before your final oral, this form can be turned in early.
     Your committee must have at least two weeks notice that your dissertation will be submitted to
     them by a specific date; it is also required that all committee members will have at least two
     weeks to read your dissertation before the exam date.



94
    Submit the Final Oral Defense Scheduling form one week prior to the exam date. This will ensure
    the Graduate School sends the form to the Chair of the Final Oral Exam (not your advisor or co-
    advisor).
    The Epidemiology PhD Final Oral Exam includes a one-hour public presentation and then a 1.5 to
    2 hour meeting with your committee. The one-hour presentation must be announced to all
    Epidemiology graduate faculty and doctoral students. At least two weeks prior to your final defense,
    please send the following information to Andrea Kish for the announcement: day, date and time of
    the presentation, building and room location; title of the thesis/talk and an abstract. Please make
    the abstract a reasonable length so that fits into an email announcement.
 8. Return the Final Oral Exam Report form to the Graduate School no later than one day after your
    final oral defense; and complete all the steps as outlined in the Graduation Packet for successful
    completion!



2.8     Published Work and the PhD Dissertation
An acceptable alternative to the traditional dissertation is to publish a series of papers on a related theme and
combine these with a summary paper reviewing the studies to form the basis of the dissertation. Several issues are
involved, including the basic structure of this alternative format, the number of papers, authorship, acceptable
journals, and the role of the committee. Such issues are resolved between the advisor, the student, and the
committee.
Numerous PhD dissertation committees in the Division have considered three first-authored papers to be sufficient.
Individuals seeking this alternative approach to the traditional dissertation should present their program plan to their
committee members as part of the Preliminary Oral, and the committee members will decide the number of
manuscripts and authorship necessary to satisfy requirements.

Graduate School Requirements
The thesis may include materials that have published while a University of Minnesota graduate student. A letter
authorizing use of this material must be obtained from the publisher. A copy of this letter must be included as the last
page of your thesis.
If all or part of your thesis is initially in a form appropriate for submission to a professional journal, the following apply:
    1. The research must have been carried out under the direction of the graduate faculty and approved by the
       student’s advisor for incorporation into the thesis.
    2. Advisor(s) must notify the Graduate School in writing of the intention to publish a part of the material (the
       Graduate School’s approval is not required).
    3. The student must be listed as the sole author of the thesis. Editorial or substantive contributions with general
       significance made by others should be acknowledged in the preliminary materials; more specific contribution
       should be acknowledged by footnotes where appropriate.
    4. Students whose manuscripts include more than the student’s research must make their contribution clear in
       the thesis.
    5. A suitable introduction is required, as well as transition sections that might not ordinarily be included in the
       published manuscript.
    6. Where appropriate, a comprehensive literature review, not usually permitted by journals, should be part of the
       submitted thesis.
    7. Appendices should be added to the manuscript as necessary to provide the comprehensiveness not ordinarily
       permitted by scholarly journals.
    8. Use of reprints of the manuscripts or the published articles themselves is acceptable if they are satisfactorily
       (and legally) reproduced and conform to all the formatting specifications described in this document.




                                                                                                                           95
2.9     Other Information

Human Subjects Research
All students at the University of Minnesota who conduct any research using human subjects are required to submit
their research proposal to the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board, for approval prior to
conducting their study. This procedure is necessary even for students who are doing secondary data analysis.

Criminal Background Check
Certain facilities are required by Minnesota law to submit paperwork for a criminal background check for all personnel
with direct, unsupervised client contact. Students who have fieldwork, master's project, or dissertation is in such a
facility, may be asked by the institution to submit paperwork.

Assistance with Writing
There are helpful resources for writing skills at the University. The primary resource is the Center for Writing; their
email is http://writing.umn.edu; and phone number is 612.626.7579.




96
2.       MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH MPH DEGREE PROGRAM
2.1      Fall 2008 Standard Program Curriculum

Standard Program [48 credit minimum]
Guide to Curriculum Notes
Please pay close attention to the following notes to assist you with your course planning.
 Offered in alternate academic years.
 Available in an on-line version at least once per academic year.
 For those students entering with strong quantitative skills who are considering a research focus or future doctoral
  level training, the more advanced biostatistics (PubH 6450) and epidemiology (PubH 6341) courses are strongly
  recommended.
 Available on-line only

Scientific Basis of Maternal and Child Health (8 credits)
Select four courses from the following list
Course             Notes     Title                                                       Offered               Credits
PubH 6600          ,       Global Reproductive Health                                  Fall `08                  2
PubH 6605                   Reproductive and Perinatal Health                           Spring `09                2
PubH 6606                   Children’s Health: Issues, Program and Policies             Spring, Summer            2
PubH 6607                   Adolescent Health: Issues, Programs and Policies            Spring `09                2
PubH 6613                   Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs           Fall `08                  2
PubH 6675                   Women’s Health                                              Fall `09                  2
PubH 6902                   Maternal and Infant Nutrition                               Fall, Summer              2
PubH 6903                   Child and Adolescent Nutrition                              Fall, Summer              2
PubH 6906                    Global Nutrition                                            Spring                    2

Methodological and Analytical Skills (7- 14 credits)
PubH 6034                    Program Evaluation for Public Health Practice               Spring                    3
Select three courses from the following list
PubH 6035                    Applied Research Methods (prerequisite 6034)                Fall                      3
PubH 6325                    Data Processing with PC SAS                                 Spring                    1
PubH 6342                    Epidemiologic Methods II (prerequisite 6341)                Spring                    3
PubH 6343                    Epidemiologic Methods III (prerequisite 6342)               Fall                      4
PubH 6344                    Epidemiologic Methods IV (prerequisite 6343 or take         Fall                      2
                             concurrently)
PubH 6415                    Biostatistical Methods II (prerequisite 6414)               Spring                    3
PubH 6451                    Biostatistics II (prerequisite 6450)                        Spring                    4
PubH 6617                    Practical Methods for Secondary Data Analysis               Fall                      3
PubH 6705                    Community Health Assessment                                 Spring                    3
PubH 6806                    Principles of Public Health Research                        Fall                      2
PubH 6910                    Critical Review of Research in Public Health Nutrition      Summer                    1




                                                                                                                  97
Management and Communication Skills (1 credit)
Course             Notes     Title                                                          Offered                 Credits
PubH 6673                    Grant Writing for Public Health                                May Session                1
Policy and Advocacy Skills (3 credits)
PubH 6630                    Foundations of MCH Leadership                                  Fall                       3
Additional Management, Policy, or Advocacy Skills (2-3 credits)
Select one course from the following list
PubH 6066                    Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for         Fall                       2
                             Community Health Work
PubH 6074                    Mass Communication and Public Health                           Spring                     3
PubH 6078                    Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy                  Fall                       2
PubH 6634                    Advocacy and Children’s Rights                                 Spring                     2
PubH 6727                    Health Leadership and Effecting Change                         Spring/Summer              2
PubH 6760                    Healthcare Finance                                             Spring                     2
Public Health Core (14-15 credits)
       Note: Courses designated as part of the Public Health Core must be taken for a letter grade (A/F)
PubH 6020                   Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science                  Fall/Spring/Summer         3
PubH 6101 or                 Environmental Health                                           Fall/Spring                2
PubH 6102                   Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health                Spring/Summer              2
PubH 6320 or                Fundamentals of Epidemiology                                   Fall/Spring/Summer         3
PubH 6341                   Epidemiologic Methods I                                        Fall                       3
PubH 6414 or                Biostatistical Methods I                                       Fall/Spring/Summer         3
PubH 6450                   Biostatistics I                                                Fall/Spring                4
PubH 6741 or                Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy      Fall/Spring/Summer         1
PubH 6742                   Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy                   Fall/Spring/Summer         1
PubH 6751                   Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations      Fall/Spring/Summer         2


Field Experience and Master’s Project (4 credits)
PubH 7694                    Master’s Project (see section 2.7)                             Fall/Spring/Summer         2
PubH 7696                    Field Experience (see section 2.6)                             Fall/Spring/Summer         2
Electives (to total 48 credits)
Elective Credits/Concentrations
Elective courses are usually taken during the second year. Students completing one of the concentrations in the
School will use their elective credits to complete the concentration. At this time, interdisciplinary concentrations are
available in Global Health, Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Health Disparities, and Public Health Policy.
Information on the concentrations is available at www.sph.umn.edu.


2.2      Fall 2008 MCH Epidemiology Emphasis Program Curriculum

48 Semester Credit Minimum
Guide to Curriculum Notes
Please pay close attention to the following notes to assist you with your course planning.

98
 Offered in alternate academic years.
 Available in an on-line version at least once per academic year.
 Available on-line only
Scientific Basis of Maternal and Child Health Epidemiology (6 credits)
Select one course from the following list:
Course             Notes      Title                                                    Offered          Credits
PubH 6600          ,        Global Reproductive Health                               Fall `08              2
PubH 6605                    Reproductive and Perinatal Health                        Spring `09            2
PubH 6675                    Women’s Health                                           Fall `09              2
Select one course from the following list:
PubH 6381                     Genetics in Public Health                                Fall                  2
PubH 6385                     Epidemiology & Control of Infectious Disease             Spring                2
PubH 6386                     Public Health Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease          Fall                  2
PubH 6387                     Cancer Epidemiology                                      Spring                2
PubH 6389                     Nutritional Epidemiology                                 Fall                  2
Select one course from the following list:
PubH 6606                    Children’s Health: Issues, Program and Policies          Spring, Summer        2
PubH 6607                    Adolescent Health: Issues, Programs & Policies           Spring `09            2
PubH 6613           ,       Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs        Fall `08              2
PubH 6902                    Maternal and Infant Nutrition                            Fall                  2
PubH 6903                    Child and Adolescent Nutrition                           Fall                  2
PubH 6906                     Global Nutrition                                         Spring                2
Methodological and Analytical Skills (13 credits)
PubH 6342                     Epidemiologic Methods II (prerequisite 6341)             Spring                3
PubH 6343                     Epidemiologic Methods III (prerequisite 6342)            Fall                  4
PubH 6344                     Epidemiologic Methods IV (prerequisite 6343 or take      Fall                  2
                              concurrently)
PubH 6451                     Biostatistics II                                         Spring                4
Management and Communication Skills (1 credit)
PubH 6673                     Grant Writing for Public Health                          May Session           1
Policy and Advocacy Skills (5- 6 credits)
PubH 6630                     Foundations of MCH Leadership                            Fall                  3
Select one course from the following list:
PubH 6066                     Building Communities, Increasing Health: Preparing for   Fall                  2
                              Community Health Work
PubH 6074                     Mass Communication and Public Health                     Spring                3
PubH 6078                     Public Health Policy as a Prevention Strategy            Fall                  2
PubH 6634                     Advocacy and Children’s Rights                           Spring                2



Public Health Core (15 credits)
       Note: Courses designated as part of the Public Health Core must be taken for a letter grade (A/F)
                                                                                                             99
Course             Notes      Title                                                            Offered                  Credits
PubH 6020                    Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science                    Fall/Spring/Summer             3
PubH 6101 or                  Environmental Health                                             Fall/Spring                    2
PubH 6102                    Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health                  Spring/Summer                  2
PubH 6341                     Epidemiologic Methods I                                          Fall                           3
PubH 6450                     Biostatistics I                                                  Fall/Spring                    4
PubH 6741 or                 Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy        Fall/Spring/Summer             1
PubH 6742                    Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy                     Fall/Spring/Summer             1
PubH 6751                    Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations        Fall/Spring                    2


Master’s Project and Field Experience (4 credits)
PubH 7694                     Masters Project (see section 2.7)                                Fall/Spring/Summer             2
PubH 7696                     Field Experience (see section 2.6)                               Fall/Spring/Summer             2
Electives (to total 48 credits)
Elective Credits/Concentrations
Elective courses are usually taken during the second year. Students completing one of the concentrations in the
School will use their elective credits to complete the concentration. At this time, interdisciplinary concentrations are
available in Global Health, Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Health Disparities, and Public Health Policy.
Information on the concentrations is available at www.sph.umn.edu. Because students in the epidemiology emphasis
take several methods courses, it may be difficult for them to complete a concentration in two years.


2.3      Fall 2008 MCH Online/Distance Learning Curriculum

42 Semester Credit Minimum
Scientific Basis of Maternal and Child Health (5 credits)
Select a minimum of five credits from the following list. Additional courses may be offered through the Public Health
Institute held annually in May.
Course               Title                                                                    Offered                 Credits
PubH 6281            Immigrant Health Issues (online)                                         Fall                        3
PubH 6600            Global Reproductive Health (online)                                      Fall `08, Fall `10          2
PubH 6606            Children’s Health: Issues, Program and Policies (online)                 Spring                      2
PubH 6613            Children and Youth With Special Health Care Needs                        Fall `08                    2
PubH 6902            Maternal and Infant Nutrition (online)                                   Summer                      2
PubH 6903            Child and Adolescent Nutrition (online)                                  Summer                      2
  Additional courses will be offered through the Public Health Institute held annually in May. The Major Chair will advise
                            students of these courses before the start of the Institute each year.
Methodological and Analytical Skills (5 credits)
PubH 6852            Program Evaluation (online)                                              Spring                      2
Select a minimum of three credits from the following list. Additional courses will be offered through the Public Health
Institute held annually in May. The Major Chair will advise students of these courses before the start of the Institute each
year.
PubH 6650            Community Based Participatory Research                                   Institute Course            1
PubH 7200            Focus Group Interviews                                                   Institute Course            1
PubH 7200            Data Analysis from Focus Groups                                          Institute Course            1
PubH 7200            Community Health Data                                                    Institute Course            1
Management and Communication Skills (6.5 credits)
Nurs 5800            Grant Writing (online)                                                   Spring                      1
100
PubH 6655                Principals and Programs of MCH in the US (online)                                      Summer                               2
PubH 6299                Public Health is a Team Sport: The Power of Collaboration                              Institute Course                 1.5
Select a minimum of two credits from the following list. Additional courses will be offered through the Public Health Institute
  held annually in May. The Major Chair will advise students of these courses before the start of the Institute each year.
PubH 6700                Foundations of Public Health (online)                                                  Fall                                 2
PubH 6005                Motivational Interviewing                                                              Institute Course                     1
PubH 6727                Health Leadership and Effecting Change                                                 Institute Course                     2
PubH 7200                Culturally Responsive Leadership and Management                                        Institute Course                     1
Public Health Core (14 credits)
       Note: Courses designated as part of the Public Health Core must be taken for a letter grade (A/F)
PubH 6020                Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science (online)                                 Fall/Spring/Summer                   3
PubH 6102                Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health (online)                               Spring/Summer                        2
PubH 6320                Fundamentals of Epidemiology (online)                                                  Fall/Spring/Summer                   3
PubH 6414                Biostatistical Methods I (online)                                                      Fall/Summer                          3
PubH 6741 or             Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy (online)                     Fall /Summer                         1
PubH 6742                Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy (online)                                  Fall/ /Summer                        1
PubH 6751                Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations                              Spring                               2


Field Experience and Master’s Project (4 credits)
PubH 7696                Field Experience (see section 2.6)                                                     Fall/Spring/Summer                   2
PubH 7694                Masters Project (see section 2.7)                                                      Fall/Spring/Summer                   2
Electives (to total 42 credits)


2.4      Other MPH Degree Requirements
Table 1. Summary of competency areas/skills that guide the MCH curriculum and courses that address these
competency areas.
Maternal and Child Health Competencies (http://www.atmch.org), developed by the education committee of the
Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health and approved by the membership and the Association of
Schools of Public Health MCH Council in 1993 and revised in 2000, provide the basis for curriculum development
programming for MCH graduate education programs. Achieving these competencies permit MCH professionals to
perform the MCH essential services within a broader context of public health core functions.

   I. Scientific Basis of MCH
   Competency Area Skills                                                                      How Acquired                   How Measured
   Has knowledge and understanding of the following:                                       • PubH 6020, 6605, 6606,      • Normal patters of
                                                                                           6607, 6613, 6645,             individual and family growth
   • Major domestic and international causes of mortality and morbidity associated with                                  and
   pregnancy, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and the child-bearing years                 6675, 6902, 6903,6906
                                                                                                                         development Course
   • Normal patters of individual and family growth and development from a lifespan        • Field experience            evaluations
   perspective
                                                                                           • Master’s project            • Student grades
   • Determinants of health & illness & includes biological, behavioral & socio-cultural
   perspectives                                                                                                          • Student and preceptor
                                                                                                                         evaluations of field
   • Characteristics of health care systems                                                                              experience
   • Principles of population based health promotion                                                                     • Master’s project from a
   • Principles of community organization, change and development                                                        lifespan perspective

   • Comprehension of foundations of scientific inquiry & limitations of conceptual
   frameworks

                                                                                                                                                     101
  Demonstration of the following skills:
  • Describe MCH topics in terms of time, magnitude/severity, dispersion/location &
  comorbidity
  • Identify scientific underpinnings for MCH interventions
  • Apply knowledge of demographics, health, familial, community & environmental
  factors to the design of MCH programs
  • Critically analyze health disparities on race/ethnicity, SES, position & gender
  II. Methodological and Analytical Skills
  Competency Area Skills                                                                           How Acquired               How Measured
  Has knowledge and understanding of the following:                                            • PubH 6034, 6035, 6320,   • Course evaluations
                                                                                               6325, 6331,
  • Research design, sampling, basic descriptive and inferential statistics, validity and                                 • Student grades
  reliability assessment of measures                                                           6345, 6414, 6415, 6450,
                                                                                               6451, 6617,                • Student and preceptor
  • Epidemiological concepts and descriptive epidemiology                                                                 evaluations of field
                                                                                               6705, 6806, 6910           experience
  • Use of date to illuminate ethical, political, scientific, economic, and overall public
  health issues                                                                                • Field experience         • Master’s project
  • Strengths and limitations of qualitative and quantitative methods                          • Master’s project
  • Data collections strategies, strengths and limitations
  • Key features of community assessment, program design, implementation &
  evaluation
  Demonstrate the following skills:
  • Prepare and interpret data from vital statistics, census, surveys & other relevant
  reports
  • Application of appropriate qualitative methods for understanding MCH health status
  • Use of data for asset identification, assessment, program planning, implementation &
  evaluation
  • Formulate research hypothesis and implant an analytic strategy
  • Evaluate the integrity & comparability of data & identify existing gaps
  • Extract data from primary & secondary sources with the use of appropriate statistical
  software

  III. Management and Communication Skills
  Competency Area Skills                                                                           How Acquired               How Measured
  Has knowledge and understanding of the following:                                            • PubH 6034, 6035, 6320,   • Course evaluations
                                                                                               6325, 6331,
  • Organizational and management theories and practices, and their administration in                                     • Student grades
  public and private agencies.                                                                 6345, 6414, 6415, 6450,
                                                                                               6451, 6617,                • Student and preceptor
  • Application of Inter-organizational theories and principles of systems development,                                   evaluations of field
  management and analysis                                                                      6705, 6806, 6910           experience
  • The purposes, rationale, activities, staffing, data strategy and analysis plan for a MCH   • Field experience         • Master’s project
  program
                                                                                               • Master’s project
  • Appropriate use of networking, team building, small group process, advocacy and
  negotiation skills, and community organization and coalition building techniques to
  address MCH issues and problems
  • Techniques of soliciting and maintaining consumer and other constituency input at all
  levels of organization
  • The processes, organization and administration of quality management techniques in
  MCH
  Demonstration of the following skills:
  • Apply knowledge of management to the implementation of integrated MCH service
  systems

102
   • Integrate health promotion strategies with primary care & other health systems
   • Develop mechanisms to monitor and evaluate programs including the use of
   performance measures.
   • Develop a budget with justification
   • Develop background & significance section of a grant application
   • Effective written & oral communication skills applicable to multiple settings i.e., health
   agency, legislative, media, etc.
   • Develop & disseminate continuing MCH education programs
   • Effectively resolve conflict through management techniques
   • Development of linkages to community boards & coalitions
   • Use information technology for efficient programming.

   IV. Values and Ethics in MCH
   Competency Area Skills                                                                             How Acquired                How Measured
   Has knowledge and understanding of:                                                            • PubH 6020, 6605, 6606,    • Course evaluations
                                                                                                  6607, 6613,
   • The philosophy, values, and social justice concepts associated with MCH                                                  • Student grades
                                                                                                  • 6630, 6645, 6675, 6741,
   • The principles and issues involved in the ethical and sensitive conduct of practice and                                  • Student and preceptor
                                                                                                  6742
   research within MCH populations                                                                                            evaluations of field
                                                                                                  • Field experience          experience
   • The philosophical concepts and rationale underlying the delivery of family centered,
   comprehensive, community-based, and culturally competent MCH and public health                 • Master’s project          • Master’s project
   services and programs, including recognition of community assets
   Demonstrate the following skills:
   • Ethical conduct in practice, program management, research and date
   collection/storage
   • Promotion of cultural competence concepts within diverse MCH settings
   • Build partnerships within MCH communities & constituencies to foster community
   empowerment, reciprocal learning and involvement in research design


Public Health Core Area Requirements
Students working towards an MPH degree must satisfy competency requirements in the six core areas of public
health – administration, behavioral science, biostatistics, environmental health, epidemiology, and ethics – by
completing one of the following in each core area:
      Satisfactorily pass one of the pre-approved courses in the core area (see the following pre-approved course
       list); OR
      Pass an equivalency exam in the core area; OR
      Pass an advanced course in the core area as approved by the respective division head or the Educational
       Policy Committee; OR
      Complete a graduate level course, with a grade of B or better, at an accredited university or college that meets
       the competencies defined by the Council on Education for Public Health. The Educational Policy Committee,
       upon petition of the student, will determine acceptance of a course for transfer.

Pre-approved Courses Meeting Public Health Core Area Requirements
Administration
PubH 6751 Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations – 2 cr.

Behavioral Science
PubH 6020 Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science – 3 cr.

Biostatistics
PubH 6414 Biostatistical Methods I – 3 cr.
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PubH 6415     Biostatistical Methods II – 3 cr.
PubH 6450     Biostatistics I – 4 cr.
PubH 6451     Biostatistics II – 4 cr.

Environmental Health
PubH 6101 Environmental Health – 2 cr.
PubH 6102 Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health – 2 cr.

Epidemiology
PubH 6320 Fundamentals of Epidemiology – 3 cr.
PubH 6341 Epidemiologic Methods I – 3 cr.

Ethics
PubH 6741     Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy – 1 cr.
PubH 6742     Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy – 1 cr.

Registration Requirement
Students are required to register for at least 2 semesters and 15 credits in the School of Public Health.

Course Numbers and Graduate Credit
5xxx, 6xxx, 7xxx and 8xxx-level courses are considered graduate-level. 1xxx and 3xxx-level courses are for
undergraduates and will not receive approval for graduate credit. Under some circumstances – with approval of the
student’s Major Chair – 4xxx-level courses may also be applied toward a MPH degree as long as they are taught by a
member of the graduate faculty.

SPH Grading Policies
Grade Point Average
Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of no less than 3.0 (B) across their entire program to receive
an MPH degree.
S-N Grade Option
MPH students may take no more than 20% of their coursework on an S-N grading basis, exclusive of those topics,
seminars, and field experience courses offered only on an S-N basis.
Public Health Core Courses
Courses designated as part of the public health core must be taken for a letter grade (A-F). Students will be required
to achieve no less than a B- grade in each course taken on an A-F basis. Students may retake public health core
courses at their own expense until they achieve a grade of B- or better. However, a retaken course may be counted
only once toward degree requirements in the student’s study plan.
Each public health major may require higher levels of achievement for its own students in public health core courses
that are also core to the major. This may include restrictions on retaking public health core courses that are also core
to the major, or requiring more than a B- performance level. Students should consult their Major Coordinator for
documentation of these requirements.

Field Experience
All students matriculating in a MPH program must complete a formal, supervised fieldwork experience; see section
2.6.

MPH Study Plan
Students are required to submit a completed MPH Study Plan to their Major Coordinator at least one semester prior to
their anticipated completion of coursework. Earlier submission (e.g. in the second to last semester) is suggested to
allow the Major Coordinators to review the study plan and notify students if they are missing any requirements prior to
their last term of study.

Master’s Project
MPH students must complete a master’s project; see section 2.7.


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Comprehensive Examination
MPH students must complete a written and/or oral examination as specified by the major; see section 2.8.

Time Frame
The maximum time allowed by the School of Public Health for completion of an MPH degree is seven years. The
seven year period begins with the first term of enrollment after admission to a degree program within the School.

Course Transfer Credits
Effective with students entering the program in Fall 2007, a student may seek transfer of no more than 40% of their
total graduate or professional program credits taken prior to the MPH program matriculation at the University of
Minnesota or at another college or university. Course credits may be used to satisfy public health core or other
program requirements as jointly approved by the Major Chair and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. No course
credits older than 5 years from the date of the student’s matriculation will be accepted for transfer. A grade of “B” or
better is required for each course requested for transfer credit.
MPH students who have completed graduate-level coursework at the University of Minnesota or another college or
university may petition to transfer those courses toward their MPH degree. To be considered for transfer, graduate
level coursework must have been taken at an accredited graduate institution. Students must:
1. Meet with their advisor to discuss the petitioning process. If the petition is acceptable to the advisor, the student
   will complete and sign the Petition form, attach an official transcript on which the final grade has been posted.
2. Submit the Petition form to the Major Coordinator for processing. The Petition form can be found at
    http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm
  The Major Coordinator will forward the petition to the major chair and then to the Associate Dean for final evaluation
  and/or approval.

Course Substitutions and Waivers
  All student requests that deviate from the degree curriculum requirements outlined in this Guidebook must be made
  on a Petition form. The Petition form can be obtained at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.
  Students should note that the process for approving a course substitution or waiver could take up to one month, so
  plan accordingly.
Course Substitution Procedures:
The following process should be followed when requesting that a course substitute for a required course in your
degree program. Students should apply for approval before they take the course whenever possible as permission
could be denied. Students should:
1. Gather the course syllabi of the required course in your degree program and the proposed substitute course and
   a transcript on which the proposed course grade has been posted (if the proposed course has already been
   completed).
2. Complete the Petition form with the following information in each section:
    REQUEST SECTION: describe the course requested for substitution including the course title, number of
     credits, term and year taken, and the name of the institution offering the course. Also list the
     course/requirement in your degree program for which you are asking for the substitution.
    REASON/EXPLANATION SECTION: Indicate what skills and/or content overlaps between the required
     course(s) and the proposed substitute course(s).
3. Compile the above materials and have the request reviewed by the advisor. S/he will complete the Department
   section of the Petition form and indicate whether or not s/he approves of the request.
4. After the advisor has made his/her recommendations, the student should submit these materials to the Major
   Coordinator who will forward it to the appropriate Credentials Committee for review. The student will be notified
   via e-mail of the committee’s decision.
5. If the substitute course is to replace a School of Public Health Core course (administration-PubH 6751/6752,
   behavioral/social science-PubH 6020, biostatistics-PubH 6414/6450, environmental health-PubH 6101/6102,
   epidemiology-PubH 6320/6341, ethics-PubH 6741/6742), there is an additional step to get School level approval.
   To complete this next step, provide two additional copies of the above materials. All of those materials should be
   submitted to your Major Coordinator. Upon receipt of those materials, the Major Coordinator will review the
                                                                                                                    105
      request with the Major Chair and then if approved by the Major Chair, all copies of the request will be forwarded to
      the Student Service Center to be presented to the appropriate SPH Educational Policy committee members. The
      student will be notified via e-mail of the committee’s decision. If the Major Chair does not approve of the request,
      the Major Coordinator will inform the student that the request will not be forwarded to the SPH Educational Policy
      Committee for review.

Application for Degree
MPH students are required to complete an Application for Degree form. There are strict deadline dates before a
student can be cleared for graduation. Copies of this form can be obtained from the Major Coordinator, the Student
Services Center or downloaded from http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm. Students are encouraged to
submit the form in their first semester of matriculation.


2.5       Sample Schedules
Students are strongly encouraged to meet with their academic advisors each term prior to registration to review their
academic plan.
Note: Part-time schedules are available upon request from Kathryn Schwartz. Part-time students must plan carefully
to make sure courses that are sequential in nature are taken in the appropriate order. Students may contact Kathryn
Schwartz at schwa139@umn.edu for assistance with your schedule.

Full-Time Standard Program Option [48 credits]
 Fall Semester I
          Course         Title                                                                                   Credits
          PubH 6320      Fundamentals of Epidemiology                                                                3
          PubH 6414      Biostatistical Methods I                                                                    3
          PubH 6630      Foundations of MCH Leadership                                                               3
                         1 Scientific Basis Course                                                                   2
 Spring Semester I
          PubH 6034      Program Evaluation for Public Health Practice                                               3
          PubH 6741      Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy                                   1
                         1 Scientific Basis Course                                                                   2
                         1 Management, Policy, or Advocacy Course*                                                   2
                         1 Methodological and Analytical Course*                                                     3
 May/Summer Session I
          PubH 6673      Grant Writing for Public Health                                                             1
          PubH 6102      Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health (online)                                    2
          PubH 7696      Field Experience                                                                            2
 Fall Semester II
          PubH 6020      Fundamentals of Social/Behavioral Science                                                   3
          PubH 6751      Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations                                   2
                         1 Scientific Basis Course                                                                   2
                         1 Methodological and Analytical Course*                                                     3
 Spring Semester II
          PubH 7694      Master’s Project                                                                            2
                         2 Elective Courses                                                                          5
                         1 Methodological and Analytical Course*                                                     2
                         1 Scientific Basis Course                                                                   2
*Several course options with varying credit totals are available to meet Methodological and Analytical Skills, and the
Management/Policy/or Advocacy requirements
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Full-Time MCH Epidemiology Emphasis [48 credits]
 Fall Semester I
         Course              Title                                                                             Credits
         PubH 6341           Epidemiologic Methods I                                                               3
         PubH 6450           Biostatistics I                                                                       4
         PubH 6630           Foundations of MCH Leadership                                                         3
         PubH 6741           Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy                             1
 Spring Semester I
         PubH 6342           Epidemiologic Methods II                                                              3
         PubH 6451           Biostatistics II                                                                      4
                             1 Policy and Advocacy Course                                                          2
                             1 Scientific Basis Course                                                             2
 May/Summer Session I
         PubH 6673           Grant Writing                                                                         1
         PubH 7696           Field Experience                                                                      2
 Fall Semester II
         PubH 6343           Epidemiologic Methods III                                                             4
         Pubh 6344           Epidemiologic Methods IV                                                              2
                                                        st
         PubH 6101           Environmental Health (1 half semester)                                                2
                                                                                             nd
                             Principles of Management & Hlth Services Organizations (2            half
         PubH 6751                                                                                                 2
                             semester)
                             1 Scientific Basis Course                                                             2
 Spring Semester II
         PubH 6020           Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science                                         3
         PubH 7694           Master’s Project                                                                      2
                             1 Scientific Basis Course                                                             2
                             Elective Course(s)                                                                   2-4
*Several course options with varying credit totals are available to meet Methodological and Analytical Skills, and the
Management/Policy/or Advocacy requirements

Full-Time MCH Online/Distance Learning Sample Schedule [42 credits]
 Fall Semester I
        Course               Title                                                                              Credits
        PubH 6320            Fundamentals of Epidemiology                                                          3
        PubH 6414            Biostatistical Methods I                                                              3
        PubH 6020            Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Sciences                                        3
        PubH 6700            Foundations of Public Health                                                          2
 Spring Semester I
        PubH 6852            Program Evaluation                                                                    2
        Nurs 5925            Grant Writing                                                                         1
        PubH 6751            Principles of Management in a Health Services Organization                            2
        PubH 6741            Ethics in Public Health                                                               1
                             Elective Course                                                                       2
 Summer Semester I
                             Methodological and Analytical Skills courses in the Summer Institute                  3
                                                                                                                          107
                           Scientific Basis course in the Summer Institute                                   1
       PubH 6299           Public Health as a Team Sport                                                    1.5
       PubH 6655           Principles and Programs of MCH in the U.S.                                        2
 Fall Semester II
                           Scientific Basis course                                                           2
                           2 Elective courses                                                                4
       PubH 7696           Field Experience                                                                  2
 Spring Semester II
       PubH 6102           Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health                                   2
       PubH 7694           Master’s Project                                                                  2
                           Scientific Basis course                                                           2
                           Elective course                                                                   2

Other Curriculum Suggestions for all MCH Students
Scientific Basis of Maternal and Child Health
Students are expected to have taken PubH 6630 Foundations of MCH Leadership before or concurrently with the
Scientific Basis of MCH courses.
Management and Communication Skills
Standard and Epi Emphasis students are required to take PubH 6673 – Grant Writing for Public Health. Students in
the online program are required to take Nurs 5800 Grantwriting. Non-credit seminars or workshops on grant writing
cannot be used as a substitute for PubH 6673.
Policy and Advocacy Skills
Students in the Standard and Epi Emphasis must take PubH 6630 Foundations of MCH Leadership. Students in the
online program must take PubH 6655 Principles and Programs of MCH in the U.S.
Public Health Core
It is important that students consult with their advisor about whether to take PubH 6414 or 6450 to meet the
biostatistics requirement and whether to take PubH 6320 or 6341 to meet the epidemiology requirement. MCH Epi
Emphasis students do not have the option: they must take 6341 and 6450.


2.6     Field Experience

Goals
The goal of the field experience is to provide an opportunity for Maternal and Child Health students to strengthen their
philosophy and understanding of public health and to begin developing an identity as a professional in MCH. This
goal is achieved by working with MCH professionals in a field agency outside of the University of Minnesota
to introduce the student to:
      The broad practice and philosophy of public health as it relates to MCH;
      The administrative and organizational framework for MCH programs and services at state and local levels; and
      The application of theory and skill to practice through work experiences with professional and community
       colleagues.
The field experience should increase the students’ confidence and ability to assess their strengths and weaknesses
as members of a public health team. Field experiences provide opportunities for personal involvement in developing,
planning, executing, and evaluating public health activities for MCH populations.
To achieve these goals, students, in consultation with their advisor, will identify objectives specific to their field
placement. The following list provides examples of relevant objectives, but is by no means exhaustive:
      Explore and apply methods of working effectively with communities or special populations within the
       community;
      Participate in needs identification, planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and/or evaluating the
       components of health services, programs, and projects related to MCH;
108
     Participate in assessing health problems of a selected population;
     Interpret current MCH research findings and their practical application to personal and community health
      through appropriate consultation experiences for physicians, nurses, social workers, therapists, teachers,
      nutritionists, or other health workers;
     Plan, direct, implement, and evaluate in-service education and orientation programs for professional and allied
      health workers in MCH programs;
     Participate in coordinating MCH services with related programs;
     Participate in planning, implementing, and evaluating needs assessments and health surveys that relate to
      MCH issues;
     Participate as a member of a multidisciplinary public health team;
     Select, plan, prepare, and evaluate teaching aids and materials to disseminate information to professional and
      nonprofessional audiences through various media; and
     Interpret legislation for professionals and consumers;

How to Meet the Field Experience Requirement
The field experience should be started after students have completed half of their required course work. Students are
encouraged to begin seeking an appropriate site six months before they are prepared to begin. Students should
consult with their academic advisor in selecting a site appropriate for achieving their educational and professional
objectives.
A minimum of 2 semester credits in PubH 7696 is required. Each credit requires 60 hours of work with the
agency/site.
Periodic communication with the advisor during the field experience is expected, although the faculty advisor will not
observe students at their field site. The site preceptor must have a master’s level degree or higher and may not be a
MCH faculty member.

How to Register and Complete the Field Experience
1. Once a potential placement has been identified, the student should make contact with the organization to identify
   and define a specific project or area, time commitment, and a site preceptor.
2. The Field Experience/Internship Contract form must be completed, approved (with signatures) by all parties and
   submitted to Kathryn Schwartz, Major Coordinator. Electronic completion of this form is available at
   www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp/. The contract must be submitted before students begin the field experience. Once
   the signed Field Experience/Internship Contract form has been submitted to Kathryn Schwartz, Major
   Coordinator, she will enter in electronic permission to register for PubH 7696. The student will receive an e-mail
   from Kathryn once this has been done.
3. Certain facilities are required by Minnesota law to submit paperwork for a criminal background check for all
   personnel with direct, unsupervised client contact. If their field experience, master's project, or dissertation is in
   such a facility, students may be asked by the institution to submit paperwork.
4. Some agencies may ask students to sign agreements concerning confidentiality of data or other data practices.
   This may be especially true in settings where students will have access to personal identifiers.
5. The field experience is graded on a pass/fail (S/N) basis. Upon completion of their field experience, students
   should provide the site preceptor with a Preceptor Evaluation of Field Experience/Internship form. Forms are
   available on-line at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm. Students also need to complete a Student
   Evaluation of Field Experience/ Internship form. This form is also available at
   www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm. The completed forms should be submitted electronically to Kathryn
   Schwartz, Major Coordinator. She will give the forms to the students’ faculty field experience advisor who will then
   review them and request a grade change. The completed forms will remain in the student’s file.
6. It is expected that students send a letter of appreciation to their site preceptor. The advisor will send a similar
   letter of appreciation; therefore a complete mailing address for the site preceptor should be on the evaluation
   forms.

Relationship to Master’s Project
The master’s project and field experience should represent separate activities, though they may be related. The
master’s project should involve more independent work than the field experience. A master’s project could evolve
                                                                                                                      109
from a field experience with an organization, but should be defined separately; the same work cannot be counted for
both. If they are related, careful consideration must be given in wording the contract to differentiate the requirements
of the field experience from the master's project.
We suggest that students do an internship at one organization and their master’s project with a different organization.
While it is not required, doing them with different organizations has several advantages. It gives the student an insight
into two organizations, expands the number of people the student can use for future references for jobs, and
increases the number of places that may turn into a job opportunity.


2.7        Master’s Project

Purpose
The purpose of the master’s project is to enable students to demonstrate:
         Familiarity with the tools of research and scholarship in the field of Public Health;
         The ability to work independently;
         The ability to plan and carry out a systematic investigation related to a public health issue; and
         The ability to effectively present, in written form, the results of their investigation.

Project Options
Students may choose among three options for their MPH project. The choice of options should be decided in
consultation with their advisor. The options are:
1. Research project;
2. Evaluation of an existing program; or
3. Critical literature review project.
Students with an MCH Epidemiology emphasis are encouraged to select the research report.
The diversity and number of research questions related to Maternal and Child Health are large. Students are
encouraged to decide upon a topic as early in their program as possible. Ideally, the primary area of interest should
be determined before the beginning of their second year. This should be followed by further specification of the topic
for investigation and a decision about the project options. Discussions with the advisor should be used to explore
opportunities and alternatives.
Students choose their topics through different avenues including:
         Prior experience that has stimulated an interest in a particular area of MCH;
         A formal course that stimulates interest in a specific area;
         Field placement projects that include sufficient scope and scholarly activity to constitute a master's project;
         Announcements from community organizations or public health agencies that have contacted the MCH
          program or SPH Career Center; and
         The student's advisor or other member of the faculty may be involved in a research study of interest to the
          student. The student may be given the opportunity to use data from a faculty research study for their master’s
          project or be referred to a public domain database.
Option 1: Research Project
This option is available for students who would like to apply research skills and analyze data (usually secondary data).
The research project will focus on pertinent questions or issues in MCH. This project will demonstrate the student’s
ability:
   To plan and conduct research using appropriate scientific methods;
   To assess quantitative or qualitative analysis using primary or secondary data; and
   For assessing the relevance of the findings of a project and research, policy, and programmatic implications.
Approval for the research needs to be obtained from the Human Subjects Committee (Institutional Review Board).
The research project should include the following components:
I.         Title Page: designate project option, advisor name, date, copyright permission (optional)
II.        Abstract - not to exceed 250 words
110
III.     Acknowledgments
IV.      Table of Contents
V.       Introduction
         A. Statement and development of problem, including its rationale and significance to public health and MCH
         B. Conceptual model or theoretical framework (if appropriate)
         C. Statement of purpose
VI.      Methodology
         A. Study design
         B. Description of database/population and sample selection procedures including nature of response and
              non-response, as appropriate
         C. Description of data/information collection procedures, study site and instrumentation, as appropriate
         D. Analytic method
VII.     Results
VIII.    Discussion
         A. Description of how findings confirm/depart from those of others
         B. Strengths and weaknesses of study
IX.      Conclusion and implications for public health/MCH
X.       References
XI.      Appendices (include copies of instruments, surveys, records used, IRB documentation, etc.)
Pending advisor's approval, students who plan to submit their master's project for publication may submit the final
project in the article format specified by a professional journal. Students collaborating with other investigators have the
primary responsibility for writing the article. However, revisions and editorial changes recommended by co-authors
may be incorporated into the final paper to be submitted to the examining committee. Students who are seeking
guidance on the format for the research project paper should examine published public health research reports in
journals like the American Journal of Public Health.
Option 2: Technical Report
This option gives students the opportunity to have in-depth involvement in a public health program. Students may
work with an agency or combine the field placement experience with the master's project requirement, depending on
the needs of the agency and the interests of the student. The project will meet the needs of the agency, as well as the
MPH requirement to produce scholarly work as the culmination of the graduate program. It is not a research study but
should reflect critical thinking, problem solving and creativity. The project should address topics of relevance to the
field of MCH and may reflect the product of: program evaluation; a community needs assessment; an assessment of
current practices or policies, data systems, or screening methods; or the development of a curriculum or program.
The technical report will demonstrate the student’s ability:
   To develop or evaluate program plans, processes, service activities or outcomes;
   To plan and organize a body of technical information into a cohesive and acceptable report format; and
   To assess the relevance policy and programmatic implications of the findings.
The technical report should be written in a style and format usable and useful to the agency, program planners and/or
policy makers. The format should be determined by the student in consultation with the faculty project advisor and site
supervisor. The technical report should include the following components:
I.      Title Page: designate project option, advisor name, date, copyright permission (optional)
II.     Acknowledgments
III.    Executive Summary
IV.     Table of Contents
V.      Overview of problem, issue, or project including its significance to public health, MCH and/or the agency
VI.     Critical Literature Review: A modest literature review may be necessary to contextualize the purpose of the
        project or the findings of the project
VII.    Methodology
        A. Design or plan of approach

                                                                                                                     111
         B. Description of data base/population and sample selection procedures including nature of response and
             non-response, as appropriate (e.g., Children’s Defense Fund, March of Dimes)
         C. Description of data/information collection procedures, study site and instrumentation, as appropriate
         D. Analytic method
VIII.    Results
IX.      Discussion
         A. Description of how findings confirm/depart from those of others
         B. Strengths and weaknesses of project
         C. Conclusion and implications for public health/MCH and/or the agency involved
X.       References
XI.      Appendices (include copies of instruments, surveys, records used, IRB documentation, etc.)
Option 3: Critical Literature Review Project
This option gives the student the opportunity to do a scholarly comprehensive and integrative review of published
literature to address a specific issue that is relevant to the science and practice of MCH. This literature review must be
of publishable quality and will demonstrate the student’s ability:
       To initiate and successfully plan and complete a comprehensive review of the literature and synthesize findings
        in an area of MCH;
       To critically and systematically evaluate the scientific, programmatic, or practice and policy evidence in the
        selected MCH content area;
       To recognize gaps in existing knowledge; and
       To assess the relevance of the literature to the delivery of health services and/or the development of programs
        or interventions for MCH populations.
A review could examine:
       The evidence-based review of a causal link (e.g., Is there a relationship between maternal hypertension and
        fetal growth?);
       The best practices in programming, evaluation or policy (e.g., Are abstinence-based programs associated with
        reductions in teen pregnancy?);
       The methodological concerns in studies of MCH populations (e.g., How has SES been modeled in studies of
        teenagers?);
       The evidence-based review of a critical issue (e.g., Mortality and morbidity for large-for-age babies).
The Critical Review Project typically has the following components:
I.       Title Page: designate project option, advisor name, date, copyright permission (optional)
II.      Abstract - not to exceed 250 words
III.     Acknowledgments
IV.      Table of Contents
V.       Introduction
         A. Statement and development of problem, including its rationale and significance to public health and MCH
         B. Conceptual model or theoretical framework (if appropriate)
         C. Statement of purpose
VI.      Methodology
         A. Method used to collect articles
         B. Criteria for including or excluding articles in review
         C. Criteria for assessing articles
VII.     Integrative Literature Review and Analysis
         A critical appraisal of the literature would involve a critique of the relevant studies that identifies strengths,
         weaknesses, and gaps (e.g., measurement of concepts, sampling, design, and analysis). An approach to this
         section would be to develop a table summarizing the studies reviewed, with the salient characteristics of the
         studies specified. It is generally recommended that the emphasis be on actual results of studies reviewed and
         not the authors' discussion of their results.
112
VIII.    Discussion
         This section is a summary of trends or patterns in the studies reviewed. If the review involves examining the
         evidence for a causal link between one or more factors and health outcomes, this section may discuss the
         literature relative to the general criteria for causality (e.g., strength of association, consistency across studies,
         temporal relationship, dose-response, biologic plausibility).
IX.      Conclusion and Implications for Public Health/MCH
X.       References
XI.      Appendices
Pending advisor's approval, students who plan to submit their master's project for publication may submit the final
project in the article format specified by the journal. Students collaborating with other investigators have the primary
responsibility for writing the article. However, revisions and editorial changes recommended by co-authors may be
incorporated into the final paper to be submitted to the examining committee. Students seeking guidance on the
critical literature review project should examine published review articles on the Cochrane database or in public health
or medical journals (e.g., The Annual Review of Public Health). Students are also advised to read Health Sciences
Literature Review Made Easy: The Matrix Method by Associate Dean Judy Garrard.

Master’s Project Advisor
All students must have an advisor to guide and approve the steps in the Master’s Project process. The Master's
Project advisor does not have to be the student's academic advisor. However, the project advisor must be a member
of the MCH faculty. Students who do not have a specific faculty member in mind to serve as their project advisor
should discuss potential project advisors with their academic advisor, the MCH Major Chair, or Kathryn Schwartz (the
MCH major coordinator).
When a faculty member agrees to serve as their project advisor, students should inform their academic advisor and
the Major Coordinators of the name of the project advisor and the subject or working title of their Master's Project. The
role of the Master's Project advisor varies with the project. Advisors should discuss with students the appropriate
scope and amount of work/credits for the project. Students can expect their project advisor to:
       Be available for consulting with the student at all stages of the project;
       Review and approve all project protocols and methods; and
       Provide guidance about the format and content of the final report;

Master’s Project Committee
The committee must include at least three members:
1. The master's project advisor, who must be an MCH faculty member, will chair the committee;
2. The second committee member must be an MCH faculty member. This person will be the academic advisor of
   the student if the academic advisor is not also the project advisor; and
3. One outside faculty person. This person must be a regular or adjunct faculty member from the University, but
   outside of the MCH Major. The project advisor and the student select this person.
The student’s academic advisor can also serve as the project advisor if both parties agree. If the student selects a
project advisor who is not her/his academic advisor, the academic advisor must be the second committee member. A
list of MCH faculty members and their research interests is available in section 2.10. All of the faculty members
included in this list may serve as a master’s project advisor for an MCH student. Students with questions about any
faculty member’s appointment should contact one of the Major Coordinators for clarification. Please remember the
academic advisor must be either the first or second committee member.
It is recommended that students inform all member of their committee about the scope of the project to give all
committee members a chance to have input. Students should also keep committee members updated on their
progress (e-mail is often fine) and be sure to schedule their exam at least one month in advance. Students should be
aware that all faculty members have full research/training schedules and are often heavily scheduled.

Approval Process and Registration
After selecting a topic, it is suggested that the project proposal be submitted to the advisor no later than the beginning
of the Fall semester in year two. This schedule will be different for part-time students.


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Prior to registering for the Master’s Project, students must submit the Master’s Project Approval Form
www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm. Students must have this form approved and signed by their master’s
project advisor, and submitted to Kathryn Schwartz, Major Coordinator, before they can start work on their master’s
project. The outline should include a detailed description of the master’s project.
Students must register for PubH 7694 – Master's Project: Maternal and Child Health for 2 semester credits. The grade
option for these credits is S-N only. Most students do not complete their master's project credits the same semester
they register for credits and thus the credits remain a "K" for "work in progress" on the transcript until they complete
their project and hold their oral exam.
The master’s project is completed in an independent study format with regular advisor meetings. Students are
encouraged to review the proposal with their advisor and schedule meetings as outlined in the implementation plan.
Regular meetings with the members of the exam committee are not expected but may occur.

Human Subjects Information
All students at the University of Minnesota who conduct any research using human subjects are required to submit
their research proposal to the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board (IRB) for approval prior to conducting
their study. The approval process can take up to two months. This time must be accounted for when developing the
proposal timeline. No contacts with potential or actual study participants, including recruitment or other research, may
occur until final IRB approval. After the outline has been approved, students should allow a minimum of six months to
complete all the tasks involved in preparing the IRB application and getting approval, conducting the project and
preparing the final draft.

Project Completion
The length and format of the final project report will vary depending on the project. Students need to decide on the
format and length in consultation with their advisor. Shorter papers (12-20 pages) prepared in a journal format to be
submitted for publication may be appropriated for research projects, but longer papers (20-50 pages) are more typical
of a master's project. Papers should be double-spaced, with 1-inch margins, using a font of 12, and prepared
according to accepted style guidelines. Copies of former students’ research projects are located near cubicle 398E on
the third floor of WBOB. Students may browse through these but cannot take them from the student study area. A list
of master’s research project titles is available on-line at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/mstrproj.shtm. Abstracts are
available on www.epi.umn.edu/mch.
In an effort to keep this requirement contemporary and relevant to the preparation of public health professionals, the
following style manuals are recommended:
     American Medical Association. American Medical Association Manual of Style. 9th ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams
      & Wilkins, 1998.
     American Psychological Association. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 5th ed.
      Washington, DC: American Psychological Association; 2001.
Suggested Timetable
During Fall Semester II students should:
     Develop topic and select project option in consultation with their advisor;
     Submit project proposal to their advisor for approval;
     Once approved, submit the Master's Project Approval Form to Kathryn Schwartz, Major Coordinator, and
      register for master's project credits;
   Complete IRB application (allow two months for approval); and
   After IRB approval, begin work on their project.
Three to four months before their expected program completion students should:
     Continue work on their project; and
     Identify and contact (in consultation with their advisor) possible Oral Examination Committee members to
      determine interest and availability.
One to three months before expected program completion students should:
   Submit the first draft of the project to their advisor and make an appointment for a follow-up discussion (allow 2
      weeks for advisor to read draft);
   Discuss the draft with their advisor and make revisions and corrections (more than one round of revisions will
      probably be required);
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     Schedule their Oral Examination, with advisor approval; and
     Submit final project to advisor and Committee members (allow at minimum two weeks for reading).

Costs Associated with the Master's Project
Students are responsible for costs associated with completing their master's projects. These costs are sometimes
offset in part by the organization with which the student is working. Funds may also be available from the Division of
Epidemiology and Community Health by applying for the J. B. Hawley Student Research Award; see section 1.6. The
Division of Epidemiology and Community Health will provide MPH, MS and PhD students working on research
projects free access to the Division's research computers. The following rules for such access are:
     A sponsoring faculty member should initiate access for the student and specify the time period that the access
      is needed;
     Access beyond the initial time period is renewable at the request of the faculty member and subject to approval
      by the Computer Resources committee;
     To be courteous, the student should run only one job at a time;
     The computer may not be used for other coursework;
     This access is limited to the main research computers and does not necessarily include exclusive use of a PC
      or Mac (the student is assumed to need access to the specialized analysis software only available on the Epi
      main system); and
     Any problems should be reported to the faculty sponsor, not the computer support staff or the Major
      Coordinators.

Dissemination
It is expected that projects will result in methods and findings of interest to professionals in the field. Students are
highly encouraged to disseminate their findings at professional meetings (poster or paper), in a professional journalat
the annual summer MCH Institute or by preparing a technical report for MCH agencies.


2.8     Oral Presentation and Examination
The following are guidelines for the MPH examination for the Maternal and Child Health Major. Forms mentioned
below can be found at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm.
Students give an oral presentation of the Master's Project to a public audience and their Examining Committee. The
presentation should last approximately 15-20 minutes followed by 10 minutes for audience questions. After the
presentation, the student and the Examining Committee convene for a closed-door examination, which lasts for
approximately 30-60 minutes.
Student in the online/distance learning program may have the option to complete their exam via
teleconference.

Material Covered
The material covered in the oral examination is comprehensive and includes:
1. Master's Project;
2. Course materials and seminars;
3. Issues of practical application

Before the Examination
Students need to complete Part I of the Study Plan at least one semester before completion of their coursework. The
form can be found at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm. Students should complete Pages 1 & 2 of the
Study Plan and then turn in the Study Plan to Kathryn Schwartz (cube 398D WBOB), Major Coordinator, who will then
make sure the advisor and Major Chair sign it before the form is placed in the student’s file. Students are urged to
keep a copy of their Study Plan for their files.
Students are responsible for scheduling the oral exam with the committee members, reserving a small conference
room for a minimum of two hours to allow preparatory time and post-exam discussion time, if needed. Students are
expected to determine the date and time of their defense and schedule the room.

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     To schedule a room in the West Bank Office Building (WBOB), call 612-624-1818.
     To schedule a room in Mayo Building, call 612-626-3500.
It is a good idea to reserve the room 30 minutes prior to the presentation time. Allowing that additional 30 minutes will
ensure that the audio-visual equipment reserved has been set up and is working. To reserve an LCD projector and/or
laptop, please notify Kathryn at least two weeks in advance.
At least two weeks prior to the exam, students must forward a copy of their final project to their committee members
for review, and notify Kathryn (schwa139@umn.edu) of the date of the oral exam so that the proper paperwork can be
forwarded to the project advisor. Students should send Kathryn a copy of the project abstract electronically. This
abstract will be included in the announcement of the oral to students and faculty. The abstract will also be posted on
the MCH website.

During the Exam
The student's formal presentation should cover the Master's Project and may also include:
     An introduction and rationale for the project;
     A description of the methods used;
     A description of major findings; and
     A concluding statement regarding public health implications and directions for the future research or
      program/policy development.
The exact components for the presentation will vary among individuals, but all presentations should be well prepared
and suitable for a professional audience.

After the Exam
The “exam” involves the student’s forma presentation, questions from the audience, and questions from the
Examining Committee. After the Examining Committee has finished its questions, the student will be excused from the
room and the Committee will make its decision by a vote. If the vote is split, the committee discusses their respective
opinions and strives to reach a unanimous decision. The final decision will be one of the following:
      Pass – The requirements are complete. The Committee members sign the MPH Study Plan indicating that the
       student has passed.
   Pass pending revisions – The Committee may request revisions of the written Master's Project. In this case
       the advisor is responsible for summarizing the changes to be made, designating who will review the changes,
       and setting a date when the changes are due on the second page of the student's Master's Project Coversheet.
       This page is then copied for the student and reviewer(s). The student must make the changes and submit an
       updated version of the project to the member(s) by the date designated at the exam.
      Students are expected to submit the revisions by the date designated at the exam and reviewers are given two
      weeks to evaluate the updated project. Upon receiving the signed Master's Project Coversheet(s) from the
      reviewer(s), the advisor will sign and forward the MPH Study Plan, student's transcript and all Master's Project
      Coversheets to Kathryn Schwartz.
   Re-take – In the case of a re-take, the Committee will provide specific reasons for the re-take and provide
       guidance to the student about what must be demonstrated to pass. The advisor will give this as verbal
       feedback to the student in the committee's presence, as well as in writing after the exam, with copies to the
       other Committee members and the Major Coordinators.
The MPH will not be conferred until the Exam Committee is satisfied with both the quality of the presentation and the
master’s project. The project advisor is responsible for returning the student’s file with the signed study plan to the
Kathryn as well as submitting a grade change for the master's project research credits, PubH 7694.
Once any necessary changes or corrections to the Master’s Project have been completed, students must submit one
unbound, unstapled copy of their Master’s Project paper and abstract to Kathryn Schwartz, Major Coordinator.


2.9     Graduate Follow-up Survey
Students must submit the Graduate Follow-Up Survey prior to receiving their degree or certificate. Students may
complete the process online at the appropriate link on the current student Web page
http://sphsdb.ahc.umn.edu/gradsurvey/gs_login.cfm. Upon submitting the electronic survey, the student's relevant


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major coordinator will be notified by e-mail. Coordinators may opt to have the student complete a paper copy, and
then enter the information for the student using the online form.
All graduates will receive a three-month and six-month e-mail message asking them to update survey information
(e.g., employment). This is through secure access and coordinators will not be able to input on students' behalf.


2.10 Program Faculty List

Primary Faculty
Name                       Phone     E-mail                       Research Expertise
Sonya Brady, PhD          626-4026   ssbrady@umn.edu              Health risk behavior during adolescence and young
                                                                  adulthood; Developmental influences on risk taking;
                                                                  Mechanisms linking stressful life circumstances to
                                                                  health risk behavior and factors promoting resiliency;
                                                                  Promotion of health protective behavior; Public
                                                                  policies affecting adolescent health.
Ellen Demerath, PhD       626-8231   ewd@umn.edu                  Body composition and obesity assessment;
                                                                  Developmental determinants of cardiovascular
                                                                  disease risk; Lifecourse epidemiology; Genetic
                                                                  epidemiology of obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart
                                                                  disease; Biomarkers of biological senescence
John Finnegan, Jr., PhD   624-5544   finne001@umn.edu             Media communication and public health; Community
                                                                  campaigns; The "Knowledge Gap" and health
                                                                  outcomes; Digital information technology and its
                                                                  impact on public health
Jean Forster, PhD, MPH    626-8864   forst001@umn.edu             Public health policy as a prevention strategy;
(on sabbatical January                                            Community-based strategies for chronic disease
08 – January 09)                                                  prevention; Tobacco policy
Bernard Harlow, PhD,      626-6527   harlow@umn.edu               Clinical and population-based reproductive
MPH                                                               epidemiology; the epidemiology of reproductive
                                                                  cancers; data collection methods; and influence of
                                                                  psychiatric disorders on reproductive function
Eileen Harwood, PhD       626-1824   harwo002@umn.edu             Social Epidemiology Health Program and Policy
                                                                  Evaluation Alcohol; Tobacco and Illicit Drugs
Wendy Hellerstedt, PhD    626-2077   helle023@umn.edu             Birth outcomes for underserved women; Adolescent
                                                                  pregnancy prevention; pregnancy intention;
                                                                  Relationship of parity to chronic disease and birth
                                                                  outcomes; Women's health; Perinatal and
                                                                  reproductive health; Socioeconomic status; Health
                                                                  disparities
Deborah Hennrikus,        626-8646   hennr001@umn.edu             Smoking cessation; Reducing environmental tobacco
PhD                                                               smoke exposure; Health education in clinical settings
John Himes, PhD           624-8210   himes001@umn.edu             Child growth and nutrition; Anthropometric
                                                                  assessment of nutritional status; Dietary assessment;
                                                                  Obesity and body composition
David Jacobs, Jr., PhD    624-4196   jacob004@umn.edu             Cardiovascular disease epidemiology; Biometry; Diet;
                                                                  Physical activity; Low serum; Cholesterol and
                                                                  noncardiovascular disease; Nutritional epidemiology
                                                                  and whole grains
Rhonda Jones-Webb,        626-8866   jones010@umn.edu             Alcohol studies; Alcohol policy as a prevention
DrPH                                                              strategy; Minority health issues; Behavioral
                                                                  epidemiology
Harry Lando, PhD          624-1877   lando001@umn.edu             Global issues in tobacco reduction; Smoking
(on sabbatical June 08-                                           cessation; Treatment of medically compromised
May 09)                                                           smokers
Russell Luepker, MD,      624-6362   luepk001@umn.edu             Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and prevention;
MS                                                                Health behavior; Community trials; Clinical trials
Leslie Lytle, PhD         624-3518   lalytle@umn.edu              Planning and evaluating eating behavior; Change
                                                                  interventions in children; Youth health promotion
                                                                  research; Theories of health behavior
Dianne Neumark-           624-0880   neuma011@umn.edu             Adolescent health and nutrition; Obesity and eating

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Sztainer, PhD, MPH                                                 disorder prevention; Health behavior change; Nutrition
                                                                   education program design and evaluation
Ruby Nguyen, PhD          626-7559   nguy0082@umn.edu              Women’s Health; Reproductive and Perinatal
                                                                   Epidemiology.
J. Michael Oakes, PhD     624-6855   oakes007@umn.edu              Quantitative Methods; Social Epidemiology; Research
                                                                   Ethics
Charles Oberg, MD,        625-6616   oberg001@umn.edu              Health Disparities; Childhood Poverty; Health Care
MPH                                                                Access & Finance
Joän Patterson, PhD       624-1394   jasu@umn.edu                  Adolescent - parent comanagement of diabetes;
                                                                   Behavioral risk factors among youth with cystic
                                                                   fibrosis; Impact of cancer on families; Child and family
                                                                   adaptation to childhood chronic illness and disability;
                                                                   Prevention of mental health problems in children;
                                                                   Family health promotion
Pamela Schreiner, PhD     626-9097   schre012@umn.edu              Etiology of cardiovascular disease particularly as it
                                                                   relates to lipids, obesity, visceral fat accumulation and
                                                                   the perimenopausal transition; Osteoporosis
Jamie Stang, PhD,         626-0351   stang002@umn.edu              Nutrition and weight status in pregnancy; Child and
MPH, RD                                                            adolescent nutrition; Behavioral counseling in child
                                                                   obesity; Eating disorders treatment
Mary Story, PhD           626-8801   story001@umn.edu              Child and adolescent nutrition; Obesity prevention;
                                                                   Eating behaviors


Adjunct Faculty
Name                         Phone        E-mail                            Research Expertise
Sara Axtell, PhD            625-4489      axtel002@umn.edu                  Community organizing
Linda Bearinger, PhD        624-5157      beari001@umn.edu                  Health promotion with vulnerable
                                                                            adolescents; Sexual behavior; Substance
                                                                            abuse; Violence involvement; Multiethnic
                                                                            issues in adolescent health
Lynn Bretl, MPP              626-0974     muen0001@umn.edu                  Sexuality Education; Healthy Youth
                                                                            Development.
Kathleen Brothen, MS      651-582-8842    Kathy.brothen@state.mn.us         Pregnancy Prevention; HIV/AIDS/STD's
                                                                            Prevention
Amos Deinard, MD,         638-0700 x212   deina001@umn.edu                  Oral Health of Poor Children; Enhancing
MPH                                                                         Parenting Skills of High Risk Mothers
Edward Ehlinger, MD,        625-1612      ehlin003@umn.edu                  Health of college students; Urban health
MSPH
Ann Garwick, PhD            624-1141      garwi001@umn.edu                  Children with special health care needs; Care
                                                                            giving experiences of families from diverse
                                                                            cultural backgrounds; Family health and
                                                                            health promotion; Qualitative research
                                                                            methods
Neal Holtan, MD           651-266-1222    holt0231@umn.edu                  History of medicine and public health; Public
                                                                            health policy
Barbara Leonard, PhD,       624-2147      leona001@umn.edu                  Children and adolescents with type I
RN                                                                          diabetes; Fetal alcohol syndrome prevention;
                                                                            Complementary care & spirituality
Luanne Nyberg, MPA          596-7709      Luane.Nyberg@co.hennepin.mn.      Health disparities; Child health; Advocacy;
                                          us                                Public health policy
Michael Resnick, PhD        624-9111      resni001@umn.edu                  Adolescent resiliency; Adolescent risk and
                                                                            protective factors; Teen pregnancy
                                                                            prevention; Youth violence prevention
Julie Ross, PhD, MPH        625-5437      ross@epi.umn.edu                  Molecular epidemiology; Childhood cancer;
                                                                            Adult leukemia
Lisa Turnham, MPH         651-644-1447    lbottham@comcast.net              Sexuality Education, Adolescent Pregnancy
                                                                            Prevention.
Margaret Youngquist, MS   651-266-2407    Grit.youngquist@co.ramsey.mn.us   Prevention of sexual violence




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2.11 Graduation Checklist

General steps for all MPH majors
1. Student submits completed Study Plan at least one semester prior to the anticipated completion of coursework;
    see section 2.8.
2. Student files the Application for Degree form (see section 2.2) at 200 Fraser Hall by the end of the first business
    day of the month in which they intend to graduate.
3. Student completes all coursework and requirements by noon on the last business day of the month in which they
    wish to have their degree conferred.
4. Student completes and circulates the Master’s Project paper and schedules the oral exam at least two weeks
    before the scheduled oral examination date; see section 2.8.
5. Student notifies Kathryn Schwartz (schwa139@umn.edu) of the date of the oral exam at least two weeks
    prior to the exam so that their study plan can be forwarded to the project advisor; see section 2.8.
6. After the oral exam, project advisor returns the student’s study plan to the Major Coordinator; see section 2.8.
7. Student submits one unbound, unstapled copy of the Master’s Project paper and abstract to Kathryn Schwartz;
    see section 2.8.
8. Student submits the Graduate Follow-up Survey; see section 2.9

All Division of Epidemiology and Community Health students who fulfill, or anticipate fulfilling, the above requirements
and deadlines for Fall 2008 through Summer Session 2009 are eligible to participate in the School of Public Health
commencement ceremony on May 18, 2009. We encourage you to attend!
It is considered highly unethical and inappropriate to use or include in your title or professional signature any degree
that you have not completed. This means you cannot use the MPH title prior to completing all your degree
requirements and your degree has been conferred. The School does not recognize or confer the title “MPH
Candidate”.


2.12 Advising Guidelines
The following is a summary guide to assist students and faculty. Much of this information was explained in more
detail in previous sections of the guidebook.

MPH Student Advising

A. ADVISORS AND KEY SUPPORT PERSONNEL
    1. Academic Advisor provides general guidance on topics related to major including identifying appropriate
       course work options, field experience and master’s project selection (general or as project advisor), and
       career planning. The Academic Advisor sits on the master’s project committee.
    2. Master’s Project Advisor provides specific direction on a master’s project including development,
       completion and, in some cases, publication. The Project Advisor must be an MCH faculty member (regular or
       adjunct) and does not have to be the Academic Advisor.
    3. Mentors. In MCH, students are assigned community mentors (if they wish). This assignment occurs in the
       Foundations course (i.e., their first semester). These mentors can be helpful in finding a field placement or a
       master’s project.
    4. Administrative Advisor for MCH is Kathryn Schwartz (612-626-2247; schwa139@umn.edu). She can assist
       faculty and students with policies and procedures (e.g., petitioning, field experience and master’s project
       paperwork).
    5. MCH Chair is Wendy Hellerstedt (612-626-2077; helle023@umn.edu) and can help with advising issues.
       Chairs have 3-year terms; Hellerstedt will be chair from 2007-2010.
    6. MCH Outreach Director is Julia Johnsen (612-624-7349; john2314@umn.edu). She may be a resource for
       student field placements.
    7. Interdisciplinary Concentrations Coordinator is Carol Francis (franc004@umn.edu; 612-624-6952).
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      8. Biomedical Reference Librarian for Public Health is Lisa McGuire (612-626-3643;
      lmcguire@umn.edu). She is also available for one-on-one consultation for students and faculty about library
      referencing.


B. EXPECTATIONS FOR THE ADVISING RELATIONSHIP (ADAPTED FROM SPH GUIDANCE FOR ADVISORS)
1. MCH students may have two different advisors: (1) an academic advisor, with whom the student should keep in
touch through her/his training; and (2) a project advisor, who will work most closely with the student as s/he prepares
the master’s final paper. The academic and project advisor may be the same person.
2. Advisors should refer to the EpiCH Faculty Guidebook, which is provided to all faculty at the beginning of each
academic year. It can also be found on http://www.epi.umn.edu/support/index.shtm. On
http://www.epi.umn.edu/support/faculty.shtm there is a faculty teaching guidebook, advising handbook, list of
resources for student referral, copyright information, and directions for how to review an advisee’s transcript.
3. Students should refer to the student guidebook at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.
4. Advisors and advisees should contact Kathryn Schwartz (Major Coordinator) for course planning/scheduling, policy
and procedural information if not available in the guidebook or on SPH or EpiCH websites.
5. Academic advisors and advisees should meet at least once per semester until graduation to communicate
about progress. They should keep in touch even when the student is working on the master’s paper with a different
project officer.
6. Project advisors and advisees should set up a timeline for completion of the master’s project. This timeline
will include several meetings from the start until the end of the project. The project advisor will oversee all aspects of
the project and review drafts of the paper before it is submitted to project committee members.
7. Project committee members may include both primary and adjunct faculty. The academic advisor and the
project advisor must be on the committee. The committee should have a total of three members: two who are on the
MCH faculty (adjunct or regular) and one who is outside of the MCH faculty, but has a primary or regular faculty
appointment somewhere at the University. Additional members may participate unofficially, but that is not common.
The advisee may meet several times with project committee members or meet only once, depending on the needs of
the project.
8. Advisees and advisors should respond to one another in a timely manner (ideally within 5 business days).
Advisors should provide reasonable office hours and/or appointments for advisee inquiries. Advisees should
schedule appointments at least one week ahead and they should provide sufficient time (i.e., > 5 business days)
when they request materials like letters of reference or review of written materials.
9. Advisors and advisees should be aware of resources for: student mental health counseling
(http://www.mentalhealth.umn.edu), career services (http://www.sph.umn.edu/current/career/home.html), disabilities
consideration (http://ds.umn.edu/), and student writing support (http://writing.umn.edu/sws/).
10. Advisors and advisees should be aware that MCH trains in both the SPH core competencies and the MCH
competencies (see faculty and student guidebooks or refer to www.atmch.org for a description of the MCH
competencies).


C. MCH Program
1. Types of Programs Offered (individual curriculum described in the guidebook)
          a. Standard program
                   • 48-credit minimum, takes a minimum of 2 years to complete.
                   • It is possible that a student could enter this program after completing the SPH certificate
                      program (thus having completed the SPH core).
          b. Epidemiology emphasis program
                   • 48-credit minimum takes a minimum of 2 years to complete.
                   • Takes all the Epi/Biostat methods courses required of Epi MPH majors: i.e., Epidemiologic
                      Methods I, Epidemiologic Methods II, Epidemiologic Methods III, Epidemiologic Methods
                      IV, Biostatistics I, Biostatistics II.
                   • These students must do a research report or a critical literature review for their master’s
                      project.

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                       •The Admissions Committee accepts these students into the emphasis, at the time
                        their application is reviewed (i.e., students indicate what program they are applying to).
                        We do not encourage transferring to this emphasis after matriculation, although such
                        requests will be formally considered (and may not be approved—these students have to
                        have GRE quantitative scores and backgrounds that are similar to Epi majors).
                    • This is not a formal program option, so it does not go on the student’s degree transcript.
            c. Distance education program
                    • 42-credit minimum.
                    • Eligibility: Advanced degree (e.g., MD, MSW, MSN, MS, PhD,DrPH) OR no advanced
                        degree but 3-5 years of work experience in MCH.
                    • These students take their classes on-line and through the 3-week Public Health Institute
                        offerings every late May/early June.
            d. Dual degrees offered by MCH
                    • Health Journalism (MPH/MA)
                    • Law (MPH/JD)
                    • Nursing (MPH/MS)
                    • Social Work (MPH/MSW)
                    • Students must be admitted to both programs through the general Admissions process.
                    • See description of curriculum for all dual degrees on
                        http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/degrees/dualdegrees/home.html

2. General Guidance for Advising Across Programs
• Students apply for admission to all of our programs and the Admissions Committee determines eligibility. Switching
programs is possible, but needs to be formally reviewed by the Chair and/or the Credentials Committee because all
programs have specific eligibility criteria. If a student wants to switch programs it is obviously best to do so in the first
semester.
• The Faculty and Student Guidebooks have sample curriculum for the three major programs, which can also be
found on http://www.sph.umn.edu/accreditation/appendix/211a/home.html.
• Sample curriculum for the dual degree program can be found on
http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/degrees/dualdegrees/home.html.
• It is possible for MCH students to take courses on-line and in-person in any degree program, with one exception
(Foundations, see below).
• Foundations of MCH Leadership should be taken in the first semester of MCH training. In this course, the
instructor defines MCH, assign mentors, and try to build a sense of camaraderie with each year’s new cohort of
students. Students in the standard program should take the in-person course, PubH 6630, and distance education
students should take the online course, Principles and Programs in MCH, PubH 6655. Students cannot take both
the in-person and on-line foundations courses for credit.
• Several of the MCH scientific basis courses are only taught every other year.
• Students may petition to replace courses: there is guidance in the handbooks about how to do that. There are
forms to complete (and an added process if students are petitioning out of an SPH core course). Students should
start this process early and before they take the course they wish to substitute.
3. Interdisciplinary Concentrations
Students do not have to identify or apply to an interdisciplinary concentration prior to being admitted, but may begin a
concentration after admission with the approval of the appropriate advisor. To complete the interdisciplinary
concentration, students select from required and elective courses, as specified, for a designated number of credits
(typically 12). Completing a concentration does not necessarily extend the amount of time to complete an MPH.
Interdisciplinary concentrations are officially recognized areas of study, and are documented on the student's
University transcript upon successful completion. There are four concentrations:
•   Complementary and alternative medicine
•   Global health
•   Health disparities
•   Public health policy


                                                                                                                       121
Curriculum, application forms, and other materials about the concentrations are on
http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/inter/home.html. The interdisciplinary concentration coordinator is Carol Francis
(franc004@umn.edu; 612-624-6952).
D. MCH Field Experience
   The goals and the conduct of the field experience are explained in the student and faculty guidebooks. Examples
      of kinds of field experiences are also listed in the guidebooks. Information is also available on
      http://www.sph.umn.edu/current/fe.

      Generally the student begins the field experience after the first year of training, but there have been exceptions.

      A minimum of 2-credits in PubH 7696 is required (i.e., 120 hours) which may vary from field experience
         requirements in other programs. The experience may be paid but usually it is unpaid.

      Finding a field experience: the Academic Advisor should provide guidance, the MCH Outreach Director is an
          excellent resource, the MCH-assigned mentor can be helpful, and the School of Public Health has resources
          at http://www.sph.umn.edu/current/fe. Students are advised to be members of the MCH listserv, which
          occasionally posts information about paid and unpaid field opportunities (information about how to join listserv
          on www.epi.umn.edu/mch).

      The field experience preceptor should be an MCH professional, outside of the University of Minnesota, who has
         a master’s degree or higher. The School of Public Health website has guidance for how to be a field
         experience preceptor at http://www.sph.umn.edu/current/fe.

      Initiating a field experience: a field experience contract must be completed, approved by the advisor and
           preceptor, and submitted to Kathryn Schwartz. Forms can be found on
           http://www.sph.umn.edu/current/fe/resources/forms.html.

      During the field experience: the advisor and advisee should discuss how things are going at least by mid-
         semester of the field experience and should keep in touch throughout. It is important to keep in touch
         because, rarely, field experiences do not go well (for the student or preceptor) and may have to be
         discontinued or re-formulated.

      Completing the field experience. The student and the preceptor complete evaluations (see
         http://www.sph.umn.edu/current/fe/resources/forms.html) and the advisor reviews them and submits them to
         Kathryn Schwartz. The field experience is graded S/N and it is often not completed in the semester for which
         students signed up for credits. In those cases, a grade of “K” is assigned at the end of the semester and is
         updated when the field experience is completed.

      The master’s project and the field experience are different activities BUT they may be related. A master's
         project could evolve from a field experience with an organization, but should be defined separately; the same
         work cannot be counted for both. If they are related, careful consideration must be given to wording the
         contract to differentiate the requirements of the field experience from the master's project. The student, the
         academic advisor, the master's project advisor, and the preceptor must determine the feasibility of related
         field and master’s projects.


MCH Master’s Project
      The goals and the conduct of the master’s project are explained in the student and faculty guidebooks.
      The student should start planning to do this project in Fall of Year 2.
      MCH offers three options for the master’s project: a research project; an evaluation of an existing program; or a
        critical literature review. Students in the epi emphasis have to do the research project (strongly
        recommended) or the critical literature review. The basic criteria for each option are described in the faculty
        and student guidebooks.

122
Projects tend to be 20-25 pages long, but may be longer. Copies of former projects are available from Kathryn
    Schwartz. The projects must be appropriately referenced, using APA (http://apastyle.apa.org/) or Vancouver
    (http://www.lib.monash.edu.au/tutorials/citing/vancouver.html) style. Students may meet with Lisa McGuire, in
    the BioMedical library, to learn how to do RefWorks.
The academic advisor will help the advisee find a master’s project advisor. It is also possible that the academic
   advisor will serve that role. It is expected that the academic advisor will stay in touch with the advisee
   even if s/he is not the project advisor once the master’s project begins. The project advisor must be an
   MCH faculty member (regular or adjunct).
The project advisor will help the student form a master’s committee. The student must have two MCH faculty and
   one faculty member outside of the MCH program. The academic advisor must sit on the student’s committee.
   The student will work with committee members to determine their level of involvement throughout the
   development of the project.
There is a list of MCH faculty (adjunct and regular) in the guidebooks and on
   http://www.sph.umn.edu/education/mch/faculty/home.html. Either adjunct or regular faculty can serve on
   MCH committees as an MCH insider or serve as a project advisor.
Prior to beginning the project:
    The student and project advisor must complete the Master’s Project Approval Form
        (www.epi.umn.edu/students/pdf/mastersprojectapproval.pdf) and submit it to Kathryn Schwartz.
    Students must register for 2 credits of PubH 7694.
    The student and the project advisor should set up a timeline for completion of the project and schedule
        meetings to monitor progress.
    The student and project advisor should apply for IRB approval, if the project involves secondary analyses or
        interaction with human subjects (http://www.research.umn.edu/irb/about). The student should also be
        sure to have completed all human subjects trainings.
    The project advisor and the student should have a frank discussion about expectations for meetings,
        timelines, and about publication and authorship, if relevant.

Establishing a timeline:
The amount of time it takes to complete a project depends on:
     • Type of project
     • External factors (access to dataset, faculty and student schedules)
     • Student’s motivation, abilities, other obligations and discipline
Projects almost always take longer than expected! The project advisor (and sometimes the academic advisor)
should work with the student to plan a timeline by working backwards from the expected finish date and consider
the time it will take the student to:
    •   Find a project and articulate a research question or a project goal
    •   Read research literature
    •   Obtain and prepare a dataset for analysis (if applicable)
    •   Obtain human subjects approval (if applicable)
    •   Conduct analyses
    •   Write drafts of the paper (the student must anticipate many drafts, which will be reviewed by the project
        advisor and, possibly, other faculty members)
    •   Obtain, and incorporate, feedback on the paper drafts (allowing faculty at least five business days to
        review a draft—ten business days is more appropriate)
    •   Distribute final copy (approved by project advisor) to committee members two weeks (14 days) before the
        oral defense
    •   Incorporate revisions, if any, requested at the defense
Working with the committee: There is great variability in how involved the committee will be. The project
   advisor and the student should discuss level of involvement. Ideally it is best to for the student to meet with
   each committee member to describe his/her project but, practically, the approach to the “outside” member is
   often done after the project is underway and there may be no personal meeting. The student is responsible
   for asking how involved each committee member wishes to be, clearly stating her/his needs of each
   committee member, and keeping the project advisor aware of the involvement of all members. It is not
   ideal—but not unusual—for committee members to see the final paper two weeks before the defense. This
                                                                                                              123
          reflects the “real world” but it is risky if the student and the committee members have not discussed how they
          see their roles.
      Oral presentation of the project: MCH requires that the student give their oral presentation of the project
         publicly (i.e., friends, family, faculty, students, and staff may attend). The project advisor and the student
         should thus plan the 20-30 minute PowerPoint presentation. After the public presentation, which will include
         the project committee and any guests, all guests will be excused and the examination will begin. Students
         are required to submit an abstract of their project to Kathryn Schwartz 2 weeks prior to the examination; she
         will e-mail the abstract, along with the presentation time, date, and room, to faculty and students. Starting in
         Fall 2007, the abstracts for each masters project will be posted on the MCH website (www.epi.umn.edu/mch)
         to provide examples of the work our students do.


F.        General Resources
1. MCH Program: HTTP://WWW.SPH.UMN.EDU/EDUCATION/MCH/HOME.HTML
2. MCH Center for Leadership Education in Maternal and Child Public Health HTTP://WWW.EPI.UMN.EDU/MCH
3. Association of Teachers of Maternal and Child Health (includes syllabi of MCH courses, MCH history, MCH
competencies, etc): http://www.atmch.org
4. SPH Core Competencies: http://www.sph.umn.edu/current/fe/gi/competencies.html
5. Teaching and Learning Resources: http://www.sph.umn.edu/faculty/resources/home.html#teach




124
2.        PUBLIC HEALTH NUTRITION MPH DEGREE PROGRAM
2.1       Fall 2008 Program Curriculum
Note: See section 2.2 below for the Nutritional Epidemiology emphasis curriculum.
       16 month program = 44 total credits
       24 month program = 50-55 total credits (without DIGS)
       24 month program = 75-83 total credits (with DIGS)
Guide to curriculum notes:
Some courses have very specific grade and grading basis requirements. For this reason, please pay close attention
to the following notes.
 Required if you are completing the Didactic Course requirements to be eligible to do the DIGS Internship; must be
      taken for A/F grade option.
 Courses must be taken for a letter grade (A/F) and you must obtain a grade of B- or above.
 Not required if taken at an undergraduate level prior to matriculation.
 Also available in an on-line version at least once per academic year.
PLEASE NOTE: Careful planning is required to avoid any overlap in course offerings while completing the additional
Didactic requirements. If you need assistance in planning your curriculum, please see Shelley Cooksey.

Public Health Nutrition Core [13-15 credits]
Course             Notes     Title                                                     Offered       Credits
PubH 6901                Foundations of Public Health Nutrition Leadership           Fall                2
PubH 6914               Community Nutrition Intervention                            Spring              3
PubH 6915                Nutrition Assessment                                        Spring              2
PubH 6933                Nutrition and Chronic Diseases                              Spring              2
16- month students must take two courses from the following list:
24-month students not doing DIGS must take two courses from the following list:
24-month students wanting DIGS must take all three courses from the following list with the  note:
PubH 6902                Maternal and Infant Nutrition                               Fall                     2
PubH 6903                Child and Adolescent Nutrition                              Fall                     2
PubH 6904                Nutrition and Aging (on-line)                               Summer                   2
PubH 6906                 Global Nutrition                                            Spring                   2
Research Methods [6 total credits]
PubH 6910                    Critical Review of Research in Public Health Nutrition    May Session             1
PubH 7994                    Master’s Project                                          Any Term                2
Plus 3 research methods credits from the following list of courses
PubH 6034               Program Evaluation in Public Health Practice                   Spring                  3
PubH 6035               Applied Research Methods [prerequisite 6034]                   Fall                    3
PubH 6325               Data Processing with PC-SAS                                    Fall/Spring             1
PubH 6342                    Epidemiologic Methods II [prerequisite 6341]              Spring                  3
PubH 6415                    Biostatistical Methods II [prerequisite 6414]             Spring                  3
PubH 6420                    Introduction to SAS Programming                           Fall/Summer             1
PubH 6451                    Biostatistics II [prerequisite 6450]                      Spring                  4
PubH 6617                    Practical Methods for Secondary Data Analysis             Fall                    3
PubH 6650                    Community Based Participatory Research                    May                     1

                                                                                                                   125
PubH 6705                     Community Health Assessment                                      Spring              2
PubH 6803                     Conducting a Systematic Literature Review                        Spring              2
PubH 6806                     Principles of Public Health Research                             Fall                2
PubH 6852                     Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings          Spring              2
PubH 6389                     Nutritional Epidemiology [prerequisite 6341]                     Fall                2
PubH 7250                     Designing and Conducting Focus Group Interviews                  May                 1
PubH 7251                     Data Analysis from Focus Groups                                  May                 1
Nurs 8171                     Qualitative Research Design and Methods                          Spring             3-4

Field Experience [2 credits]
PubH 7996                     Field Experience [1 credit each of two semesters; see section    Fall/Spring         2
                              2.5]
PubH 7996                     Block Field Experience [Optional; see section 2.5]               Summer              4


Public Health Core [11-12 credits]
         Note: courses designated as part of the public health core must be taken for a letter grade (A/F)
Course             Notes      Title                                                     Offered                Credits
PubH 6101 or                 Environmental Health                                      Fall/Spring               2
PubH 6102                   Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health           Spring/Summer             2
PubH 6320 or                Fundamentals of Epidemiology                              Fall/Spring/Summer        3
PubH 6341                     Epidemiologic Methods I                                   Fall                      3
PubH 6414 or               Biostatistical Methods I                                  Fall/Spring/Summer        3
PubH 6450                   Biostatistics I                                           Fall/Spring               4
PubH 6741 or                Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice & Policy   Fall/Spring/Summer        1
PubH 6742                   Ethics in Public Health: Research & Policy                Fall/Spring/Summer        1
PubH 6751                  Principles of Mgmt in Health Service Organizations        Fall/Spring/Summer        2
Electives [11-12 credits]
      A. Students in the 24 month program can take the required additional 4000 level nutrition science courses as
         electives
      B. Students choosing one of the School of Public Health Interdisciplinary Concentrations (Global Health, Public
         Health Policy, Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Health Disparities) which require a minimum of 12
         credits can use those courses as electives
      C. Students can elect to complete other related Regents Certificates
      D. Examples of recommended courses for electives include (but are not limited to):
             • Public Health Nutrition Content
             •       Health Behavior and Policy
             •       Research Methodology
Additional Nutrition Science Courses for the 24-Month Program [6-10 credits]*
PubH 6355 or                Pathophysiology of Human Disease                          Fall                       4
Phsl 3051                   Human Physiology                                          Fall or Spring             4
PubH 6905                    Human Nutrition and Health                                Fall                       2
Nutr 5621W                   Macronutrient Metabolism [prerequisite FScN 4612 &        Fall                       4
                              Phsl 3051 or equiv.]
Additional Food Science/Nutrition Didactic Requirements for 24-Month Program Students
Doing the DIGS Internship [32 credits]*
FScN 1102                    Food: Safety Risk and Technology                          Fall                       3
FScN 3102                    Introduction to Food Science                              Fall                       3
FScN 3615                    Socio-cultural Aspects of Food, Nutrition, and Health     Spring                     3
FScN 3731                    Food Operations Management Lab [prerequisite FScN         Fall                       2
                              3102 or concurrent registration with FScN 3102]
FScN 3732                    Food Operations Management Lecture [prerequisite          Fall                       3

126
                            FScN 3102 or concurrent registration with FScN 3102]
FScN 4111 or               Food Chemistry [prerequisite FScN 3102]                  Fall                        3
FScN 4121                   Food Microbiology & Fermentation [prerequisite VPB       Spring                      3
                            2032]
FScN 4612                  Human Nutrition [prerequisite Phsl 3051 or equiv]        Fall                        3
FScN 4613                  Experimental Nutrition [prerequisite FScN 4612]          Spring                      2
FScN 4665                  Medical Nutrition Therapy I [prerequisite FScN 4612      Fall                        3
                            and Phsl 3051 or equivalent]
FScN 4666                  Medical Nutrition Therapy II [prerequisite FScN 4665]    Spring                      3
VPB 2032                   General Microbiology w/lab                               Fall/Spring                 4
                                                                                     Summer


*Registration note for students taking any 1000 and 3000 level FSCN courses:
If you don't want to pay the graduate tuition rate for the undergraduate courses, you can register for those courses
through the College of Continuing Education (CCE) as an undergraduate student. One word of caution, those
undergraduate courses are not counted toward your "total" credits for the semester and therefore it is possible that
you won't be considered a full-time student. You must register for nine credits or more under the public health
graduate career to be considered full-time and to be considered half-time you need to register for four credits under
the public health graduate career. You are eligible for financial aid as a half-time student.
To register for the undergraduate level FScN courses you need to obtain permission numbers from Shelley Cooksey
for each of the undergraduate courses you want to take and register for through CCE. Prior to the start of registration
Shelley will send out an email requesting that you indicate to her which courses you will be registering for during the
upcoming semester. Once you have been given permission numbers you can fill out an on-line email registration
form. Go to www.onestop.umn.edu, click on forms on-line, then under the registration heading click on Email form
registration and cancel/add form. You will have to fill it out (click that you are an undergraduate) then submit it. Only
do it this way for the classes you want to register for through CCE. Also, before you register for any
undergraduate course through CCE make sure you register for your graduate level courses first.




                                                                                                                     127
2.2      Fall 2008 Nutritional Epi Emphasis Program Curriculum
     16 month program = 44 total credits
     24 month program = 48-54 total credits
Guide to curriculum notes:
Some courses have very specific grade and grading basis requirements. For this reason, please pay close attention
to the following notes.
 These courses must be taken for a letter grade (A/F) and you must receive a grade of B- or above
 Not required for 16-month program students.
 Also available in an on-line version at least once per academic year.

Public Health Nutrition Core [11-17 credits]
Course           Notes     Title                                                Offered           Credits
PubH 6901                Foundations of Public Health Nutrition Leadership     Fall                   2
PubH 6914                Community Nutrition Intervention                      Spring                 3
PubH 6915                Nutrition Assessment                                  Spring                 2
PubH 6933                Nutrition and Chronic Diseases                        Spring                 2
One course from the following list:
PubH 6902                 Maternal and Infant Nutrition                         Fall                   2
PubH 6903                 Child and Adolescent Nutrition                        Fall                   2
PubH 6904                  Nutrition and Aging (on-line)                        Summer                 2
PubH 6906                  Global Nutrition                                     Spring                 2
The following two courses are NOT required for the 16-month option but ARE required for the 24-month
option:
Nutr 5621               Macronutrient Metabolism [prerequisite PubH 6355 or    Fall                   4
                         equiv]
PubH 6905               Human Nutrition & Health [optional if had equivalent   Fall                   2
                         content]
Epidemiology Core [24 or 28 credits]
PubH 6341               Epidemiologic Methods I                                Fall                   3
PubH 6342               Epidemiologic Methods II                               Spring                 3
PubH 6343               Epidemiologic Methods III                              Fall                   4
PubH 6344               Epidemiologic Methods IV                               Fall                   2
PubH 6389                Nutritional Epidemiology                               Fall                   2
PubH 6355               Pathophysiology of Human Disease [optional if had      Fall                   4
                         equivalent content]
PubH 6450               Biostatistics I                                        Fall                   4
PubH 6451                Biostatistics II                                       Spring                 4
Plus one of the following four courses:
PubH 6385                Epi & Control of Infectious Diseases                   Spring                 2
PubH 6386                PubH Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease                 Fall                   2
PubH 6387                Cancer Epidemiology                                    Spring                 2
PubH 6360                Obesity & Eating Disorders: Etiology/Epidemiology      Fall                   2
Field Experience/Master’s Project [4 credits]
PubH 7996                Field Experience [1 credit each of two semesters see   Any term               2

128
                               section 2.5]
PubH 7994                      Master’s Project [see section 2.6]                                 Any term                  2
Public Health Core [5 credits]
        Note: courses designated as part of the public health core must be taken for a letter grade (A/F)
Course               Note      Title                                                              Offered                 Credits
                     s
PubH 6101 or                  Environmental Health                                               Fall/Spring                   2
PubH 6102                    Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health                    Spring/Summer                 2
PubH 6741 or                  Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice & Policy            Fall/Spring/Summer            1
PubH 6742                    Ethics in Public Health: Research & Policy                         Fall/Spring/Summer            1
PubH 6751                    Principles of Mgmt in Health Service Organizations                 Fall/Spring/Summer            2

Competency Areas
Table 1. Summary of competency areas/skills that guide the Public Health Nutrition curriculum and courses that
address these competency areas.



   I. Theoretical and skill-based knowledge of nutrition science
   needed for public health nutrition practice
   Competency Area Skills                                                                How Acquired            How Measured
    •          Demonstrate an understanding of biological and physiological          •       PubH 6933,        • Satisfactory
        processes that affect nutrient needs of individuals and populations across     6915, 6389, 6902,         completion of
        the lifespan                                                                   6903, 6904, 6905,         coursework
    •          Demonstrate understanding of psychosocial processes that affect         6355                    • Completion of 2 field
        nutrient needs of individuals and populations across the lifespan            •       Dietetic            experiences with
    •          Identify, utilize and interpret appropriate nutrition screening and     internship (optional)     satisfactory review
        assessment parameters for individuals and populations                                                    by preceptor
    •          Measure and interpret dietary intake of individuals and populations                             • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                                 week block
    •          Measure and interpret body composition data                                                       experience with
                                                                                                                 satisfactory review
                                                                                                                 by preceptor
                                                                                                               •       Successful
                                                                                                                 defense of master
                                                                                                                 project oral exam




                                                                                                                                    129
  II. Methodological and analytic skills necessary to acquire,
  analyze, and apply data to enact the core public health functions
  of assessment, assurance, and policy development, and be able
  to evaluate nutrition programs and services for populations
  Competency Area Skills                                                                How Acquired        How Measured
      • Describe and utilize qualitative and quantitative research and evaluation   •      PubH 6320,     • Satisfactory
        methods                                                                       6341, 6414, 6450,     completion of
      • Prepare justified program budgets                                             6806, 6910, 6901,     coursework
                                                                                      6914, 6034, 6852    • Completion of 2 field
      •      Illustrate components of nutrition surveillance systems
                                                                                    • Masters project       experiences with
                                                                                    • Field experience      satisfactory review
                                                                                                            by preceptor
                                                                                                          • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                            week block
                                                                                                            experience with
                                                                                                            satisfactory review
                                                                                                            by preceptor
                                                                                                          •       Successful
                                                                                                            defense of master
                                                                                                            project oral exam
  III. Organizational management and leadership skills needed to
  develop, implement and sustain systems of care, programs and
  interventions (including preventive and treatment) for improving
  the nutritional health of populations
  Competency Area Skills                                                                How Acquired        How Measured
      • Identify characteristics of public health and nutrition systems             •      PubH 6901,     • Satisfactory
      •       Describe relationships between public health and nutrition systems      6914, 6751, 6752      completion of
        and community programs                                                      • Masters project       coursework
                                                                                    • Field experience    • Completion of 2 field
                                                                                                            experiences with
                                                                                                            satisfactory review
                                                                                                            by preceptor
                                                                                                          • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                            week block
                                                                                                            experience with
                                                                                                            satisfactory review
                                                                                                            by preceptor
                                                                                                          •       Successful
                                                                                                            defense of master’s
                                                                                                            project oral exam




130
IV. Policy and advocacy skills to promote the nutritional health of
populations in policies, laws (e.g., Title V), and regulations in
public and private sectors
Competency Area Skills                                                             How Acquired             How Measured
 • Understand and describe policy development processes at local, state          • PubH 6901, 6741,       • Satisfactory
   and national levels                                                             6742                     completion of
 •      Analyze effects of public policy on public health and nutrition          • Field Experience         coursework
   systems, programs and services                                                •       American         • Completion of 2 field
                                                                                   Dietetic Association     experiences with
                                                                                   Public Policy            satisfactory review
                                                                                   Workshop (optional)      by preceptor
                                                                                                          • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                            week block
                                                                                                            experience with
                                                                                                            satisfactory review
                                                                                                            by preceptor
                                                                                                          •       Successful
                                                                                                            defense of master’s
                                                                                                            project oral exam
V. Cultural competency skills to develop programs and services
that are responsive to the cultural, social, linguistic, and ethnic
diversity of the community
Competency Area Skills                                                             How Acquired             How Measured
 • Define cultural and linguistic competency                                     • PubH 6906, 6901,       • Satisfactory
 • Understand effects of linguistic and cultural diversity health status of        6902, 6903, 6904,        completion of
   individuals and populations                                                     6914, 6910               coursework
 • Assess and address issues of health literacy in individuals and               • Field Experience       • Completion of 2 field
   populations                                                                   •       Masters            experiences with
                                                                                   Project                  satisfactory review
 • Demonstrate and describe methods of community engagement                                                 by preceptor
 •        Describe factors associated with and effects of health disparities                              • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                            week block
                                                                                                            experience with
                                                                                                            satisfactory review
                                                                                                            by preceptor
                                                                                                          •       Successful
                                                                                                            defense of master’s
                                                                                                            project oral exam
VI. Insight into leadership styles and an awareness of personally
authentic strategies for affecting their visions of change and
capacity to improve the nutritional health of populations
Competency Area Skills                                                             How Acquired             How Measured
 • Identify strategies for developing partnerships, collaborative programs and   • PubH 6901, 6902,       • Satisfactory
   community coalitions                                                            6903, 6904, 6906,        completion of
 • Create and articulate a mission, value statement and vision for public          6914, 6910, 6751,        coursework
   health nutrition programs and services                                          6752                   • Completion of 2 field
 •       Demonstrate team building, negotiation, motivation and conflict         • Field Experience         experiences with
   resolution skills                                                             •       Masters            satisfactory review
                                                                                   Project                  by preceptor
                                                                                                          • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                            week block
                                                                                                            experience with
                                                                                                            satisfactory review
                                                                                                            by preceptor
                                                                                                          •       Successful
                                                                                                            defense of master’s
                                                                                                            project oral exam

                                                                                                                              131
  VII. Ethics and professionalism
  Competency Area Skills                                                                How Acquired          How Measured
      • Identify principles underlying ethics (eg, social justice)                    • PubH 6741, 6742,    • Satisfactory
      • Demonstrate ability to utilize knowledge and evidence-based guidelines to       6751, 6752            completion of
        make decisions                                                                •      Field            coursework
      • Demonstrate commitment to professional development and service                  Experience          • Completion of 2 field
                                                                                      •      Masters          experiences with
      • Develop personal sense of integrity, honesty and social justice                                       satisfactory review
                                                                                        Project
      •       Identify and communicate the impact of legal or regulatory policies                             by preceptor
        on health of individuals and populations                                                            • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                              week block
                                                                                                              experience with
                                                                                                              satisfactory review
                                                                                                              by preceptor
                                                                                                            •       Successful
                                                                                                              defense of master’s
                                                                                                              project oral exam
  VIII. Written and verbal communication skills and information
  systems
  Competency Area Skills                                                                How Acquired          How Measured
      • Identify and illustrate the principles of public health communication         • PubH 6901, 6902,    • Satisfactory
        strategies (eg social marketing)                                                6903, 6904, 6914,     completion of
      • Translate research into health promotion and disease prevention                 6910                  coursework
        strategies, policies, programs and services                                   •      Field          • Completion of 2 field
      • Demonstrate ability to write grants                                             Experience            experiences with
                                                                                      •      Masters          satisfactory review
      •       Apply technology methods to core public health functions (program                               by preceptor
        planning, implementation and evaluation, community assessment)                  Project
                                                                                                            • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                              week block
                                                                                                              experience with
                                                                                                              satisfactory review
                                                                                                              by preceptor
                                                                                                            •       Successful
                                                                                                              defense of master’s
                                                                                                              project oral exam
  IX. Critical thinking skills
  Competency Area Skills                                                                How Acquired          How Measured
      •        Integrate knowledge and skills from public health, nutrition, ethics   • Field Experience    • Satisfactory
          and management in all aspects of public health practice                     •       Masters         completion of
                                                                                        Project               coursework
                                                                                                            • Completion of 2 field
                                                                                                              experiences with
                                                                                                              satisfactory review
                                                                                                              by preceptor
                                                                                                            • Completion of 6-
                                                                                                              week block
                                                                                                              experience with
                                                                                                              satisfactory review
                                                                                                              by preceptor
                                                                                                            •       Successful
                                                                                                              defense of master’s
                                                                                                              project oral exam




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2.3     Other MPH Degree Requirements

Public Health Core Area Requirements
Students working towards an MPH degree must satisfy competency requirements in the six core areas of public
health – administration, behavioral science, biostatistics, environmental health, epidemiology, and ethics – by
completing one of the following in each core area:
     Satisfactorily pass one of the pre-approved courses in the core area (see pre-approved course list below); OR
     Pass an equivalency exam in the core area. OR
     Pass an advanced course in the core area as approved by the respective division head or the Educational
      Policy Committee, OR
     Complete a graduate level course, with a grade of B or better, at an accredited university or college that meets
      the competencies defined by CEPH. The Educational Policy Committee, upon petition of the student, will
      determine acceptance of a course for transfer.

Pre-approved Courses Meeting Public Health Core Area Requirements
Administration
PubH 6751 Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations – 2 cr.

Behavioral Science
PubH 6020 Fundamentals of Social and Behavioral Science – 3 cr.
PubH 6914 Community Nutrition Intervention – 3 cr. (public health nutrition students only)

Biostatistics
PubH 6414       Biostatistical Methods I – 3 cr.
PubH 6415       Biostatistical Methods II – 3 cr.
PubH 6450       Biostatistics I – 4 cr.
PubH 6451       Biostatistics II – 4 cr.

Environmental Health
PubH 6101 Environmental Health – 2 cr.
PubH 6102 Issues in Environmental and Occupational Health – 2 cr.

Epidemiology
PubH 6320    Fundamentals of Epidemiology – 3 cr.
PubH 6341 Epidemiologic Methods I – 3 cr.

Ethics
PubH 6741       Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice and Policy – 1 cr.
PubH 6742       Ethics in Public Health: Research and Policy – 1 cr.

Registration Requirement
Students are required to register for at least 2 semesters and 15 credits in the School of Public Health.

Course Numbers and Graduate Credit
5xxx, 6xxx, 7xxx and 8xxx-level courses are considered graduate-level. 1xxx and 3xxx-level courses are for
undergraduates and will not receive approval for graduate credit. Under some circumstances – with approval of the
student’s Major Chair – 4xxx-level courses may also be applied toward a MPH degree as long as they are taught by a
member of the graduate faculty.

SPH Grading Policies
Grade Point Average
Students must achieve a cumulative grade point average of no less than 3.0 (B) across their entire program to receive
an MPH degree.

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S-N Grade Option
MPH students may take no more than 20% of their coursework on an S-N grading basis, exclusive of those topics,
seminars, and field experience courses offered only on an S-N basis.
Public Health Core Courses
Courses designated as part of the public health core must be taken for a letter grade (A-F). Students will be required
to achieve no less than a B- grade in each course taken on an A-F basis. Students may retake public health core
courses at their own expense until they achieve a grade of B- or better. However, a retaken course may be counted
only once toward degree requirements in the student’s study plan.
Each public health major may require higher levels of achievement for its own students in public health core courses
that are also core to the major. This may include restrictions on retaking public health core courses that are also core
to the major, or requiring more than a B- performance level. Students should consult their Major Coordinator for
documentation of these requirements.

Field Experience
All students matriculating in a MPH program must complete a formal, supervised fieldwork experience consisting of at
least 90 hours in order to graduate. Neither prior professional degrees nor prior work experience in a field not closely
related to the MPH degree program are sufficient grounds for waiving the fieldwork requirement. Each major has
established requirements for completion of fieldwork; see section 2.5.
All students must complete a contract prior to beginning the experience. The online contract form provides
streamlined, comprehensive for the student, their preceptors, and faculty advisor. Please refer to the current student
Web site for this and other resources related to the field experience www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp/.

MPH Study Plan
Students are required to submit a completed MPH Study Plan to their Major Coordinator at least one semester prior to
their anticipated completion of coursework. Earlier submission (e.g. in the second to last semester) is suggested to
allow the Major Coordinators to review the study plan and notify students if they are missing any requirements prior to
their last term of study.

Master’s Project
MPH students must complete a master’s project, demonstrating familiarity with the tools of research or scholarship in
the major, the capacity to work independently, and the ability to present the results of the investigation effectively. The
master’s project should involve a combined total of approximately 120 hours of work. The major faculty specifies the
nature and extent of the options available to satisfy this requirement and determines whether the requirement is to be
satisfied in conjunction with or independent of the coursework in the student’s major; see section 2.6.

Comprehensive Examination
MPH students must complete a written and/or oral examination as specified by the major; see section 2.7.

Time Frame
The maximum time allowed by the School of Public Health for completion of an MPH degree is seven years. The
seven year period begins with the first term of enrollment after admission to a degree program within the School.

Course Transfer Credits
Effective with students entering the program in Fall 2007, a student may seek transfer of no more than 40% of their
total graduate or professional program credits taken prior to the MPH program matriculation at the University of
Minnesota or at another college or university. Course credits may be used to satisfy public health core or other
program requirements as jointly approved by the Major Chair and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. No course
credits older than 5 years from the date of the student’s matriculation will be accepted for transfer. A grade of “B” or
better is required for each course requested for transfer credit.
MPH students who have completed graduate-level coursework at the University of Minnesota or another college or
university may petition to transfer those courses toward their MPH degree. To be considered for transfer, graduate
level coursework must have been taken at an accredited graduate institution. Students must:
            •    Meet with their advisor to discuss the petitioning process. If the petition is acceptable to the advisor,
                 the student will complete and sign the Petition form, attach an official transcript on which the final
                 grade has been posted.
134
            •   Submit the Petition form to the Major Coordinator for processing. The Petition form can be found at
                http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm
The Major Coordinator will forward the petition to the major chair and then to the Associate Dean for final evaluation
and/or approval.

Course Substitutions and Waivers
All student requests that deviate from the degree curriculum requirements outlined in this Guidebook must be made
on a Petition form. The Petition form can be obtained at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm.
Students should note that the process for approving a course substitution or waiver could take up to one month, so
plan accordingly.
Course Substitution Procedures:
The following process should be followed when requesting that a course substitute for a required course in your
degree program.
    1. Gather the course syllabi of the required course in your degree program and the proposed substitute course
       and a transcript on which the proposed course grade has been posted (if the proposed course has already
       been completed).
    2. Complete the Petition form with the following information in each section:
    3. REQUEST SECTION: describe the course requested for substitution including the course title, number of
       credits, term and year taken, and the name of the institution where the course was taken. Also list the
       course/requirement in your degree program for which you are asking for the substitution.
    4. REASON/EXPLANATION SECTION: Indicate what skills and/or content overlaps between the required
       course(s) and the proposed substitute course(s).
    5. Compile the above materials and have the request reviewed by your advisor. He/she will complete the
       Department section of the Petition form and indicate whether or not they approve of the request.
    6. After the advisor has made his/her recommendations, the student should submit these materials to the Major
       Coordinator who will forward it to the appropriate Credentials Committee for review. The student will be
       notified via e-mail of the committee’s decision.
    7. If the substitute course is to replace a School of Public Health Core course (administration-PubH 6751,
       behavioral/social science-PubH 6020, biostatistics-PubH 6414/6450, environmental health-PubH 6101/6102,
       epidemiology-PubH 6320/6341, ethics-PubH 6741/6742), there is an additional step to get School level
       approval. To complete this next step, provide two additional copies of the above materials. All of those
       materials should be submitted to your Major Coordinator. Upon receipt of those materials, the Major
       Coordinator will review the request with the Major Chair and then if approved by the Major Chair, all copies of
       the request will be forwarded to Guy Piotrowski to be presented to the appropriate SPH Educational Policy
       committee members. The student will be notified by Guy Piotrowski via e-mail of the committee’s decision. If
       the Major Chair does not approve of the request, the Major Coordinator will inform the student that the
       request will not be forwarded to the SPH Educational Policy Committee for review.

Application for Degree
MPH students are required to complete an Application for Degree form. There are strict deadline dates before a
student can be cleared for graduation. You must turn in the form by the end of the first business day of the month in
which you want your degree cleared. Copies of this form can be obtained from
www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm.

2.4     Sample Schedules

Full-Time 16-Month Program Option [44 credits]
 Fall Semester I
       Course           Title                                                                             Credits
       PubH 6101        Environmental Health [1st half semester]                                             2
       PubH 6414        Biostatistical Methods I                                                             3
       PubH 6751        Principles of Management in Health Services Organizations [2nd half semester]        2

                                                                                                                    135
       PubH 6901     Foundations of Public Health Nutrition Leadership                             2
       PubH 6902     Maternal and Infant Nutrition                                                 2
                     Electives                                                                     2
 Spring Semester
       PubH 6320     Fundamental of Epidemiology (on-line only in spring 2009)                     3
       PubH 6852     Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings (on-line)             2
       PubH 6914     Community Nutrition Intervention                                              3
       PubH 6915     Nutrition Assessment                                                          2
       PubH 6933     Nutrition and Chronic Diseases                                                2
       PubH 7996     Field Experience                                                              1
 May Session
       PubH 6910     Critical Review of Research in Public Health Nutrition                        1
                     Electives                                                                     2
 Summer Session
      PubH 6904      Nutrition and Aging (on-line)                                                 2
      PubH 7996      Field Experience                                                              1
 Fall Semester II
       PubH 6325     Data Processing with PC-SAS                                                   1
       PubH 6741     Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice & Policy [1st half semester]   1
       PubH 7994     Master’s Project                                                              2
                     Electives                                                                     8

Full-Time 24-Month Program Option (for students wanting to do DIGS) [75-83 credits]
 Fall Semester I
       Course        Title                                                                         Credits
       PubH 6355     Pathophysiology of Human Disease                                                  4
       PubH 6414     Biostatistical Methods I                                                          3
       PubH 6901     Foundations of Public Health Nutrition Leadership                                 2
       PubH 6905     Human Nutrition and Health                                                        2
       FScN 1102     Food: Safety, Risks & Technology                                                  3
 Spring Semester I
       VBS 2032      General Microbiology                                                              4
       PubH 6101     Environmental Health                                                              2
       PubH 6320     Fundamentals of Epidemiology (on-line only in Spring 2009)                        3
       PubH 6325     Data Processing with PC-SAS                                                       1
       PubH 6852     Program Evaluation in Health and Mental Health Settings (on-line)                 2
 May Session I
       PubH 6910     Critical Review of Research in Public Health Nutrition                            1
 Summer Session I
       PubH 6741     Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice & Policy (1st half semester)       1
       PubH 6751     Principles of Management in Health Service Organizations (on-line)                2
 Fall Semester II
       FScN 3102     Introduction to Food Science                                                      3
                     Food Operations Management-Lab [prerequisite FScN 3732 and FScN 3102 or
       FScN 3731                                                                                       2
                     concurrent enrollment in FScN 3732 and FScN 3102]
                     Food Operations Management-Lecture [prerequisite FScN 3102 or concurrent
       FScN 3732                                                                                       3
                     enrollment in FScN 3102]
       FScN 4612*    Human Nutrition [prerequisite Phsl 3051 OR PubH 6355]                             3
136
       FScN 4665*        Medical Nutrition Therapy I                                               3
 Spring Semester II
       FScN 3615         Social and Cultural Aspects                                               3
       FScN 4613*        Experimental Nutrition [prerequisite FScN 4612]                           2
       FScN 4666*        Medical Nutrition Therapy II [prerequisite FScN 4665]                     3
       PubH 7996*        Field Experience                                                          1
 Summer Session II
       PubH 6904         Nutrition and Aging (on-line)                                             2
 Fall Semester III
       Nutr 5621               Macronutrient Nutrition [prerequisite FScN 4612]                        4
       PubH 6902               Maternal and Infant Nutrition                                           2
       PubH 6903               Child and Adolescent Nutrition                                          2
       PubH 7996               Field Experience                                                        1
                               Electives                                                               3
Spring Semester III
       FScN 4121               Food Microbiology and Fermentations                                     3
       PubH 6914               Community Nutrition Intervention                                        3
       PubH 6915               Nutrition Assessment                                                    2
       PubH 6933               Nutrition and Chronic Diseases                                          2
       PubH 7994               Master’s Research Project                                               2
Summer Session III
       PubH 7996      Field Experience (DIGS)                                                          4

* To maintain financial aid eligibility register for graduate credit for these courses

Full-Time 24-Month Program Option (without DIGS)[50-55 credits]
 Fall Semester I
       Course          Title                                                                       Credits
       PubH 6355       Pathophysiology of Human Disease                                                4
       PubH 6414       Biostatistical Methods I                                                        3
       PubH 6901       Foundations of Public Health Nutrition Leadership                               2
       PubH 6905       Human Nutrition and Health                                                      2
 Spring Semester I
       PubH 6034       Program Evaluation for Public Health Practice                                   3
       PubH 6101       Environmental Health                                                            2
       PubH 6320       Fundamentals of Epidemiology (on-line only in Spring 2009)                      3
       PubH 6751       Principles of Management in Health Service Organizations                        2
                       Electives                                                                       3
 May Session I
       PubH 6910       Critical Review of Research in Public Health Nutrition                          1
 Summer Session I
       PubH 6904       Nutrition and Aging (on-line)                                                   2
 Fall Semester II
       Nutr 5621w      Macronutrient Metabolism [prerequisite FScN 4612]                               4
                       Electives                                                                       3
                                                                                  st
       PubH 6741       Ethics in Public Health: Professional Practice & Policy (1 half semester)       1
       PubH 6902       Maternal and Infant Nutrition                                                   2

                                                                                                       137
       PubH 7996     Field Experience                                                                         1
 Spring Session II
       PubH 6914     Community Nutrition Intervention                                                         3
       PubH 6915     Nutrition Assessment                                                                     2
       PubH 6933     Nutrition and Chronic Diseases                                                           2
       PubH 7994     Master’s Project                                                                         2
       PubH 7996     Field Experience                                                                         1
                     Electives                                                                                2

Full-Time 16-Month Nutrition Epidemiology Program Option [40-41 credits]
Fall Semester I
       Course        Title                                                                          Credits
       PubH 6101     Environmental Health [1st half semester]                                         2
       PubH 6341     Epidemiologic Methods I                                                          3
       PubH 6450     Biostatistics I                                                                  4
       PubH 6751     Principles of Management in Health Service Organizations [2nd half semester]     2
       PubH 6901     Foundations of Public Health Nutrition Leadership                                2
Spring Semester I
       PubH 6342     Epidemiologic Methods II                                                         3
       PubH 6451     Biostatistics II                                                                 4
       PubH 6914     Community Nutrition Intervention                                                 3
       PubH 6915     Nutrition Assessment                                                             2
       PubH 6933     Nutrition and Chronic Diseases                                                   2
Summer Session I
       PubH 6904     Nutrition and Aging (on-line)                                                    2
       PubH 7996     Field Experience                                                                 1
Fall Semester II
       PubH 6343     Epidemiologic Methods III                                                        4
       PubH 6344     Epidemiologic Methods IV                                                         2
       PubH 6386     Public Health Aspects of Cardiovascular Disease                                  2
       PubH 6389     Nutritional Epidemiology                                                         2
                                                                     st
       PubH 6741     Ethics in Public Health: Practice & Policy [1        half semester]              1
       PubH 7994     Master’s Project                                                                 2
       PubH 7996     Field Experience                                                                 1

Full-Time 24-Month Nutrition Epidemiology Program Option [48-54 credits]
 Fall Semester I
        Course       Title                                                                          Credits
       PubH 6341     Epidemiologic Methods I                                                          3
       PubH 6355     Pathophysiology of Human Disease                                                 4
       PubH 6450     Biostatistics I                                                                  4
       PubH 6901     Foundations of Public Health Leadership                                          2
       PubH 6905     Human Nutrition and Health                                                       2
 Spring Semester I
       PubH 6101     Environmental Health                                                             2
       PubH 6342     Epidemiologic Methods II                                                         3
       PubH 6451     Biostatistics II                                                                 4

138
        PubH 6741     Ethics in Public Health: Practice & Policy [1st half semester]                       1
        PubH 7996     Field Experience                                                                     1
 Summer Session
        PubH 6751     Principles of Management in Health Service Organizations (on-line)                   2
        PubH 6904     Nutrition and Aging (on-line)                                                        2
        PubH 7996     Field Experience                                                                     1
 Fall Semester II
        Nutr 5621W    Macronutrient Metabolism                                                             4
        PubH 6343     Epidemiologic Methods III                                                            4
        PubH 6344     Epidemiologic Methods IV                                                             2
        PubH 6389     Nutritional Epidemiology                                                             2
        PubH 6360     Obesity and Eating Disorders: Etiology/Epidemiology                                  2
 Spring Semester II
        PubH 6914     Community Nutrition Intervention                                                     3
        PubH 6915     Nutrition Assessment                                                                 2
        PubH 6933     Nutrition and Chronic Diseases                                                       2
        PubH 7994     Master’s Project                                                                     2


2.5     Field Experience
The following guidelines are adapted from the Guide for Field Experience in Community and Public Health Nutrition
approved in 1978, revised in 1990 by the graduate faculties in Public Health Nutrition and the Association of State and
Territorial Nutrition Directors. They meet the requirements set by the Council on Education for Public Health (CEPH).
Students are covered by University liability insurance during the periods of field experience (as specified in the Field
Experience Contract form). Therefore, contract forms must be signed and turned in before starting the field
experience.
Field experiences help students try new skills and to see themselves in a practice setting. They allow for integration
of theory and practice in an agency setting; they are a joint venture between the Major in Public Health Nutrition and
the field agency. The effectiveness of future practitioners of public health nutrition depends on collaboration between
the field faculty and the Major in Public Health Nutrition in the development of productive and meaningful field
experiences.

Goals
The broad goals of field experience are to help the Public Health Nutrition graduate students strengthen their
philosophy and understanding of public health and to identify themselves as professionals in public health. These
goals are achieved by introducing the student in a health related field agency to:
    The broad practice and philosophy of public health as it relates to nutrition;
    The organizational framework for nutrition programs and services at the federal, state, and local levels;
    The application of theory to practice through work experiences.
Because field experiences provide opportunities for personal involvement in developing, planning, executing, and
evaluating activities with and for professional and nonprofessional groups and individuals, a goal for students is
increased self-awareness and self-confidence through accomplishment of these activities.
Field experience can contribute to the student's learning by offering the opportunity to apply knowledge and abilities
within the framework of a public health agency.

PLANNING & procedures for the Field Experience
A list of agencies that have provided field experiences is available at http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/field/index
Students should start thinking about their field experience and making arrangements as early as possible in order to
have adequate time to accomplish all objectives. It is also advantageous to have a few different field ideas and
agencies in mind, in case one does not work out. Field experiences are designed to expose students to public health
practice in the community; therefore field experiences within the University of Minnesota are not appropriate. An
                                                                                                                    139
exception to this rule would be made in the case of a student who is working in the community on a U of MN funded
project. These exceptions require prior approval by the Public Health Nutrition Major Chair.


1. Early in Fall Semester, students are guided to assess their personal, educational and professional goals in order
   to develop a tentative plan for the field experience for the year. Students meet with their academic advisor to
   discuss these goals and current field experience opportunities that would assist the students in achieving these
   goals. It is the student's responsibility to make final arrangements for field placement with the field preceptor who
   will be supervising them in the community setting. The academic advisor is available to facilitate placement. The
   Student Worksheet, Overall Objectives for Field Experience (PubH 7996), should serve as a guide to plan field
   experiences.
2. Students should meet with their field preceptor early in the semester. Students present a resume and discuss
   goals and objectives for the field experience. The field preceptor provides an orientation and overview of the
   agency. After negotiating mutually acceptable goals and timelines, finalized objectives for the field experience are
   established.
3. Before beginning field experience work, final objectives for the field experience should be recorded on the Field
   Experience/Internship Contract on-line form, be reviewed and approved by the field preceptor, academic advisor
   and the major coordinator and student. The student initiates the contract, available at
   http://www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp/ .
4. Near the midway point of the field experience, students should set aside time for discussion and evaluation of
   progress toward outlined objectives with their field preceptor.
5. At the end of the field experience, students should be evaluated by their field preceptor using the on-line
   Preceptor Evaluation of Field Experience/Internship form. Students should also evaluate their experience using
   the on-line Student Evaluation of Field Experience/Internship form.
6. Students are responsible to guide the preceptor to the on-line Preceptor Evaluation form. The contract, report,
   and evaluation must be completed no later than the last day of finals week in order to avoid a grade of "K"
   representing work in progress.
7. Generally, field experiences are planned to coincide with the University semester schedule. Field experiences are
   based on 45-60 hours (usually 3-4 hours/week for the 15 week semester), and are one credit each. However,
   since program activities in field agencies do not necessarily lend themselves to this schedule, flexibility is allowed.
   Field preceptors are encouraged to notify the public health nutrition major when they have a project or opportunity
   for student involvement regardless of the time.
8. Regular communication is essential for all involved. Students should notify their academic advisor of problems
   immediately. When in doubt about whether the placement is appropriate, contact your academic advisor or major
   coordinator by phone or email to discuss the placement.
9. The on-line Field Experience Contract, Preceptor Evaluation Form and Student Evaluation form are available at
   http://www.ahc.umn.edu/sphfieldexp/ . While you may register for the credit at any time, you must have a
   contract in place before beginning your field work.
10. Certain facilities are required by Minnesota law to submit paperwork for a criminal background check for all
    personnel with direct, unsupervised client contact. If their field experience or master's project is in such a facility,
    students may be asked by the institution to submit paperwork.

Overall Guidelines for Field Experience credits
[For 16- and 24-month program options]
1. Longer or Block Field Experiences comprising more than 2 credits can be arranged at any time, but they happen
   most often after students have completed the majority of their coursework. While usually full-time for 6-8 weeks,
   the optional block field experience can be planned for less than 40 hours per week over a longer period of time.
   The same on-line contract, and evaluation forms are used, but may require additional space to answer questions
   succinctly. Students enrolled in the DIGS (Dietetic Internship for Graduate Students) program can use this longer
   block field experience to maintain a registered student status during DIGS. Students doing DIGS may use the
   block field experience as elective credits.
2. 16-month students need to complete 2 field credits. They may do additional field experience credits as electives.

140
3. 24-month students also complete a minimum of 2 field credits. A 4-credit block field experience is optional and
   may be part of DIGS and used as elective credits, see #1.

Relationship Between the Field Experience and the Master’s Project
The master’s project and field experience should represent separate activities, though they may be related. The
master’s project should involve more independent work than the field experience. A master’s project could evolve
from a field experience with an organization, but should be defined separately; the same work cannot be counted for
both. If they are related, careful consideration must be given in wording the contract to differentiate the requirements
of the field experience from the master's project.
We suggest that students do an internship at one organization, and their master’s project with a different organization.
While it is not required, doing them with different organizations has several advantages. It gives the student an insight
into multiple organizations, expands the number of people the student can use for future references for jobs, and
increases the number of places that may turn into a job opportunity.



2.6     Master’s Project

Purpose
The purpose of the master’s project is to enable students to demonstrate:
     Familiarity with the tools of research and scholarship in the field of Public Health;
     The ability to work independently;
     The ability to plan and carry out a systematic investigation related to a public health issue; and
     The ability to effectively present, in written form, the results of their investigation.
The program views well-developed investigation and communication skills as essential if Public Health Nutrition
professionals are to be effective in advancing the health and well-being of populations and at-risk groups.

Project Options
Students may choose among three options for their MPH project. The choice of options should be decided in
consultation with their advisor. The diversity and number of research questions related to Public Health Nutrition are
large. Students are encouraged to decide upon a topic as early in their program as possible. Ideally, the primary area
of interest should be determined by the end of the first semester for students in the 16-month program. Students in
the 24-month program should select a general topic by the end of the first semester of their second year. This should
be followed by further specification of the topic for investigation and a decision about the project options. Discussions
with the faculty advisor should be used to explore opportunities and alternatives.
Students choose their topics through different avenues including:
     Prior experience that has stimulated an interest in a particular area of Public Health Nutrition
     A formal course that stimulates interest in a specific area
     Field placement projects that include sufficient scope and scholarly activity to constitute a master's project
     Announcements from community organizations or public health agencies that have contacted the Public Health
      Nutrition program or SPH Career Center
     The student's advisor or other member of the faculty may be involved in a research study of interest to the
      student. The student may be given the opportunity to use data from a faculty research study for their master’s
      project.

Once you have identified a topic of interest, talk to faculty members who have similar interests to identify a project
advisor. Many times your academic advisor will serve as your project advisor. However, in other instances, another
faculty member may be a more appropriate project advisor based on their content or methodological expertise. In this
case, discuss your interests with that faculty member and ask them to serve as your project advisor. Once a faculty
person agrees to serve as your project advisor, make sure you inform your academic advisor.




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Option 1: Research Project
This option is available for students who would like to apply research skills and analyze data (either primary or
secondary). The research project will focus on pertinent questions or issues in public health nutrition. The project
includes the following objectives:
       Demonstrates the student's ability to plan and conduct research using appropriate scientific methods;
       Demonstrates the student's ability to do quantitative or qualitative analysis utilizing primary or secondary data;
        and
       Demonstrates the student's ability for assessing the relevance of the findings of the project and translating this
        knowledge into future research, policy, and programmatic implications.
Approval for the research needs to be obtained from the Human Subjects Committee (Institutional Review Board).
The research project should include the following components:
I.       Title and Approval Page
II.      Abstract - not to exceed 250 words
III.     Acknowledgments
IV.      Table of Contents
V.       Introduction
         A. Statement and development of problem, including its rationale and significance to public health and public
              health nutrition
         B. Conceptual model or theoretical framework (if appropriate)
         C. Statement of purpose
VI.      Literature Review
VII.     Methodology
         A. Study design
         B. Description of data base, target population, and/or sample selection procedures including nature of
              response and non-response, as appropriate
         C. Definition of variables/indicators, description of data collection procedures, study site and instrumentation,
              as appropriate
         D. Analytic technique used – quantitative, qualitative, as appropriate
VIII.    Results
IX.      Discussion
         A. Description of how findings confirm/depart from those of others
         B. Strengths and weaknesses of study
         C. Implications for public health and public health nutrition
         D. Conclusion and recommendations
X.       References
XI.      Appendices (include copies of instruments, surveys, records used, IRB documentation, etc.)


Option 2: Systematic Review of the Literature
This option gives students the opportunity to perform a scholarly comprehensive and integrative review of published
literature to address a specific issue that is relevant to the science and practice of public health nutrition. This
literature review must be of publishable quality, and aims to demonstrate the student’s ability to:
       Initiate and successfully plan and complete a comprehensive review of the literature and synthesize findings in
        an area of public health nutrition;
       Critically and systematically evaluate the scientific, programmatic, or practice and policy implications of a
        literature review in the selected public health nutrition content area;
       Recognize gaps in existing knowledge as well as those that are in need of further clarification; and
       Assess the relevance of the existing literature to the delivery of health services and the development of
        programs and interventions for populations or targeted subgroups.

142
The Critical Review Project typically has the following components:
I.       Title and Approval Page
II.      Abstract - not to exceed 250 words
III.     Acknowledgments
IV.      Table of Contents
V.       Introduction
         A. Statement and development of problem, including its rationale and significance to public health and public
              health nutrition
         B. Conceptual model or theoretical framework (if appropriate)
         C. Statement of purpose
VI.      Methodology
         A. Method used to collect articles
         B. Criteria for including or excluding articles in review
         C. Criteria for assessing articles
VII.     Integrative Literature Review and Analysis
         A. Summary of trends in the literature
         B. Strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in the literature including the following:
              1) Measurement (including validity and reliability)
              2) Populations and data sources
              3) Study designs
              4) Analyses and data presentation techniques and their adequacy
              5) Appropriateness of conclusions
         C. Implications for public health nutrition
         D. Conclusions and recommendations
VIII.    References
IX.      Appendices
Pending advisor's approval, students who plan to submit their master's project for publication may submit the final
project in the article format specified by the journal. Students collaborating with other investigators have the primary
responsibility for writing the article. However, revisions and editorial changes recommended by co-authors may be
incorporated into the final paper to be submitted to the examining committee. Students should attach the journal’s
guidelines for publication to the project.
The following references may be useful resources in writing an integrative literature review:
      Garrard, J. Health Sciences Literature Review Made Easy: The Matrix Method Aspen Publishers, 1999.
      Bauman, L.J., Drotar, D., Leventhal, J.M., Perrin, E.C., Pless, I.B. A review of psychosocial interventions for
       children with chronic health conditions. Pediatrics. 1997;100(2):244 - 251.
      Benson, M.J., Sporakowski, M.J., Stremmel, A.J. Writing reviews of family literature: guiding students using
       Blooms's taxonomy of cognitive objectives. Family Relations. 41:65 - 69, 1993.
      Cooper, H.M. The Integrative Research Review: A Systematic Approach. Beverly Hills, CA: SAGE; 1988.
      Tabak, E.R., Mullen, P.D., Simons-Morton, D.G., Green, L.W., et al. Definition and yield of inclusion criteria for
       a meta-analysis of patient education studies in clinical preventive services. Evaluation & the Health
       Professions, 14(4):388 - 411, 1991.
      Jackson, G.B. Methods for integrative reviews. Review of Educational Research 50:438 - 460, 1980.
      Light, R.J. & Pillemer, D.B., Summing Up: The Science of Reviewing Research. Cambridge, MA, Harvard
       University Press, 1984.
      Mulrow, C.D. The medical review article: State of the science. Annals of Internal Medicine 106:485 - 488, 1987.
      Thacker, S.B. Meta-analysis: A quantitative approach to research integration. Journal of the American Medical
       Assoc., 259:1685 - 89, 1988.




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Option 3: Technical Field Project
This option gives students the opportunity to have in-depth involvement in a community-based project. Students may
work with an agency or combine the field placement experience with the master's project requirement, depending on
the needs of the agency and the interests of the student. The technical field project is based upon the project(s) that
students initiate during the course of their field experiences. The project should address topics of current relevance to
the field of public health nutrition practice, which may include: program evaluation; a community needs assessment;
an assessment of current practices or policies, data systems, or screening methods; or the development of a
curriculum or program.
The Technical Field Project includes the following objectives:
     Demonstrates the student's ability to develop, initiate, and evaluate a community-based project;
     Demonstrates the student's ability to plan and organize a body of technical information into a cohesive and
      acceptable report format; and
     Demonstrates the student's ability for assessing the relevance of the findings of projects, and translating this
      knowledge into policy and programmatic implications.
The technical field report should be suitable for distribution to public health nutrition-related agencies, and therefore
should be written in a style and format usable and useful to program planners and policy makers. The format used
should be decided with the advisor and field supervisor. For the technical field report components, see Option 2:
Research Project above.

Master’s Project Advisor/Committee
The committee must include at least three faculty members:
1. The master’s project advisor, who must be a Public Health Nutrition faculty member, will chair the committee,
2. The student’s academic advisor must be the second member, and must also be a Public Health Nutrition faculty
   member; if the academic advisor is also the master’s project advisor, then the second committee member must
   be some other Public Health Nutrition faculty member, and,
3. One outside faculty person; this person must be a regular or adjunct faculty member from within the University,
   but outside the Public Health Nutrition Major. This person is selected by the project advisor and the student.
Students having questions about any faculty member’s appointment status should contact one of the Major
Coordinators for clarification. If a student wishes to have someone from an outside agency or organization sit on the
committee, that is permissible, but that person would not sign the student's official Study Plan form.
It is recommended that students and their committee meet to outline the scope of the project before it begins. This
provides an opportunity for all committee members to have input on the project and should minimize the amount of
"last minute" work needed to satisfy all committee members as the project nears completion.
Listed below, for your convenience, is a list of public health nutrition faculty who are eligible to serve as your master’s
project advisor. Also listed is contact information as well as research expertise information to help you determine who
might be a good match with your research interests.

Approval Process and Registration
After selecting a topic, it is suggested that the project proposal be submitted to the advisor no later than the end of the
first Fall Semester for 16-month students and by the end of the second Fall Semester for the 24 month students.
Prior to registering for the Master’s Project, students must submit the Master’s Project Approval Form found at
http://www.epi.umn.edu/students/guidebook.shtm AND a project outline (see Timetable below). Students must have
this form approved and signed by their master’s project advisor, and their second Public Health Nutrition committee
member, and submitted to Shelley Cooksey, Major Coordinator, before they can start work on their master’s project.
The outline should include a detailed description of the scope of the master’s project. A timeline would also be helpful
to include in your description but it is not required. Upon receipt of the Master’s Project Approval Form, Shelley will
enter a permission code in the registration system for you to register for PubH 7994. Most students do not complete
their master's project credits the same semester they register for credits and thus the credits remain a "K" for "work in
progress" on their transcript until they complete the project and hold an oral defense.
The master’s project is completed in an independent study format with regular advisor meetings. Students are
encouraged to review the proposal with the advisor and schedule meetings as outlined in the implementation plan.


144
Human Subjects Information
All students at the University of Minnesota who conduct any research using human subjects are required to submit
their research proposal to the University of Minnesota Institutional Review Board (IRB) for approval prior to conducting
their study. The approval process can take up to two months. This time must be accounted for when developing the
proposal timeline. No contacts with potential or actual study participants, including recruitment or other research, may
occur until final IRB approval. After the outline has been approved, each student should allow a minimum of six
months to complete all the tasks involved in preparing the IRB application and getting approval, conducting the project
and preparing the final draft.
For IRB procedures and further information or go to the IRB website at www.research.umn.edu/irb/ .

Project Completion
The length and format of the final project report will vary depending on the project. Students need to decide on the
format and length in consultation with their advisor and the guidelines in this section. Shorter papers (20-25 pages)
are usually prepared in a journal format to be submitted for publication, while longer papers (25-50 pages) are more
typical of a master's project. Projects should be double-spaced, with 1-inch margins, using a font of 12, and prepared
according to accepted style guidelines.
In an effort to keep this requirement contemporary and relevant to the preparation of public health professionals, the
following style manuals are recommended:
     American Medical Association. American Medical Association Manual of Style. 9th ed. Baltimore, MD: Williams
      & Wilkins, 1998.
     American Psychological Association. Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 5th ed.
      Washington, DC: American Psychological Association; 2001.
Copies of former students’ research projects are located near cubicle 398E on the third floor of WBOB. Students may
browse through these but cannot take them from the student study area. A list of master’s research project titles is
available on-line at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/mstrproj.shtm.
Upon completion of the project, students are required to provide copies of the paper to each committee member two
weeks before the oral defense.
Timetable
After choosing a topic, students must prepare an outline for the project and submit it to the advisor no later than the
beginning of the second semester of year one for students in the 16-month program (or that equivalent for part-time
students). Students in the 24-month program should submit an outline by the beginning of the first semester of year
two. Students should allow a minimum of six months to complete the tasks involved in doing the project and preparing
the final draft of the project after the outline has been approved. The purpose of establishing a timeline is to give the
student as much guidance and constructive criticism as necessary while leaving sufficient time for the advisor to
review the written project and to meet with the student prior to scheduling the oral defense.
Timetable outline
[For full-time students or equivalent for part-time students]
During the first third of their degree program, students should:
     Develop a topic and select a project option in consultation with their advisor;
     Submit a proposed outline of the project to their advisor for approval; and
     Begin preliminary work on the project, including IRB approval.
During the second third of their degree program, students should:
     Continue work on their project.
During the final third of their degree program, students should:
     Submit a first draft to their advisor (allow 2 weeks for reading);
     Discuss the draft with their advisor and make revisions/corrections (more than one round of revisions may be
      required);
     Submit the revised project to their advisor and other committee members (allow 2 weeks for reading);
     Make any further revisions and corrections; and
     Submit the final report to their advisor, committee members, and Shelley Cooksey.

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Costs Associated with the Master's Project
Students are responsible for costs associated with completing their master's projects. These costs are sometimes
offset in part by the organization with which the student is working. Funds may also be available from the Division of
Epidemiology and Community Health by applying for the J. B. Hawley Student Research Award; see section 1.6.
Students who choose the data analysis project option may find the research project with which they are associated
can cover the costs of their project. There are also resources available for statistical computing. The Division of
Epidemiology and Community Health will provide MPH, MS and PhD students working on research projects free
access to the Division's research computers. This policy is addressed to those students who need computer access
for faculty-sponsored research that is part of their Master's or PhD project. The following rules apply:
     A sponsoring faculty member should initiate access for the student and specify the time period that the access
      is needed;
     Access beyond the initial time period is renewable at the request of the faculty member and subject to approval
      by the Computer Resources committee;
     To be courteous, the student should run only one job at a time;
     The computer may not be used for other coursework;
     This access is limited to the main research computers and does not necessarily include exclusive use of a PC
      or Mac (the student is assumed to need access to the specialized analysis software only available on the Epi
      main system); and
     Any problems should be reported to the faculty sponsor, not the computer support staff.

Dissemination
It is expected that projects will result in methods and findings meritorious of sharing with others in the field. Students
are highly encouraged to disseminate their findings at professional meetings, in a professional journal, by preparing a
technical report for a public health agency, or at a poster session at a professional meeting.


2.7     Oral Examination
The following are guidelines for the MPH examination for the Public Health Nutrition Major. Forms mentioned below
can be found at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm.

Material Covered
The material covered in the oral examination is comprehensive and includes:
1. Master's Project;
2. Course materials and seminars;
3. Issues of practical application.

Before the exam
Students need to complete Part I of the Study Plan at least one semester before completion of their coursework.
The form can be found at www.epi.umn.edu/academic/handbook.shtm. Students should complete Pages 1 & 2 of the
Study Plan and then turn in the Study Plan to Shelley Cooksey (cube 398E WBOB), Major Coordinator, who will then
make sure the advisor and Major Chair sign it before the form is placed in the student’s file. Students are urged to
keep a copy of their Study Plan for their own files.
Students are responsible for scheduling the oral exam with the committee members and for reserving a small
conference room for a minimum of two hours. Students are also responsible for arranging for any audio-visual
equipment needed for the presentation through Shelley Cooksey.
     To schedule a room in the West Bank Office Building (WBOB), call 612-624-1818.

It is a good idea to reserve the room starting 30 minutes prior to the time that you want to start your presentation.
Allowing that additional 30 minutes will ensure that any audio-visual equipment reserved has been set up and your
presentation works as you anticipate that it will. To reserve an LCD projector and/or laptop, please notify Shelley
Cooksey at least two weeks in advance. These arrangements can usually be accommodated in WBOB conference
rooms with at least two weeks notice.


146
At least two weeks prior to the exam, students must forward a copy of their final project to their committee members
for review, and notify Shelley Cooksey, 612-626-8803, of the date of the oral exam so that the proper paperwork can
be forwarded to the project advisor. Please note that students cannot show up on the day of the oral and expect the
paperwork to be prepared with no advance notice. If this happens, the student would hold their oral but the committee
would not have the paperwork to sign. It would be the project advisor's responsibility to get the required committee
signatures after the paperwork is prepared.

During the exam
At the oral exam, the student will present for roughly 20-30 minutes, followed by questions from committee members.
After that, the committee will ask the student to leave the room so the committee can decide if the student passed or
not. The committee will ask the student to rejoin them, and the student will hear the committee’s decision. If the
student passes, the committee will sign the study plan. If the student did not pass, the committee will explain what
steps are necessary before they will approve the student’s project.
Note that the MPH will not be conferred until the exam committee is satisfied with both the quality of the presentation
and the master’s project.

After the exam
The project advisor is responsible for returning the student’s signed study plan to the Major Coordinators as well as
submitting a grade change for the master's project research credits.
Once any necessary changes or corrections to the Master’s Project have been completed, students must submit one
unbound, unstapled copy of their Master’s Project paper and abstract to Shelley Cooksey, Major Coordinator. This
can be a hard-copy printed out or emailed to Shelley as a Word attachment. Email can be sent to Shelley at
cooks001@umn.edu.


2.8     Public Health Nutrition Faculty Directory
NAME                       PHONE      E-MAIL ADDRESS          RESEARCH EXPERTISE
Andrew Flood, PhD         624.2891    flood009@umn.edu        Nutritional epidemiology; cancer epidemiology with emphasis
                                                              on colorectal cancer, insulin resistance, IGFs and their
                                                              binding proteins
Myron Gross, PhD          624-5417    gross001@umn.edu        The role of micronutrients in health and disease; Cancer
                                                              pathobiology; Biomarkers of dietary factor consumption and
                                                              cancer progression
Lisa Harnack, DrPH, RD    626.9398    harna001@umn.edu        Primary research interests focus on assessment and
                                                              evaluation of dietary behaviors and dietary intake, particularly
                                                              as they relate to prevention of chronic disease and obesity
John Himes, PhD           624.8210    himes001@umn.edu        Child growth and nutrition; anthropometric assessment of
                                                              nutritional status; dietary assessment; obesity and body
                                                              composition
Robert Jeffery, PhD       626.8580    jeffe001@umn.edu        Health behavior change; dietary intervention; obesity
                                                              epidemiology, treatment, and prevention
Russell Luepker, MD,      624.6362    luepk001@umn.edu        Cardiovascular disease epidemiology and prevention; health
MS                                                            behavior; community trials; clinical trials
Leslie Lytle, PhD         624.3518    lalytle@umn.edu         Planning and evaluating eating behavior change interventions
                                                              in children; youth health promotion research; theories of
                                                              health behavior; obesity prevention in youth
Melissa Nelson, PhD       624.8832    nels5024@umn.edu        Environmental and behavioral determinants of excess weight
                                                              gain and obesity during childhood, adolescence and young
                                                              adulthood
Toben Nelson, ScD         626-9791    tfnelson@umn.edu        Health policy, organizational change, health behavior during
                                                              developmental transitions, influence of sports participation on
                                                              health, social determinants of health, program evaluation,
                                                              prevention of alcohol-attributable harm, physical activity
                                                              promotion, obesity prevention, motor vehicle safety
Dianne Neumark-           624.0880    nuema011@umn.edu        Adolescent health and nutrition; obesity and eating disorder
Sztainer, PhD, MPH                                            prevention; health behavior change; nutrition education
                                                              program design and evaluation
Mark Pereira, MPH,        624.4173    perei004@umn.edu        Nutrition and physical activity in the prevention of obesity;
PhD                                                           type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, including
                                                                                                                        147
(on sabbatical Fall                                             interactions between dietary and exercise patterns
Semester 08)
Kim Robien, PhD, MS         625.8279    robie004@umn.edu        Diet and cancer survivorship; oncology nutrition;
                                                                pharmacogenetics; folate mediated one-carbon metabolism;
                                                                evidence-based nutrition practice guidelines; outcomes
                                                                related to medical nutrition therapy
Nancy Sherwood, PhD         625-4567    sherw005@umn.edu        Obesity prevention and treatment in children and adults
                            (Th only)
                            952-967-
                           7303 (M-W
                              & F)
Jamie Stang, PhD,           626.0351    stang002@umn.edu        Nutrition and weight status in pregnancy; child and
MPH, RD                                                         adolescent nutrition; behavioral counseling in child obesity;
                                                                eating disorders treatment
Lyn Steffen, PhD, MPH,      625.9307    steff025@umn.edu        CVD epidemiology & prevention; nutritional epidemiology;
RD                                                              stroke surveillance; diet relations with diabetes; insulin
                                                                resistance and obesity
Mary Story, PhD             626.8801    story001@umn.edu        Child and adolescent nutrition; obesity prevention; eating
                                                                behaviors


2.9       Graduate Follow-up Survey
Students must submit the Graduate Follow-Up Survey prior to receiving their degree or certificate. Students may
complete the process online at the appropriate link on the current student Web page
http://sphsdb.ahc.umn.edu/gradsurvey/gs_login.cfm. Upon submitting the electronic survey, the student's relevant
major coordinator will be notified by e-mail. Coordinators may opt to have the student complete a paper copy, and
then enter the information for the student using the online form.
All graduates will receive a three-month and six-month e-mail message asking them to update survey information
(e.g., employment). This is through secure access and coordinators will not be able to input on students' behalf.


2.10 Graduation Checklist

General steps for all MPH majors
      1. Student submits completed Study Plan at least one semester prior to the anticipated completion of
         coursework; see section 2.7.
      2. Student files the Application for Degree form (see section 2.3) at 200 Fraser Hall by the end of the first
         business day of the month in which they intend to graduate.
      3. Student completes all coursework and requirements by noon on the last business day of the month in which
         they wish to have their degree conferred.
      4. Student completes and circulates the Master’s Project paper and schedules the oral exam at least two weeks
         before the scheduled oral examination date; see section 2.7.
      5. Student notifies Shelley Cooksey, cooks001@umn.edu, of the date of the oral exam at least two
         weeks prior to the exam so that their study plan can be forwarded to the project advisor; see section
         2.7.
      6. After the oral exam, project advisor returns the student’s study plan to the Major Coordinators; see section
         2.7.
      7. Student submits one unbound, unstapled copy of the Master’s Project paper and abstract to Shelley Cooksey.
         See section 2.7.
      8. Student submits the Graduate Follow-up Survey. See section 2.9

All Division of Epidemiology and Community Health students who fulfill, or anticipate fulfilling, the above requirements
and deadlines for Fall 2008 through Summer Session 2009 are eligible to participate in the School of Public Health
commencement ceremony on May 18, 2009. We encourage you to attend!
148
It is considered highly unethical and inappropriate to use or include in your title or professional signature any degree
that you have not completed. This means you cannot use the MPH title prior to completing all your degree
requirements and your degree has been conferred. The School does not recognize or confer the title “MPH
Candidate”.




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