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Latitude and Longitude Latitude and Longitude by wanghonghx

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									                                     Latitude and Longitude

Objectives:
       Students will be able to correctly identify location using latitude and longitude

Core Standards:
Geography for Life, 1.1b
U.S. History, 1.1a
Utah Studies, 1.2a

Vocabulary:
Latitude
Longitude
Horizon
Sextant
Compass
Key
Legend

Materials:
Shipwreck at the Bottom of the World by Jennifer Armstrong (p. 72)
Maps/Globe
“Track the Expedition” from Shackleton's Antarctic Adventure,
http://main.wgbh.org/imax/Shackleton/pdf/teachgd_hi.pdf
“Finding the Way” from Shackleton's Antartic Adventure,
http://main.wgbh.org/imax/Shackleton/pdf/teachgd_hi.pdf
“Navigate the High Seas” activity www.pbs.org/nova/shackleton/navigate/
“Find Your Latitude” from Shacleton's Antarctic Adventure,
http://main.wgbh.org/imax/Shackleton/pdf/teachgd_hi.pdf
“Celestial Navigation from Argonauts to Astronauts” activity,
www.mat.uc.pt/~asalves/H6iflan.htm
Compass

Introduction/Overview:
       This lesson helps students learn how to find latitude and longitude using a map. It also
       helps them to find their own latitude and longitude using a sextant. In Shipwreck at the
       Bottom of the World, Shackleton's crew used maps and sextants to help them know
       their own position. Activate background knowledge relevant to latitude and longitude.
       Ask students “Who knows what latitude and longitude are? Why do we use them to
       divide up the globe? How did Shackleton and his crew use latitude and longitude?”

Direct instruction:
        Discuss lesson vocabulary.
        Using a map, show students how to find latitude and longitude coordinates.
        Read p. 72-73 of Shipwreck, which describes the process of “shooting” the sun with a
        sextant to find position.
        Select as many of the activities listed in the “Materials” section as you want to do with
        the students, and follow the instructions with each.

Modeling:
      Using the selected activities (for example, the “Track the Expedition” activity), find
       latitude and longitude for the students to see.

Guided Practice:
      Using the selected activities, find latitude and longitude as a whole class.

Independent Practice:
      As small groups or individuals, use the selected activities to find latitude and longitude.
      Using the “Find Your Latitude” activity, have the students make a sextant for homework
      and find their own latitude and longitude.

Wrap-up:
  • Have students answer the following questions in writing:
         Could the same thing happen today? Would modern GPS technology have kept the
         crew from being stuck in the ice?
         How can map-reading skills help you? When might you need to read a map?

Assessment:
       Sextant activity—assesses students' ability to find latitude and longitude

Extension/Reteaching:
       Use other activities that you didn't use the first time to help students find latitude and
       longitude.
       Find local latitudes and longitudes.

Content Connections:
Earth Systems Science
Geometry
Geography for Life
Utah Studies
U.S. History

								
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