Resources-for-Students-in-Transition-from-Secondary-School

					                  Updated:Tuesday 21 st July, 2009




Resources for Students in
Transition from Secondary
   School to TAFE and
         University




            1
                      THE PURPOSE OF THE GUIDE

This electronic Guide has been developed to assist students with a disability who are
contemplating their transition from school to TAFE and/or University

It aims to benefit students with a disability directly and by raising their awareness of
resources worth bringing to the attention of others such as teachers, and employers.

Via a series of hyperlinks, the Guide will connect students to information on Disability
Specific Assistance, Assistive and Inclusive Technologies, Accommodations, Disclosure
and other areas of interest.

It is hoped that the Guide will help students prepare and plan ahead for some of the
questions and issues that they may confront when moving from school to tertiary
education and onto work.


We hope you find the Guide useful.       If you would like to provide feedback on any
aspect of the Guide, please contact:

           Steven Plant
           Banyule/Nillumbik LLEN               Ph: 9439 6522
           162 Main Road                        Fx: 9439 6010
           Lower Plenty, Victoria 3093          Email:
                                                steveplant@bnllen.org.au




                                USING THE GUIDE

The Guide and some of the linked files in the Guide are in Adobe Acrobat format
(PDF). If you do not already have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed, you can download
it free of charge from the Adobe website


To assist you to navigate the Guide easily, the Table of Contents contains hyperlinks to
each section. Simply hold down the “Ctrl” button, place your cursor over the relevant
item in the Table of Contents (the cursor changes to a hand) and click. Apart from the
Table of Contents, all links are blue text, and links you have already visited appear as
purple underlined text.




                                            2
                                         Table of Contents

Assistive & Inclusive Technology ...............................................................5
 Centre for Learning Innovation – Hearing Loss and Deafness............................ 5
 Centre for Learning Innovation – Neurological Disabilities ................................ 5
 Centre for Learning Innovation – Physical Disabilities ...................................... 6
 Centre for Learning Innovation – Vision Impairment and Blindness .................... 7
 EduApps - A New, Portable and Free Way to Support Students! ........................ 8
 Opening All Options - Web Site ................................................................... 9
 Universal Access Fact Sheets ..................................................................... 10

Disability Specific Resources .................................................................... 11
Asperger’s Syndrome .................................................................................. 11
  Aspiration Asperger's Synd rome ................................................................. 11
  Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Asperger syndrome, Autism and
  ADHD .................................................................................................... 11
  Towards Success - Asperger’s Syndrome ..................................................... 12

Brain Injury............................................................................................... 13
  Adapt, Build & Inspire Acquired Brain Injury ................................................. 13
  Towards Success - Acquired Brain Injury ..................................................... 13
  Where There's a Will There's A Way – Brain Injury ........................................ 13

Hearing Impairment ................................................................................... 14
 Teaching Students with a Hearing Impairment .............................................. 14
 Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Deafness or Hearing Impairment
  ............................................................................................................ 14
 Towards Success – Deafness ..................................................................... 14
 Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Hearing Impairment ........... 15
 Where There's a Will There's A Way – Hearing Impairment ............................. 16

Learning Disability ...................................................................................... 17
  Grasp the Nettle Learning Disabilities .......................................................... 17
  Moving On.............................................................................................. 17
  Learning Strategies - for Students with a Learning Disability ........................... 18
  Teaching Students with a Disability – Learning Disability ................................ 18
  Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Learning Disabilities ............... 19
  Towards Success - Learning Disabilities ....................................................... 19
  Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Learning Disability ............. 19
  Where There's a Will There's A Way - Dyslexia.............................................. 20

Medical Condition ....................................................................................... 21
 Teaching Students with a Disability – Medical Condition.................................. 21
 Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Health Conditions .................. 21
 Towards Success - Ongoing Medical Condition .............................................. 22
 Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Chronic Illness .................. 22




                                                      3
Mental Illness ............................................................................................ 23
 Academic Accommodations for Students with a Psychiatric Disability ................ 23
 Objectives Mental Health .......................................................................... 23
 Staying Sane On Campus .......................................................................... 24
 Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Mental Illness ....................... 24
 Teaching Students with a Disability – Psychiatric Disability.............................. 25
 Towards Success - Psychiatric Condition ...................................................... 25
 Types of Support Available and How to Get Them - Psychiatric Disability ........... 25
 Where There's a Will There's a Way - Psychological Disorders .......................... 26

Mobility Impairment.................................................................................... 27
 Teaching Students with a Disability – Mobility Disability.................................. 27
 Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Mobility Impairment ........... 27
 Where There's a Will There's A Way – Impaired Mobility ................................. 28

Physical Impairment ................................................................................... 28
  Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Physical Impairments ............. 28
  Where There's a Will There's A Way – Cerebral Palsy ..................................... 29

Visual Impairment ...................................................................................... 29
  Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Blindness or vision impairment 29
  Teaching Students with a Visual Impairment ................................................ 30
  Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Vision Impairment ............. 30
  Viewpoint Vision Impairment ..................................................................... 30
  Where There's a Will There's A Way – Visual Impairment ................................ 31

Disclosure ............................................................................................... 32
 'Choosing Your Path. Disclosure: It's a Personal Decision' ............................... 32
 Disclosure Worksheet ............................................................................... 32
 To tell or not to tell …. .............................................................................. 32

Employment / Employers......................................................................... 33
 Australian Employers' Network on Disability ................................................. 33
 Disability Confidence ................................................................................ 34
 Education to Employment Package for Graduates with Disabilities and Employers34

General Transition Resources................................................................... 35
 Consider it! - A Guide for Junior Secondary Students with a Disability ............... 35
 Considering Further Education? .................................................................. 35
 Considering Higher Education? ................................................................... 36
 Creating Accessible Teaching And Support ................................................... 37
 CSU: 'How Do I Learn? “Quiz:.................................................................... 38
 Documentation for Students Commencing Tertiary Study................................ 38
 Get Ready for Uni Website ........................................................................ 39
 People with a Disability in Vocational Education and Training ........................... 39
 Self-Directed Action Booklet ...................................................................... 40
 Towards Success (Discovering Your Learning Style) ....................................... 41
 Transition to University - Frequently Asked Questions Sheets .......................... 42
 What’s The Difference – School vs. VET vs. Uni ............................................. 43
 SEAS ..................................................................................................... 43



                                                     4
Assistive & Inclusive Technology

Centre for Learning Innovation – Hearing Loss and Deafness

Technology options for Hearing Loss and Deafness

     Summary of Hearing Aids

     Equipment which connects to hearing aids to increase effectiveness


Source: http://www.cli.nsw.edu.au/cli/e-learning/clearn.shtm

The Connected Learning section of the CLI website includes a section on Adaptive
Technologies.

The aim of this section is to provide teachers with up-to-date information in the
important field of adaptive technology. This may also be of value to students and
parents.




Centre for Learning Innovation – Neurological Disabilities

Technology options for Neurological Disabilities

     Talking calculators
     Talking clocks and watches
     Educational computer games

Source: http://www.cli.nsw.edu.au/cli/e-learning/clearn.shtm

The Connected Learning section of the CLI website includes a section on Adaptive
Technologies.

The aim of this section is to provide teachers with up-to-date information in the
important field of adaptive technology. This may also be of value to students and
parents.




                                         5
Assistive & Inclusive Technology

Centre for Learning Innovation – Physical Disabilities

Technology options for Physical Disabilities

     Keyboard modifications - Some options for making keyboards more accessible
     Alternative keyboards - Some alternative keyboards to meet needs of people
     who have Physical Disabilities
     Switches -Switches as an alternative to a keyboard
     On-screen keyboards - On-screen keyboard software for use with keyboard
     alternatives
     Predictive software - Software to help increase input speed
     Speech input to computers - Speech input as an alternative to a keyboard
     Pointing device options - Pointing devices for use with computers
     Mouse emulation - Alternatives to a standard computer mouse
     Alternative access to printed material - Some options for people who have
     difficulty handling hardcopy material

Source: http://www.cli.nsw.edu.au/cli/e-learning/clearn.shtm

The Connected Learning section of the CLI website includes a section on Adaptive
Technologies.

The aim of this section is to provide teachers with up-to-date information in the
important field of adaptive technology. This may also be of value to students and
parents.




                                         6
Assistive & Inclusive Technology

Centre for Learning Innovation – Vision Impairment and Blindness

Technology options for Vision Impairment and Blindness

     Enlargement of paper-based text - Options for magnifying hardcopy material

     Computer access - Technologies providing access to computers for people
     who are Vision Impaired or Blind

     Note-taking options - Some note-taking options for people who have Little or
     no Vision


Source: http://www.cli.nsw.edu.au/cli/e-learning/clearn.shtm

The Connected Learning section of the CLI website includes a section on Adaptive
Technologies.

The aim of this section is to provide teachers with up-to-date information in the
important field of adaptive technology. This may also be of value to students and
parents.




                                         7
Assistive & Inclusive Technology

EduApps - A New, Portable and Free Way to Support Students!

The freely downloadable AccessApps is an initiative developed by the Scottish JISC
Regional Support Centres. It consists of over 90 open source and freeware assistive
technology applications that can be used entirely from a USB stick on an MS
Windows computer.

This means EduApps will run without needing to install any software or utility
application on the host computer. A wide range of e-learning solutions that support
writing, reading and planning as well as visual and mobility difficulties are provided
– and you can add additional portable applications to EduApps, if and when
required.

The advantages of having EduApps:
      No need for technical support at a school or workplace
      No permissions required for installing assistive technologies onto a local
        computer or server
      Independent use, independent tools - anywhere, anytime
      Independent set up, configuration and preferences in each App for each
        user
      Ability to add more portable apps to cater to individual interests or needs
      Low cost solution (approximately $20-for a 4GB USB2 memory
        drive/stick)
      Provides increased independence
      USB drive technology is accepted and used universally already
      Ability to add and save MP3, Podcasts, graphics, photos and other
        documents on the drive
      Ideal for older PCs and Eee PC style and ultra portable computers that
        have minimal or restricted hard disk space

How do I get it?
Individual learning support needs dictate the type of software solution required by a
user. The download section allows you to choose the portable applications which
best suit your individual needs and download them in a single application suite.
There are three versions – the full EduApps and a lite version or a “pick and mix”
option where you choose the apps that you need.

www.rsc-ne-scotland.ac.uk/eduapps/download.php
Further information about using EduApps can be found on the website site at The
following address -
www.rsc-ne-scotland.ac.uk/eduapps/help.php

You can access Help files and directions about all of this material as well. There are
video guides and tutorials to help you from A-Z. It is extremely comprehensive and
a great way to invite students to learn how to install EduApps themselves.




                                           8
Assistive & Inclusive Technology

Opening All Options - Web Site

www.adcet.edu.au/Oao/

There is a range of assistive technology available for people with learning
disabilities (LD). Since LD manifests in different ways, and the effects vary
according to the type, extent and characteristics of each LD and the experiences,
abilities and management strategies developed by each person, it is important that
a thorough and appropriate assessment of the impact of the LD be undertaken in
each case. This will enable more informed decisions on the most appropriate use of
Assistive Technology for each individual.

This resource is designed to provide information about possible technology which
may be of assistance in certain cases, and the indications for particular LD effects.
It is not designed to be prescriptive or comprehensive, and it is important to stress
the desirability of professional assessment and testing to determine the appropriate
use of any assistive technology.

Types of Assistive Technology

 For more information on specific types of assistive technology click on the links
below.

      Screen readers & screen magnification software
      Voice recognition
      Optical character recognition (OCR)
      Word prediction
      Maths technologies
      Audio transcription
      Suggested approaches




                                             9
Assistive & Inclusive Technology

Universal Access Fact Sheets
Author: GERRY KENNEDY

You will be introduced to a range of assistive technologies that can be used in
educational institutions to support student learning.

      Universal Access using OCR with Printed Text
      Universal Access to PDF Files

      Universal Access using Text-to-Speech

      Universal Access using Text-to-Audio and Sound Editing Programs

      Universal Access using Onscreen Keyboards

      Universal Access using Word Prediction

      Universal Access using Spell Checker and Thesaurus/Dictionary Supports

      Universal Access using Mind Mapping and Flow Charting Software

      Universal Access using Note Taking Software

Email: specmelb@bigpond.net.au         Ph: 03 9894 4826 Mob: 0411 569 840




                                           10
Disability Specific Resources

Asperger’s Syndrome

Aspiration Asperger's Syndrome

Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Home-Page.aspx


These stories share the experiences of individuals with Asperger’s Syndrome or
Autism who have successfully made the transition into further education.

Additional Information:

Understanding Asperger's Syndrome

Tertiary Transitions Tips from students with Asperger's

Link to: Aspirations Asperger's Syndrome CD


Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Asperger syndrome,
Autism and ADHD
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050

Asperger syndrome is an autistic spectrum disorder caused by a neurological
dysfunction which particularly impacts on social functioning. As this is so intrinsic to
the way that most teaching and learning takes place, students with autism or
Asperger syndrome may find the experience of higher education daunting despite
having the intellectual capacity to study at this level. However, many st udents have
successfully completed a range of subjects including, most commonly, mathematics
and computing.

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Aspergers' or Autism

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is considered a neurological disorder.
Research has indicated that ADHD is likely to be caused by biological factors that
influence chemical messages (neurotransmitters) in certain parts of the brain.
Slight imbalances in the neurotransmitters affect the parts of the brain which
control reflective thought and the inhibition of ill-considered behaviour.

Adjustments in the learning environment can greatly assist a student with ADHD,
but as the nature of the student’s disability and its impact on learning will vary
significantly adjustments need to be tailored to meet the individual's needs.

See: Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with AD/HD




                                           11
Disability Specific Resources
Towards Success - Asperger’s Syndrome
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Information---Resources/Student-Transition---
Participation/Towards-Success-in-Tertiary-Study.aspx

Towards Success series: for students with disabilities who are considering or
have begun tertiary study. The books can be downloaded in pdf, or ordered in
hard copy from the Language and Learning Skills Unit: ph (03) 8344 0930.

See: Asperger's Syndrome.(Pdf)




                                           12
Disability Specific Resources

Brain Injury


Adapt, Build & Inspire Acquired Brain Injury
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Home-Page.aspx


This CD shares the experiences of 12 individuals with Acquired Brain Injury who
have successfully engaged in tertiary study.

Additional Information:
Understanding Acquired Brain Injury

Tertiary Transitions Tips from students with ABI

Link to - Adapt Build & Inspire Acquired Brain Injury CD


Towards Success - Acquired Brain Injury

Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Information---Resources/Student-Transition---
Participation/Towards-Success-in-Tertiary-Study.aspx

Towards Success series: for students with disabilities who are considering or
have begun tertiary study. The books can be downloaded in pdf, or ordered in
hard copy from the Language and Learning Skills Unit: ph (03) 8344 0930.

See: Acquired brain injury (Pdf)



Where There's a Will There's A Way – Brain Injury
Case Study: Supporting students with...Brain Injury


Supporting university students with disabilities, researched and prepared by Paddy
Zakaria. This guide intends to provide academic staff with a sample of ideas and
strategies that can legitimately be incorporated into the teaching and evaluation of
university courses to maximise the chances of success with the tertiary studies of
students with a disability. It is also intended as a guide for students with a disability
to the kind of flexibility of provision that can reasonably be expected from academic
staff.


Extracted from Where There's a Will There's a Way
http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/Where_theres_a_will_theres_a_way.chpx




                                           13
Disability Specific Resources

Hearing Impairment

Teaching Students with a Hearing Impairment
Source: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/lta/disability/


This resource is a part of the Teaching students with a disability series prepared by
Ann Noble and Gerry Mullins of the Advisory Centre for University Education, The
University of Adelaide. Each of these six brochures presents information about a
specific category of disability, providing a general description of the disability and
its likely impact on participation and learning, a summary of the issues which staff
may need to consider when teaching and assessing students with such a disability.


See: Teaching students with hearing impairment (pdf 146kB)



Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Deafness or Hearing
Impairment
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050


It is estimated that there are approximately 30,000 deaf people in Australia who
have no useable hearing and whose first language is Auslan (Australian Sign
Language). In addition, it is believed that between one and three million Australians
have varying degrees of hearing impairment that mainly use oral communication.
Hearing impairment or Deafness may involve:

      Using sign language
      English as a second language
      Limited aural access to information
      Use of lip reading for oral communication

See: Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Deaf or Hearing Impaired Students


Towards Success – Deafness
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Information---Resources/Student-Transition---
Participation/Towards-Success-in-Tertiary-Study.aspx

Towards Success series: for students with disabilities who are considering or
have begun tertiary study. The books can be downloaded in pdf, or ordered in
hard copy from the Language and Learning

See: Deaf or hard of hearing



                                           14
Disability Specific Resources

Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Hearing
Impairment

Source:   http://www.ndco.stepscs.net.au/careerPathways.asp#AdaptiveTechnology

Every student needs support to assist them to successfully complete their training
or studies. Know yourself and your needs, and get to know what supports may be
available to you. Remember, all support offered by VET providers and universities
must be negotiated and approved by the institution.
Written by Jacqui Tomlins for the Victorian Regional Disability Liaison Unit .


See : Hearing impairment and post-secondary education and training




                                                   15
Disability Specific Resources
Where There's a Will There's A Way – Hearing Impairment
Case Studies: Supporting students with... Hearing Impairment


Extracted from Where There's a Will There's a Way
http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/Where_theres_a_will_theres_a_way.chpx
Supporting university students with disabilities researched and prepared by Paddy
Zakaria. This guide intends to provide academic staff with a sample of ideas and
strategies that can legitimately be incorporated into the teaching and evaluation of
university courses to maximise the chances of success with the tertiary studies of
students with a disability. It is also intended as a guide for students with a disability
to the kind of flexibility of provision that can reasonably be expected from academic
staff.




                                           16
Disability Specific Resources

Learning Disability

Grasp the Nettle Learning Disabilities
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Home-Page.aspx


This CD shares the experiences of 11 individuals with learning disabilities who have
successfully made the transition into further education.

Additional Information:

Understanding Learning Disabilities
Tertiary Transitions Tips from students with Learning
Disabilities

Link to: Grasp The Nettle Learning Disabilities CD


Moving On

Source: http://www.ndco.stepscs.net.au/images/MovingOn08.pdf

A publication to support people with a learning disability.

Produced by the National Disability Coordination Officer, Western Region of Victoria.




                                             17
Disability Specific Resources
Learning Strategies - for Students with a Learning Disability
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/Oao/Learning_Strategies.chpx
(Opening all Options web site)

If you have a learning disability (LD) you may benefit by adopting and using the
strategies listed below that relate to your areas of need as identified in your
educational psychometric assessment report.

Memory                        Mathematics

Spelling                      Written Expression

Reading                       Lectures

Be prepared - because time is extremely precious to you.

Here are some useful steps for you to follow:

      Before   starting university
      Before   semester
      During   semester
      Before   examinations



Teaching Students with a Disability – Learning Disability
Source: http://www.unisa.edu.au/regdisability/teaching_students.htm#_blank



This resource is a part of the Teaching students with a di sability series prepared by
Ann Noble and Gerry Mullins of the Advisory Centre for University Education, The
University of Adelaide. Each of these six brochures presents information about a
specific category of disability, providing a general description of the disability and
its likely impact on participation and learning, a summary of the issues which staff
may need to consider when teaching and assessing students with such a disability.

See: Teaching students with a learning disability (pdf 152kB)




                                            18
Disability Specific Resources

Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Learning
Disabilities
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050

Learning disability is the result of neurological disorder which may cause the learner
to receive and process some information inaccurately. The most common learning
disability found in the tertiary environment is dyslexia. Other learning disabilities
are dysgraphia and aphasia. Research indicates that at least 5% of tertiary level
students have a learning disability which can cause significant difficulties in
perceiving and/or processing auditory, visual or spatial information. Learning
disabilities can affect:

      Auditory-visual processing
      Phonological processing
      Short-term or working memory
      Ability to easily read or write text leading to technical errors in punctuation,
       capitalisation, grammar etc

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Learning Disabilities


Towards Success - Learning Disabilities
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Information---Resources/Student-Transition---
Participation/Towards-Success-in-Tertiary-Study.aspx

Towards Success series: for students with disabilities who are considering or
have begun tertiary study. The books can be downloaded in pdf, or ordered in
hard copy from the Language and Learning Skills Unit: ph (03) 8344 0930.

See: Learning disabilities (Pdf)



Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Learning
Disability
Source: http://www.ndco.stepscs.net.au/careerPathways.asp#AdaptiveTechnology

Every student needs support to assist them to successfully complete their training
or studies. Know yourself and your needs, and get to know what supports may be
available to you. Remember, all support offered by VET providers and universities
must be negotiated and approved by the institution.

Written by Jacqui Tomlins for the Victorian Regional Disability Liaison Unit.

See: Learning disability and post-secondary education and training




                                                   19
Disability Specific Resources
Where There's a Will There's A Way - Dyslexia
Case Study: Supporting students with... Dyslexia


Supporting university students with disabilities, researched and prepared by Paddy
Zakaria. This guide intends to provide academic staff with a sample of ideas and
strategies that can legitimately be incorporated into the teaching and evaluation of
university courses to maximise the chances of success with the tertiary studies of
students with a disability. It is also intended as a guide for students with a disability
to the kind of flexibility of provision that can reasonably be expected from academic
staff


Extracted from Where There's a Will There's a Way
Source:
http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/Where_theres_a_will_theres_a_way.chpx




                                           20
Disability Specific Resources

Medical Condition

Teaching Students with a Disability – Medical Condition
Source:   http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/lta/disability/


This resource is a part of the Teaching students with a disability series prepared by
Ann Noble and Gerry Mullins of the Advisory Centre for University Education, The
University of Adelaide. Each of these six brochures presents information about a
specific category of disability, providing a general description of the disability and
its likely impact on participation and learning, a summary of the issues which staff
may need to consider when teaching and assessing students with such a disability.
See: Teaching students with a medical disability (pdf 147kB)



Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Health Conditions
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050

A wide range of medical conditions may impact on students’ learning and their
ability to attend lectures and tutorials, complete assignments by due dates or be
assessed in the usual ways. These conditions include epilepsy, asthma, diabetes,
kidney disorders, cystic fibrosis, cancer, hepatitis, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
and HIV/AIDS. While some of these conditions are lifelong, others such as CFS,
may last for periods ranging from a few months to several years.
A chronic health condition may result in:
      Allergic reactions
      Chronic fatigue
      Periods of fatigue
      Sensitivity to chemicals
      Increased need to use the toilet
      Difficulty sitting still for long periods


See: Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Health Conditions




                                               21
Disability Specific Resources
Towards Success - Ongoing Medical Condition
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Information---Resources/Student-Transition---
Participation/Towards-Success-in-Tertiary-Study.aspx

Towards Success series: for students with disabilities who are considering or
have begun tertiary study. The book can be downloaded in pdf, or ordered in
hard copy from the Language and Learning Skills Unit: ph (03) 8344 0930.

See: Chronic/ongoing medical conditions (Pdf)



Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Chronic Illness
Source: http://www.ndco.stepscs.net.au/careerPathways.asp#AdaptiveTechnology


Every student needs support to assist them to successfully complete their training
or studies. Know yourself and your needs, and get to know what supports may be
available to you. Remember, all support offered by VET providers and universities
must be negotiated and approved by the institution.
Written by Jacqui Tomlins for the Victorian Regional Disability Liaison Unit .



See: Chronic illness and post-secondary education and training




                                               22
Disability Specific Resources

Mental Illness


Academic Accommodations for Students with a Psychiatric Disability
Source: http://www.cdu.edu.au/ndco/resources.html

Charles Darwin University

Students with psychiatric disabilities are entitled to reasonable academic
accommodations under the Disability Discrimination Act (1992) and Disability
Standards for Education 2005. Providing effective accommodations allows students
equal access to academic courses and activities. Their presence also contributes to
the diversity of the student population. This resource is concerned with the impact
of mental illness on academic pursuits, and the development of strategies to study
successfully.

Download a copy of the resource book: Academic Accommodation for Students
with Psychiatric Disability - A Resource Book (.pdf, 359KB)


Objectives Mental Health
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Home-Page.aspx


This CD shares the experiences of 8 individuals with mental health conditions who
have successfully made the transition into further education. The aim of this CD is
to inform, impress and inspire professionals, parents and students in the journey of
further learning.

Additional Information:

Understanding Mental Health Conditions

Tertiary Transitions Tips from students with Mental Health

Link to: Objectives Mental-Health CD




                                         23
Disability Specific Resources

Staying Sane On Campus
Source: Equity & Diversity Planning (Melbourne University)
http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/edp/


Tips and techniques for optimizing mental health while studying at uni
A Part Of The Towards Success series: for students with disabilities who are
considering or have begun tertiary study. The books can be downloaded in Pdf, or
ordered in hard copy from the Language and Learning Skills Unit: ph (03) 8344
0930.
See: http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/edp/downloads/Staying_Sane.pdf




Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Mental Illness
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050

Disabilities labeled as psychiatric or psychological may include schizophrenia,
clinical depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, and
anxiety disorders. Anxiety and depression are two of the most common
psychological disabilities evident in the university environment.

Mental illness or (associated medications) can affect:

      Concentration
      Cognitive processing
      Memory
      Motivation
      Exam anxiety
      Capacity to socialise

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Mental Illness




                                         24
Disability Specific Resources
Teaching Students with a Disability – Psychiatric Disability
Source: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/lta/disability/


This resource is a part of the Teaching students with a disability series prepared by
Ann Noble and Gerry Mullins of the Advisory Centre for University Education, The
University of Adelaide. Each of these six brochures presents information about a
specific category of disability, providing a general description of the disability and
its likely impact on participation and learning, a summary of the issues which staff
may need to consider when teaching and assessing students with such a disability.


See: Teaching students with psychiatric or psychological disabilities



Towards Success - Psychiatric Condition
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Information---Resources/Student-Transition---
Participation/Towards-Success-in-Tertiary-Study.aspx

Towards Success series: for students with disabilities who are considering or
have begun tertiary study. The books can be downloaded in Pdf, or ordered in
hard copy from the Language and Learning Skills Unit: ph (03) 8344 0930.

See: Mental health conditions (Pdf)



Types of Support Available and How to Get Them - Psychiatric
Disability
Source: http://www.ndco.stepscs.net.au/careerPathways.asp#AdaptiveTechnology


Every student needs support to assist them to successfully complete their training
or studies. Know yourself and your needs, and get to know what supports may be
available to you. Remember, all support offered by VET providers and universities
must be negotiated and approved by the institution.

Written by Jacqui Tomlins for the Victorian Regional Disability Liaison Unit.

See: Psychiatric disability and post-secondary education and training




                                                   25
Disability Specific Resources

Where There's a Will There's a Way - Psychological Disorders
Case Study: Supporting students with...Psychological Disorders


Extracted from Where There's a Will There's a Way
http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/Where_theres_a_will_theres_a_way.chpx
Supporting university students with disabilities, researched and prepared by Paddy
Zakaria. This guide intends to provide academic staff with a sample of ideas and
strategies that can legitimately be incorporated into the teaching and evaluation of
university courses to maximise the chances of success with the tertiary studies of
students with a disability. It is also intended as a guide for students with a disability
to the kind of flexibility of provision that can reasonably be expected from academic
staff




                                           26
Disability Specific Resources

Mobility Impairment

Teaching Students with a Disability – Mobility Disability
Source: http://www.unisa.edu.au/regdisability/teaching_students.htm#_blank


This resource is a part of the Teaching students with a disability series prepared by
Ann Noble and Gerry Mullins of the Advisory Centre for University Education, The
University of Adelaide. Each of these six brochures presents information about a
specific category of disability, providing a general description of the disability and
its likely impact on participation and learning, a summary of the issues which staff
may need to consider when teaching and assessing students with such a disability.
See: Teaching students with a mobility disability (pdf 150kB)




Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Mobility
Impairment
Source: http://www.ndco.stepscs.net.au/careerPathways.asp#AdaptiveTechnology


Every student needs support to assist them to successfully complete their training
or studies. Know yourself and your needs, and get to know what supports may be
available to you. Remember, all support offered by VET providers and universities
must be negotiated and approved by the institution.

Written by Jacqui Tomlins for the Victorian Regional Disability Liaison Unit.


See: Mobility impairment and post-secondary education and training




                                                   27
Disability Specific Resources
Where There's a Will There's A Way – Impaired Mobility
Case Study: Supporting students with...Impaired Mobility


Supporting university students with disabilities, researched and prepared by Paddy
Zakaria. This guide intends to provide academic staff with a sample of ideas and
strategies that can legitimately be incorporated into the teaching and evaluation of
university courses to maximise the chances of success with the tertiary studies of
students with a disability. It is also intended as a guide for students with a disability
to the kind of flexibility of provision that can reasonably be expected from academic
staff


Extracted from Where There's a Will There's a Way
Source:
http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/Where_theres_a_will_theres_a_way.chpx



Physical Impairment

Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Physical
Impairments
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050

Physical Impairments

Conditions that result in physical disabilities include spinal cord injury, arthritis,
cerebral palsy, acquired brain injury, multiple sclerosis and a number of other
conditions of the muscular, nervous and respiratory systems. These conditions tend
to result in some degree of restricted activity in mobility and manipulation, such as
restricted arm and hand movements and communication.

Physical disability or mobility impairment may result in:
   Limited mobility and access to facilities
   Ability to manipulate or lift objects
   Acute or chronic pain
   Restricted ability to write or type
   Inability to sit for extended periods

See Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Students with Physical Impairments




                                           28
Disability Specific Resources
Where There's a Will There's A Way – Cerebral Palsy
Case Studies: Supporting students with...Cerebral Palsy


Extracted from Where There's a Will There's a Way
Source:
http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/Where_theres_a_will_theres_a_way.chpx
Supporting university students with disabilities, researched and prepared by Paddy
Zakaria. This guide intends to provide academic staff with a sample of ideas and
strategies that can legitimately be incorporated into the teaching and evaluation of
university courses to maximise the chances of success with the tertiary studies of
students with a disability. It is also intended as a guide for students with a disability
to the kind of flexibility of provision that can reasonably be expected from academic
staff



Visual Impairment

Teaching Students with Particular Impairments - Blindness or vision
impairment
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/View.aspx?id=4050

It is estimated that there are about 300,000 Australians who are blind or have
some kind of vision impairment. While some people have a total absence of vision,
approximately ninety percent of people classified as legally blind have some useable
vision. Access requirements of people with vision impairments will therefore vary
widely.

Vision impairment or blindness can affect:

      Ability to read printed material or diagrams
      Sensitivity to light or screen glare - TV & Video Conference
      Mobility and orientation

See: Teaching and Assessment Strategies for Blind or Vision Impaired Students




                                           29
Disability Specific Resources

Teaching Students with a Visual Impairment
Source: http://www.adelaide.edu.au/clpd/lta/disability/
This resource which is a part of the Teaching students with a disability series
prepared by Ann Noble and Gerry Mullins of the Advisory Centre for University
Education, The University of Adelaide. It presents information about a specific
category of disability, providing a general description of the disability and its likely
impact on participation and learning, a summary of the issues which staff may need
to consider when teaching and assessing students with such a disability.
See: Teaching students who have vision impairment (pdf 145kB)



Types of Support Available and How to Get Them – Vision
Impairment
See: Vision impairment and post-secondary education and training


Every student needs support to assist them to successfully complete their training
or studies. Know yourself and your needs, and get to know what supports may be
available to you. Remember, all support offered by VET providers and universities
must be negotiated and approved by the institution.

Written by Jacqui Tomlins for the Victorian Regional Disability Liaison Unit.
Source: http://www.ndco.stepscs.net.au/careerPathways.asp#AdaptiveTechnology



Viewpoint Vision Impairment
Source: http://www.ndcovictoria.net.au/Home-Page.aspx


This CD shares the experiences of 12 individuals who are blind or vision impaired
who have successfully made the transition into further education. The aim of this
CD is to improve the transition experience for those about to embark on tertiary
education.

Additional Information:

Understanding Vision Impairment

Tertiary Transitions Tips from students with Vision Impairment

Link to: Viewpoint Vision Impairment




                                                   30
Disability Specific Resources
Where There's a Will There's A Way – Visual Impairment
Case Study: Supporting students with...Visual Impairment


Supporting university students with disabilities, researched and prepared by Paddy
Zakaria. This guide intends to provide academic staff with a sample of ideas and
strategies that can legitimately be incorporated into the teaching and evaluation of
university courses to maximise the chances of success with the tertiary studies of
students with a disability. It is also intended as a guide for students with a disability
to the kind of flexibility of provision that can reasonably be expected from academic
staff


Extracted from Where There's a Will There's a Way
Source:
http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/Where_theres_a_will_theres_a_way.chpx




                                           31
Disclosure

'Choosing Your Path. Disclosure: It's a Personal Decision'
Source: http://pubsites.uws.edu.au/rdlo/disclosure/index.htm

The 'Choosing Your Path. Disclosure: It's A Personal Decision' website provides
substantial information about options and pathways that people with disabilities ca n
use in disclosing their disability in post secondary education and employment
environments.

The website also articulates the role and responsibilities of employers and educators
in relation to disclosure.

This is a web based resource however if you require a hard copy of the Resource, a
PDF version of each section has been made available. Entire Document: PDF (845
KB)



Disclosure Worksheet
Source: http://www.answd.org/archive/03/DisclosureWorksheet.rtf
Created by Leonie Challans, University of South Australia, an RDLO/DCO initiative,
2002


To tell or not to tell ….
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/To_tell_or_not_to_tell.chpx

The information presented here is intended to help students with disabilities (and
others who interact with them) by offering a resource about the issues of
disclosure and medical conditions. The information will also help students with
disabilities to make informed decisions about whether or not to disclose.




                                          32
Employment / Employers

Australian Employers' Network on Disability
www.aend.org.au

Ph: (02) 9261 3922
Fax: (02) 9261 3966

Stepping Into … Program

Stepping Into... is a paid internship program designed specifically for university
students with disability. The program provides a “step into” practical work
experience for students with disability who may otherwise face significant barriers
to finding employment.

The program is one of mutual benefit.

Participating Organisations benefit by identifying, gaining greater awareness of,
and eliminating, some of the barriers faced by people with disability within their
organisation, as well as by breaking down many of the myths and stereotypes that
are often associated with people with disability in the workplace;

Students benefit significantly through gaining experience of the job application and
interview process, developing a network of contacts within a professional
organisation, and gaining valuable hands-on work experience which they can
include on their resumes, and having the opportunity to showcase their skills and
knowledge.

Fact Sheets:
   Fact Sheet - Business Benefits of            Fact Sheet - Providing a Safe Work
   Employing People with Disability             Environment
   Fact Sheet - What is Disability?             Fact Sheet - Hiring Staff
   Fact Sheet - Interviewing People             Fact Sheet - Getting Advice and
   with Disability                              Support
   Fact Sheet - What is a Disability            Fact Sheet - Evacuation Procedures
   Action Plan?
   Fact Sheet - Managing Someone                Fact Sheet - Side Effects of
   Returning to Work                            Medication
   Fact Sheet - Etiquette                       Fact Sheet - Disclosure and Privacy
   Fact Sheet - Training for People with
   Disability

Publications:
Item Title
         Opportunity
         Managers' guide: disability in the workplace




                                           33
Employment / Employers

Disability Confidence
Source: www.disabilityconfidence.org.au

This website has been developed to assist you and your organisation to build
disability confidence, particularly in relation to employing people with disability and
welcoming customers with disability.

"Disability Confidence" was developed to complement "Opportunity", a 20 page
booklet produced by the Australian Employers' Network on Disability which
articulates the business case for including people with disability as employees and
customers. An electronic version of "Opportunity" can also be downloaded from this
website.

This website contains a great deal of information about things you can do to make
your business more accessible to customers with disability, and how to become an
employer of choice for candidates and employees with disability.



Education to Employment Package for Graduates with Disabilities and
Employers

Looking for a job can be very challenging for new graduates, including university
and TAFE graduates with disabilities. Challenges may include understanding your
rights and responsibilities in the work environment, when, if and how to disclose
your disability and negotiating workplace adjustments with an employer.

The Education to Employment Packages also features a section for employers
to assist in the process of employing people with disabilities. Some employers feel
uncertain as to their role in recruiting people with disabilities , such as developing
appropriate recruitment processes and inclusive workplaces, implementing
workplace adjustments and understanding the services available to assist them
through the process.

The Education to Employer Package has been developed to address these issues by
providing information, services, resources and contacts for graduates with
disabilities and employers.


To access the EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT PACKAGE refer to the website:
www.uws.edu.au/rdlo/employment




                                           34
General Transition Resources

Consider it! - A Guide for Junior Secondary Students with a Disability
Source: http://services.admin.utas.edu.au/adcet/tipd/CONSIDER.HTM

This booklet is for people with a disability who are considering university study as
an option in the future. It is most useful for those in Years 8, 9 and 10.



Considering Further Education?
Source:
http://www.adcet.edu.au/StoredFile.aspx?id=1155&fn=Considering_further_education_07.
doc

The information in this document has been prepared for people with a disability who
are considering studying at TAFE or university in Victoria.

The information will help you make an informed decision about whether you want to
study and if you do how to go about getting in to the course of your choice. You will
need to consider how you might best be able to study with your particular disability.
There will be many issues you will need to think about and it is likely that working
through these issues will take you quite a while and involve a lot of planning.
However, it will be worth it in the end because, whether you decide to study or not,
you will be making a realistic decision based on sound information.

If you decide to study at TAFE or university, you can be certain that it will change
your life considerably. Study will introduce you to challenging new ideas and skills,
and will make significant demands on your time effort and finances. These personal
demands, which are experienced by all students, are balanced by the potential of
TAFE or university study to provide you with immense personal satisfaction as well
as increased career opportunities and financial security.

The information provided here aims to help you think through your reasons for
studying, your current academic qualifications and skills, financial considerations
and the support you may need while studying. You may find it helpful to talk to
students and staff at TAFE and universities and to read the information about
courses, support services and social activities that are available.




                                          35
General Transition Resources

Considering Higher Education?
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/AdcetResources/Considering_Higher_Education.chpx

... a planning guide for people with disabilities or medical
conditions
This is a comprehensive planning guide to assist people with disabilities or medical
conditions to make an informed decision about what they want to study and, how to
go about gaining entry into the course of their choice. It contains information
relating to decisions about TAFE or university study, how to decide on a course or
subject, what entry requirements are needed, how to apply for a place at TAFE or
university, and what support is available. The planning guide also includes an Action
Planner. This assists you to work through your study options and support needs in a
systematic fashion.

This planning guide was initially produced by the UniAbility project and has now
been re-developed by the National Regional Disability Liaison Officer Initiative, SA.


The information sheets (which have a South Australian focus) are intended to
provide you with information relating to decisions about TAFE or university study,
how to decide on a course or subject, what entry requirements are needed, how
you get a place at TAFE or university, what support is available and so on.
Important dates to keep in mind and resource contacts are also included.

The information sheets) are:

   1.   Deciding on a course/program
   2.   Gaining a place at TAFE or university
   3.   Entry requirements
   4.   Accessing support
   5.   Modes of study
   6.   Financial considerations
   7.   Important dates
   8. Your rights and responsibilities
   9. Resource contacts
   10. Commonly used terms

This publication is available on request in Braille; on audiotape and in large print.




                                           36
General Transition Resources

Creating Accessible Teaching And Support            (CATS)
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/cats

Creating Accessible Teaching and Support (CATS) web based resources has been
completely re-written and is now available on line at the above website.

The resource aims to provide information to assist staff in higher education to
better teach and support students with disability.

CATS now includes:

      introductions to the key issues impacting on the educational and employment
       success of students with disability
      video content covering disability awareness, student / staff case studies,
       accessibility and assistive technology
      improved access to the comprehensive database of fact sheets, articles and
       web links
      Really cute graphics!!

Each page provides a Wiki type function giving users the opportunity to comment,
suggest additional content or engage in debate.

See: http://www.adcet.edu.au/cat




                                         37
General Transition Resources

CSU: 'How Do I Learn? “Quiz:
Source : http://www.csu.edu.au/division/studserv/learning/learn/questionnaire.htm

This simple questionnaire is provided by Student Services at Charles Sturt
University to help determine a preferred learning style.



Documentation for Students Commencing Tertiary Study
Source: www.adcet.edu.au/Practitioner_Resources/Documentation.chpx

Students who require support services, adjustments or accommodations at
University or TAFE may be asked to provide written evidence of their circumstances
from an appropriately qualified independent professional.

Ideally, this documentation should be no more than three years old for young
adults (perhaps longer for adults), and more recent if the condition is temporary or
fluctuating.

The documentation should clearly identify the health professional and their
credentials, be written on letterhead and signed and dated. It should incorporate
information about:

      The name, nature and degree of impairment or health condition (physical or
       psychological)
      The time of onset, expected duration and/or prognosis of the impairment or
       health condition
      An outline of the limitations and implications arising from the impairment or
       health condition in relation to post-secondary education and training in
       general and the student’s proposed course of study in particular
      Teaching, learning and assessment accommodations that have been found to
       be useful in other educational programs
      Accommodations recommended now and, if different, in the future
      Any other observations the professional thinks relevant.

An example of a Health Practitioner's Report form

Clear and comprehensive documentation confirms eligibility for support and helps to
ensure that practitioners have reliable information on which to base their
recommendations and accommodations. Documentation may also be obtained from
within the institution, community or from the student’s school.

For detailed information about the documentation of learning disabilities by
education psychologists see Opening All Options




                                           38
General Transition Resources

Get Ready for Uni Website
Source: Disability Education and Employment News

"Making the move from school to university is a big change for anyone. For
students with disability the change is even bigger. So how do you succeed? Prepare
early, base your decisions on good information, and plan ahead for any disability
supports you may need."

The 'Get Ready for Uni' website is an information kit for high school students with
disability thinking about going to uni. It contains sections on career planning,
finding and getting in to a course, choosing a university, alternative entry
pathways, organising disability support at uni and lots more. "


To access the Get Ready for Uni website go to
http://pubsites.uws.edu.au/ndco/getready/




People with a Disability in Vocational Education and Training
A Statistical Compendium
Source: http://www.ncver.edu.au/
NCVER has published a report highlighting VET participation and issues for a range
of disability types


Obtain: Full Report


Obtain: Statistical Compendium
Provides data specifically related to VET Participation for the
following disabilities:
       Physical Disability           Hearing Disability

       Medical Disability            Intellectual Disability

       Visual Disability             Mental Illness

       Learning Disability           Acquired Brain Injury



Obtain: Key Messages




                                           39
General Transition Resources

Scholarships for Students with Disability
Source: http://www.adcet.edu.au/

Listing of Australian and New Zealand educational scholarshi ps for students with
disability.

See: Scholarships for Students with Disability



Self-Directed Action Booklet
Source: http://www.ecu.edu.au/student/data/shared/documents/self_directed_action.pdf


So you've finally made it to post-secondary education. Congratulations! What you
now need to work out is how to help yourself get through. All students need the
ability to self-advocate, but as a student with a disability or medical condition there
are issues you face that others may have no awareness of. And effe ctive self-
advocacy isn't easy, so this book has been written to help you decide what others
can do for you, and what you need to do for yourself.
This book may also be of benefit to post-secondary education staff. Many students
suggest that academic staff do not know what it is like to have a disability or the
difficulties involved in requesting accommodations. So, this booklet has some
information on advice to staff when interacting with you, as well as things that you
need to think about when interacting with staff.
This useful on-line book will provide students with disabilities and medical
conditions in post-secondary education with information on how to negotiate and
self-advocate.
“The skills and abilities required by you as a student with a disability while studying
at a post-secondary level may differ from those developed prior to entering post -
secondary education. Being able to effectively self-advocate is an important skill to
have.

It is particularly important for you, as a student with a disability, to learn
appropriate skills in self-advocacy as you may find it necessary to express your
particular needs and feelings to individuals who are unfamiliar with your
experience.”




                                           40
General Transition Resources

Student Housing Officer's Association of Australia
Source: http://www.housing.rmit.edu.au/shoaa

SHOAA is a national peak body of Australian Housing Officers. SHOAA's primary
focus is on assisting students to find suitable accommodation and helping them
maintain that accommodation throughout their academic life. Most Housing Officers
work in Student Housing Services which provide referral lists to accommodation
offered by residents in the local community, hostels and Residential Colleges.



Towards Success (Discovering Your Learning Style)
Source: http://www.services.unimelb.edu.au/edp/policy/publications.html



Towards Success series: for students with disabilities who are considering or have
begun tertiary study. The books can be downloaded in Pdf, or ordered in hard copy
from the Language and Learning Skills Unit of Melbourne University: ph (03) 8344
0930.

See: Towards Success in Tertiary Study: Discovering Your Learning Style (Pdf
60KB)




                                        41
General Transition Resources

Transition to University - Frequently Asked Questions Sheets
Source: http://pubsites.uws.edu.au/rdlo/current_projects.html

This resource provides information to help students with a disability make a smooth
transition to university. Topics covered provide the answers to frequently asked
questions in the following areas:

     Cost of university and available assistance with fees
     Income support for students
     Scholarships
     Accommodation options
     Transport
     Organising community support

Note: As this is produced in NSW, some aspects are slightly NSW centric.
However, many contacts organisations and information is generic.

Pathways to gaining admission to university

FAQ Sheet 1: What is the cost of university fees? Does the government offer any
assistance to pay fees?

FAQ Sheet 2: What income support is available to students?

FAQ Sheet 3: What scholarships can I apply for?

How can I find more information about scholarships?

FAQ Sheet 4: What are my accommodation options if I want to live closer to
university?

FAQ Sheet 5: What are my transport options for getting to and from university?

FAQ Sheet 6: What do I need to do to find and organise Community Support
Services for when I go to university?

FAQ Sheets 7 -10: What are some pathways to gain admission to university?

FAQ Sheet 7: How is my UAI used to gain admission to university?

FAQ Sheet 8: What is the Educational Access Scheme? How can this help me gain
admission to university?

FAQ Sheet 9: What is the Special Tertiary Admissions Test?

FAQ Sheet 10: What is a university preparation course? Can this help me gain
admission to my choice of university?

Click here to access the FAQ’s
http://pubsites.uws.edu.au/rdlo/Index%20of%20FAQ's.doc
                                      42
General Transition Resources
What’s The Difference – School vs. VET vs. Uni
Source:
http://www.adcet.edu.au/Uploads/Documents/07%20Info%20sheet%20on%20sch
ool%20v%20TAFE%20v%20uni.DOC


What’s the Difference – School vs VET vs Uni - This is a fact sheet that compares a
number of aspects of school, VET and university life. Areas looked at: enrolment ,
personal freedom, classes, teachers/lecturers, studying, and exams.


SEAS
Source: www.vtac.edu.au/seas.html

SEAS is the umbrella program for special entry and access schemes conducted by
participating tertiary institutions with course applications through VTAC.

SEAS has two separate and distinct schemes:

      SEAS Access and Equity is available for applicants whose education has
       been affected by long-term disadvantage. More...

      SEAS Year 11/12 Special Consideration is for current Year 12 students
       who have experienced adverse circumstances in Years 11 and/or 12 only.
       More...

About Access and Equity
http://www.vtac.edu.au/seas/access-equity.html

Access and Equity is open to applicants whose education has been affected by long-
term disadvantage.

Access and Equity categories

There are ten Access and Equity categories that are recognised as equity groups.
Applicants may apply for consideration in one or more of these categories.
Note: Not all institutions recognise all categories. For more information and a list of
institutions that recognise each category, click the links below.

 Mature age consideration                     Non-English speaking background
 Recognition as an Indigenous Australian      Difficult family circumstances
 Disadvantaged socio-economic background      Applicants from rural or isolated areas
 Under-represented schools                        Women in non-traditional courses
  Personal disability or long-term medical        Refugee status
 condition




                                             43
General Transition Resources
SEAS   (continued)

About Year 11/12 Special Consideration
http://www.vtac.edu.au/seas/special-consideration.html

Year 11/12 Special Consideration is aimed at assisting those current Year 12
students who have experienced circumstances that can be demonstrated to have
had an adverse impact on their performance in the final two years of secondary
school.

The following are the circumstances which may be considered under this scheme:

     health of a family member
     personal health or trauma
     death of a close family member or friend
     divorce or separation of parents
     adverse living conditions
     excessive family responsibility
     natural disaster
     refugee status.
For more information on Year 11 and 12 Special considerations go to
http://www.vtac.edu.au/seas/special-consideration.html




                                           44

				
DOCUMENT INFO