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					                           Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing                    LAATAH
                   Leadership Austin Action Team
                    Final Report – May 14, 2004
                                        Table of Contents
                                       Executive Summary

Overview of the Project .......................................................................... 3
  Mission/Constituency of Partner Organization .................................................................... 3
  Challenge or Problem To Be Solved ................................................................................. 3
  Challenge/Problem Changes ......................................................................................... 4
  Final Project Objectives .............................................................................................. 4
Team Accomplishments ........................................................................... 4
  Activities/Tasks ........................................................................................................ 4
Anticipated Impacts ............................................................................... 5
  Short-Term Impact ..................................................................................................... 5
  Long-Term Impacts .................................................................................................... 5
  Evaluative Measures ................................................................................................... 5
  Post-Project Evaluation ............................................................................................... 6
  Learned/Enhanced Leadership Skills ............................................................................... 6
Future of the Project.............................................................................. 6


                                                   Appendix
Affordable Housing as a Horizon Issue .......................................................... 7
  Defining Question for RECA as LA Partner Organization ........................................................ 7
Personal Objectives and Interests ............................................................... 7
Team Objectives ................................................................................... 8
Team Protocol ...................................................................................... 8
Proposal 1: Optional Density Bonuses -- Outreach and Educational Campaign ........... 9
 Proposal 2: Ascertainment Sessions ...................................................... 14
  Invitation Letter ......................................................................................................   14
  Tips and Follow-Up Email ...........................................................................................       15
  Sample Ascertainment Session Notes .............................................................................           17
  Suggested Script for Sessions ......................................................................................       19
  Ascertainment Session – Schedule Overview ....................................................................             21
  Ascertainment Session – Composite Findings ....................................................................            22
Process: Agendas & Meeting Minutes ......................................................... 27
  November Kick-Off Meeting: Meeting Minutes ..................................................................              27
  December RECA Meeting: Agenda .................................................................................            29
  December RECA Meeting: Meeting Minutes ......................................................................              30
  Agenda: December Team Meeting ................................................................................             34
  December Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes .....................................................................               34
  January Team Meeting: Agenda ...................................................................................           39
  January Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes ........................................................................             39

Work in Progress                                                                                                              1
                           Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing                    LAATAH
  February Team Meeting: Agenda ..................................................................................           44
  February Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes .......................................................................             45
  March Team Meeting: Agenda .....................................................................................           48
  March Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes ..........................................................................             49
  April Team Meeting: Agenda .......................................................................................         50
  April Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes ............................................................................           50
RECA – Quick Facts............................................................................... 54
Current Affordable Housing Initiatives ....................................................... 54
  RECA Affordable Housing Committee ............................................................................. 54
  Inclusionary Housing Initiative ..................................................................................... 57
  RMMA Affordable Housing Working Group—Recommendations to MNC ..................................... 59
Community Resources ........................................................................... 62
  Associations (Central Texas) .......................................................................................       62
  Public Agencies and Committees (Central Texas) ..............................................................              62
  Private Sector (Central Texas) .....................................................................................       62
  Non-profit Sector (Central Texas) .................................................................................        62
  Internet Links .........................................................................................................   62
     Central Texas ......................................................................................................    62
     National/International ...........................................................................................      62
Bios ................................................................................................ 63
  Ascertainments Session Participants ..............................................................................         63
       Jon Beall ........................................................................................................    63
       Thurman Blackburn ...........................................................................................         63
       A. Elizabeth Colvin ............................................................................................      64
       Ty Von Cunningham ...........................................................................................         65
       Frank Fernandez ...............................................................................................       66
       Mitchell Gibbs ..................................................................................................     66
       Linda H. Guerrero .............................................................................................       68
       John Henneberger .............................................................................................        68
       Paul Hilgers .....................................................................................................    69
       Richard Huffman ...............................................................................................       70
  Partner Organization ................................................................................................      71
       Jeremy Martin ..................................................................................................      71
       Terry E. Mitchell ...............................................................................................     72
  Team Speakers .......................................................................................................      72
       Dean J. Almy III: ...............................................................................................     73
       Walter Moreau .................................................................................................       73
       Elizabeth Mueller, Ph.D., Lecturer .........................................................................          74
  Leadership Austin Team ............................................................................................        74
Recommended Bibliography on Inclusinary Zoning ......................................... 75




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                      Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing    LAATAH
                     Leadership Austin Action Team
                      Final Report – May 14, 2004

Project Name: Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH)

Team Contact: Sasha Grinshpun                       sasha@grinshpun.com
Partner Organization Contact: Jeremy Martin         jmartin@recaonline.com
LA Coach Liaison: Winston Williams                  wgwandcomp@aol.com


Overview of the Project
Mission/Constituency of Partner Organization

The Partner Organization for LAATAH was the Real Estate Council of Austin (RECA), a
nonprofit association of developers, architects, builders, brokers, contractors,
property leasing and management agents, real estate agents, and others affiliated
with real estate industry. RECA's mission is ―to be an effective resource and advocate
for the interests of the real estate industry and to promote and sustain the Greater
Austin region as an outstanding community in which all its citizens have the
opportunity to find meaningful employment, affordable housing and outstanding
education within a clean and safe environment.‖

Challenge or Problem To Be Solved

Escalating housing prices, a limited supply of available land within the city limits, and
a growing wage disparity has resulted in fewer families being able to afford a median-
priced home in Austin. Nearly 58,700 Austin households are estimated to have unmet
housing needs, and about 40,000 families live in substandard homes. Three out of
every five low-income families pay more than half their income for rent.
        In 2003, the RECA Affordable Housing Committee prioritized three top options
for providing more affordable housing in Austin: (1) optional density bonuses for
developers who provide affordable housing; (2) allowing multifamily residential in
light industrial zoned land; and (3) encouraging the development of granny
flats/secondary apartments.
        RECA had begun drafting policy proposals to present to the Austin City Council
requesting zoning changes and builder incentives to encourage densification as a way
to increase construction of affordable housing. The RECA representatives asked
LAATAH for assistance in identifying any major oversights related to their proposed
policy changes and for assistance with the group‘s efforts to increase community
awareness, acceptance, and support for its initiatives.




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                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

Challenge/Problem Changes

As LAATAH continued to meet with RECA representatives and discuss the issues
associated with affordable housing and the policy proposal, it became clear that RECA
would not have the draft policy documents available during the course of the class
year. With the loss of focus, LAATAH was challenged to address the issue of affordable
housing in a meaningful but manageable way, while also honoring the priorities set by
its partner organization.

Final Project Objectives

After much discussion over several meetings, LAATAH decided to focus on assisting
RECA with its marketing efforts by researching stakeholder concerns. While there are
several in-depth studies that define the problems associated with affordable housing,
few address stakeholder issues. Based on past experiences, RECA expects there to be
some opposition to their proposed policy changes when presented. LAATAH, with
approval by RECA, decided to focus on identifying stakeholder concerns so that future
education campaigns could be better targeted to improve effectiveness and
acceptance.


Team Accomplishments
Activities/Tasks

To learn more about the many issues affecting affordable housing, LAATAH invited a
variety of guest speakers to meetings, and members read numerous reports and
studies. This research helped the group identify the major stakeholders who were
expected to have strong opinions on any policy proposal related to affordable housing.
The team identified five primary stakeholder groups: public officials/city staff;
builders, developers, and other real estate or financial representatives; neighborhood
associations; affordable housing advocates; and social justice/environmental groups.
         With limited time and no budget, the group decided to conduct small focus
groups to ascertain stakeholders‘ concerns and perspectives. In these sessions, a
representative from each of the stakeholder groups was invited to a roundtable
discussion. Each participant was asked to respond to the same question, which was
provided in advance by the team. After all had spoken without interruption, the
participants could engage in a dialogue on any critical issues that surfaced during the
discussion.
        Team members were assigned one of the stakeholder groups for which they
were asked to develop invitation lists. The goal was to choose 10 contacts per
stakeholder group, who would be invited to attend one of five ascertainment sessions.
Informal advisors were also identified as resources to assist in creating the invitation
lists to assure balanced representation across the sessions.

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                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
       The sessions were scheduled for different times and days to make it more
convenient for participants to attend. A team member‘s organization agreed to
provide refreshments and a central location for the sessions. A letter of invitation was
developed and sent to the lists of stakeholder representatives. Two team members
were assigned to each ascertainment session, with responsibilities for making
reminder calls to invitees, facilitating the discussions, taking notes, and sharing their
notes with the rest of the team. A script was created to assist the team members
conducting the ascertainments.
       Two to five invitees participated in each of the ascertainment sessions. The
notes from all five sessions were compiled and analyzed by the team.


Anticipated Impacts
Short-Term Impact

LAATAH hoped to foster a dialogue among the various stakeholders to identify the
levels of support and opposition to densification as a means of increasing the
availability of affordable housing in Austin. Because our goal was to underestand how
stakeholder representatives shared common perspectives, concerns, and goals, the
comments shared during the focus groups were compiled without identification of the
speaker or group represented. Those comments will be shared with RECA, along with
a slide presentation and, potentially, a web page to be developed later by LAATAH.
By identifying commonalities and differences among stakeholder groups, RECA can
develop more effective strategies to reach consensus. A broader goal was to
understand what current affordable housing initiatives were underway in Central
Texas and understand how LAATAH members who wished to stay involved could
become critical catalysts in enacting change through collaborative processes.


Long-Term Impacts

Building consensus among the various stakeholder groups could lead to meaningful
changes in local zoning ordinances and/or state statutes that could facilitate
increased supply of affordable housing through densification. The dialogue could also
result in identifying and addressing other constraints to constructing or obtaining
affordable housing. Ultimately, the goal is to provide safe, conveniently-located,
affordable housing for every household.


Evaluative Measures

After LAATAH presents the oral report, Leadership Austin class members will be asked
to provide feedback indicating whether they learned anything new about the issue of
affordable housing and whether their concerns were addressed. That information will

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                   Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
be used to amend the presentation as needed to meet the intended goal of increasing
awareness and education.
       The partner agency representatives also will be asked for their comments
about the process and the project. In addition, LAATAH will present the project at a
RECA luncheon in June. Builders and realtors, who are among the RECA membership
and also one of the groups targeted for the education campaign, are expected to be
in attendance. Their responses will be indicative of whether the project succeeded in
providing helpful information.

Post-Project Evaluation
The team‘s success will be measured in part by whether RECA is able to use the
information and materials provided to increase awareness about the affordable
housing issues, and ultimately effect the ordinance changes and incentives desired.


Learned/Enhanced Leadership Skills
LAATAH members cited enhanced communication (especially listening), collaboration,
and team-building as skills enhanced through the action team project. The process
offered opportunities for all members to participate, use their strengths, and to
―stretch‖ themselves in areas that were perhaps not as comfortable or natural to
them.


Future of the Project
The slide presentation and stakeholder analysis should be useful to RECA in their
community outreach efforts. Several LAATAH members have indicated an interest in
developing and becoming part of a speakers‘ bureau to assist RECA in increasing
awareness and support for affordable housing initiatives among stakeholder groups
and the general public. Team members have also expressed interest in transforming
the PowerPoint presentation into other formats such as a web site and video, as well
as working with existing agencies to donate time and expertise to finding long term
solutions for the affordable housing issue in Central Texas.

Future information can be sent to the group through Sasha Grinshpun
(sasha@grinshpun.com) or Jeremy Martin (jmartin@recaonline.com).




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                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
                   Leadership Austin Action Team
                             Appendix

Affordable Housing as a Horizon Issue
Defining Question for RECA as LA Partner Organization

How can Central Texas meet the demand for affordable housing in a timely
manner and create economic value in the region?

Affordable and convenient housing are key components of the social safety net that
supports teachers, public safety workers, artists, manufacturing employees, and many
other service workers critical to the region's viability. How can we ensure an
adequate supply of housing that they can afford to purchase, that is convenient to
their work, and that they can later sell for a profit?

Another aspect of affordable housing is providing user friendly financing for investors
and developers. Innovative financing (such as land trusts) are not used very
effectively in Texas or Austin.



Personal Objectives and Interests
Question posed to the team: why did you choose to be involved with the affordable
housing action team. The reasons given including interests in:

 Social justice/equity
 Fulfillment of the American dream
 Those in the 30-50% income bracket being excluded
 Livability/quality of life
 Convenience to workplace
 Differences in the approaches pursued by public, private sectors
 Social stigma attached to ―affordable housing‖
 The economic impact of not providing convenient/affordable housing
 Housing needs of low income/immigrant community
 Scarcity as a product of past mortgage financing practices
 Green building and the ecological impact of housing
 Proximity to mass transit
 Gentrification



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                   Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

Team Objectives
Question posed to the team: why would you like to see come out of the effort with
RECA. The reasons given including interests in:

 Any product has to be actionable
 Even if nothing is accomplished, there needs to be a way to measure something
 Recommendation for future action/post-team action plan
 Produce a product that can be taken beyond LA
 Have a long-term impact via networking/community collaboration
 Serve as a hub or catalyst for subsequent action
 Encourage feedback/evaluation
 Have a good understanding of the scope of affordable housing




Team Protocol
 No interruptions; those wishing to speak should raise their hands
 There should be no personal agendas
 All ideas should be respected
 There should be an effort to be concise
 Cell phones should be set to ―vibrate‖/no cell phone conversations
 Members should be on time
 Avoid speaking in lingo
 Rotate roles amongst team members to foster participation
 Encourage participation
 Have fun!




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                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
Proposal 1: Optional Density Bonuses -- Outreach and
Educational Campaign

                   Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing:
                            SUMMARY OF PROPOSED TEAM ACTION PLAN

The following summary consists of two basic parts:
   1. A summary from Jeremy Martin and Terry Mitchell regarding the work that
      RECA has done pertaining to our affordable housing project;
   2. A summary of our project for your review that you can comment on and revise
      for us to finalize as a group.


RECA’S PRIORITIZATION OF STRATEGIES:


For the first several months of 2003, the RECA Affordable Housing Committee
prioritized nine possible strategies to provide more affordable housing in Austin.
These nine strategies were developed in committee discussions throughout 2002. The
criteria for ranking these strategies included:
       importance and
       ease of implementation.

Based on feedback from the committee, the three highest ranked options were:
    1. optional density bonuses for developers who provide affordable housing
    2. allowing multifamily residential as an allowed use in light industrial zoned land
    3. encouraging the development of granny flats and secondary apartments in SF-3
       zoned land.


The team discussion that continued after the official meeting concluded sought to
come up with a manageable, actionable AND significant contribution that LAATAH
could make. Given that RECA is already in the process of drafting a policy proposal
for optional density bonuses, Tim drafted a proposal detailed in pages 4 and 5 of this
document. The idea to be discussed at the next team meeting is whether the action
team approves, by consensus, the proposal to proceed with an outreach and
educational specific to the optional density bonus proposal.




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                     Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

DISCUSSION OF PRIORITIZED STRATEGIES:

1. Optional Density Bonuses:


By allowing optional density bonuses, housing developers would be able to provide a
minimum percentage of units at prices affordable to moderate income households.
The committee discussed providing an incentive to developers who provide a
minimum amount of units affordable to households earning 80% area median family
income (AMFI) or less. For developers who provided a minimum number of units
affordable to households earning 50% AMFI or less, a larger density bonus incentive
would be available. Furthermore, the focus has been on voluntary rather than
mandatory inclusionary zoning due to concerns that builders may choose to provide
housing in less complicated jurisdictions and not in Austin.

Hypothetical example:
A developer can construct X units of housing under the city's zoning code. If a
developer sets aside Y units that are affordable to 80% AMFI households, the
developer will receive a bonus to construct Z additional units, for a total of X + Z.
Furthermore, if a developer sets aside V units that are affordable to 50% AMFI
households, the developer will receive an additional bonus to construct w additional
units. In theory, W is greater than Z to provide extra incentive to construct housing
affordable to lower-income households. Finally, the bonus would be capped to
discourage concentration of similar income level households and encourage mixed
income development.


2. Multifamily in LI zoned land:


RECA‘s hypothesis stated that the City of Austin had a 20-30 year supply of LI zoned
land in or near the urban core. Furthermore, with the construction of SH-130 and the
negative perceptions of LI uses near existing residential, the committee expressed
concerns that this land would remain undeveloped under its current zoning.
Traditionally, the time required to secure a zoning change from the Austin City
Council and Commissions takes at least 6 months and could be more than a year. To
reduce the time to construct multifamily (MF) properties on these LI zoned parcels,
the committee proposed adding MF as an allowed use in LI. However, after
discussions with the city's Neighborhood Planning and Zoning Department (NPZD), this
proposal is no longer under active consideration because of the current efforts by the
NPZD to appropriately rezone land as part of newly adopted and proposed
neighborhood plans.




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                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

3. Granny Flats:


Single family houses in the SF-3 zoning classification and that are on lots greater than
7,000 square feet in size are able to construct a secondary apartment on their lot
without going through a zoning change or approval from Council. These apartments
generally range in size from 400-800 square feet and can't exceed 850 square feet.
Rents for these apartments can be as low as $300 depending on age and location.
Because of the potentially low rents, garage apartments can serve low-income
households in the 30% AMFI to 50% AMFI range. However, a very low percentage (<1%)
of eligible properties constructed secondary apartments last year.


It is unclear whether the lack of construction of secondary apartments is due to (i)
the general public not being aware of this option or (ii) some regulatory limitation
such as impervious cover limits preventing the construction or (iii) some other reason.
We have been told that ―awareness‖ is the issue. If so, the suggested course of
action would seem to be to increase that awareness of the availability of such a
program.


NEXT STEPS:


The RECA Affordable Housing Committee will continue their discussions in order to
create policy documents that can be adopted by the City of Austin. The timeframe
for presentation to the City depends on the development of these policies and
whether or not RECA can gain sponsorship and support for the new policies from a
diverse group of advocates and stakeholders.


The Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH) will partner with
RECA over the next several months to provide some assessment of the policy
documents as they are created by the RECA Affordable Housing Committee in order to
identify any major oversights pertaining to their proposed policy changes. The
LAATAH will also assist RECA with its outreach capacity by:
    1. developing an educational/marketing campaign; and
    2. contacting various stakeholders in the community to obtain their support.




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                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
LAATAH PROJECT


This proposed partnership with RECA is the perfect project for our team because it
includes all of the issues we identified as team members at our last meeting, and also
addresses the benefits we wanted to obtain from our participation in the work of the
team.


By focusing on an outreach and educational campaign, our team will be able to
improve our knowledge and understanding of a wide variety of issues, including social
justice and equity pertaining to housing availability, financing of real estate, quality
of life impacts of sprawl, transportation restrictions, population density facts and
myths, immigrant population challenges, multifamily ownership, and a whole host of
other such issues. Not only will our own knowledge improve in these areas, but we
will be able to affect the public‘s perception of these issues in our community as a
whole.


By focusing on an outreach and educational campaign, our team will be able to obtain
the benefits we identified of our participation in Leadership Austin, including meeting
people who influence and work within the field of affordable housing in our
community, working on something that allows for an ongoing and long-term
participation if we so choose beyond our LA class year, and making the project
scalable to meet our time constraints.

The Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing will develop an action
plan that will address two primary goals:

1. An educational campaign for our community that would focus on information
   that is needed or would be helpful to three primary groups:
    a. elected officials;
    b. general citizenry; and
    c. builders and realtors.

2. Provide some assessment of the RECA policy documents as they are created by
   the RECA Affordable Housing Committee in order to help identify any major
   oversights pertaining to their proposed policy changes.


We can develop the outreach/educational campaign simultaneously with our own
learning, since the public at-large knows little more than we do about this subject, so
we can build-as-we-go. Once we have the groundwork laid, others can follow-up on
our work and continue to exand and improve it – so the project is very scalable. It
will be meaningful no matter what we accomplish and can grow to as big a size as we
have time and resources to achieve.

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                   Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

I also would propose that our team meetings be expanded slightly to go from 6:00 pm
– 9:00 pm so that we can avoid as many additional subgroup meetings as possible and
accomplish a bit more during the time we meet as a team. Our agenda could include
a 15 minute de-briefing time, a 1 hour education time from ―experts‖ recommended
by RECA or others on the team, a 30 minute session de-briefing our learnings from the
session, and then a 1 hour work session on our deliverable. We may consider working
on a ―core‖ unit that would be at the heart of the presentation for all three of these
groups, and then have ―specialized modules‖ that we can add on to the core that are
more audience specific and appropriately sophisticated.


As we become familiar and comfortable with the issues and material, we will be able
to contact neighborhood associations and other such groups and present the material
as an initial wave of outreach for the proposed policy changes we decide are good for
the community. RECA could be the reinforcement line and can take over with their
expertise on follow-up or more detailed meetings where the information required may
be beyond our scope or expertise. This would contribute to the long-term nature of
the project, as we could each decide to what extent we want to continue to be a part
of this for the foreseeable future.

Submitted by: Tim Stahlke




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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH

       Proposal 2: Ascertainment Sessions
Invitation Letter
DATE

NAME
ADDRESS

Dear ,

We write to you to ask for your participation as an expert on an issue of critical importance to the
Austin community – affordable housing.

As members of this year‘s Leadership Austin program, we are part of a nine-month program for leaders
in Austin. The program curriculum is designed to deepen participants‘ understanding of local issues
and develop their leadership skills. During the course of the program, participants are divided into
action teams tasked with addressing an issue of local importance. This year one of those issues is
affordable housing.

In our research on previous affordable housing initiatives, we have found a noticeable gap in
collaborative stakeholder analysis. Affordable options are dwindling and sprawl is worsening. To help
further the dialogue, the Leadership Austin Affordable Housing team is hosting a series of five
stakeholder roundtables held at various times from March 16 to 26. Each session will include one
community leader from each of the five stakeholder groups – affordable housing advocates,
builder/developers, neighborhood associations, environmental groups, and public officials. Those that
cannot attend a session are invited to take part in an online survey. Your perspective, shared with
other leaders, will not only advance the dialogue, but also ultimately help Austin move towards a
solution to the affordable housing issue. Only a select number of experts have been invited to partake
in the roundtables. We do hope to count on your participation.

All roundtable sessions will be held at the Texas Homeless Education Office, 2901 N I-35 (NE corner of
I-35 and Dean Keaton), Room 2.200 (contact: Tim Stahlke, 475-9709). Please select a date for your
participation from the options listed below:

        Tuesday, March 16, 4 – 6 pm
        Wednesday, March 17, 12 – 2 pm
        Friday, March 19, 12 – 2 pm
        Tuesday, March 23, 8 – 10 am
        Friday, March 26, 12 – 2 pm

We value your input, and we hope you will join us in this important effort. Please respond to NAME at
EMAIL or TELEPHONE by DATE.

Sincerely,

SIGNER
Leadership Austin, Class of 2003-2004




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                         Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

Tips and Follow-Up Email
Stakeholder duo - Checklist

Builder/developers: Julien & Sasha
AH advocates: Sophie & Tim
Neighborhood groups: Kerri & Evvie
Environmental/social civic groups: John & Susana
Public officials: Rebecca & Deborah

 Invitations sent / Follow-up call
 [NEW] Fill out the Ascertainment Schedule.xls by end of day Thur (tomorrow) and send
    back to Sasha for consolidation. Final version will be sent out Fri.
 [NEW] Request bio by email (1/3 of a page max) this week. Follow up two days prior to
    ascertainment session if hasn’t been received yet.
   Agenda (2-3 days prior)
   Reminder call (1 day prior)

Facilitator - Checklist

Tuesday, Mar. 16, 4-6pm:         Rebecca and Deborah
Wednesday, Mar 17, 12-2pm:       Julien and Sophie
Friday, Mar 19, 12-2pm:          Kerri and Evvie
Tuesday, Mar. 23, 8-10am:        Susana and Sasha (Sydnia)
Friday, Mar. 26, 12-2pm:         Tim and John (Cathy)

Day before
 Confirm logistics with Tim
 Receive bios from stakeholder duos
 Email LAATAH to see who else might be coming (notetakers appreciated!)
 Print out
    Ascertainment session how-to
    Suggested script
    Table tents
    Agenda copies
Day of
 Arrive 20 minutes early
 Make sure food, table tents, agenda copies are laid out
 On whiteboard, write “Stakeholder Roundtable Discussion on Affordable Housing”
 Set up your notepad, pen, etc...
By next ascertainment session
 Send process improvements on checklists or script
 Write-up send out notes




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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing         LAATAH
Location: 2901 N. IH 35,Room 2.200 - on the NE corner of IH 35 and Dean Keaton (26th St.)

Session Rules:
       This is a roundtable discussion, BUT for the sake of time, each person will be given 8-10 minutes,
        uninterrupted, to tell us what they believe to be the top one or two issues in our community
        related to [affordable housing.] No formal presentation is needed, but they can leave handouts if
        they want to.

       After each person has spoken, the facilitators have 2-3 minutes to ask questions directly of that
        person. (Questions don't have to be asked, but can be at this point).

       Rather than choosing the order in which people speak, I ask for a volunteer to go first, then after
        they speak, someone else volunteers, and so forth. - This lends for natural transitions and people
        being able to springboard off each other's comments.

       Use the time left over (if any) after everyone has had their turn to speak to give everyone the
        opportunity to voice anything that was left out, reply to someone else's comments, etc.

       Facilitators will need to take notes -one actively and one passively - so we can compare notes to
        ensure nothing is left out. See pages 2 and 3 for sample notes.

       At the end of the session, with 10 minutes left, the facilitators state for the group some of the
        "top issues" they heard mentioned and clarify any questions they may have, including those on
        our overall project goal.

Reminders for Facilitators:
    Let everyone get food first, and start the session as soon as everyone is seated. Treat it as a
      "working lunch."
    Don't be afraid to cut people off at the end of their allotted time, but pleasedo be courteous.
    Affirmations such as "Thank you" or "Your comments are appreciated" are fine. However, please
      refrain from stating your own thoughts, beliefs, opinions, etc. Remain neutral at all times,
      especially when asking questions.
    At the end of the session, reiterate the purpose and let them know what will be done with the
      information re: follow up, etc. A sample follow-up email could be:
        Hi, everyone.

        Thanks again for your participation last week. It was a great session!

        Attached is a high-level account of your comments, for your records. - If you see that
        anything was inaccurately recorded, or that anything of special note was left out, please
        email or call me.

        From here, we will work to formulate action items for News and Community Relations
        based on what we heard from you. -- We will keep you updated.

        One item that we have decided to move forward on... We will be re-airing the
        Depression Special (from May 29) on December 15, 6:30 - 7 pm and will have another
        phone bank 5 - 8 pm.




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                      Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH


                                    Sample Ascertainment Session Notes
                                                 Topic: Health & Wellness
Following are high-level notes from our Ascertainment Session on Health & Wellness.
All “possible action items” listed below will be reviewed and considered by KEYE, and final
action items will be determined accordingly.
We welcome your additional input and ideas.

* Indicates key concerns voiced by two or more participants; Indicates greatest concerns of the
group as a whole.

Fred Butler – Community Action Network
       Key Concerns:
        Number of uninsured people
               o 15% of the population, 25% of Texans, and 22% of Texas children are uninsured
                  (Texas is the highest in the nation for the number of uninsured people and
                  children)
               o Children’s Health Insurance Program has helped
               o The Campaign to Restore CHIP / Children’s Defense Fund
                       Though a partial restoration was just announced in October, there is a
                          need to restore all CHIP benefits
        Health Care districts
               o Austin residents are paying for a hospital 20 other counties use
               o This issue will be addressed in the upcoming May election
        Indigent Care Collaboration
        Obesity*
               o The number of overweight children has doubled since 1980
               o Has a large part to do with poverty
               o Travis County just got the STEPS Grant (12.5 million dollars over five years)
                       Interventions around tobacco use, etc.
        Elder issues
               o The number of older adults in this area will triple by 2030
       Possible Action Items:
        Concentrate on the positive things (i.e. the restoration of partial CHIP benefits, STEPS
           Grant, etc.)
        Community forum or town meeting w/ KRLU  shattering the stigma and validating
           the problem
        News story: Educate the public about the upcoming election and the issues
           surrounding the health care districts

Susan McDowell – Lifeworks

        Key Concerns:
         The link between physical health and mental health
              o There has been an increase in depression and anxiety disorders due to job loss
                  and an insecure national situation



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                          Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
                   o There is an increase in the need for services because the severity has
                      increased (i.e. higher number of suicidal people)
                   o Human beings aren’t designed to deal with long-term stress
                         There is a program here in Austin where organizations work with
                           teachers and counselors to go into schools and talk to students about
                           stress
                o What programs do people have access to and how are these programs
                   funded?
         Cutbacks
                o With Medicare, etc.
         Eating disorders
                o Many are due to mental health issues
        Possible Action Items:
         News story informing the public on what they have access to (i.e. organizations like
           Lifeworks)
         News story on what it takes to provide these services
         News story on the program Susan mentioned above where students are talked to
           about stress
         News story on the need for volunteers

Ray Fernandez – Capital Area Food Bank
       Key Concerns:
        Obesity*
               o Hunger feeds obesity – Eating the wrong kinds of foods; overeating because
                  they’re not sure where their next meal will come from.
        Food Bank issues
               o Food shortage
                       Capital Area Food Bank goes through 1 million lbs. of food every 16
                          days
                       Hard to keep up with that demand
                       There is no seasonality (food is needed year round)
               o Who benefits from the Food Bank?
                       People with full-time jobs who still can’t make ends meet
                       People who have lost their jobs
               o People are getting food but don’t know how to cook healthfully.
       Possible Action Items:
        News story on the food shortage at food banks – and how food is needed year-
          round.
        News story on how hunger feeds obesity
        News story on who really uses the Food Bank (maybe profile a person who actually
          uses the Food Bank to make the issue a real issue)
        “Ask the Experts” on obesity issue
        Re-run the Depression special with updated statistics (to help with the stigma that
          depression is a weakness) – PLANNED FOR DECEMBER 15, 2003.
        News story on the Killeen families getting food pantry assistance
        News story on the need for volunteers and donors year-round




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                         Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

Suggested Script for Sessions

(Greet everyone as they come in and invite them to get food and then be seated. Begin once everyone
is seated.)

Welcome/Introductions
Welcome to a Stakeholder Roundtable Discussion on Affordable Housing. Please feel
free to continue eating but we‘re going to begin now. Would each of you please give
us your name, the name of your business or organization, and your title?

(Facilitators introduce selves after participants.)

We are members of the Leadership Austin Class of 2003-04 and serve on the
Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing.


Explanation of Process
The lack of affordable housing has been identified as one of the critical issues facing
Austin now and in the future. Recent surveys indicate that many community members
believe future growth should be addressed by increasing density in existing developed
areas rather than encouraging additional suburban growth.


This session is one of five we have scheduled to further the dialogue among key
stakeholders concerned with affordable housing initiatives. Each of you represents a
particular group: affordable housing advocates, builders and developers,
neighborhood associations, environmental groups, and public officials.


For this discussion, we will ask each of you to answer the following question:
        From your perspective, how can densification both:
           1. contribute to the availability of affordable housing?
           2. limit the availability of affordable housing?

You will have 10 minutes to answer the question. During that time, no other
roundtable member may interrupt. We will interrupt only if needed to remind you to




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                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
answer both parts of the question before your time is up. At the end, FACILIATOR
NAME and I will have two to three minutes to ask questions.


We will continue with this process until everyone has had an opportunity to speak. If
there is any time left, everyone will have a chance to respond to comments, add
anything they feel was left out, or ask questions of one another.


We will be taking notes throughout this process. We will reserve the last 10 minutes
to briefly review some of the top issues we heard mentioned and to address any
questions you may have. We know you are all busy so we promise that we will end at
the designated time.

Discussion
Who would like to begin? Once again, the question is,
        From your perspective, how can densification both:
           3. contribute to the availability of affordable housing?
           4. limit the availability of affordable housing?

(Repeat the process until each participant has had an opportunity to speak. If time permits, invite
participants to address one another with any concerns or questions. During the last 10 minutes, review
the ―highlights‖ mentioned by each person from your notes.)

Conclusion
We appreciate all of you sharing your time and insights. Your comments have been
noted and will be compiled and distributed to you. The information collected from all
of these sessions will be used to develop a survey for stakeholders who did not
participate in this part of the process. Survey results and notes from the roundtable
sessions will be used to develop a report that will be shared with you and other key
community, business, and government leaders. Thank you for coming and have a
good morning (or afternoon or evening)!




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                   Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

Ascertainment Session – Schedule Overview




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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH

Ascertainment Session – Composite Findings

 Densification puts more units on a given piece of real estate, allowing builders take advantage of
    economies of scale. It can also lower the cost of land by 15 to 20 percent per unit of housing.




 The City of Austin (COA) has enough regulatory hurdles and high fees to discourage the construction
    of affordable homes within the city. A wide array or ordinances have negatively impacted the
    ability to build affordable housing (AH).




 The development approval process is too slow.     It takes 24 months in COA, compared with seven to
    eight months in San Antonio.




 Larger development of higher end housing limits the development of AH.


 Need to change perceptions of what is an acceptable or ideal home, with respect to densification
    or multi-family dwellings. Also need to challenge the perception that Texas has so much open
    space that people don‘t need to live on less land.




 Continue the current trend of taking sites slated for apartment construction and building condos
    instead. Buyer gets benefits of ownership of home w/out owning the land. Makes home
    ownership more affordable.




 Granny flats and zero lot lines are good concepts, and another way to increase density without
    promoting urban sprawl.




 Local zoning restrictions, like neighborhoods that allow only single family units with garages, are
    barriers to development of multi-family.




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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing          LAATAH
 Low-cost lots on which to build AF are hard to find.


 It is often difficult to obtain financing for other housing options like condos.


 Opposition to multi-family and AH needs to be examined and discussed.       Some people say they are
    opposed to density, when their opposition is really rooted in prejudice against others.




 There is a question as to what is an acceptable level of density, and what consumers (homebuyers)
    will accept.




 There is a cost in land, materials, labor and regulations that drive up the cost and make housing
    less affordable. Another cost is repair and/or replacement of utility infrastructure.




 To increase density, developments and redevelopments need to be better planned – materials,
    services, transportation, green space. Zoning changes are also necessary to allow development of
    AH.




 Tax credit deals require the housing to be built in ―qualified census tracts‖ – poor areas, limiting
    geographic diversity. There is also a perception that people who live in these projects don‘t pay
    taxes. Education is needed to overcome that poor public image.




 The COA land development code and zoning needs to be reviewed with the goal of eliminating
    barriers to more multi-family housing.




 Densification will have a positive impact over the long term.


 There needs to be engagement in aggressive multi-family development.

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                           Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing     LAATAH
 There is a perception that affordable housing diminishes property values; there is no evidence to
    support the reality.




 Gentrification is increasing the price of housing in East Austin because of limited availability of
    housing in the central city.




 Prohibition against construction of multifamily housing in many areas has limited availability.


 Alternatives to traditional single-family units are not perceived as ideal housing in Austin or Texas
    in general.




 Many buyers of AH are resistant to multi-family housing and prefer traditional house w/ yard and
    separation from neighbors. Education is needed to broaden perspectives.




 In order for densification (or any development) to work, it should be adjacent to jobs, services,
    adequate parking.




 Downtown development must include affordable housing.       There should be safeguards in place to
    prevent subletting or other practices that could undermine affordability.




 Other benefits of densification to consumers and the community are reduced transportation costs
    and decreased environmental impacts.




 When calculating the cost of AH, expenses such as maintenance, taxes and transportation must be
    considered.




 Affordable housing industry is most concerned with those who are able to help themselves to a
    degree, leaving out the chronic homeless.

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                         Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
 Increased density should be distributed spatially, so as to prevent it being concentrated in one area
    of the city, like East Austin.




 Density limits should be honored with regard to environmental laws.       Need to look at solutions
    regionally, not locally.




 Density bonuses alone won‘t necessarily produce AH.        Voluntary inclusionary zoning (IZ) has not
    been as successful as it could be.




 There is disagreement with the argument that IZ would chase developers out of the city.        Rent
    controls could be another option, but would have to be carefully crafted.




 IZ could be useful method of producing AH that is geographically dispersed.


 As you go down the income scale, it gets harder and harder to meet housing needs.


 IZ is one of the strategies that should be used – it has been successful in other cities.   Densification
    is a must if you are going to increase housing supply.




 Perception exists that some environmentalists are more concerned with land than with people.
    There eeds to be more focus on how land is used.




 There is a growing realization that greater density could be a key to protecting the environment.


 Densification would be a good strategy toward fulfilling residents‘ desires as evidenced by the
    Envision Central Texas result.



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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
 Densification would help to preserve Central Texas‘ most valuable asset – its natural beauty – from
    the effects of sprawl.




 There is often friction between interest groups over densification, even when the more dense
    housing is in appropriate locations.




 There will always be opposition to construction in the critical water quality or drinking water
    protection zones, whether it is dense or not..




 If the demand remains high, not sure housing will be affordable.     Changes are needed in how the
    market supplies/allocates housing product.




 It‘s difficult to convince people to agree to high rises in "their backyard".


 Poorly planned attempts at increasing density have ruined opportunities because of opposition from
    neighborhoods.




 That East Austin has gotten almost all of the AH and West Austin hardly any is inequitable.


 Rentals have a reputation as a problem (not with tenants, but with landlords) and gives it a bad
    name and hurts densification.




 Quality of life should be an important consideration in densification.


 Government has a role in balancing market forces with community good.


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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
 Vacant or under-utilized land could be redeveloped as multi-family.


 City of Austin should invest in infrastructure spending to make housing really affordable.


 When property owners could not get their land rezoned multi-family, they turned to super-
    duplexes. A moratorium on those led to seven-bedroom houses with three-bedroom garage
    apartments. Densification is happening piece-meal, with no planning.




 Many neighborhoods are impacted by business expansion/redevelopments on periphery.


 Some neighborhoods are no longer affordable for those who used to live there or for workers in the
    area. Densification may be happening, but it is not resulting in greater affordability in those areas.




 Often, the owner/developer of property is not the person with whom the neighborhoods have to
    negotiate.




 Developers wanting to do multifamily need to come to the neighborhoods and discuss their
    projects, let the neighborhoods have a stake in the planning.


Process: Agendas & Meeting Minutes
November Kick-Off Meeting: Meeting Minutes

The regular meeting of the LAATAH was called to order at 3:30pm on November 19, 2003 in AFP
Training Facility during the November Class Day. Those present included:

Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH):
Members present: Susana Almanza, Cathy Brandewie, Deborah Britton, Sydnia Crosbie, Sophie Follie,
Sasha Grinshpun, Kerri Qunell, Julien Ross, Tim Stahlke, John Umphress and Rebecca Young.
Additional member includes: Evvie Nazro.
RECA: Jeremy Martin and Terry Mitchell
Coach: Winston G. Williams




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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
The RECA representatives gave the team members a brief summary of the work that the organization
had performed with regard to an affordable housing initiative. They indicated that they had analyzed
a number of possible initiatives and took off the table those that they believed had a low probability of
success.

They said that the two concepts RECA wished to focus on were to increase density through increasing
multi-family zoning and to allow second residences on existing single-family lots.

Jeremy said that they would be happy to provide LAATAH with the background documentation on the
work that RECA had done so far (there are two copies of a big binder of materials).

There was a brief discussion amongst the team members as to what outcomes they anticipated as a
result of their involvement in the action team project.

The group then discussed the Leadership Austin Action Team Partnering Meeting form which lays out
the general task of the action team and interests of stakeholders. It was the concensus of the group
that there be some time to consider the task and respective stakeholder interests, and that those be
decided upon at the next meeting of the LAATAH.

The team then focused on selection of team members to carry out specific tasks so as to facilitate the
work of the LAATAH. The following were selected (with the understanding that additional roles will be
established as necessary):

Team Leader: Sasha Grinshpun
Facilitator: Sydnia Crosbie
RECA Liaison/Meeting Coordinator: Sophie Folly
Reporter/Secretary: John Umphress

The team members agreed to coordinate via e-mail to determine the best date, time and location for
the first meeting of the LAATAH. The next meeting, marking inaugural all-team meeting, will focus on
developing group protocols and team objectives.




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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH

December RECA Meeting: Agenda
December 10, 2003
Wednesday: 4:45 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Location: 98 San Jacinto Blvd, Suite 150 (Lobby Level)
RSVP: Evvie, John, Sasha, Sophie, Sydnia // Jeremy, Terry
Please bring: N/A


4:45 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.         Introduction
                              Review Agenda
                              Quick Admin Check-in

                              Sasha
5:00 p.m – 5:45 p.m           Affordable Housing: Understanding RECA’s Perspective
                              Understand RECA's interests in the project
                              Discuss potential scope of work and deliverables
                              Review what materials have already been gathered

                              Interactive discussion – led by Jeremy and Terry
5:45 p.m - 6:00 p.m           Action Plan Next Steps
                              Discuss what issues need to be addressed at Monday Team Meeting
                              Brainstorm roles: what other roles need to be filled for team to function smoothly

                              Team brainstorm




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                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH

December RECA Meeting: Meeting Minutes
Opening:
A meeting of the Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH) was called to order at
5:10 pm on December 11, 2003 in the offices of the Real Estate Council of Austin (RECA) by Sasha
Grinshpun.

Present:
John Umphress, Sasha Grinshpun, Sophie Follie and Sydnia Crosbie of the LAATAH; Jeremy Martin and
Terry Mitchell of the Real Estate Council of Austin (RECA).

A.     Approval of Agenda
The agenda was unanimously approved as distributed.

B.     Approval of Minutes
The minutes of the November 19, 2003 were unanimously approved as distributed.

C.      Open Issues

C.1     Understand RECA’s interests in the project


Sasha asked Jeremy Martin, Director of Governmental Affairs for RECA, to describe what caused his
organization to address affordable housing as an issue and what they hoped to accomplish.

Jeremy said that Leadership Austin had approached RECA
    [source: RECA] Information provided by Leadership Austin regarding RECA and affordable housing:
    How can Central Texas meet the demand for affordable housing in a timely manner and create
    economic value in the region?
     Affordable and convenient housing are key components of the social safety net that supports
        teachers, public safety workers, artists, manufacturing employees, and many other service
        workers critical to the region's viability. How can we ensure an adequate supply of housing
        that they can afford to purchase, that is convenient to their work, and that they can later sell
        for a profit?
     Another aspect of affordable housing is providing user friendly financing for investors and
        developers. Innovative financing (such as land trusts) are not used very effectively in Texas or
        Austin.


In 2002 RECA established an Ordinance and Review Committee to look at how city regulatory practices
affect land use and development. Affordable Housing (AH) was originally a subcommittee of that, but
had been a stand-alone committee for the past year.


Jeremy was asked if there were representatives of non-profit organization on the AH committee. He
said that there are non-profit developers, but no groups representing tenants or homebuyers.


He continued that Cindy Kohler of Milburn Homes (who worked for Terry at the time) was a passionate
advocate for affordable housing and that she was responsible for much of the background material in
the reference binder produced by the AF committee.




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                          Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing         LAATAH
Jeremy said that one of the reasons for RECA‘s focus on affordable housing was that in ten years Austin
had gone from one of the most affordable housing markets in the past to the most expensive. He
added that affordability is not currently as big a problem for renters as it is for homebuyers. This will
change, however, as the economy improves and demand for rental units catches up with the supply.


He pointed out that there are some developers focusing on affordable housing, but that cost were
pushing them out to the outskirts of Austin, east of US 183.


Jeremy was asked if RECA had attempted to quantify the cost of sprawl. He cited findings of the
Surface Transportation Project (STP) that found the average cost of transportation nationally was 19%
of household income. That percentage was higher in Texas because of the greater distances driven,
and that there was a correlation between cost of transportation and cost of housing; i. e., the less
household income spent on housing, the more was spent on transportation. He added that Austin was
not included in the STP study as it was too small a metro area.

C.2     Discuss potential scope of work and deliverables


Sasha asked Jeremy to narrow the action team mandate; ―how to get affordable housing where we
need it.‖ Jeremy responded that the AH committee was sensitive to the budget challenges faced by
the city, and agreed to go to the city and say ―These strategies will increase affordable housing with no
cost to the city.‖ A major objective was to advance policies that would allow builders/developers to
get more housing on the ground more quickly without the vagaries and dependencies on grant money.


Sasha asked if the committee had looked at federal grant programs. Jeremy replied that experience
with those was not a strength of their core constituency, but that there are some non-profit developers
that know something about them.

Jeremy said the focus was on three strategies:

                  Redeveloping light industrial (LI) land as multi-family
                  Offering optional density bonuses for dedicated low-income units
                  Granny flats (i.e., garage apartments)


Clustering of housing is another strategy that RECA is studying.


Jeremy said that some developers had taken advantage of the city of Austin‘s SMART housing program,
where they benefit from expedited review and fee waivers, allowing them to build faster and less
expensively. He added that this does not benefit those families at the lower end of the income scale.
Other criticisms of the program are that most SMART development has been concentrated in east
Austin, and that a zoning change is required. He said that many developers are scared off by the long
lead time required for a zoning change; the AH committee would like to improve SMART housing and
make it more usable.


Jeremy pointed out that success of a modification to SMART housing depends upon politics, the
proposal offered and intended beneficiaries. He stressed the importance of talking to other interest
groups and constituencies, especially those who would benefit from the program; i.e., stakeholders.




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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
John asked if RECA had taken the proposal to the Austin Neighborhoods Council (ANC). Jeremy
answered that when Jim Walker was president of the group (2000-2001) RECA co-sponsored an
initiative with the ANC, but it never got off the ground. He added that at the end of the day, they
would want local jurisdictions to adopt code changes and land use regulations that would increase the
stock of affordable housing.


Jeremy illustrated the importance of community coalition building to the success of the initiative by
describing a meeting between RECA and the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. He said that the issues of
greatest concern to that group were the availability of transportation and difficulty of sale, especially
to newly-arrived residents.


Jeremy stressed that there had to be a good appreciation of which factors affecting affordability could
be influenced by policy changes at the local level.

John commented that affordability waxes and wanes; it might be difficult to hit an affordability target.

Sasha said that the definition of affordability might be an issue with some groups.


Jeremy responded that the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has a definition, and
that Austin‘s SMART housing program relies upon that.


C.3     Review what materials have already been gathered


Jeremy directed the team members to a binder that was the work product of the AH committee. He
said that there were a number of benchmark studies of what other communities around the country
were doing to increase the supply of affordable housing.


He also asked the team members to review documents showing how a household‘s income and debt
influence the affordability of housing. He also showed how housing at lower price points was being
built farther away from Austin, especially the center of Austin. This material can be found on our team
site at: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/LA04_AffordableHousing/files/RECA_Background_Material/
      [Source: e-mail from Terry Mitchell describing the contents] Attached is a Powerpoint
         presentation on workforce housing that I used in a speech in April, 2002. This type of analysis
         let RECA to start to see if they could, through regulatory changes, impact the availability of
         workforce housing closer to employment locations. This type of material is a good starting
         point for taking us on the journey of attempting to determine why reasonably priced workforce
         housing (let‘s say 60% to 80% of median family income) is so important. In my opinion, the
         lack of such housing close to employment is THE major reason for sprawl, traffic congestion
         and increased air pollution. .. . . People want to have a home to call their own and they are
         having to travel far to get it.

D.      New Business


Sasha asked those team members present to begin identifying experts who could offer insight and
guidance to the LAATAH. She said that the month of January 2004 could be used as an educational
―ramp-up‖ period for the LAATAH members. Optional sessions with experts and field trips will
comprise a bulk of the months‘s work… and will rely heavily on internal team + LA knowledge and RECA
suggestions.

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                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
E.       Agenda for Next Meeting
List the items to be discussed at the next meeting.
       Flesh out our individual and team interests going into the project
       Establish team protocol for:
             o Communication among members
             o Procedures
             o Sharing of information
       Review the project mandate and allow time for questions
       Finalize roles for the next phase of the project
       Next steps for January Mtg

Adjournment:
Meeting was adjourned at 7pm. The next general meeting will be at 6pm on Monday, December 15,
2003 in Tim‘s office: 2901 N. IH 35,Room 2.200 - on the NE corner of IH 35 and Dean Keaton (26th St.).

Minutes submitted by: John Umphress




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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH

Agenda: December Team Meeting

December 15, 2003
Wednesday: 6:00 p.m. - 8:15 p.m.

Location: 2901 N. IH 35,Room 2.200 - on the NE corner of IH 35 and Dean Keaton (26th St.)
RSVP: Whole team
Meeting Prep:
    Review the meeting minutes from Nov class day mtg and Dec RECA mtg
    Check that team roster info is correct – send any changes to Sophie Send me
       (sasha@grinshpun.com) your team survey response by 3pm (original deadline was noon) –
       please bring a hard copy with you to the mtg.
    Final request to have those who haven’t already to sign up for yahoogroups. All these files are
       already posted on the website and we could lighten up everyone’s e-mail box if we could rely on
       the central e-mail. Let me know if you need the link resent. It really will make a big difference
       in team communication. Thanks!
    Bring your general Jan schedule (in mind)

6:00 -6:20 pm                  Introduction
                               Review Agenda
                               Quick Admin Check-in
                               Handouts
                               Map
                               Contact Sheet Roster / Plaxo
                               Yahoogroups

                               Sasha - Sophie
6:20 – 6:50 p.m                Discuss Interests
                               Engage in interests dialogue: team & individual; content & skills

                               Team discussion
6:50 – 7:30 p.m                Establish Team Protocol
                               1. Communication among members
                               2. Procedures
                               3. Sharing of information

                               Team brainstorm
7:30 - 7:45 p.m                Provide RECA Recap
                               Summary of project mandate and brief Q&A

                               Terry - Jeremy
7:45 p.m - 8:15 p.m            Set Action Plan - Next Steps
                               Brainstorm roles: what other roles need to be filled for team to function smoothly
                               Discuss game plan for January as LAATAH Education Month

                               Team brainstorm


December Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes
Opening:

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                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing      LAATAH
A meeting of the Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH) was called to order By
Sasha Grinshpun at 6:08 on December 15, 2003 at 2601 North IH-25.

Present:
Cathy Brandewie, Susana Almanza, Evvie Nazro, John Umphress, Sasha Grinshpun, Sophie Follie, Sydnia
Crosbie, Julien Ross, Rebecca Young, Kerri Quinell (via phone), Tim Stahlke, of the LAATAH; Jeremy
Martin and Terry Mitchell of the Real Estate Council of Austin (RECA).

A.     Approval of Agenda
The agenda was unanimously approved as distributed.

B.     Approval of Minutes
The minutes of the December 11, 2003 meeting were unanimously approved as distributed.

C.      Open Issues

Sasha said that she had spoken with Lee Thompson about the best strategy for getting the most out of
the process. She pointed out that the group had essentially four months to produce a result.

Sasha asked the team members to rank themselves as to their level of knowledge on affordable
housing. The results were:

Novice             -   3
Casual -           7
Expert             -   1




Work in Progress                                                                                   35
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
She then asked the members to offer reasons why they had wanted to be involved with the affordable
housing effort. The reasons given including interests in:

       Social justice/equity
       Fulfillment of the American dream
       Those in the 30-50% income bracket being excluded
       Livability/quality of life
       Convenience to workplace
       Differences in the approaches pursued by public, private sectors
       Social stigma attached to ―affordable housing‖
       The economic impact of not providing convenient/affordable housing
       Housing needs of low income/immigrant community
       Scarcity as a product of past mortgage financing practices
       Green building and the ecological impact of housing
       Proximity to mass transit
       Gentrification

It was suggested that the team have a working definition of affordable housing; RECA focused its
efforts on housing for those between 60-80% AMFI.

There was another suggestion that the team look at income by zip code so that it would have a good
idea as to who is where.

Terry Mitchell observed that the group had a good grasp of the issues. He added that RECA had made a
decision to tackle what was doable.

Sasha asked the team members what they would like to see come out of the effort with RECA. The
responses were:

       Any product has to be actionable
       Even if nothing is accomplished, there needs to be a way to measure something
       Recommendation for future action/post-team action plan
       Produce a product that can be taken beyond LA
       Have a long-term impact via networking/community collaboration
       Serve as a hub or catalyst for subsequent action
       Encourage feedback/evaluation
       Have a good understanding of the scope of affordable housing

Sasha stressed that everyone on the team needs to have a good feeling that they are participating
fully, and that there is a fair distribution of work among all team members.

Team Protocol

Sydnia conducted this portion of the meeting. She asked the team members if there were any rules
that the team needed so as to operate more effectively and efficiently.

The following suggestions were offered:

       No interruptions; those wishing to speak should raise their hands
       There should be no personal agendas
       All ideas should be respected
       There should be an effort to be concise
       Cell phones should be set to ―vibrate‖/no cell phone conversations
       Members should be on time
       Avoid speaking in lingo

Work in Progress                                                                                     36
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
     Rotate roles amongst team members to foster participation
     Encourage participation
     Have fun!

Sydnia queried the team members as to what means of communication works best for everyone. Most
preferred e-mail. Sasha suggested that everyone establish a Yahoo groups account to facilitate
communication to the entire action team.

Sydnia asked the group for suggestions on how decisions should be made. It was decided that
consensus was preferable over voting to establish a majority position. The team agreed to work
through any disagreements to reach a solution that most of the team members could live with.

Sydnia turned to Terry of the RECA Affordable Housing committee to give the team an overview of
RECA‘s findings and recommended remedies to address the affordable housing issue.

Terry provided the team handouts based on a Power Point presentation he had prepared for the RECA
AF committee showing the spatial distribution of affordable housing in the Austin area. He pointed out
that due to the rise in housing prices, any housing developments that could be termed affordable were
on the outskirts of the area.

Terry pointed out that in 1999, there were 19 subdivisions in the Austin area that had houses (new
construction) under $100,000. In 2003 he could identify none. He added that you have to go out to
Manor or beyond to find any new houses for less than $100,000.

Terry said that median household income demonstrated that many households could afford quite a bit
of house, except for the level of non-housing debt; i.e., credit cards, auto loans, and student loans.
The average household debt for mortgage applicants was $1200 per month. He said that an extremely
small percentage of mortgage applicants carry no household debt.

He then gave the team an overview as to how increasing the density (decreasing the lot sizes) affected
lot prices and, by extension, housing prices. He agreed that builders were compelled to build more
expensive structures on more expensive lots, thereby further increasing housing prices. He added that
with a 10% increase in density, builders could begin to increase their profits.

Terry said that the RECA AF committee was going down two main paths; a voluntary bonus for
inclusionary zoning (voluntary in the hopes builders would be more receptive) and construction of
secondary units.

Someone asked why there was not more construction of secondary units, and Terry suggested that it
might just be a matter of better publicizing the opportunity.
Next Steps

The team turned to the Next Steps portion of the agenda, and Sasha asked team members for feedback
on what could be done to make meetings and process more efficient. Suggestions were:

     Have both a facilitator and flip chart note taker

     Not rehash during meeting material/information that was sent out prior to - everyone should
      be reading the material and be ready to participate fully in the meeting

     Materials pertinent to an upcoming meeting should be distributed at least 48 hours before, to
      allow sufficient time for team members to access and read them.

It was agreed that all monthly LAATAH meetings would take place on the second Monday of the month
at 6:00 pm. The permanent location is Tim Stahlke's office, with an alternate location at Evvie Nazro's


Work in Progress                                                                                      37
                          Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
office (same building as RECA). The next team meeting is scheduled for Monday, January 12 - 6 – 8:15
pm at Tim Stahlke's office.

Progress on Defining the Scope

There was some extensive discussion regarding a proposal to make January ―Education Month,‖ a ―boot
camp‖ for members to ramp up on affordable housing issues. Sasha proposed having optional
educational sessions, in addition to the monthly meeting, involving presentations by experts or field
trips. There was concern among some team members about the time commitment involved.

In order to determine the most efficient way to proceed, team members asked the RECA
representatives for further clarification on what they hope will come out of this action team. They
responded that they wished to propose an ordinance to the city council regarding density bonuses that
would facilitate/ease/improve the process/incentives for builders/developers to develop higher
density and more affordable housing.

Terry and Jeremy added that RECA would like LAATAH's project/initiative to assist RECA's efforts to
educate and advocate on this issue. The exact deliverable would be up to LAATAH, but could take on
the form of campaign materials, a whitepaper, public presentations, etc… to build a coalition to make
the ordinance a success. In addition, RECA sees LAATAH as providing a "sanity check" on the work RECA
has done so far on this issue.

Tim Stahlke proposed making LAATAH's deliverable an outreach/communication piece - exact format to
be determined - to provide education and information to stakeholders regarding the issue of affordable
housing in the five-county metropolitan area and RECA's proposed ordinance.
ACTION ITEMS
        For December Class Day, Tim will distribute copies of the Community Action Network (CAN)
         report on affordable housing Through the Roof

              o    [01/08/04] NB: CAN still needs to respond to the request to find the hard copy

        Jeremy will provide to the team a brief memo explaining the proposed ordinance

Adjournment:
Meeting was adjourned at 9pm by Sasha Grinshpun. The next general meeting will be at 6-9pm on
Monday, January 12, 2004 at 2601 North IH-25.

Minutes submitted by:     John Umphress




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                         Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing      LAATAH

January Team Meeting: Agenda

January 12, 2004
Monday: 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Location: 2901 N. IH 35,Room 2.200 - on the NE corner of IH 35 and Dean Keaton (26th St.)

Meeting Prep:
    Review the meeting minutes from Dec team mtg
    Preview learning links sent Sunday
    Bring your general schedule (in mind) to plan learning sessions
    Start considering wishlist of stakeholders and specific contacts for team learning
    See bio and link on tonight’s speaker, Walter Moreau (Foundation Communities)

6:00 - 6:10 pm                 Introduction
Sasha                          Review Agenda
                               Handouts

6:10 – 6:30 p.m                Introduce Potential Action Team Proposal
Team discussion led by Tim     Put forth the potential focus on optional density bonuses: planning an outreach
                               and education campaign for proposed policy change.

6:30 – 7:30 p.m                Learning Session
Jeremy Martin (RECA)           Jeremy and Walter introduce the optional density bonus idea
Walter Moreau (FC)             Q&A

7:30 - 7:40 p.m                Break

7:40 – 8:10 p.m                Discuss Proposal
Consensus decision             Review Team Objectives
                               Go or no-go decision to pursue current proposal

8:10 – 8:30 p.m                Stakeholder Discussion
Team discussion led by
John
8:30 - 9 p.m                   Set Action Plan - Next Steps
Sasha                          Review group protocol checklist
                               Check in on Team Rules: additions/subtractions
                               Select roles:
                               Information hubster: written
                               Education coordinator: live
                               Presentation editor: visual/written
                               Discuss game plan for next four weeks: education sessions, etc...
                               Confirm next meeting and select rotating facilitator




January Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes
Opening:



Work in Progress                                                                                       39
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
A meeting of the Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH) was called to order by
Sasha Grinshpun at 6:08 on December 15, 2003 at 2601 North IH-25.

Present:
Cathy Brandewie, Susana Almanza , John Umphress, Sasha Grinshpun, Sydnia Crosbie, Julien Ross,
Rebecca Young, Kerri Quinell, Tim Stahlke, of the LAATAH; Jeremy Martin of the Real Estate Council of
Austin (RECA); and Walter Moreau of Foundation Communities as guest speaker.

A.    Approval of Agenda
The agenda was unanimously approved as distributed.

B.    Approval of Minutes
The minutes of the December 15, 2003 meeting were unanimously approved as distributed.

C.     Open Issues
Sasha announced that she would have Tim give an overview of the proposal he developed based on the
consensus reached at the December meeting. She then introduced Walter Moreau of Foundation
Communities (FC).

Walter gave a description of FC‘s mission as providing high quality affordable housing (AH) as well as
social and educational assistance, and described the population they seek to serve. He said that FC
sees its properties as community assets and announced that they had just finished converting a nursing
home on Ben White Blvd. into an 85 unit housing center for the homeless.

He also described how both the housing market and the job market impact affordability, and that in a
soft housing market FC finds itself competing with for-profit housing for tenants.

Jeremy added that affordability is a moving target, and that at the current time it is easier to move
into affordable housing due to weakness in the market. He asked Walter to give an overview of
methods to increase AH in Austin.

Walter said that inclusionary zoning (IZ) presents an opportunity to spread AH all over town. He said
that the state‘s tax credit program is the largest program facilitating the development of AH in Austin,
but that of 9000 units built under the program, 6000 are east of IH-35 and only 160 were west of Mopac
Expressway.

He said that the real crisis in AF is for those residents making $10 per hour. Finding an apartment for
$400 – 500 per month rent is a real challenge. Also, there are a very limited number of units for
transitional housing or for families with children.

Walter said that the Austin Housing Authority (AHA) serves some low-income residents through the
issuance of housing vouchers, with a priority for the aged and disabled. It has been 18 months since a
family with children has received a housing voucher. Currently, the waiting list for vouchers exceeds
5000, most of them families. He added that there is not currently a crisis amongst seniors – most of
them are being served.

Walter explained that in 2000-2001 there was an availability crisis in housing due to the strong local
economy. Now there are 20,000 vacant rental units in the Austin market.

Walter said that CF is working on several fronts to increase affordability – one was to increase the rate
of families filing for the earned income tax credit, which could put an additional $15 million annually
in the pockets of lower income residents. He pointed out that an income of 80% of the median was the
threshold for buying a house, and 50% of median made it tough even to afford a rental property.




Work in Progress                                                                                          40
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
Jeremy said that Walter had made a good point that in Austin one population was being served at the
exclusion of the other.

Sasha asked how, under various mechanisms to encourage AH, would affordability be maintained?
Walter said that in Montgomery County, Maryland the IZ ordinance required that for each development
approved there had to be a percentage of AH. Thirty years later, that county has thousands of units of
AH. He said he was not sure how that would work for housing that was owned instead of rented.

Jeremy explained that mandatory IZ would be less effective in Texas due to the counties having weak
zoning authority. Mandatory IZ would just push more development out into the unincorporated areas.

Walter agreed that Austin had to be careful not to contribute to that trend. Mandatory programs only
seem to work across wider regions. On the other hand, the criticism of voluntary programs is that they
just don‘t work very well.

Jeremy said that offering richer benefits to developers may achieve a higher degree of participation –
perhaps if one developer enters the program, others will follow.

Someone asked what the level of participation was in voluntary IZ programs. Walter answered that it
was pretty low. He added that CF properties were currently 92% occupied, with the Austin rental
market at 86% occupancy. When the economy slides, people alter their housing situation by finding
roommates, doubling up, etc.

Someone asked about home ownership as part of the AH equation. Walter responded that CF has home
ownership assistance programs, but agreed that there needed to be a mix of rental and owned
properties.

Jeremy added that the results of the Envision Central Texas survey demonstrate the dichotomy
between what people desire and what they are willing to tolerate or allow. Jeremy continued that
under current statute and governance, mandatory IZ programs are not a viable option. It would take a
number of years to alter that situation.

Tim asked what would be the next option after the IZ program.

Jeremy said that transferable development rights (TDRs) would be next. Development rights in
sensitive areas could be sold to owners of tracts that have lower density or that are otherwise more
suitable for development. It could also be part of a neighborhood redevelopment plan – there had
been efforts to put TDRs forward in the past.

He noted that any ordinance needed to be clear and unambiguous, yet have the necessary flexibility to
serve the intended purpose.

Sasha said she would like to have a better understanding as to what the next steps might be toward
advancing some of these AF initiatives.

Walter suggested that it would be helpful if RECA had a draft ordinance that it could offer for review.

Jeremy said that changes to the SMART housing program were to be considered by the Austin City
Council months ago. Given the problems with that process, RECA is reluctant to go public with yet
another proposal for change.

Jeremy added that there would be value in more education marketing, as well as an update in AF
institutional information (Community Action Network‘s 1996 report on AF and the Affordable Housing
Task Force‘s 2000 report, Through The Roof)



Work in Progress                                                                                         41
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing      LAATAH
Discussion on Project Scope
There was a discussion regarding what the LAATAH should focus on, such as marketing and outreach,
and if so, what should be marketed.


Tim said that his proposal was prepared as if there was not yet a product to market (an example of a
―product‖: marketing an optional density bonus proposition to the city council). More of a pre-
marketing proposal that raises the following questions:
     Why does this problem exist?
     Why is it important to address it?
     What solutions are available?


Tim added that there needs to be more information and education because most people on the team
don‘t have a handle on the problem.

Sasha asked if the team should be doing more than reviewing existing reports. Is there a need to
identify stakeholders?


Tim said that he saw the team‘s role as educating people who might go to the council to speak in favor
of an ordinance change. Specifically, so many groups seem against a possible solution like optional
density bonuses, that there needs to more groundwork on a possible good solution how it addresses the
problem.

Walter Moreau (Foundation Communities) suggested that if the team wanted to study the issue, it
should:
     Speak to the Housing Authority regarding their voucher program
     Measure the potential impacts to neighborhoods so to counter knee-jerk opposition
     Ask RECA to provide a draft ordinance so it could be vetted and focus-grouped


Jeremy added that there were few people even in the RECA committee who were knowledgeable of or
involved with affordable housing, so there could be value in educating them, as well.

After a short break, the meeting resumed at 8:15 pm.


Sasha revisited the LAATAH protocol. There was a discussion as to how to ensure better attendance for
the team meetings. Kerri suggested that those who were not in attendance wanted to be there but
couldn‘t because of unavoidable schedule constraints or health concerns.


Cathy said that it was important that all team members be given ample opportunity to participate
within the constraints of their schedules and commitments.


There was then discussion as to what elements should comprise the project. Cathy said that based on
the discussion, the basics were education and information.

The discussion focused on four elements:
    Definition of affordable housing
    Scope of the project
    Why is the problem happening

Work in Progress                                                                                       42
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
       Who are the players


The key issues were then identified as: (1) stakeholder analysis, and (2) definition of the problem. Tim
offered that the team might find it difficult to do more than that.


Sydnia said that might be helpful to look at the CAN report and Homeless Task Force reports and
identify the stakeholders and their issues. Walter said that ―Through the Roof‖ was good at defining
the problem, but it lacked in offering solutions and looking at stakeholder issues.

That density could be advanced via bonuses, granny flats and rezoning was reiterated.


Walter said that a Brookings Institute study contained good examples of strategies to make housing
more affordable; i.e., tax credits and the need for more transitional housing.

Walter said that other means of increasing affordable housing were:
   Housing trust fund
   Housing campaigns
   Impact fees


Tim suggested that the team target the NIMBY response to increased density. He was not convinced
that the team possessed the time and resources to do a bona fide stakeholder assessment.

Cathy recommended using the knowledge and expertise of Jeremy and RECA regarding density and
related issues. Look at the impacts of density, identify stakeholders, conduct focus groups and address
opposition.


Kerri said the process could be similar to ‗ascertainment sessions‘ that are used in her profession, and
explained how they work. The sessions last two hours during lunch. Six participants are invited on a
panel and each has a chance to speak several minutes on their perspective. Then, the facilitators ask
questions to the group.


There was a discussion as to how such sessions should be organized and conducted. The consensus of
the team was to move forward with the ascertainment session concept.

Jeremy offered some ideas as to how the session attendees could be selected
and how the sessions could be organized.


A related proposal that could be used in conjunction with theh ascertainment sessions is to assign pairs
to a stakeholder category.

By the next team meeting, the scope and individual responsibilities would be decided. Given the
fledgling state of the project scope, team input via email will help meet that goal.

Next Team Meeting: Monday, February 9, 6-9pm




Work in Progress                                                                                       43
                         Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH

February Team Meeting: Agenda

February 9, 2004
Monday: 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Location: 2901 N. IH 35,Room 2.200 - on the NE corner of IH 35 and Dean Keaton (26th St.)

Meeting Prep:
      Review the meeting minutes from Jan team mtg
    Read CAN report Through the Roof and Housing Urgent Issues, 2001 Housing Matrix
    Preview learning links sent last week
    Start considering wishlist of stakeholders and specific contacts for team learning
    See bio and link on tonight’s speaker, Liz Mueller (University of Texas) on page 2


6:00 - 6:10 pm                 Introduction
Sydnia                         Review Agenda
                               Handouts

6:10 – 6:30 p.m                Confirm Proposal Direction
Consensus decision             Review January proposal discussion
                               Review feedback mechanism described by Kerri

6:30 – 7:10 p.m                Learning Session
Terry Mitchell (RECA)          Terry and Liz share insights then answer questions on issue and readings
Elizabeth Mueller (UT)

7:10 – 7:50 p.m                Stakeholder Discussion
Team discussion led by         Finalize stakeholder + interview list
Sydnia                         Receive input from Terry, Liz and Jeremy

7:50 – 8:00 p.m                Break

8:00 – 8:30 p.m                Project Assignments
Team discussion led by         Select project teams for identified stakeholder groups
Sydnia                         Set February objectives
                               Identify resource needs to meet objectives

8:30 - 9 p.m                   Set Action Plan - Next Steps
Sydnia                         Discuss game plan for next eight weeks: education sessions, etc...
                               Confirm next meeting and select rotating facilitator




Work in Progress                                                                                      44
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing         LAATAH

February Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes
Opening:
A meeting of the Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH) was called to order by
Sydnia Crosbie at 6:20 pm on February 9, 2004 at 2601 North IH-25.

Present:
John Umphress, Sasha Grinshpun, Sydnia Crosbie, Julien Ross, Rebecca Young, Kerri Quinell, Evvie
Nazro, Deborah Britton, Tim Stahlke, of the LAATAH; Jeremy Martin of the Real Estate Council of
Austin (RECA); and Elizabeth Mueller of the University of Texas as guest speaker.

A.    Approval of Agenda
The agenda was unanimously approved as distributed.

B.    Approval of Minutes
The minutes of the January 12, 2004 meeting were unanimously approved as distributed.

C.     Open Issues

There was a brief overview of the agenda for the meeting. It was commented that there was a lack of
stakeholder info in the ―Through the Roof‖ report on affordable housing that had been distributed
earlier.

Kerri was asked to explain in detail the ascertainment process

Sydnia asked the team what they thought about that process; there was consensus that the process was
workable.

Sydnia then introduced Elizabeth (Liz) Mueller from the University of Texas. She explained that she
had been approached by affordable housing (AH) advocates to measure the impact had inclusionary
zoning (IZ) been in place over the past ten years.

She explained that IZ can produce a high volume of units but not necessarily a volume priced for the
lowest income residents. She used 50-unit projects as the cut-point and found that the following
percentage requirements would have produced the respective number of units:

     10% requirement           -        3760 units
     15% requirement           -        5600 units
     20% requirement           -        7500 units
She added that there had been a strong housing market in recent years coupled with a lack of multi-
family zoning, especially in west Austin.

She said that the city of Austin had facilitated the construction of 2900 units of AF over the period,
adding that if IZ had been in place it would have dispersed units more evenly over the city.

There were lots of people pushing for IZ, but there was not good data on its effects.

Liz then spoke to efforts at the state level. She said that there was the Texas Housing Forum, a public
education group with a broad array of participants. She added that private sector developers that rely
on housing bonds were willing to pay a fee for education and research due to fierce NIMBY battles that
some went through.

She explained that the Texas Department for Housing and Community Affairs (TDHCA) is about to issue
an RFP for research grants to look at the AH issue. She is a member of a working group for housing


Work in Progress                                                                                         45
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
research that had formed a steering committee and that was looking for academics to serve on an
advisory committee.

She said that one goal was to design a set of housing report cards to make AH efforts by various cities
more transparent.

Liz offered some thoughts on defining the problem, as well as the interest groups involved:

       There had been a general decline in affordable housing because housing costs had risen faster
        than incomes (Chamber of Commerce, RECA, city council, builders, Housing Authority)
       There was a danger of displacement of communities of color; i.e., forcing those populations
        from central Austin (development corporations, churches, neighborhood groups)
       There is a deepening problem for residents at the lower income levels (social service agencies,
        AF advocates, immigrant advocacy groups, Housing Authority)
       People are worried about Austin losing its identity as a community (central Austin neighborhood
        groups, Livable City, the ―City of Ideas‖ people)

She added that the process that produced ―Through the Roof‖ included stakeholder involvement, with
groups coming from different interests. That was why the recommendations are general in nature;
specific recommendations would have been difficult.

There was a brief discussion regarding what works in Austin. It was commented that parts of the city
that should work together do not.

Liz said that some cities had adopted a ―Fair Share Plan‖ where neighborhood plans had to complement
one another.

Kerri asked who the target buyers were for some of these new developments, such as Montopolis.

Deborah said that she was under the impression that some of the earlier Austin Revitalization Authority
(ARA) proposals spoke to maintaining affordability.

Liz said that she had had her students conduct a survey of appraised values in the E. Caesar Chavez
area of Austin.

Sophie suggested that perhaps the team should look at rising housing costs and overall unaffordability
for the poor.

Jeremy offered that density may be an issue worth tackling. That was something the private sector
can reasonably do absent public subsidies, and it might be a good way to get a dialogue started.

There was a discussion of how the density ascertainment should be handled. Jeremy said that there
would be differences amongst developers, similar to other stakeholders.

Tim said he was not sure how critical it would be to select the ―right‖ stakeholders.

Kerri suggested that it can make a difference who is in the groups, or at least make a difference in the
outcome.

Jeremy said he would like to see the stakeholders be the same parties who will show up at the city
council with respect to an AH initiative.

There was a discussion as to what interest groups would be stakeholders. Suggestions were:


Work in Progress                                                                                          46
                           Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
       Public officials/city staff
       Builders/developers/financial representatives
       Neighborhood groups
       AH advocates
       Environmental groups

The team then set about determining what interest groups or individuals would best represent each
group.

There was a discussion re how best to organize the stakeholder meetings

Tim said that conducting the ascertainment sessions might be the most that the team was able to
accomplish.

There was then a discussion regarding the format of the sessions; how many questions to ask, etc.

The team then agreed on a process for conducting the sessions:

       There would be four to five ascertainment sessions, consisting of information download,
        presentation of questions, and solicitation of possible solutions/roadblocks.

       The team would define and identify the stakeholders, then coordinate the sessions.

       Outcome or deliverables would be to identify repeated concerns, identify tensions between
        stakeholders, and develop possible action items.

Team members were assigned to stakeholder groups as follows:

       Developers         -      Julien, Sasha
       AH advocates       -      Sophie, Tim
       Public Officials   -      Rebecca, Deborah
       Neighborhoods      -      Kerri, Evvie
       Environmental      -      Susana, John
       General            -      Sydnia, Cathy

The team then established objectives to be completed during February:

       Flesh-out stakeholder lists
       Schedule dates for ascertainment sessions
       Send out invitations

There was discussion regarding the scheduling of LAATAH meetings and activities. Evvie was nominated
to be facilitator at the March 1 LAATAH meeting. Meeting adjourned.




Work in Progress                                                                                    47
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH

March Team Meeting: Agenda
March 1, 2004
Monday: 6 p.m. - 8:10 p.m.

Location: 2901 N. IH 35,Room 2.200 - on the NE corner of IH 35 and Dean Keaton (26th St.)

Meeting Prep:
      Review the meeting minutes from Feb. team mtg
    Guest speaker: Dean Almy, Professor of Urban Planning (U.T. School of Architecture)
    Report on status of invitations to ascertainment sessions.
    Conduct mock ascertainment session
    Discuss final product


6:00 - 6:10 pm                Introduction
Evvie                         Review Agenda
                              Handouts
                              Approve Feb meeting minutes

6:10 – 6:40 p.m               Learning Session
                              Prof. Dean Almy discusses urban planning and affordable housing


6:40 – 7:10 p.m               Stakeholder Discussion
Evvie                         Report on status of invitations to ascertainment sessions
                              Identify top stakeholders

7:10 – 7:45 p.m               Mock ascertainment session
Kerri                         Practice session


7:45 – 8:1 0 p.m              Next Steps
                              discuss final product




Work in Progress                                                                                48
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH

March Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes
Opening:
A meeting of the Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH) was called to order by
Evvie Nazro at 6:20 pm on March 1, 2004 at 2601 North IH-25.

Present:
John Umphress, Sasha Grinshpun, Sydnia Crosbie, Julien Ross, Rebecca Young, Tim Stahlke, Sophie
Folly, Evvie Nazro, Cathy Brandewie, of the LAATAH; Jeremy Martin of the Real Estate Council of Austin
(RECA); and Dean Almy of the University of Texas as guest speaker.

A.    Approval of Agenda
The agenda was unanimously approved as distributed.

B.    Approval of Minutes
The minutes of the February 9, 2004 meeting were unanimously approved as distributed.

C.    Open Issues

There was a brief overview of the agenda for the meeting

Evvie then introduced Dean Almy, Professor of Urban Planning at the University of Texas School of
Architecture.

Almy began by explaining how zoning laws have impacted the spatial distribution and seperation of
different types of housing. He said that traditional developments with alleys allow greater flexibility
with regard to development and redevelopment compared to contemporary suburban developments.

He said that land values have a greater-than-appreciated influence on housing costs.

Resubdividing could be one strategy to allow people to afford to purchase homes. Another would be
mixed-use development, where housing is situated upstairs from commercial and retail space.

Almy pointed out that if the population doubles in 30 years, as some have projected, then residential
density must be increased. The challenge will be to overcome objections to increased density.
Transportation infratructure also needs to be planned in such a way to serve the greatest number of
people in the most efficient manner.

When asked if Green Building could be useful strategy, he answered that it does not get at the root of
the problem, which is too few units of housing for the given land.

When asked what changed housing development after World War II, Alby replied that mass-produced
housing was one of the positive thinks emerging from the post-WWII era. That, unfortunately, led to
manufactured housing which is all some can afford. The greatest drawback to manufactured housing is
that. instead of appreciating, it depreciates.

He concluded by saying that it is regrettable that the low-income housing discussion does not involve
consideration of sustainablity, environment, quality of life, and value.

The team members then began a discussion of how best to select stakeholders to participate in the
ascertainment sessions. It was decided that the stakeholder liasons would be responsible for making
sure that the people from their respective stakeholder groups would be invited to the sessions.



Work in Progress                                                                                          49
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
The discussion then turned to the questions that would be asked of stakeholders in the ascertainment
sessions. It was decided that the questions should focus on densification and its impact on AH. The
wording of the questions was discussed and agreed upon.

The team then decided on what schedule to follow for the ascertainment sessions, and the scheduling
of a mock ascertainment session.

Sasha said that she would distribute a ―how-to‖ on the ascertainment sessions.

There was a discussion of which tasks should be assigned to which team members.

The meeting was adjourned.




April Team Meeting: Agenda

April 7, 2004
Wednesday: 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Location: 2901 N. IH 35,Room 2.200 - on the NE corner of IH 35 and Dean Keaton (26th St.)
Meeting Prep:
    Read Ascertainment Session Notes


6:00 - 6:05 pm                Introduction
                              Review Agenda

6:05 – 6:50 pm                Ascertainment Post-Mortem
                              Each team comment on findings/observations from Ascertainment sessions
                              The Ascertainment process: How did we do? What worked well? What didn’t?

6:50 – 8:05 pm                Next Steps
                              What will be the final product?
                              How to present/package Ascertainment session findings
                              How to proceed with survey

8:05 – 8:15 pm                Break

8:15 – 9:00 pm                Task Assignments
                              Discuss game plan for now through May 14 (5 weeks)
                              Set objectives
                              Determine tasks
                              Assign teams to tasks
                              Identify resource needs to meet objectives



April Team Meeting: Meeting Minutes
Opening:

Work in Progress                                                                                       50
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
A meeting of the Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing (LAATAH) was called to order by
Sophie Folly at 6:30 on April 7, 2004 at 2601 North IH-25.

Present:
Sydnia Crosbie, Sophie Folly, Sasha Grinshpun, Kerri Qunell, Tim Stahlke, John Umphress, of the
LAATAH; Jeremy Martin of the Real Estate Council of Austin (RECA); and Winston Williams, LA Alumni
Coach.

A.      Ascertainment Post-Mortem
Highlights were given by a representative from each ascertainment session. Also discussed was the one
startling fact or eye-opener for each person.

RECA‘s interest is to be a facilitator in moving the stakeholders together in the same direction. Jeremy
reminded us that density is ―A‖ method to get everyone on the same page, not the only solution. It is a
way to get the dialogue moving. It does not have to be the central focus of our project.

The ascertainment sessions served to gather information and that objective was met. Everyone felt the
sessions were successful in that we received honest and thorough feedback on the issue.

B.     Final Product Brainstorming
Jeremy described what RECA is looking for from the team. LAATAH‘s role is to provide an unbiased,
third-party view of the issue. The final product should educate RECA members and the public of the
goals, concerns, wants and needs. It could be used by anyone to introduce the issue of affordable
housing and GET ACTION and people thinking of what‘s possible. RECA‘s ultimate goal is to be a
clearinghouse of information on affordable housing.

The group began with brainstorming on what the final product should be. Comments made were:

Content
    Divide content by universal topics rather than stakeholder groups to avoid reinforcing existing
       stereotypes
    Include an overview that has hyperlinks for deeper education
    Create 4 vignettes – the ―real life‖ faces of affordable housing to represent the issues.
    Create a video of the 4 vignettes
    Sell the positives of the issue and how we all benefit by addressing the problem
    Include overview of possible options as presented by our ascertainment experts
    Include an appendix with bios of all the experts

Visual
     Must include photos of different types of affordable housing to change people‘s perception of
       what affordable housing is and isn‘t. Can also include hyperlinks to more information on these
       examples.
     Create a PowerPoint that could be used by anyone to give an overview of the issue. Later it
       could be posted on a website as a PDF or enhanced as a web page with links to deeper
       information

Suggestion
Feeling we had a lot of good information to work with as a result of the ascertainment sessions, the
group suggested we forgo the survey component. The group present also suggested we go forward with
the development of the educational PowerPoint.

After the LA retreat in May, those interested could follow up with the video vignettes and expand the
PowerPoint into a web site. A survey to gather additional information could also be developed at that
time.


Work in Progress                                                                                        51
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing      LAATAH
C.      Timeline
The group then proceeded to create a preliminary project timeline based on the above suggestion for a
final product. We were also reminded a plan needs to be formulated for the team‘s presentation at the
May Retreat.

Project was broken down into several components so all team members could participate. Given the
short time frame remaining, this is essential. Major components include the PowerPoint presentation,
Retreat presentation, and required written report for LA.


Next Team Meetings:
    Wednesday, April 21: Lunch meeting during LA class day
    Monday, May 10, 6-9pm: Rehearse oral presentation for retreat




Work in Progress                                                                                       52
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
LAATAH Project Timeline


Tasks                                                                    Contact            Due

 Pick 3-5 main topics from ascertainment notes of all sessions and
                                                                         ALL                Done
 send list to John

 Distill meeting speaker notes                                           SYDNIA             Done

 Distill Ascertainment Session notes
 *John will identify gaps, if any, and will get help from team to fill   JOHN               Done
 gaps.

 Review John‘s distillation                                              ALL                Done
                                                                                            Missing 4; all
 Gather bios from stakeholders                                           DEBORAH
                                                                                            contacted
 Complete 1st draft LA written report                                    CATHY              Done
 Complete draft PowerPoint presentation content outline                  KERRI & SOPHIE     Done
 Collect presentation graphics                                           SYDNIA             N/A

 Complete 1st draft PowerPoint presentation copy                         KERRI & SOPHIE     Done

 Draft Appendix of materials                                             SASHA              Done

 Complete 2nd draft PowerPoint copy with graphics                        TIM                Done

 Script retreat presentation including equipment/props plan              JULIEN & SYDNIA    Done

 Group reviews 2nd draft PowerPoint & 1st draft of retreat
                                                                         ALL                Done
 presentation

 Final changes made to PowerPoint presentation                           TIM                5/12

                                                                         SYDNIA, REBECCA,
 Make revisions to retreat presentation                                                     N/A
                                                                         EVVIE

 Gather any presentation equipment/props needed                          All                5/11 – 5/13

 Assign roles for oral presentation for retreat                          SYDNIA             Done

 Complete LA final written report                                        CATHY              5/12

 Rehearse oral presentation for retreat                                  ALL                N/A




Work in Progress                                                                            53
                         Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing            LAATAH
RECA – Quick Facts
   The Real Estate Council of Austin, Inc. (RECA) is a member-oriented organization committed to
    economic development and real estate-related issues in one of the fastest growing cities in the
    United States. It is a non-profit corporation (501 (c) 6) created January 15, 1991.
   RECA's mission is to be an effective resource and advocate for the interests of the real estate
    industry and to promote and sustain the Greater Austin region as an outstanding community in
    which all its citizens have the opportunity to find meaningful employment, affordable housing and
    outstanding education within a clean and safe environment. RECA believes that achieving a
    sustainable balance of economic, social and environmental interests is critical to the long-term
    vitality of our community.
   RECA has more than 1,200 members. Our membership is a diverse group of Austin's leading
    citizens, including attorneys, appraisers, architects, brokers, builders, contractors, consultants,
    CPAs, developers, engineers, financial institutions, insurance executives, interior designers, land
    planners, landscaping companies, property leasing and property management agents, public
    relations professionals, real estate agents, title companies, interested citizens and more.
   RECA's Committees actively work on important public policy issues and community service projects,
    such as the Gardner-Betts Art Auction, Christmas in October and the RECA Charity Golf Classic.
   RECA is managed by its members through an Executive Committee and a Board of Directors, which
    are elected annually. Directors may serve additional terms, if requested by the Nominating
    Committee. Individual projects and issues are managed through RECA Committees.

                      Percentage Breakdown of RECA Members by Type of Business




                             5%      7%
                        5%                                        Arch itects/L and scape
                                               13 %               Attorn eys
               12 %                                               Brokers: Sal es/L easin g
                                                                  Bu il ders/Co ntra ctors
                                                                  Co nsu ltan ts
                                                                  De vel op ers
              10 %
                                                  20 %            En gin eers
                                                                  Fi na nci al
                                                                  Mi scel la neou s
                      16 %                                        Ti tle Co mpan ie s
                                          7%
                                  5%




Current Affordable Housing Initiatives
RECA Affordable Housing Committee
 Overview of effort

Work in Progress                                                                                          54
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing      LAATAH
For the first several months of 2003, the RECA Affordable Housing Committee prioritized nine possible
strategies to provide more affordable housing in Austin. These nine strategies were developed in
committee discussions the previous year. Criteria for ranking the strategies were 1) importance and 2)
ease of implementation. Based on feedback from the committee, the three highest ranked options
were 1) optional density bonuses for developers who provide affordable housing; 2) allowing
multifamily residential as an allowed use in light industrial zoned land; and 3) encouraging the
development of granny flats and secondary apartments in SF-3 zoned land.

Discussion of Prioritized Strategies:
Optional Density Bonuses:
 Discussion: By allowing optional density bonuses, housing developers would be able to provide a
    minimum percentage of units at prices affordable to moderate income households. The committee
    discussed providing an incentive to developers who provide a minimum amount of units affordable
    to households earning 80% area median family income (AMFI) or less. For developers who provided
    a minimum number of units affordable to households earning 50% AMFI or less, a larger density
    bonus incentive would be available. Furthermore, the focus has been on voluntary rather than
    mandatory inclusionary zoning due to concerns that builders may choose to provide housing in less
    complicated jurisdictions and not in Austin.
 Hypothetical example: A developer can construct X units of housing under the city's zoning code. If
    a developer sets aside Y units that are affordable to 80% AMFI households, the developer will
    receive a bonus to construct Z additional units, for a total of X + Z. Furthermore, if a developer
    sets aside V units that are affordable to 50% AMFI households, the developer will receive an
    additional bonus to construct w additional units. In theory, W is greater than Z to provide extra
    incentive to construct housing affordable to lower-income households. Finally, the bonus would be
    capped to discourage concentration of similar income level households and encourage mixed
    income development.

Multifamily in LI zoned land:
 Discussion: Our hypothesis stated that the City of Austin had a 20-30 year supply of LI zoned land
   in or near the urban core. Furthermore, with the construction of SH-130 and the negative
   perceptions of LI uses near existing residential, the committee expressed concerns that this land
   would remain undeveloped under its current zoning. Traditionally, the time required to secure a
   zoning change from the Austin City Council and Commissions takes at least 6 months and could be
   more than a year. To reduce the time to construct multifamily (MF) properties on these LI zoned
   parcels, the committee proposed adding MF as an allowed use in LI. However, after discussions
   with the city's Neighborhood Planning and Zoning Department (NPZD), this proposal is no longer
   under active consideration because of the current efforts by the NPZD to appropriately rezone land
   as part of newly adopted and proposed neighborhood plans.

Granny Flats:
 Discussion: Single family houses in the SF-3 zoning classification and that are on lots greater than
   7,000 square feet in size are able to construct a secondary apartment on their lot without going
   through a zoning change or approval from Council. These apartments generally range in size from
   400-800 square feet and can't exceed 850 square feet. Rents for these apartments can be as low as
   $300 depending on age and location. Because of the potentially low rents, garage apartments can
   serve low-income households in the 30% AMFI to 50% AMFI range. However, a very low percentage
   (<1%) of eligible properties constructed secondary apartments last year.




Work in Progress                                                                                    55
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
Next Steps:
The RECA Affordable Housing Committee will continue their discussions in order to create policy
documents that can be adopted by the City of Austin. The timeframe for presentation to the City
depends on the development of these policies and gaining sponsorship and support from a diverse
group of advocates and stakeholders. Therefore, the immediate next steps would be:
1) developing an educational/marketing campaign;
2) contacting various stakeholders and soliciting their support; and
3) addressing any major concerns or issues identified by the Leadership Austin team regarding the
affordable housing proposal.

 Collaboration efforts: short-term collaboration will be with low-income housing
    advocates

 Ways community can get involved: the primary involvement of non-builder and
    non-low income housing advocates would be educational: get educated, educate
    others, promote positive change; how the education effort takes place is unknown
    at this time

 Contact Information
    Jeremy Martin
    Government Affairs Liaison
    The Real Estate Council of Austin, Inc.
    98 San Jacinto, Ste. 150
    Austin, TX 78701
    (512) 320-4151
    (512) 320-4152 (fax)
    jmartin@recaonline.com




Work in Progress                                                                                    56
                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

Inclusionary Housing Initiative

 Proposal: The Inclusionary Housing Initiative strongly urges the City to consider
    funding an economic feasibility study to more thoroughly evaluate the economic
    consequences of adopting an inclusionary housing (IH) ordinance in Austin.

    Inclusionary housing is a market-based, zoning policy tool that attempts to spur
    the creation of additional affordable housing throughout a designated area. It
    requires that all developments of a certain size include a percentage of housing
    affordable to low- and moderate-income households. Typically, such ordinances
    stipulate threshold levels of coverage (e.g., all developments of 10 units or more),
    income targets for populations to be served, and developer financial incentives
    (e.g., density bonuses, reduced parking requirements, to name a few).
    Communities throughout the country, such as San Francisco, Denver, San Diego,
    Boston, and Montgomery County, MD, have adopted inclusionary housing
    ordinances to great effect.

    IH has multiple socio-economic benefits, including: 1) increasing the production of
    affordable housing for low- and moderate-income wage workers and households,
    such as police officers, young families, day care instructors, minimum wage
    workers, etc.; 2) providing affordable housing opportunities throughout the
    community; 3) harnessing the power of the marketplace to increase affordable
    housing production without significant outlays of public subsidy; and 4) working to
    dispel the misconception that affordable housing cannot be successfully mixed
    with market rate housing.

 Concerns: Despite wider acceptance of IH as an effective tool for increasing
    economically integrated affordable housing, there are legitimate policy concerns.
    If an IH ordinance was to be adopted it is paramount that its economic
    consequences are quantified, reasonable to the various stakeholders involved, and
    tailored to Austin‘s particular economic context. Specifically, it would be
    imperative to quantify that the proposed ordinance would not impede
    development, be cost-feasible to developers, and not harm the local property tax
    base. Addressing these concerns is important not only for getting stakeholder buy-
    in, but also for crafting effective, informed public policy.

    The Inclusionary Housing Initiative proposes that the City fund an economic
    feasibility study to quantify clearly the economic consequences of IH. The study
    should produce a ―development‖ financial pro-forma that allows all stakeholders
    to understand the economic benefits and costs of different ordinance structures –
    not only generally, but also to particular types of residential development, such as
    multi-family rental vs. single-family ownership developments. Moreover, the study
    needs to be informed by input from all the principal stakeholders involved,


Work in Progress                                                                      57
                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
    including City staff, developers, neighborhood associations, and affordable housing
    providers and advocates.

 Cost: $35,000 to $50,000 (estimates based on discussions with experts in the field)
 Timing : At this time, we are focused on getting an economic study developed that
    would provide a feasibility analysis of different types of set-asides and density
    bonuses. This month (May 2004) we are working to get the study in the city budget
    and Consolidated Plan. We are also continuing to work on reaching out to
    different stakeholders and will continue to do so this year and next year. This fall
    (2004), we are considering holding a city-wide housing summit that would in part
    bring together people to discuss inclusionary housing. We are hoping to have an
    economic study completed over the summer and an ordinance drafted and ready
    to be presented to City Council by this Fall.

 Collaboration efforts:
    A working group of approximately 10 affordable housing advocates has been
    meeting for 2 years to discuss the development of a package of public policies that
    would increase affordable housing opportunities in Austin. This working group is
    part of a larger (and loose) coalition of affordable housing advocates, nonprofit
    developers, and neighborhood advocates.

    For the past year, the working group has been meeting with a broad range of
    stakeholders, including public officials, neighborhood groups, environmental
    groups, real estate reps, and other community groups who would be impacted or
    otherwise interested in this issue. Our focus has been finding out where areas of
    consensus lie and what would other stakeholders could endorse but that would
    also have a positive impact on increasing affordable housing for families below 60%
    median family income and spread affordable housing opportunities across the city,
    instead of concentrated developments.

    Initiative includes support and involvement of:
     Livable Cities
     Austin CHDO Roundtable
     Austin CDC
     Foundation Communities
     Texas Low Income Housing Information Services

 Contact Information:
        Heather Way, 444-3093; hway@austin.rr.com
        Karen Paup: 477-8910; Karen@texashousing.org
        Liz Mueller, ejmueller@mail.utexas.edu
        Frank Fernandez, 472-8087; frank@austincdc.org


Work in Progress                                                                      58
                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

RMMA Affordable Housing Working Group—Recommendations to MNC

The members of the Mueller Neighborhoods Coalition Housing Working Group have
reached consensus on a set of affordable housing goals for the Mueller site. We have
laid out these goals below, along with a set of next steps that we recommend be
taken in order to move us forward toward their achievement. We see these goals as
building upon the solid foundation put in place through the city‘s widely heralded
SMART Housing program. We see this as a unique opportunity to push ahead and
further enhance Austin‘s reputation as a livaable, humane city. We hope to help
build a community that will remain accessible to people from a wide variety of
backgrounds as it evolves over time.

Goals:

1. At least 30% of overall units should be affordable—10% to households below 30% of
median, 10% to those below 50% and 10% to those below 80%.
We support requiring that 30% of the overall units developed at Mueller be affordable
and that affordability be targeted as follows: 10% affordable to households making up
to 30% of the regional median income ($21,350 for 2004), 10% affordable to those
between 30 and 50% of regional median income ($35,550) and 10% affordable to those
between 50 and 80% of regional median income ($56,900). We further propose that
the lowest income tier include transitional housing, supported by city social services.

2. We propose that there be a mix of homeowner and rental housing within the
affordable housing provided and recommend specific targets. Specifically, we
recommend that at least 50% of units affordable to households with incomes up to
80% of regional median be available for homeownership, and at least 20% of units
affordable to households with incomes up to 50% of regional median be available for
homeownership.

3. Create housing that will be affordable for the long term.
We support strategies that will make those affordable units developed, whether for
ownership or rental, a continuing stock of affordable housing. Ongoing affordability
should be routinely monitored and enforced by the city.

4. Uphold the principles of the Master plan.
We support the principles of the master plan, which called for the affordable housing
to be integrated throughout the site, be integrated through each residential
component of the development phases, and be indistinguishable from market rate
housing in terms of construction quality.

5. Follow SMART Housing development standards.




Work in Progress                                                                       59
                    Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH
To minimize energy use and maintenance costs, promote accessibility for people with
disabilities, ensure building quality and access to transit, require developers to meet
the standards set for these factors by the SMART Housing program.

6. Require an annual affordable housing progress report to the City Council and the
city’s Neighborhood Housing and Community Development Department from the
Master Developer, Catellus.

Next Steps:

Achievement of these goals will require cooperation between the city and the Master
Developer, as well as the participation of affordable housing producers and the
ongoing support of community residents. In order to move forward, we recommend
that several steps be taken by stakeholders.

    1. Set aside funds through the city’s consolidated planning process to support
       these goals. While few units might be constructed this year, the 2005
       consolidated plan lays out priorities for the next five years and should
       incorporate this project into its proposed budget.

    2. Explore the possibility of using a commercial mitigation program for larger
       commercial enterprises to support the cost of developing housing for workers
       earning below 50% of median family income.

    3. Encourage the Master Developer and city to begin discussion with social service
       agencies providing services to formerly homeless families and other potential
       residents of the site’s transitional housing. This process might be facilitated
       through the CAN.

    4. Encourage formation of a joint planning commission/community development
       commission committee to review these goals and make a recommendation on
       their endorsement to council.

    5. Establish a neighborhood-based Community Development Corporation, with a
       mission of working toward these goals and engaging residents. This
       organization could engage in production and operation of affordable housing or
       contract and partner with other organizations to perform these functions. As
       the Mueller site is built out, the new residents would assume governance of the
       CDC.




Work in Progress                                                                      60
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
    Appendix:
    Table 1: Household income of neighborhoods immediately surrounding the RMMA site, 2000
     Census    Residents     Income <    $10-            $20-          $30-          $50,000 +
     tract     sampled       $10,000     19,900          29,999        49,999
     3.01             3322          491         506              514           878          933
     3.03             1195          124         165              219           290          447
     4.01             1763          290         309              234           322          608
     4.02             1271          228         229              261           323          230
     21.05            2102          350         479              327           514          432
     21.06            1192          104         123              193           244          528
     21.07            1459          196         239              231           356          437
     Total          12304          1783        2050             1979          2927         3615
     Percent           100        14.5%       16.7%            16.1%         23.8%        29.4%
    Source: US Census 2000, sample data.

    Table 2: Household income of neighborhoods immediately surrounding the RMMA site, by
    regional median income thresholds used in housing programs, 2000
                                Regional median family        Percent of RMMA area
                                income, family of 4           households below threshold
     100% of median                        $58,900                          100%
     80% of median                         $47,100                          71.1
     50% of median                         $29,450                          47.3
     30% of median                         $17,650                          31.2
    Source: median income figures from HUD. Percent of households (of any size) falling in these
    categories calculated from 2000 Census data.

    Table 3: Share of households at various income levels whose housing is not affordable, by
    tenure, 2000
                                Paying between 30-50% of        Paying more than 50% of
                                gross monthly income            gross monthly income
     Household income as        Renters          Owners         Renters         Owners
     share of regional
     median family income
     Under 30%                    8.4             17.1  1,198 69.8 21,406 56.8 3,979
                                         2,576
     Between 30 and 50%          54.7 12,865 30.0       2,334 23.7       5,574   26.1 2,031
     Between 50 and 80%          32.8 11,153 30.1       4,909     3.5    1,190    9.3    1,517
     80% or greater               4.0    2,262     7.9  6,847     0.5      283    1.0      867
    Source: HUD, State of the Cities Data System, CHAS Data: Housing Problems Output for All
    Households, 2000.

    Table 4: Share of housing units affordable at various income levels that are occupied by
    households earning that income or less

     Maximum share of regional       Share of occupants at that     Share of occupants at
     median income that can          income level or below          that income level or
     afford units                    (renters)                      below (owners)
     30% of regional median                      55.6                          n/a
     30-50% of regional median                   52.8                          25.9
     50-80% of regional median                   57.9                          25.2
    Source: HUD, State of the Cities Data System, CHAS Data: Affordability Mismatch Output for All
    Households, Austin, Texas, 2000.


Work in Progress                                                                                     61
                   Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

Community Resources
<In progress>

Associations (Central Texas)
---
         --

Public Agencies and Committees (Central Texas)
---
         --

Private Sector (Central Texas)
---
         --

Non-profit Sector (Central Texas)
---
         --



Internet Links

Central Texas
         --

National/International
         --




Work in Progress                                                                  62
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH

Bios
Ascertainments Session Participants

The Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing is grateful for the participation of all the
exceptional community leaders in the ascertainment sessions held in mid-late-March. In addition to
the those mentioned below, other participants included: Bo McCarver, Rose Lancaster, Fred Ellis and
Jeff Jack.


Jon Beall
Originally from Houston, He graduated from Texas A&M. After military service with the U. S. Marine
Corps, he attended graduate school at the University of Texas in Austin for an MBA. He owns Telephone
Data Integrators, which he started in 1982 while his wife ran a restaurant to pay the bills. He is on the
board of the Save Barton Creek Association, and Jon spends a great amount of time working on quality
of life issues for Central Texas through Envision Central Texas.


Thurman Blackburn
Box 27335
Austin, Texas 78335
(512) 346-3481
TBlackburn@austin.rr.com

EXECUTIVE PROFILE
        • 25+ successful years of experience in Real Estate Finance and Brokerage, Leadership,
          Vision, Commitment, Property Tax Representations, Land Development, Investments,
          Construction Management, Negotiations, Business Development and Client Relations
        • Skillful at staying in front of rapidly evolving schedule requirements, quickly identifying
          company needs, implementing effective solutions while minimizing costs
        • Comprehensive understanding of the regional real estate market, local land use, zoning,
          ordinances, environmental and development communities and current transportation
          issues
PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
1990 - Present     REALTRUST SERVICE, INC., Austin, Texas
                   President
                   • Acquired, planned, developed and marketed over 600 acres for various
                      construction projects, subdivisions and homes.
                   • Reviewed pro formas to determine market value and feasibility.
                   • Handled property acquisition and disposition, inspections, contract negotiations,
                      title company processing and closing.
                   • Coordinated with development professionals, regulatory agencies and authorities,
                      permit departments and neighborhood associations.
                   • Addressed, spoke or testified before local, regional and state-elected and
                      appointed bodies, boards and commissions.
1982 - 1990        MORTGAGE COMMITMENTS, INC., Austin, Texas
                   President
                   • Financed over $250M in commercial real estate projects over a 5-year period.
                   • Brokered over $20M in real estate during the same period.


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                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
                   • Profitably led company through challenging times during the banking bust of the
                      1980s.
                   • Developed nationwide property tax challenge and administration practice
                      culminating in $4B portfolio (over 14,000 properties).
                   • Sold company in April 1990.
EDUCATION:         Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas
                   The University of Texas, Austin, Texas
                      Major Fields of Study: Transportation and Traffic Management, Accounting,
                      Real Estate Finance,Construction and Law
AFFILIATIONS:      Real Estate Council of Austin (currently Member of the Board of Directors and
                     Executive
                   Committee); Home Builders Association of Greater Austin (former Director and
                     Executive Committee
                   Member) Texas Association of Builders (former Director); National Association of
                      Home Builders
SPEAKING:          Former Lecturer, Speaker and Seminar Leader at Professional Conferences and
                      Community College
                   on Real Estate, Mortgage and Property Tax Issues
LICENSES:          State of Texas Real Estate Broker‘s License, Texas Property Tax Professional‘s
                      License


A. Elizabeth Colvin
Wiseman, Durst, Owen & Colvin, P.C.
1004 West Avenue
Austin, TX 78701

Elizabeth Colvin is a partner at the law firm of Wiseman, Durst, Owen & Colvin, PC. Her practice
currently includes the representation of teachers, employees, and small businesses in employment law,
civil rights, and professional licensing and certification matters. Prior to attending law school, she did
statistical analysis for an Atlanta investment firm and the Federal Reserve Bank. She has a BA in math,
history, and policy studies from Rice University and a law degree from the University of Texas.
For the past nine years, Elizabeth has helped produce the People‘s Law School, a free one-day event,
sponsored by the Travis County Bar Association and the University of Texas School of Law, where the
public can learn the basics on common legal issues. Additionally, she is a weekly volunteer and the
Board Chair for Meals on Wheels and More.




Work in Progress                                                                                        64
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
Ty Von Cunningham
248 Addie Roy Road
Suite B-101
Austin, TX 78746
cpc@land-dev.com
1991 – Present     Commercial Property Consultants, Inc.
                   Austin, Texas/President
        Management of Brokers, Consultants and Contractors in commercial real estate development,
brokerage and leasing, free-lance appraisal acquisition, financing, leasing, and disposition negotiation.
Provide fee-development services for various real estate development projects.
2002 – Present     Felipe von, Inc.
1995 – Present     Geneva Properties, Inc.
                   Austin, Texas/President
        Syndicate partnerships and arrange financing to develop subdivisions, including design, site

        development, utilities, zoning and permit applications

1983 – 1991      Carpenter Development
                 Austin, Texas/Vice President
    Supervised and trained Brokers in income producing property sales of multi-family, industrial,
    office, retail, triple net leased properties, and land sales. Assembled acreage for mixed-use airport
    development.
1981 – 1983     Cornerstone Development Corporation
                Austin, Texas/Development Consultant
    Served as Project Manager for over 400,000 square feet of office projects, headed office leasing
    and research department. Published the Austin Office Market Studies for financing, development,
    leasing and disposition of office buildings and subdivisions.
1979 – 1980     Amarillo Equity Investors
                Austin, Texas/Project Manager
    Structured and managed partnership syndications, negotiated leases, space planning design for
    tenants, prepared financial analysis on apartment, retail, industrial, and office syndications
    throughout Texas and Arizona.
EDUCATION:
M.S. Community and Regional Planning – University of Texas School of Architecture, at Austin.
Prototype for joint degree with MBA – University of Texas School of Business
B.A. International Business, University of Texas at Austin
A.B. Architectural Studies Occidental College, Los Angeles, CA, California Institute of Technology,
Universidad de Salamanca, Spain
MEMBERSHIPS AND AFFILIATIONS:
Former Director/Treasurer:              Travis County Municipal Utility District No. 2
Member:                                 Commercial Leasing Brokers Association (CLBA)
Member:                                 Austin Commercial Real Estate Society (ACRES)
Committee Member:                       Affordable Housing Real Estate Council (RECA)




Work in Progress                                                                                       65
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
Frank Fernandez
Director of Programs
Austin Community Development Corporation
207 Chalmers
Austin, TX 78702
Frank has been with the Austin CDC since August 2001. Frank serves as the Director of Programs,
overseeing the lending, technical assistance, and loan administration programs. He holds a B.A. in
Philosophy from Harvard University and an M.P.A. from the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the
University of Texas. Frank brings a wealth of finance and economic development experience to the
Austin CDC.

Prior to joining the Austin CDC, Frank worked on Wall Street for several years as a financial analyst for
Salomon Smith Barney providing technical and quantitative support to municipalities and states across
the nation, including the State of Connecticut and the City of Detroit. Frank was also a research
specialist for the Texas Association of CDCs where he helped develop a new revolving loan fund for
Texas CDCs and performance measures for assessing the economic impact of CDCs. Currently, Frank
serves as a commissioner on the City of Austin's Electric Utility Commission, Board President for the
UBC Child Development Center, a non-profit child care center and sits on the Business Capital
Committee of the Greater Austin Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

Mitchell Gibbs
Development / Communications Director
Austin Habitat for Humanity
mdgaustin@hotmail.com
512-462-0214

EXPERIENCE
1999-03 Austin Habitat for Humanity                   Austin, TX
Development / Communications Director
 Increased annual donations by 40percent.
 Increased donor base by 30 percent.
 Coordinated direct mail campaigns of over $600,000. annually.
 Managed 14,000 member donor database
 Solicitation and retention of sponsors / major donors
 Website development and oversight
 Marketing materials design and placement
 Budget design and management
 Media relations coordinator and spokesperson

1998-99    Adult Day Care of San Angelo                  San Angelo,TX Executive Director
 Supervised social / medical environment for elderly and disabled
 Created media events, agency communications, PSAs and marketing
 Managed State contracts, budgets, and financial resources
 Awarded grants from San Angelo Health Foundation, Texas Department of Transportation, Texas
  Department of Health and Human Services
 Created first agency advertising and media campaign including development of first agency website.

1992–1998 San Angelo AIDS Foundation                     San Angelo, TX
Care Coordinator
 Program management: case management / client advocacy/ staffing
 Increased program funding from $35k to over $175k via state grant funds
 Increased client participation ten-fold within five years


Work in Progress                                                                                        66
                         Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing         LAATAH
   Managed funding source reporting, subcontractor relations, program development, grant renewals,
  legislative relations, etc
 Created agency press, marketing and media management
 Planning and implementation of local fundraising efforts

1991–1992       KIDY-TV-FOX                              San Angelo, TX
Public Service Director, Promotions Director
 Corporate liaison to local community
 Wrote and produced community agency service announcements
 Extended media coverage to over 250 local organizations
 Managed national & local promotions, including special events, fundraisers for charities, etc

EDUCATION

1981-1985 Angelo State University                          San Angelo, TX
 B.A., Journalism. English/Psych minor
 Masters level study at two leading universities

APPLICABLE SKILLS
   Resource development and budgetary management experience, including research and development
    of resources, goal setting, timeline development, outcome analysis, strategic planning, budget
    definition…
   Public Speaking and Presentation Skills
   Television, Radio and Newspaper experience, including production of public service announcements,
    commercial production, copywriting, promotions, marketing and special event management
   Trainer / Educator in Health, Ethics, Policy Issues
   Ability to complete timely inner-office and funding source programmatic    reporting requirements
   Advocacy experience at both the community and legislative levels
   Experience with community volunteers; training, orientation and application
   Web design, development and management
   Support Group facilitator with training in communications, group dynamics,        faith issues, crisis
    management

COMMUNITY ACTIVITIES
   Suicide Prevention Hotline , Volunteer
   American Cancer Society, Board Member
   CrimeStoppers of San Angelo, Board Member
   Mayor's Committee for Persons with Disabilities, Member
   Texas Department of Health, Consultant
   Grant Center of the Concho Valley, Founding Board Member
   Social Health Resources Coalition, Board Member
   Texas AIDS Network, Board Member
   AFP, CofC, ASAE, TAB, Member




Work in Progress                                                                                             67
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
Linda H. Guerrero

Biography
Linda Guerrero, born on September 2, 1954 in Austin, Texas, has dedicated her life to education and
community. After completing high school at Stephen F. Austin, Linda enrolled at the University of
Texas. While at college, Linda became certified in special education, elementary education, and
sociology. Upon completion at the University of Texas, Linda was employed at the Austin State School
as a social worker. After two years at the state school, Ms. Guerrero started her career with the Austin
Independent School District. For the next 14 years, Linda primarily taught children with autistic
disorder. The next stage of her teaching career came as she moved to teach at the secondary level.
While the school was different, she remained teaching students with certain special needs, autism only
being one of many. As of present, Linda Guerrero has taught in the Austin Independent School District
for 26 years.
Civic Duties:
Advocate for a protégé for Associations for Retarded Citizens – 20 years
Court appointed financial guardian
Chair of the advisory committee for Associations for Retarded Citizens
On Board of Directors for Open Door Preschool
On Board of Directors for Lolya B. Wright Foundation
On Board of Directors for the Sharir-Bustamante Dance Works
President of the Sharir-Bustamante Dance Works
Central Austin sector representative for the Austin Neighborhood Council
Board of Directors Parks and Recreation Department
Citizens Advisory Committee for the Balcones Canyon Land Conservation Preserve
Commission for the Travis County Grand Jury
Executive Officer – Hancock Neighborhood Association

Awards And Recognition:
Advocate of the Year – Austin Associations for Retarded Citizens
Certificate for Expertise in Special educators – U.S. Depart. Of Education
Numerous certifications and awards through Austin ISD


John Henneberger
Co-Director
Texas Low Income Housing Information Service
John Henneberger is the co-director of the Texas Low Income Housing Information Service in Austin,
Texas. His organization is a policy research and educational institution with ties to low- income
communities and academic institutions. In that capacity John has become one of the state's leading
authorities on low-income housing issues and government housing policy.

John's work with housing began in 1974, when, as an undergraduate student at the University of Texas
at Austin, he worked as a full-time volunteer in an inner-city African-American community confronting
problems of lack of housing and gentrification.

Over the past twenty years, John has worked with low income Hispanic and African-American
community organizations to establish eight nonprofit community development corporations in Texas
which have built and rehabilitated more than 500 individual housing units as well as multi-family
housing such as rural housing for farm-workers. He has been recognized as an innovator in community
development through his work in combining housing programs with community preservation strategies
to bring about comprehensive community revitalization.


Work in Progress                                                                                      68
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
John is a leader in bringing people together to work on solutions to our state's housing problems. John
co-founded the Border Low Income Housing Coalition a 300+ member coalition concerned with housing
problems of the U.S. Mexico Border Region. He founded the Texas Community Reinvestment Coalition
which is a coalition of community groups concerned with fair access to banking depository and
mortgage services in low income and ethnic minority communities. He also co-founded the Texas
Housing Resident's Network, a statewide organization of residents of public housing and HUD assisted
housing working on policy issues pertaining to government housing. Texas Low Income Housing
Information Service provides staffing and support for each of these coalitions.

John is a housing advocate on the behalf of low-income people. His work in nonprofit housing
development and in coalition building led him to develop housing program reforms and support a new
housing policy. He has drafted and secured passage of landmark housing legislation in the areas of
consumer rights, public housing resident representation, targeting of funds to very low income housing
needs, colonias housing initiatives, open records, and public planning processes for the allocation of
public resources. In addition to his policy work and legislative advocacy, John is a tireless
administrative advocate before housing agencies and departments. Besides lobbying on the state level,
John is active in working in Washington on national housing issues, especially in the areas of rural
housing, public housing and block grants.

John's advocacy work has won the Texas Low Income Housing Information Service the Texas
Outstanding Public Service Award from his public interest colleagues working in the Legislature.

After graduation from the University of Texas at Austin, John directed the most in-depth analysis ever
undertaken in Texas on the causes and nature of housing segregation and discrimination for the City of
Austin Human Relations Commission.

Prior to becoming involved in housing policy, John worked as a civil rights researcher and investigator
for the Legal Aid Society of Central Texas. In that capacity he oversaw successful litigation in the areas
of voting rights, fair housing, public housing desegregation, landlord-tenant law, banking practices, and
in the areas of federal block grants and individual housing programs.

John has served as a board member of the National Low Income Housing Coalition since 1990. He is a
member of the National Community Reinvestment Coalition and a founding board member of Iniciativa
Frontera, a community organizing project working with residents living in the impoverished colonias of
south Texas.

Paul Hilgers
Director and Community Development Officer
Neighborhood Housing and Community Development Department City of Austin

Paul Hilgers joined the City of Austin in August 1997 as Director of the Neighborhood Housing and
Community Development Office (NHCD). NHCD serves as the administrator of U.S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding allocation
for the City of Austin as well as carries out a variety of programs related to affordable housing and
economic development. Paul holds a BA degree in Political Affairs. He has served a Coordinator of
Employment and Training, Governor‘s Office of Economic Development under Governor Mark White,
and as District Director of Congressman J. J. Pickle‘s office. Before joining the City in this latest
capacity, he served as Federal Relations Coordinator and Customer/Community Relations
Representative with the Lower Colorado River Authority. He is married to Nancy, another native
Austinite, and has two children, John and Sydney.




Work in Progress                                                                                        69
                       Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing   LAATAH

Richard Huffman

EDUCATION
BSEE Electronics – MIT, UT
BA Mathematics – UT
MBA Production – HBS


CERTIFICATIONS
Certified Graduate Builder
Graduate Master Builder
Registered Texas Builder
Registered Professional Engineer
Real Estate Broker


AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROJECTS & PARTNERS
Heritage Village       Subdivision development, home design/construction
South Creek South              Home design/construction
Springfield                    Home design/construction
Creek Bend South               Home design/construction
Aus. Housing Fin. Corp. Indian Hills – Showcase of Affordable Homes
Guad. Neigh. Dev. Corp.        Home construction
Homeward Bound                 Home design/construction
Home of Your Own               Home design
AIL/Amer. Yth. Wks.            Home design
Intl. Cooperatives             Lot development, home design/construction
Habitat for Humanity           Lot development


PROFESSIONAL AWARDS/INVOLVEMENT
Home Builders Assn.            MAX Award
                               Home of the Month Awards – 4 times
                               Presidents Award
                               Board of Directors
                               Custom Builders Council
City of Austin                 Planning Commission
                               Building and Fire Code Board
Tex. Soc. Of Architects Honorary Member

Work in Progress                                                                      70
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
OTHER AWARDS/INVOLVEMENT
Chamber of Commerce Business Man of the Year
                                Architect/President – ―Buy Greater Austin‖
                                Leadership Austin
Tex. Bot. Garden Soc. President, Board of Directors




Partner Organization

Jeremy Martin
The Real Estate Council of Austin, Inc.
98 San Jacinto Blvd
Suite 150
Austin, TX 78701
jmartin@recaonline.com

Education:
Rice University: BA Mathematical Economic Analysis and Spanish
University of Pennsylvania: MCP Master of City Planning (Coursework at The Wharton School and Penn
School of Design)

Professional Experience:
Consultant: Ernst & Young Management Consulting
        Primary responsibilities:
         Strategic consulting;
         Financial analysis; and
         Process reengineering and organizational design.
        Representative clients included Aeromexico Airlines, Southwest Airlines, Shell Chemical, and
        Williams Company
Government Affairs Liaison: The Real Estate Council of Austin, Inc.
        Primary responsibilities:
         Representing RECA positions to elected officials and staff primarily at the local level (City
            of Austin and Travis County);
         Coordinating RECA policy committees focused on Affordable Housing, Leadership
            Development, Ordinance and Legislation Review, Regional Issues, and Transportation; and
         Informing and mobilizing RECA membership as needed regarding relevant policy issues
            affecting the real estate industry.
Personal:
         Active member of St. Martin's Lutheran Church;
         Training for upcoming Motorola Marathon in February;
         Will fix up several gallons of chili, gumbo, or jambalaya for large crowds of hungry folk;
         Fourth generation Texan, although not one of the generations is a native.




Work in Progress                                                                                      71
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
Terry E. Mitchell
Relevant Skills and Experience:
     Extensive experience in all phases of real estate development. Have developed over 16,000
        residential units and over 1.5 billion dollars in residential community value.
     Extensive land acquisition, financing and development experience in over three billion dollars
        worth of transactions (both as an attorney and community developer) involving all facets of
        real estate including single family, multi-family, retail, office and resort projects.
     Extensive operational experience in creating teams to acquire, finance, develop and construct
        real estate projects. Each project involves the creation of a development team of real estate
        professionals and consultants necessary to address the issues facing the particular project.
     Extensive financial analysis experience necessary for proper financing and structuring of real
        estate transactions.
     Focus is to develop ―quality, desirable communities that improve through the years‖ Each
        community is unique and must be planned within the context of the neighborhood in which it
        exists. The community must enhance the overall area and achieve the objectives of the
        governing City.
            o Focus is to create long-term relationships with every stakeholder involved in a project –
                the collaboration among the stakeholders will result in a better project for the
                community.
Employment History
    2003 to              Momark Development L.L.C., Austin, Texas
                         Principal involved in the planning and development of various residential and
                         mixed-use real estate developments.
    1991 to              Milburn Homes (D.R. Horton, Inc. division), Austin, Texas
       2003              Vice President responsible for Land Acquisition, Land Development and General
                         Operational Issues.
                         Formerly General Counsel responsible for analysis of all legal issues affecting
                         company, including land acquisitions, land development issues, corporate
                         planning, internal procedures and management of outside counsel.
    1989 to 1991         Pillsbury, Madison & Sutro (formerly Lillick & McHose), San Diego, California
                         Senior Associate responsible handling all types of real estate transactions and
                         development.
    1985 to 1989         Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue, Austin, Texas and Los Angeles, California
                         Associate responsible for large real estate transactions, including acquisitions,
                         development projects and financings.
    1983 to 1985         Kelly, Hart & Hallman, Fort Worth, Texas
                         Associate responsible for extensive document drafting and closing of real
                         estate transactions.
    1975 to 1980         First City Bank – Austin, Austin, Texas
                         Various positions in banking industry culminating as a Credit Officer responsible
                         for financial/credit analysis of all credits within the bank.
Education
    1983 to 2001         Various continuing legal education and development education courses. Author
                         and lecturer on various topics.
    1980 to 1983         Doctor of Jurisprudence (Articles Editor, Saint Mary's Law Journal), Saint Mary's
                         University, San Antonio, Texas.
    1978 to 1980         Masters of Business Administration, Saint Edward's University, Austin, Texas.
    1973 to 1977         Bachelors of Business Administration (Accounting), University of Texas, Austin,
                         Texas.

Team Speakers
Dean J. Almy III, r.a.
Assistant Professor, University of Texas School of Architecture

Work in Progress                                                                                       72
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing       LAATAH
B. Arch, Cornell University 1983
M. Arch, University of Texas, Austin 1989

Areas:
Urban Design and Theory
Landscape Urbanism

Background:
Dean Almy is an architect and partner of Atelier Hines Almy. In 1989, after completing his post-
professional degree in urbanism, he was appointed the Walter B. Sanders Fellow at the University of
Michigan, where he subsequently taught for six years and during which time he founded the Summer
Program in Architecture. He has also been Visiting Assistant Professor at the Royal Danish Academy of
Fine Arts in Copenhagen, the Summer Academy in Prague with the Czech Technical University, and
Associate Professor at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Research, Scholarship and Other Activities:
His graphic, architectural and urban design work has been the subject of numerous exhibitions and
awards, Including an AIA/RUDAT award for excellence in urban design and an American Advertising
Award for graphic design. His architectural office is currently working on the design of a residence in
the Smoky Mountains in Tennessee and the renovation of the 1968 Tempchin house in Washington D.C.
by MLTW. Additional scholarly work includes articles on urban design process and on relationships
between the city and the landscape, including funded research on modern Dutch housing and urban
form. In addition, he has edited two books: Object-Type Landscapes, on the paintings of Anthony
Ames, and Work, for the Architecture Program at the University of Michigan. In 1999, Almy was
awarded the Thomas Jefferson Prize for creative and scholarly research from the University of
Tennessee. Since joining the faculty of the University of Texas, he has been focusing both his teaching
and research on urbanism and is the organizer of the Landscape Urbanism Symposium and Charrette,
sponsored by The Center for American Architecture and Design.

Walter Moreau
Walter Moreau is the Executive Director of Foundation Communities (FC), whose mission is to ―create
housing where families succeed.‖ FC provides high quality affordable housing, onsite learning centers,
education services, and asset building programs to over 2,000 low-income families each year. During
his tenure as Director, the organization has more than tripled and is one of the premiere housing
providers in the region. FC owns twelve communities, seven learning centers, and over $70 million in
real estate assets. He guides a staff of 90 and manages a $13.7 million annual budget, which includes a
$1.1 million resident service program funded by property cash flow and private donations.

Recent Chronicle article on the most recent FC community
http://www.austinchronicle.com/issues/dispatch/2004-01-09/pols_feature.html




Work in Progress                                                                                        73
                        Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing        LAATAH
Elizabeth Mueller, Ph.D., Lecturer
Areas:
Community development, housing, poverty, urban politics, qualitative methods

Research, Scholarship and Other Activities:
Elizabeth Mueller is currently a Research Scientist in the School of Architecture at UT Austin. She holds
masters and doctoral degrees in city and regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley.
She is primarily interested in questions of social equity in cities and regions, focusing primarily on
community-driven strategies for preserving and revitalizing low-income communities. In the School of
Architecture's Graduate Program in Community and Regional Planning she teaches courses on
affordable housing policy, urban poverty in the U.S., community development, urban politics,
qualitative research methods, planning theory and research design. Prior to coming to U.T., Dr.
Mueller was Assistant Professor of Urban Policy at the Milano Graduate School at New School University
where she was also a Senior Research Associate in the Community Development Research Center.

In addition to her teaching responsibilities, Dr. Mueller is an active researcher. Her work focuses on
community development and affordable housing. She is co-author of From Neighborhood to Community:
Evidence on the Social Effects of Community Development, the first study to systematically consider
residents' views of the work of community development corporations. She is also a member of the
national evaluation team for the Jobs Initiative, a six-city, eight-year employment initiative of the
Annie E. Casey Foundation due to end in 2005. Her work has been published in Economic Development
Quarterly, Policy Studies Journal, The Journal of Migration and Ethnicity, Berkeley Planning Journal and
Planning Forum. Past funders of her work include the Pew Charitable Trusts, Rockefeller Foundation,
Lilly Endowment, the New York Community Trust, the Ford Foundation, the Aspen Institute, the
Fannie Mae Foundation and the US Department of Housing and Urban Development

She is also active in state and local affordable housing policy and advocacy, producing research aimed
at advancing the state of current discussions. She is a member of the Texas Housing Forum, a
statewide group bringing together stakeholders from a wide range of interests and perspectives to
make affordable housing a priority for Texas. An outgrowth of her work with this group has been
formation of the Texas Housing Research Consortium, a new group established in order to build a
community of researchers engaged in research on housing needs and issues across Texas. She currently
serves on the board of the Texas Low Income Housing Information Service and is active in housing issues
in Austin. She co-authored the 1999 report Through the Roof: A Report on Affordable Homes, on the
barriers to affordable housing in Austin, published by the Community Action Network's Affordable
Housing Task Force. Other current projects include development of Housing Report Card for Texas
cities (with funding from the Rockefeller Foundation) and a report on the potential impact of
inclusionary zoning on the supply and location of affordable housing in Austin.

Leadership Austin Team
To Be Completed




Work in Progress                                                                                       74
                            Leadership Austin Action Team on Affordable Housing                   LAATAH
Recommended Bibliography on Inclusinary Zoning
Source: Mueller, Elizabeth. 2004. The Potential Impact of Inclusionary Zoning on the Supply and Location of Multifamily
Affordable Housing in Austin, Texas: 1992-2003, Working Paper #1: Texas Affordable Housing Project. Graduate Program in
Community and Regional Planning, School of Architecture University of Texas at Austin. February 18.

Anderson, Mary. 2002. Opening the Door to Inclusionary Housing. Regional Inclusionary Housing
Initiative, Business and Professional People for the Public Interest. Chicago, IL.

Bradley, Alison, Lakesha Pope, Anjanette Scott, Andrea Tirres, Michelle Wisdom. 2001. Inclusionary
Zoning for Austin: A Part of the Affordable Housing Solution? A proposal for Action. Prepared for the
Austin Idea Network under the direction of Professor William Spelman, LBJ School of Public Affairs,
University of Texas at Austin. May 16.

Brown, Karen Destorel. 2001. Expanding Affordable Housing Through Inclusionary Zoning: Lessons From
the Washington Metropolitan Area, Brookings Institution, Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy,
October. http://www.brook.edu/es/urban/publications/inclusionary.htm

Burchell, Robert W. and Catherine C. Galley. 2000. ―Inclusionary Zoning: Pros and Cons,‖ New Century
Housing, vol. 1, issue 2. October. http://www.inhousing.org/NHC-Report/NHC-2.htm

California Affordable Housing Law Project of the Public Interest Law Project and Western Center on
Law and Poverty. 2002. Inclusionary Zoning: Policy Considerations and Best Practices. December.
http://wclp.org/advocates/housing/IZBestPracticesFINALDecember2002.PDF
Accessed 2/2/04.

City of Austin, Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report.
http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/housing/downloads/CPR02CH1.pdf. Accessed 1/31/04.

City of Austin, Montopolis Report: Zoning, 2001. http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/landuse/montzotab.htm.
Accessed 1/31/04.

Community Action Network, Affordable Housing Task Force. 1999. Through the Roof: A Report on
Affordable Homes in Austin. Austin, TX. August.

Diana McIver and Associates, Inc. 2000. Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice in the City of
Austin. Prepared for NHCDO, City of Austin, June 16.

Enterprise Foundation. Inclusionary Zoning: Program Design Considerations (with a program design
checklist.) An Enterprise Foundation Issue Brief.
http://www.enterprisefoundation.org/model%20documents/e512.htm Accessed 2/2/04.

Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae Requirements for Inclusionary Zoning (Deed Restrictions). 9/18/2003.
Accessed 2/2/04. http://www.principal.com/partners/wholesale/prmi_fhlmc_fnma_zoning.pdf

Housing Authority of the City of Austin. http://www.hacanet.org/haca_communities/. Accessed
1/31/04.

US Census 2000. AmericanFactFinder. www.census.gov/

National Low Income Housing Coalition. 2003. Out of Reach. America‘s Housing Wage Climbs.
http://www.nlihc.org/oor2003/ Accessed 2/9/04.

TAMU Real Estate Center. Austin market report. http://recenter.tamu.edu/mreports/AustinSanM.html
Accessed 1/31/04.


Work in Progress                                                                                                          75