ESA

Document Sample
ESA Powered By Docstoc
					E2730

             SUB-REGIONAL FISHERIES COMMISSION (SRFC)
                             ---------------

                         PERMANENT SECRETARIAT




          WEST AFRICA REGIONAL FISHERIES PROJECT (WARF)
                         Project ID: P106063


                                  _______________


                  ADDITIONAL FUNDING OF THE PRAO:
        JETTY OF KISSY (SIERRA LEONE) AND MESURADO (LIBERIA)
                                  _______________


        ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL ASSESSMENT (ESA)


                                  _______________


                                  FINAL REPORT



                                     January 2011




                                Mbaye Mbengue FAYE
                        Social and Environmental Evaluation Consultant
                         fayeconseil@orange.sn - mbmbfaye@yahoo.fr
                Tél : Portable : (221) 77549 76 68 – Domicile : 33832 44 31
                                 BP : 12 860 Dakar-Colobane
                                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS
ABBREVIATIONS ....................................................................................................................................... III
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................. 1
1.      INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 4
     1.1 CONTEXT AND JUSTIFICATION.............................................................................................................. 4
     1.2 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT ............................................................................................................. 4
     1.2.1  DEVELOPMENT OBJECTIVE OF THE WARF ..................................................................................... 4
     1.3 JUSTIFICATION AND OBJECTIVE OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL ASSESSMENT (ESA) .............. 4
2.      ENVIRONMENTAL AND ENVIRONNEMENTALE SITUATION OF THE SITES ................... 6
     2.1 LIBERIA ............................................................................................................................................... 6
     2.1.1  GENERAL INFORMATION ................................................................................................................. 6
     2.1.2  MARINE PROTECTED AREAS OF LIBERIA ........................................................................................ 6
     2.2 SIERRA LEONE ..................................................................................................................................... 7
     2.2.1  GENERAL INFORMATION ................................................................................................................. 7
     2.2.2  MARINE PROTECTED AREAS IN SIERRA LEONE ............................................................................... 7
     3.1 INTERNATIONAL CONVENTIONS IN RELATION WITH THE WARF ......................................................... 9
     3.2 ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL POLICY FRAMEWORK ........................................................................... 9
     3.2.1  LIBERIA ........................................................................................................................................... 9
     3.2.2  SIERRA LEONE ................................................................................................................................ 9
     3.3.1  LIBERIA ......................................................................................................................................... 10
     3.3.2  SIERRA LEONE .............................................................................................................................. 10
     3.4.1  LIBERIA ......................................................................................................................................... 10
     3.4.2  SIERRA LEONE .............................................................................................................................. 10
     3.5.2  NATIONAL LEVEL IN LIBERIA ....................................................................................................... 11
     3.5.3  NATIONAL LEVEL IN SIERRA LEONE ............................................................................................. 11
4.       REVIEW OF THE SAFEGUARD POLICIES OF THE WORLD BANK ................................... 13
5.      ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF PROJECTS .................................................. 16
     5.1 NEGATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF THE JETTIES ................................................... 16
     5.1.1  NEGATIVE IMPACTS DURING JETTY CONSTRUCTION WORKS ......................................................... 16
     5.1.2  NEGATIVE IMPACTS DURING UTILIZATION OF THE JETTIES ............................................................ 18
6.      ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT PLAN (ESMP) ........................................ 21
     6.1.1   DEVELOPMENT OF A RESETTLEMENT ACTION PLAN (RAP) FOR THE KISSY SITE .......................... 21
     6.2 CONSTRUCTION PHASE ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT............................................. 21
     6.2.1   GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL MEASURES FOR MITIGATION OF NEGATIVE IMPACTS ......................... 21
     6.2.2   SUMMARY OF GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL MEASURES AND BY TYPE OF ACTIVITY ........................ 22
     6.3 OPERATION PHASE ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT ................................................... 23
     6.4 ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL CLAUSES TO INSERT IN THE TENDER DOCUMENTS .............................. 25
     6.4.1   GENERAL MEASURES .................................................................................................................... 25
     6.6 CAPACITY BUILDING MEASURES FOR ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT ......................... 28
     6.6.3   TECHNICAL CAPACITY BUILDING, TRAINING AND SENSITIZATION MEASURES ............................... 30
     6.7 MONITORING – EVALUATION PROGRAMME OF THE ESA ................................................................... 31
     6.7.1   MONITORING-EVALUATION .......................................................................................................... 31
     6.7.2   MONITORING INDICATORS OF THE REGIONAL COORDINATION OF THE WARF ............................. 31
     6.7.3   INDICATORS TO BE MONITORED BY THE NATIONAL COORDINATION UNITS .................................. 31
     6.7.5   THE EXTERNAL MONITORING SHOULD BE ASSURED BY THE NATIONAL INSTITUTIONS IN CHARGE OF
     THE ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS (SLEPA IN SIERRA LEONE AND EPA IN LIBERIA) WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK
     OF THEIR ASSISTANCE TO THE NATIONAL COORDINATION UNITS OF THE WARF. ....................................... 32
     6.7.6   6.7.6 MONITORING INDICATORS AT THE NATIONAL LEVEL ........................................................... 32
     6.8 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR IMPLEMENTATION AND MONITORING OF THE ESMF ............... 33
7.       CONSULTATION ............................................................................................................................... 34
8.     ANNEXES ............................................................................................................................................ 35
     ANNEX 1: DETAILS OF CONSULTATIONS WITH STAKEHOLDERS ................................................................... 35
     ANNEX 2: TOR FOR THE PREPARATION OF THE RESETTLEMENT PLANS (RAP) ............................................ 36
     ANNEX 3 PERSONS MET AND CONSULTED ............................................................................................... 37
                     ABBREVIATIONS

AIDS    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
CBO     Community Based Organizations
CSRP    Sub-Regional Fisheries Commission
DAO     Tender Documents
ESA     Environmental and Social Assessment
ESIA    Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
ESMP    Environmental and Social management Plan
EPA     Environment Protection Agency (Liberia)
ESFP    Environmental and Social Focal Point
FEM     Global Environment Fund
HIV     Human Immunodeficiency Virus
HSE     Health, Safety and Environment
IEC     Information Education and Communication
IMBO    Institute of Marine Biology and Oceanography
IST     Sexually Transmitted Infections
MPA     Marine Protected Areas
MST     Sexually Transmitted Diseases
NEAP    National Environmental Action Plan
OMD     Millennium Development Goals
ONG     Non Governmental Organizations
OP      Operational Policy
PCU     Project Coordination Unit
SCS     Monitoring, Control and Surveillance
SLAFU   Sierra Leone Artisanal Fishermen’s Union
SLEPA   Sierra Leone Environment Protection Agency
TOR     Terms of Reference
WARF    West African Regional Fisheries
WB      World Bank
                                       EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Development Objective of the WARF
The development objective of the WARF is to increase, in a sustainable manner, the totality of
wealth generated by the exploitation of the fisheries resources of the countries of West Africa, by:
(i) reducing illegal fishing (ii) developing the capacities of the countries to govern and to manage
their fisheries in a sustainable manner, and (iii) increasing the value and the profit generated by the
fisheries products as well as the part of this value captured by these countries. The components of
the WARF are as described below:

Good Governance and Sustainable Fisheries Management; Reduction of illegal Fishing;
Coordination, Monitoring and Evaluation and Program Management.

Objective of the additional funding project
The present project is the construction of a jetty on the bay of Kissy in Freetown (Sierra Leone) and
on Mesurado site in Monrovia (Liberia).

Justification and objective of the Environmental and Social Assessment (ESA)
The construction of the jetties envisaged within the framework of the additional funding of the
WARF could generate, if some adequate measures are not taken beforehand, some negative
environmental and social impacts. In order to minimize these unfavorable impacts, it has been
found necessary to develop an environmental and social assessment (ESA) whose objective is to
determine the environmental and social challenges linked to the construction and use of the jetties.

 National Environmental Policies and Legislations
Liberia and Sierra Leone have policies and strategic procedures as well as the legal and regulatory
instruments for the management of the environment, particularly marine and coastal. The national
legislations of these countries include procedures on Environmental and Social Impact Assessment
(ESIA) which define the content, methodology and the procedure of the impact studies, as well as
the conditions in which these studies are made public.

National Fisheries Policies and Legislations
In the two countries, the policies and the related legislations on fishing placing particular emphasis
on sustainable management of resources, the code of conduct for fishing, the type and the mode of
utilization of fishing gears and equipment; the fisheries management plans, protection and
preservation of marine biodiversity, control and surveillance of the activity, and promotion of sub-
regional cooperation in the management of the fisheries.

Environmental and Social Safeguards policies of the World Bank
The safeguards policies environmental and social of the World Bank that could be applied to the
projects for construction of the jetties are: OP 4.01: Environmental Evaluation (the two countries);
and OP 4.12, Involuntary Resettlement of the populations (Sierra Leone). The activities that trigger
the above policies must be considered by the Project. The remaining operational policies are not
triggered by the Project.

Environmental and social stakes of the zone of the project in Mesurado
The site of Mesurado is behind the Free Port of Monrovia, and is relatively distant from the city
center: there are neither riverine nor socio-economic activities. Concerning the environment, the
Mesurado site does not have any special ecological sensitivity in terms of biodiversity (No Marine
Protected Areas; no mangroves, no spawning areas).




                                                  1
Environmental and social stakes of the zone of the project in Kissy
The Kissy site is situated on the estuary of the stream, not far from the Port of Freetown. The flanks
of the site is nearly virtually occupied by temporary dwellings, occupied essentially by the sand
mining operators whose activity is currently the predominant one on the site. At the environmental
level, the site of Kissy does not have any particular ecological sensitivity in terms of biodiversity
(no Marine Protected Areas; no mangroves, no spawning zone), but intense landing and sale of
beach sand.

Negative impacts during construction of the jetties
During the construction of the jetties, there will be hindrances and nuisances and temporary
disruptions resulting from the activities on the sites on the coastal zone. The environmental and
social issues would include the risks of pollution of the water body by the wastes, the risks of
accidents during the works and the potential resettlement and disruptions of the current activities
(squatters and sand mining in Sierra Leone).
     Pollution of the sites and the water by the wastes
     Impact of sea sand mining
     Lack of protection of the site staff
     Disruption of local socio-economic activities

       Mesurado Jetty (Liberia) :
        Construction of the jetty will not lead to social losses because no socio-economic activity is
        conducted on the site.

       Kissy Jetty (Sierra Léone) :
        At the social level, construction of the pier could require possession of zones, legally or
        illegally (exploitation and sale of sand, illegal dwellings, etc.). The works will cause loss of
        income to sand sellers whose activity will be disrupted or stopped during the construction
        works and even during the utilization of the jetty. This will require the development of a
        Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) which will address these socio-economic impacts.

Negative impacts during utilization of the jetties
Several daily activities on the jetty are sources of negative impacts: management of the
infrastructures and services; storage and handling of products, petroleum or others, repair and
maintenance of the ships and the artisanal canoes; sewage disposal; disposal of the solid wastes;
public access; fisheries management; etc.
     Petroleum products wastes - Refueling zones
     Uncontrolled discard of wastes emanating from canoes and boats
     Disposal of solid wastes
     Unsafe conditions and disruption of socio-economic activities:

Mesurado Jetty (Liberia) :
    Operation of the jetty will cause social losses because no socio-economic activity is
       conducted on the site.

Kissy Jetty (Sierra Lone) :
     At the social level, operation of the jetty could take place but with difficulty for the
        populations who occupy the temporary facilities on the edges of the site, particularly with
        regards to problems of safety. If they are left to occupy their structures they could very
        easily have access to the facilities of the jetty, and there will be challenges with ensuring
        the safety and security of the workers and construction materials.

Environmental and social management before the works:
    Formulation of a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) to take in account these socio-economic
       impacts on the Kissy site (Sierra Leone).

                                                  2
Environmental and social management during the works:
    Communication and sensitization campaign before and during the construction works
    Respect for the hygiene measures of construction facilities
    Notification of the works and respect for the safety rules during the construction works
    Collection and disposal of wastes emanating from the construction works
    Sensitization campaigns (hygiene, safety conditions of work, etc.)
    Closely participation of local collectivities in monitoring implementation
    Compensation in case of destruction of properties or losses of activities due to the project
    Protection of the construction staff
    Environmental and social clauses to be integrate during the construction works;
    Procedure to follow in case of discovery of archaeological vestiges.

Environmental and social management during operation of the jetties
    Mitigation measures against the unhygienic conditions and the insecurity of the sites:
    Management measures for petroleum and oils:
    Management of the sanitation waters and the solid wastes:
    Measures for the areas for storage of materials and goods
    Protection of the staff of utilization and management of the jetties
    Management of the sanitary facilities and drinking water:

Management measures for environmental and social management capacity building
   Measures for institutional strengthening at the national level
   Institutional and regulatory measures for the jetties
   Measures for strengthening technical capacities, training and sensitization
   Provision for the formulation of a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP)
   Provision for assistance to the National Coordination Units of the project
   Development of a manual of good practices for management of the jetties
   Monitoring and Evaluation of activities at the jetties
   Training and sensitization of the actors involved in the management of the jetties

Institutions responsible for monitoring and application of mitigation measures
Internal monitoring will be done by the Environmental Experts who will be recruited, with the
support of the ESFP the Directorate of Fisheries. It is necessary to have a budget for this
monitoring. The external monitoring should be conducted by the national institutions in charge of
environmental matters (SLEPA in Sierra Leone and EPA in Liberia) within the framework of their
assistance to the NCU and civil society organizations.

Costs of the environmental and social measures
The total estimated costs of taking into account of the environmental and social mitigation
measures consist of the following activities is:
     $US 50 000 for the Mesurado Jetty in Liberia ;
     $US 100 000 for the Kissy Jetty in Sierra Leone.




                                                 3
    1. INTRODUCTION

     1.1 Context and justification

The Sub-Regional Fisheries Commission (SRFC) which is an intergovernmental organism for
fisheries cooperation whose global objective is the long-term harmonization, of the policies of the
member countries for the preservation, conservation and durable exploitation of their fisheries
resources and the reinforcing of their cooperation in the interest of the well-being of their
respective populations, secured through the intermediary of the World Bank, a grant of the Global
Environment Fund (GEF) and the Government of Japan (PHRD), for the preparation of a Regional
Fisheries Project for West Africa (WARF) to find a solution to the aforementioned problem. This
project covers 9 coastal countries. The first phase of the project involves four countries (Cape
Verde, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Liberia) and the project strives to expand its field of intervention
progressively so as to cover all member countries, before the end of the program. It is within this
context that this project for the construction of a jetty in the bay of Kissy in Sierra Leone and on the
Mesurado site in Monrovia (Liberia) lies.

     1.2 Description of the Project

    1.2.1   Development Objective of the WARF

The development objective of the Program is to increase in a sustainable manner the totality of the
wealth generated by the exploitation of the fisheries resources of the countries of West Africa, by:
(i) reducing illegal fishing (ii) developing the capacities of the countries to govern and to manage
their fisheries Sustainably, and (iii) increasing the value and the benefits generated by the fisheries
products as well as the part of this value captured by these countries.. The components of the
WARF are as described below: Component 1: Good Governance and Sustainable Fisheries
Management; Component 2: Reduction of illegal fishing; Component 3: Increasing the contribution
of the Marine Resources to the local economies; Component 4: Coordination, Monitoring and
Evaluation and Program Management.

    1.2.2   Objective of the additional funding project

The present project is for the construction of a jetty in the bay of Kissy in Freetown (Sierra Leone)
and on the Mesurado site in Monrovia (Liberia).

     1.3 Justification and objective of the Environmental and Social Assessment (ESA)

The construction of the planned jetty within the framework of the additional funding of the WARF
could in certain cases generate, if certain appropriate measures are put in place, in certain cases,
negative environmental and social effects. In order to minimize these unfavorable effects, it has
been considered necessary to develop an environmental and social assessment (ESA) whose
objective is to determine the environmental and social challenges linked to the construction of the
jetties and their eventual utilization. The ESA will consist of an Environmental and Social
Management Plan (ESMP), including mitigation measures, as well as the implementation of these
measures (technical; capacity building; sensitization; monitoring/evaluation), institutional
responsibilities, monitoring, and the budget.




                                                   4
Jetty site of KISSY (Sierra Leone)



 Jetty site of Mesurado (Liberia)




                5
    2. ENVIRONMENTAL AND ENVIRONNEMENTALE SITUATION OF THE
         SITES

     2.1 Liberia

    2.1.1    General Information

The Republic of Liberia is a country in West Africa, 97 754 km2 surface area, along the Atlantic
Ocean, bound to the northwest by Sierra Leone, to the north by Guinea-Conakry and to the East by
the Cote d'Ivoire. The country is divided in 13 counties: Bomi, Bong, Grand Bassa, Grand Cape
Mount, Grand Gedeh, Grand Kru, Lofa, Margibi, Maryland, Montserrado, Nimba, River Cess and
Sinoe. The population is 3 300 000 inhabitants. Concerning agriculture, rice accounts for the
biggest cultivated area, followed by cassava and cocoa. Mining (iron, diamonds, however) has been
stopped for the moment. There is also large cultivation of rubber and oil palm in Liberia.

    2.1.2    Marine Protected Areas of Liberia

Liberia has no marine protected areas. However, there is Lake Piso Natural Reserve (nursery zones
of great economic importance with a fauna dominantly of fish, crabs, shrimps, birds, oysters and
other mollusks) which connects to Roberts Port. The Lake Pisso is not affected by the jetty works.

    2.1.3    Environmental and social challenges of the project zone in Mesurado

The Mesurado site is behind the Free Port of Monrovia, and is relatively far from the city center:
there are neither coastal dwellings nor socio-economic activities. On an environmental level, the
site of Mesurado does not have any particular ecological sensitivity in terms of biodiversity (no
Marine Protected Areas protected; no mangroves no spawning zones).

                                   Status of the Mesurado site




Water Body of the site…                              Existing Installations on the site




Water body of the site..                             Access way to the site…



                                                 6
     2.2 Sierra Leone

    2.2.1    General Information

Sierra Leone is situated on the west coast of Africa. The country is located between the Republic of
Guinea to the north, the Republic of Liberia to the East and the Atlantic Ocean to the west and to
the southwest. Its surface area is 71 740 km2 with a population of 5 300 000 inhabitants. The
Capital Freetown has 500 000 inhabitants. Sierra Leone is a mountainous country, with heavy
rains, with savanna on the north; and forest and plantation zones on the south. It is a country rich in
mineral resources, marine and agricultural resources. Mining production is the strength of the
country: diamonds, bauxite, etc. Agricultural production is high. The GDP per capita is about
US$160

         2.2.2    Marine Protected Areas in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone has no marine protected areas. However, there are numerous sensitive zones such as
the mangroves that are specific vegetation formations and adapted to the tropical coastal
surroundings occupying the downstream parts of the estuaries, deltas and major estuaries of the
streams. They are sensitive aquatic ecosystems containing a rich and varied fauna, constituted of
permanent and seasonal species. These are very important economic nursery zones with a fauna
dominantly of fish, crabs, shrimps, birds, oysters and other mollusks. Particular attention must be
given by the WARF to these sensitive areas that could be disrupted not only by the construction
works, but also during fish smoking activities that use large quantities of mangrove wood.

    2.2.3    Presentation and environmental and social stakes of the zone of the project in Kissy

The Kissy site is situated at the estuary of the stream, not far from the Port of Freetown. The
boundary of site is essentially occupied by irregular dwellings, occupied by sea sand mining
operators whose activity is currently predominant on the site. More than 200 people are engaged in
this activity, with daily earnings of 25000 Leones.

On an environmental level, the Kissy site does not have any particular ecological sensitivity in
terms of biodiversity (no Marine Protected Areas; no mangroves, no spawning zone), but there is
intense landing and sale of sea sand.

                                              Kissy site occupation




Irregular Occupation of borders of the site                Irregular Occupation of borders of the site




                                                       7
Irregular Occupation of borders of the site             Irregular Occupation of borders of the site




Irregular Occupation of borders of the site             Irregular Occupation of borders of the site




Exploitation and landing of sea sand                    Exploitation and landing of sea sand




Boats and crafts in the open waters of the site …       Occupants and exploiters of sea sand…



                                                    8
    3. POLITICAL, LEGAL AND INSTITUTIONAL FRAMEWORK FOR
       ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT

     3.1 International Conventions in relation with the WARF

In an overall framework, the two countries accessed several international conventions in
relation to the activities of the WARF, especially the following ones:
     The United Nations Convention on the Law of the sea, 1982
     Algiers Convention on Nature and its resources conservation;
     The Convention of Abidjan relating to the co-operation in terms of protection and
        development of coastal areas environment such as its protocol relating to the co-
        operation for pollution control in the event of critical situation;
     The Convention of the United Nations on the Right of the Sea ;
     The Convention of the United Nations on Biological diversity ;
     The Code of conduct for FAO responsible fishing;
     The Convention bearing creation of the Fisheries Sub-regional Commission
     The Convention of the United Nations on the Climate changes


     3.2 Environmental and social policy framework

    3.2.1   Liberia

National environmental policy of the WARF
The country does not yet have a global strategy document on the environment (similar to the
National Action Plans for the environment of other countries), but rather sectoral documents such
as the National Climate Change Adaptation Action Program (developed in 2008 with the support of
GEF and UNEP).

The environment in the fisheries policies and programs
The national fisheries development and management has the objective of sustainable management
of resources to benefit all Liberians (present and future generations), particularly for increase in the
contribution of fisheries to food security; job creation and poverty reduction in the rural
communities; increased incomes and improvement of the quality of life of the fishers; increase in
revenues and foreign exchange to support the national economy. The policy emphasizes sustainable
management of resources, the code of conduct for fisheries, fisheries management plans, protection
and conservation of marine biodiversity, control and the surveillance of fishing activity, promotion
of sub-regional cooperation in fisheries management.

    3.2.2   Sierra Leone

Environmental and social policy in relation to the WARF
The National Environmental Policy approved in 1999 has been finally adopted and is now being
implemented through the various different components of its National Action Plan, including also a
new legislation (Environmental Protection, 2000) which is in force. The National Biodiversity
Strategy document puts particular emphasis on the protection and conservation of marine and
coastal Biodiversity, including sustainable fisheries management. The country elaborated a
National Climate Change Adaptation Action Program in 2007 (with the support of GEF and
UNEP).




                                                   9
Fisheries Sector Policy
The general goal of the national fisheries sector policy is to encourage responsible fishing practices
and sustainable fisheries development among the actors for the present and future generations
while contributing to poverty reduction in Sierra Leone. The fisheries policy puts particular
emphasis on the conservation and protection of the resources and ecosystems; sustainable fisheries
management; control, surveillance and monitoring of fishing activities; capacity building and the
empowerment of the actors; etc.


     3.3 National environmental and social legislation

    3.3.1   Liberia

The November 26, 2002 Law on management and protection of the environment in Liberia has
provisions, among others, on environmental impact procedures, audit and the monitoring; the
necessity of development of norms and standards on environmental quality; (iii) the control of
pollution and nuisances. The law puts particular emphasis on protection and management of marine
and coastal zones and the conservation of biodiversity. The Law indicates in its Annex 1 the list of
projects or activities that should be the subject of environmental impact study (notably fishing
activities), but does not give any procedure for categorization of projects.

    3.3.2   Sierra Leone

The 2000 Law on Protection of the environment in Sierra Leone regulates the whole procedure on
environmental impact studies (content of the report, consultation, validation, etc.), with a selection
procedure (screening) and classification into three categories (Class 1 requiring a complete EIA;
Class 2 requiring complementary information; Class 3 not requiring complete EIA).

     3.4 The Environment in the fisheries sector legislation

    3.4.1   Liberia

The 1954 law (revised in 1973) on Natural Resources is still in force in Liberia. The part on the
fisheries puts particular emphasis on the registration of boats, authorized fishing materials,
prohibition of the use of dynamites and other harmful fishing methods; authorized mesh sizes of
nets; authorized fishing grounds, etc. A draft fisheries regulation was prepared in 1999, but is not
yet approved by the Government. The new fisheries legislation should have a lot more
"international" character, including provisions for a code of conduct for responsible fisheries and
respect for international agreements, conventions and protocols, with emphasis also on control and
monitoring. At the level of the Ministry of Agriculture, the Directorate of Quarantine and the
Environment outlined instructions for inspections in the fisheries sector.

    3.4.2   Sierra Leone

The Decree of 1994 on fisheries development and management has provisions for the following:
fisheries management, development and conservation plans; fisheries management and planning
for efficient conservation and optimal resource use; measures against over-exploitation; types of
authorized fishing materials; protection of some endangered species; prohibited fishing techniques
(explosives, poison, electricity); creation of protected marine reserves; prohibition of pollution of
fisheries waters; evaluation of the impacts of fisheries; surveillance, control and monitoring of
activities.




                                                 10
     3.5 Institutional Framework for Environmental and Social Management of the project

The WARF will be implemented, at sub-regional level, by the Project Coordinating Unit based at
the Permanent Secretariat of the Sub-Regional Fisheries Commission (SRFC). In Sierra Leone,
coordination will be by a National Steering Committee (NSC) and implementation will be by a
National Project Coordinating Unit (NPCU).

    3.5.1   Sub-regional level: Project Coordination Unit

The Coordinating Unit of the WARF/PCU is the organ of coordination and supervision of
implementation of the activities of the project in the 2 countries, in collaboration with the national
steering and coordination structures which include the essential categories of actors concerned with
the project.

    3.5.2   National Level in Liberia

National Steering Committees of the WARF
The National Steering Committee of the WARF consists of the following structures: the Ministry
of Agriculture as chair; Ministry of Defense; Ministry of Justice; Ministry of Finance; National
Ports Authority; Office of Maritime Affairs; Office of Immigration and Naturalization;
Environment Protection Agency; the Nations-United Office for the Civilian Affairs.

National Coordination of the WARF
The National Coordination of the WARF is assured by a National Coordination Unit that has the
human and technical material resources to ensure evaluation and monitoring of fisheries resources,
but which lacks an environmental expert. A Consultant is needed to support the Coordination Unit,
as well as the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency).

National Institution for Environmental and Social Management
The management of environmental affairs is incumbent upon the Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) which is responsible for the Environmental Impact Assessment. In terms of capacities, the
EPA has the technical expertise to ensure monitoring of the procedures for Environmental Impact
Studies, supervision as well as control of conformity and legal status, particularly of the
development projects. The human resources exist but the control and monitoring resources are
lacking. In the framework of this ESF, EPA will play a major role as this institution has to approve
the screening procedure; to validate the ESIA and the conduct the ESMF monitoring plan. For this,
EPA needs to be supplied by the WARF to realize all these activities.

    3.5.3   National Level in Sierra Leone

National Steering Committees of the WARF
The National Steering Committee of the WARF comprises of the following structures: the Ministry
of Fisheries and Marine Resources (Chair); the Ministry of Finance and Economic Development;
the Sierra Fishing Company ; the Union of Artisanal Fishers of Sierra Leone; The Marine; the
National office of Marine Security; the Ministry of Health and Hygiene; the Environmental
Protection Agency; The Maritime Administration of Sierra Leone; the Ministry of Local
Government and Internal Affairs.

It is necessary to indicate the existence of national institutions in charge of the environment within
the Steering Committee, which ensures the integration of environmental concerns at the time of
preparation and implementation of the activities of the WARF. In addition, in terms of sanitary
matters, inspections will be conducted regularly in the boats (verification of the storage holds,
toilets, the vats for collection of oils, hygiene of the places, etc.) so as to meet sanitary
requirements.


                                                 11
National Coordination of the WARF
The National Coordination of the WARF is assured by the Directorate of Fisheries that has
technical staff experienced in fisheries management, in spite of some shortcomings in terms of
resources monitoring and surveillance. There is no Environmental service and the Directorate
needs to be reinforced in the management of the marine and coastal resources.

National institution in charge of Environmental and Social Management
The management of environmental affairs is incumbent upon the Sierra Leone Environmental
Protection Agency (SLEPA) which ensures management of the relative procedures relating to
environmental impact studies. In terms of capacity, SLEPA has the technical expertise monitoring
the procedures for environmental impact studies, supervision as well as the control of conformity
and legal status, of particularly development projects. The human resources are available but the
means for control and monitoring are lacking. In the framework of this ESF, SLEPA will play a
major role as this institution has to approve the screening procedure; to validate the ESIA and the
conduct the ESMF monitoring plan. For this, SLEPA needs to be supplied by the WARF to realize
all these activities.




                                                12
    4. REVIEW OF THE SAFEGUARD POLICIES OF THE WORLD BANK

     4.1 Analysis of Safeguards policies

The environmental and social safeguards policies of the World Bank consists of both, the
Operational Policies (OP) and the Procedures of the Bank (BP). The safeguards policies are
conceived to protect the environment and the society against the potential negative effects of the
projects, plans, programs and policies. The most recent environmental and social
safeguardspolicies are: OP/BP 4.01 Environmental Assessment, including public participation;
OP/BP 4.04 Natural Habitats; OP 4.09 Fights Parasites; OP/BP 4.11 Cultural Heritage; OP/BP 4.12
Involuntary Resettlement of the populations; OP/BP 4.10 indigenous People OP/BP 4.36 Forests;
OP/BP 4.37 Dams Safety; OP/BP 7.50 Projects on International water ways; OP/BP 7.60 Projects
in Conflict Areas .

The environmental and social safeguards policies of the World Bank that could apply to the
activities of the WARF: OP 4.01: Environmental Assessment; OP 4.01: Natural habitat; and OP
4.12, Involuntary Relocation of the populations. The activities that could trigger the above-
indicated must be considered by the Project. The remaining operational policies are not triggered
by the Project.

Environmental Assessment OP 4.01
The objective of OP 4.01 is to ensure that the projects financed by the Bank are viable and feasible
at the environmental level, and decision making is improved through appropriate analysis of
actions and their likely environmental impacts (OP4.01, para 1). This policy is triggered if a project
is probably going to have risks and potential environmental impacts (negative) in its zone of
influence. OP 4.01 covers the impacts on the physical environment (air, water and earth); living
standard, health and the security of the populations; physical cultural resources; and global and
trans-boundary environmental preoccupations. The social aspects (involuntary resettlement,
indigenous people) as well as natural habitats, the fight against parasites, forestry and the dams
safety are covered by separate policies having their own requirements and procedures.

OP 4.01 also describes the requirements for consultation and diffusion. For projects classified as A
and B, the borrower consults the groups affected by the project and Non Governmental
Organizations (NGOs) about the environmental aspects of the project and takes into account their
points of views. The borrower begins this consultation as early as possible. The borrower makes
available the draft EIA (for category A projects) or all separated EIA report (for category B
projects) in the country and in the local language in a public place accessible to the groups affected
by the project and to local NGOs. On authorization of the borrower, the Bank will disclose the
appropriate reports at the Infoshop.

Natural Habitats, OP 4.04
OP/BP 4.04, Natural Habitats does not permit financing projects that degrade or convert critical
habitats. The natural sites such as mangroves present a particular interest for fisheries and are
important for the preservation of coastal biological diversity or because of their ecological
functions (spawning zones./grounds, etc.). The natural habitats deserve a particular attention at the
time of the realization of EIAs. The project excludes all construction of port infrastructures in parks
and other Marine Protected Areas in the country. The Project will not finance activities that could
trigger this policy and therefore it is not envisaged that the Project would have any impact on
natural habitats, like parks and nature reserves and especially Community Marine Protected Areas
of the Islands of Formosas, Nagos and Chediãs. In the unlikely case of an impact on zones not
considered as natural habitats, some adequate mitigation measures will be put in place at the time
of the assessment of sub projects as described in the present document.




                                                  13
Pests Management, OP 4.09
This policy supports integrated approaches in the fight against parasites. It identifies the pesticides
that could be financed within the framework of implementation of the project and elaborates
appropriate plan in pest management aimed at reducing the risks. The purchase of pesticides is not
envisaged under the WARF project . Also, the activities envisaged in the Project are not going to
trigger this Policy.

Involuntary Resettlement OP 4.12
The objective of OP 4.12 is to avoid or minimize the involuntary resettlement where ever is
feasible, while exploring all other viable alternative to the projects. Furthermore, OP 4.12 aims to
bring assistance to displaced people through the improvement of their former ways of life, their
capacity to generate income, their levels of production, or at least to restore them to pre-location
levels. OP 4.12 encourages the community participation in planning and the conduct of the
resettlement and the provision of assistance to affected people, regardless of the legal status of the
land tenure. This policy not only covers the physical resettlement, but also all loss of land or other
goods causing (i) resettlement or loss of shelter; (ii) loss of assets or access to goods; and (iii) loss
of sources of incomes or means of livelihood. The policy also applies to the involuntary restriction
from access to designated parks and to protected areas, caused by the destructive impacts on the
means of livelihood of the displaced people. The requirements for disclosure are those that are
required under OP 4.01. The project activities could entail loss of means of livelihood for some
groups and individuals, thus triggering this policy. To take in account these social requirements, a
Resettlement Action Plan need to be prepared to take into account these types of losses.
     Liberia :
         The construction of the jetty in Mesurado is not going to require acquisition of land
         (displacement) or loss of socio-economic activities. The designated site belongs to the
         harbor area which has placed it at the disposal of the jetty project. Also, preparation of a
         Resettlement Action Plan will not be necessary for the project.

       Sierra Leone :
        Construction of the Kissy jetty on the river will require acquisition of land (displacement of
        the irregular occupations situated on the flanks of the site), and also losses of socio-
        economic activities, precisely disruption of otherwise cessation of exploitation, landing and
        sale of sea sand on the very site. Indeed, this activity will be incompatible with
        implementation of construction activities and use of the jetty. During the works, it would
        be necessary to displace the sand winners. The construction will require space for
        the movement of heavy duty equipment. Also, the project should prepare a
        Resettlement Action Plan to take into account these social impacts.

 Indigenous Populations OP 4.10
Indigenous populations, in the opinion of the Bank, do exist in Guinea Bissau. Consequently the
activities foreseen within the framework of the WARF will not trigger this Policy.

Forestry OP 4.36
PO 4.36, Forestry supports sustainable sylviculture and oriented to forest conservation. It does not
support commercial exploitation in primary humid tropical forests. Its global objective is to reduce
deforestation, reinforce the contribution of forested zones to the environment, promote
reforestation. The World Bank: do not finance the operations of commercial exploitation or the
purchase of equipment destined for the exploitation of the humid primary tropical forests. The
activities foreseen in the implementation of the WARF will not trigger this Policy because
lumbering (or forest exploitation) is not foreseen in the project.


 Dams Safety OP 4.37
This policy distinguishes between big dams and small dams. The policy recommends, the conduct
of periodic technical survey and safety inspections by independent experts specialized in the
                                                   14
security of dams for big dams. The Project is not concerned with the construction of or the
management of these big dams because it will not finance these types of works.

Cultural Heritage OP 4.11
PO 4.11, Cultural Heritage conducts investigations on cultural resources affected and their
inventory. It establishes mitigation measures where there exist some possible negative impacts
material cultural resources. The communities possess some very rich cultural heritage. However, in
the framework of the WARF, no infrastructure works are foreseen that could impact on this
national cultural heritage. In this regard, the WARF is not going to trigger this Policy.

Projects on international water ways OP 7.50
The policy ensures that coastal agreements exist and guarantee that the coastal states are informed
and that they have no objection to the interventions of the project. All investment projects are
covered. There are some international rivers that traverse Guinea Bissau, but the Project does not
envisage any specific activities on these water bodies. Thus, sub - project envisaged within the
framework of the Project will not trigger this policy.

Projects in Conflict Areas OP 7.60
OP 7.60, Projects in contested zones aims to guarantee that people claiming their right in contested
zones have no objection to the proposed project. The WARF Project does not have any activities in
zones in litigation. Consequently, the sub - project activities foreseen in the framework of the
Project are not going to trigger this policy.

     4.2 Conclusion

Construction of the two jetties of Mesurado (Liberia) and Kissy (Sierra Leone) triggers the
following environmental and social policies of the Bank: OP 4.01: Environmental Assessment (the
two countries); and OP 4.12, Involuntary Resettlement (Sierra Leone). The activities that fall in the
area of the policies indicated must be considered in the framework of the project. The remaining
operational policies are not triggered by the Project.

Furthermore, it is recommended that the WARF Project should not grant priority to financing of
activities whose environmental and social aspects could be very difficult to manage, considering
the available limited capacities of the national and local actors of the fisheries sector on
environmental and social management matters.




                                                 15
    5. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL IMPACTS OF PROJECTS

     5.1 Negative environmental and social impacts of the jetties

The operation of the jetties will cover all fishing activities, including landing and handling of
fisheries products, temporary storage, processing, transportation, including products and other type
of solid, liquid or gaseous merchandise. The environmental concerns include the disposal of solid
and liquid wastes, insecurity and lack of protection of the staff and lack of monitoring of
environmental activities.

    5.1.1   Negative Impacts during jetty construction works

During the jetties construction, works will cause hindrances and nuisances and temporary
disruptions of local activities on the sites, as well as on the coastal zone and water body. The
environmental and social considerations include the risks of pollution of the water body by the
garbage from the yard, the risks of accidents during the construction and the potential disruptions
of existing activities (sand exploitation in Sierra Leone).

Pollution of the sites and the water body by wastes
Overall, it is the civil engineering works that would generate solid and liquid wastes from the work
site: earth and rubbles from site preparation, excavations, foundations, drained oils from engines;
etc.). Relatively large quantities of wastes will be generated in the preparatory phase, following
cleaning of the sites before setting up the works sites. These pollutions resulting from the
construction/rehabilitation activities are big threats to the harbor and fisheries waters (dumping of
materials) as well as on hygiene and health of the surroundings. It is the same way with
manipulation of fine materials (cement and sands) which could alter the water body. The materials
normally used for the construction of infrastructure (concrete, embankment stones) have no
negative effects on the environment; on the other hand, the walls of the steel plates undergo serious
corrosion in hot regions, due to salt water and particularly brackish water. They could not therefore
be used except in combination with anticorrosion products, it important to limit the choice of these
products to non toxic painting so as to avoid contaminations.

Impact of sea sand mining
It is important to avoid abusive sea sand mining along the beaches for construction of
infrastructures. This activity can contribute to the exacerbation of the process of coastal erosion,
which would cause other ominous effects on the environment.

Lack of protection for works site personnel
On the construction sites, poor protection of staff could cause discomfort and nuisances by noise,
dust and gases, particularly accidents at work. Furthermore, poor displaying of works could also
cause some accidents (collusion of engines with other users). The utilization and movement of
machinery cause noise, smoke and dusts which will upset site workers and other users of the
fisheries.

Disruption of local socio-economic activities
     Mesurado Jetty (Liberia) :
        Construction of the jetty will not lead to social losses because no socio-economic activities
        are conducted on the site.

       Kissy Jetty (Sierra Leone) :
        On the social level, construction of the jetty could require taking the space legally or
        illegally occupied for exploitation and sale of sand, slum dwellings, etc.). The works will
        cause loss of income for sand sellers whose activity will be disrupted or stopped during the



                                                 16
                    works and even during use of the jetty. Thus it will be necessary to develop a Resettlement
                    Action Plan (RAP) to take these socio-economic impacts into account.

             Occupation of public or private land: non authorized storage of materials and/or works tools on
             public or private lands could generate some conflicts with the owners.

             Generally, initial review of the potential impacts of the infrastructure and equipment on the
             environment would enable identification of the following problems:

             Global impacts linked to the civil engineering works

Activities           Sources                      Negative Impacts                        Mesurado       Kissy
                                                                                          (Liberia)      (Sierra Leone)
Liberation of the    Clearing of the works site      Resettlement                        Not            Applicable
site and                                             Disruption of practices and customs applicable
implantation of                                      Disruption of the activities of the
the works                                             riverside populations
Installation and     Spilling of used oils           Water and soil pollution            Applicable     Applicable
putting the          Disposal of solid wastes        Water and soil pollution            Applicable     Applicable
facilities into
                     Demolition of community         Disruption of practices and customs Not            Applicable
service
                     social infrastructures          Conflicts between foreign and local applicable
                                                      staff
                     Poor staff protection           Disturbance/nuisances by noise,     Applicable     Applicable
                                                      dust and gases
                                                     Accident at work
                     Poor demarcation of the         Collusion of machinery/engines      Applicable     Applicable
                     works site                       with the other users
                     Closing of the works site       Social conflicts with the           Applicable     Applicable
                     yard                             populations (restoration of the
                                                      places; transfer of the facilities,
                                                      etc.)
Works and       Noise emission by the                Noise and atmospheric pollution     Applicable     Applicable
movement of the engines                              Disruption of peace of the
machinery       Dust and Smoke emission               populations
                by the machinery                     Soil erosion
                                                      Risks of accidents




                                                            17
    5.1.2   Negative Impacts during utilization of the jetties

Several activities concerning the daily operations on the jetties could be sources of negative
impacts: management of the infrastructure and services; storage and handling of products,
petroleum or others,; repair and maintenance of the ships and the artisanal canoes; evacuation of
sewages; disposal of solid wastes; public access; fisheries management; etc.

Disposal of Petroleum products - Refueling Zones
In the landing zones, liquid petroleum, chemical or other liquids could contaminate the marine
waters. They could also cause fires and explosions. Leaking petrol, oil derivatives, liquid chemicals
or other liquids could be produced. With these pollutions, the possible secondary effects of
deterioration of the aquatic fauna could be the sanitary risks linked to the consumption of fish.

Disorganized disposal of liquid wastes emanating from the canoes and boats
The boats generate huge quantities of liquid wastes (disposal of waste waters coming from cleaning
of the cisterns and loading holds, as well as maintenance and the draining of the engines).
Generally, there are no particular collection and storage device for these wastes which are often
discarded into the sea.

A large proportion of pollution of the waters of the harbor can also be the result of direct disposal
of domestic used waters also coming from the sanitary facilities installed in the boats. Water
pollution constitutes a risk for swimmers and the consumption of sea products (particularly
mollusks), with major risks of infections and poisoning.

Discard of solid wastes
The fisheries produce qualitatively and quantitatively very variable wastes according to the
different activities that are conducted there: wastes emanating from the maintenance and repair
activities, domestic wastes, commercial packaging, fermented stuff, special solid wastes. Generally,
the fisheries do not have a system for management of these wastes in terms of collection, storage
and disposal in accordance with the national legislations in force.

Insecurity and disruption of socio-economic activities
     Mesurado Jetty (Liberia) :
       Use of the jetty will not lead to insecurity of people and construction materials. There will
       also not be any negative social impact because no socio-economic activity takes place at
       the site. That is, there are no human settlements.

       Kissy Jetty (Sierra Leone) :
        On a social level, use of the jetty could encounter difficulty as a result of the people who
        live in temporary structures on the borders of the site, especially due to problems of
        security. Indeed, while there, these irregular occupants could very easily access the
        facilities of the jetty, and it will be very difficult to ensure its protection and surveillance.




                                                  18
          Potential impacts of usage activities of the jetties

N°                 Utilization Activities                     Negative Impacts            Liberia     Sierra Leone
                                                                                        (Mesurado)       (Kissy)

 1 Maintenance of the internal traffic paths
                                                        Pollutions of the waters by Applicable       Applicable
                                                        wastes
   Cleaning/Laundry Waters                              Disruption of fishing       Applicable       Applicable
   Solid residues of clearing, etc.                     activities
 2 Storage and maintenance of petroleum products
                                                        Pollutions of waters by     Applicable       Applicable
   Loading; Storage; Discharge                          wastes
   Refueling of ships                                   Risks of accidents and fire Applicable       Applicable
 3 Handling of cargos (other products)
                                                        Pollutions of waters by        Applicable    Applicable
   Solid and liquid freights; various cargos;           wastes
   containers; storage and handling of chemicals        Risk of accidents              Applicable    Applicable
 4 Maintenance and repair of canoes and vessels
                                                        Pollution of waters by         Applicable    Applicable
                                                        wastes and residues
                                                        (paint)
                                                        Sanitary nuisances             Applicable    Applicable
   Maintenance, preparation of the ships,               (asbestos, etc.)
   Cleaning of the ships                                Obstacles to navigation        Applicable    Applicable
   Abandonment of land and maritime wreckages           Risks of accident              Applicable    Applicable
 5 Removal of remains of shipwrecks
                                                        Pollution of waters            Applicable    Applicable
                                                        residues
                                                        Disruption of port             Applicable    Applicable
                                                        activities
   Presence of ship wrecks                              Risks of accident              Applicable    Applicable
 6 Wastes from the boats
                                                        Pollution of the water     Applicable        Applicable
                                                        body
                                                        Contamination of fisheries Applicable        Applicable
   Ballast Water; Cleaning of tanks                     ressources
   Tank Waters; Sewer Waters                            Obstacles to navigation    Applicable        Applicable
 7 Disposal of solid wastes
     Wastes emanating from the boats or generated by    Pollutions of water body       Applicable    Applicable
     harbor activities or carried to the berges/quays   Silting up of the waters       Applicable    Applicable

 8 Unsafety and disruption of activities
                                                        Risks of accident, theft       Applicable    Applicable
                                                        and vandalism with the
     Existence of the temporary dwellings and other     easy access to facilities of
     economic activities (exploitation sands)           the jetty




                                                         19
    5.1.3   Synthesis of analysis of the impacts of construction and utilization of the jetties

On an environmental level, construction of the jetties may have major negative effects on the water
body in the two jetties. Works will be done near the water plan, which could contribute to the
silting up of the estuary, as well as destruction of the aquatic micro-fauna. Works will generate
wastes and other pollutions of the water body, the sanitary nuisances and the insecurity problems
also. These negative effects will be avoided or greatly mitigated by the setting up of simple
measures for environmental management hygiene and security of works site. It is all about
essentially engineering measures that will be taken into account in the civil engineering works of
the construction.

At the social level, construction of the Kissy Jetty (Sierra Leone) will require taking over of the site
legally or illegally occupied by squatters and sea sand mining operators. The construction of the
jetty will need to move the temporary dwellings; in the other hand, there is still possibility that
activities of mining and sale of sea sand will be seriously disrupted or stopped during the works
and even during utilization of the pier. Furthermore, concerning safety matters, it will be difficult
for the activities of the jetty to go along with the presence of these populations on the site, because
they could very easily access the facilities and it will be very difficult to monitor them. Also, for
the Kissy site, it is recommended that a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) be developed in
conformity with the national procedures and those of the World Bank, particularly with regard to
the cessation of the mining and sale of the sea sand. For the Mesurado site in Liberia, no social
measure is required as there are no settlements in close proximity to the site.

During the utilization phase, the negative effects linked to the activities of the jetties will be
relatively significant as they relate to the sanitary and environmental risks linked to the pollution of
the water body, environmental hygiene, safety, management of petroleum products, management of
solid and liquid wastes emanating from the canoes and boats, but especially of the activities to soil,
etc. But these effects will be strongly mitigated by the environmental and social management
measures that will be recommended at the end of the complete environmental impact studies. In
addition, environmental monitoring and support involving all concerned actors will be organized to
ensure implementation of the mitigation measures. Also guides, procedures and good
environmental practices will be developed for the operation phase.




                                                  20
      6. ENVIRONMENTAL AND SOCIAL MANAGEMENT PLAN (ESMP)

The current Environmental and Social Management Plan (ESMP) consists of the following
components:
    environmental and social management before the works;
    environmental and social management during the works;
    environmental and social management during operation of the jetties;
    check-list of simple mitigation measures to avoid or reduce the potential negative impacts
       during implementation of the project;
    environmental and social clauses to integrate during the works;
    capacity building;
    monitoring and implementation mitigation measures;
    Related costs estimation as well as the chronology.

The ESMP will be included in the Operations Manual of the project.

6.1      Pre-Construction Environmental and Social Management.

      6.1.1   Development of a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) for the Kissy site

A RAP will be developed to take into account these socio-economic impacts at the Kissy site
(Sierra Leone). A draft ToR has been provided in Annex 1of this report.

       6.2 Construction Phase Environmental and Social Management

      6.2.1   General environmental measures for mitigation of negative impacts

General Mitigation Measures:
    Communication and sensitization Campaigns before and during works
    Respect for hygiene measures at the works facilities
    Works Sign board and respect for the safety rules during the works
    Collection and disposal of wastes emanating from the works
    Sensitization Campaigns (hygiene, works safety etc.)
    Close involvement of the local collectivities in the monitoring of implementation of works
    Compensation in case of destruction of goods or loss of activities due to the project

Safety at Construction Site:
     Safety works dresses (Dress, helmets, boots, masks, gloves, glasses, etc.)
     Strict respect o protective port equipment
     Putting in place of a First Aid Box
     Regular medical monitoring of the staff and fisheries operators




                                                21
             6.2.2   Summary of general environmental measures and by type of activity

Activities      Sources          Negative Impacts                Mitigation Measures                Mesurado          Kissy
                                                                                                    (Liberia)    (Sierra Leone)

Liberation of   Mechanical          Losses of activities and       Preparation of a               Non          Applicable
the site        Works for            incomes sources                 Resettlement Action Plan       Applicable   (A)
                preparation of                                      Indemnisation/compensation     (NA)
                the land            Disruption of customs abd      Information and                A            A
                                     practices                       sensitization
                                    Disruption of riverside        Social accompaniment
                                     activities
                                    Disorderly disposal of         Disposal of solid wastes and   A            A
                                     solid wastes and rubbles        rubbles on authorized sites
Setting up of Dumping of            Contamination of waters        Collection and recycling of    A            A
the works site solid wastes          and soils                       used oils
               and drained                                          Collection and disposal of
               engine oils                                           solid wastes
                                                                    Suitable sanitary facilities
                Poor protection     Disturbances/nuisances by      Hygiene Safety Officer         A            A
                of the staff         the noise, dust and gases      Protection equipment
                                    Accident at work               First Aid Kit
                                                                    Sensitization of the staff
                Presence of         Spread of STD/AIDS             Sensitization (personnel /     A            A
                many laborers                                        population)
                                                                    Distribution of condoms
                                                                     (work site)
       A : Applicable
       NA : Not applicable




                                                            22
     6.3 Operation Phase Environmental and Social Management

The following measures should be implemented by the pier management unit. Monitoring should
be conducted by EPA (Liberia) and SLEPA (Sierra Leone).

Mitigation Measures against unhygienic conditions and safety of the sites:
     Prohibition to empty wastes from toilets and laundry into coastal waters
     System for collection and treatment of all untreated wastes
     Limitation of discards to the maximum (to allow discharge treated used waters only)
     Installation of sufficient sanitary blocks and regular maintenance (cleaning, draining, etc.)
        Setting up of a collection and disposal system for solid wastes
     Putting up Street light on the sites
     Protection of staff and users
     Prohibition of disorganized occupation of the site
     Protection of facilities (permanent control and surveillance of access)
     Fire Fighting Systems
     Surveillance and rescue equipment (patrol boats, etc.)

Management Measures for petroleum and oils:
   Waterproofing for transshipment, loading and storage areas
   Construction of loading, discharge and storage infrastructures
   Cleaning of the infrastructures and facilities of the users
   Security devices and auxiliary materials (recuperation equipment; absorbent agents; sand
      reserves; fire fighting systems; sprinkler systems; foam generators; standby generators;
      special water pumps)
   Insulated storage and retention containers
   Materials for fighting against spills (absorbents, shovels, pumps, containers, gloves)
   Communication Materials (radio transmitters, walkie-talkie, cell phone)
   Safety Materials (signals, etc.)
   Recovery, treatment or recycling of all petroleum residues, used oils.
  Management of used waters and solid wastes:
   Cover and waterproofing of storage areas
   Evacuation of excess materials
   Waste containers (dustbins)
   Recuperation and evacuation of drainage wastes
   Constructions of sanitary infrastructures (toilets, latrines, etc.)
   Organization of engine washing and maintenance areas
   Acquisition of barrels for storage of drained oils

Measures for materials and goods storage area
    Stabilization of the storage areas
    Setting up of a drainage system in these areas and the surrounding areas
    Covering of the storage warehouses for bulk materials

Protection of the staff using and managing the jetties
    Safety working gears (dresses, helmets, boots, masks, gloves, glasses, etc.)
    Strict respect of port's protective facilities
    Putting in place a First Aid Box
    Regular medical monitoring of staff and fisheries operators


Management of the sanitary facilities and drinking water:

                                                23
   Decontamination of the reservoir waters and regular clearing-out the bottoms
   Maintenance and regular draining of the toilets and septic tanks




                                           24
     6.4 Environmental and social clauses to insert in the tender documents

The current terms are destined to help people responsible for preparing the tender documents and
the contracts for the execution of the works (detailed engineering designs), so that they could
integrate in these documents prescriptions to optimize the protection of the environment and the
socioeconomic conditions.

    6.4.1   General Measures

Respect for the national laws and regulations
The Contractor and subcontractors must: know, respect and apply the laws and regulations in force
in the country relating to the environment, to the disposal of solid and liquid wastes and noise
standards, to the working hours, etc.; to take all appropriate measures in order to minimize the
impacts on the environment; to assume the responsibility for all complaints linked to failure to
respect the environment.

Permits and authorizations before works
All implementation of works must be subjected to initial procedure of information and
administrative authorizations. Before beginning works, the Contractor must obtain all the necessary
permits for the implementation of planned works. Before the start of works, the Contractor must
confer with the residents with whom he can make arrangements for facilitating the progress of the
works.

Meeting of works take off
Before the starting of works, the Contractor and the consultant, under the supervision of the
National Coordinating Unit, should organize meetings with the authorities, representatives of the
populations situated in the zone of the project to inform them of the works to be implemented and
their duration, of the calendar of works and the sites likely to be affected.

Preparation and Takeover of the site The takeover of the site must be according to a defined
calendar in agreement with the affected populations and the consultant. Before the installation and
the beginning of works, the Contractor must ensure that compensations are paid to the rightful
owner by the consultant.

Environmental and Social Management Programme
The Contractor must establish and submit, for the approval of the consultant, a detailed program of
environmental and social management of the works that comprises a plan of occupation of the land
by the facilities; a wastes management plan for the works; the program of information and
sensitization of the population; a plan for management of safety and accidents.

Display of the -internal regulations and sensitization of the staff
The Contractor must display internal regulation in a visible way in the various facilities of
prescribing specifically: respect for the local customs; protection against the STD/HIV/AIDS; and
the hygiene rules and safety measures. The Contractor must sensitize his staff particularly on the
respect for the customs of the populations of the region where the work is done and on the risks of
STD and HIV/AIDS.

Use of local labour
The Contractor is required to hire (outside of its technical staff) more labor in the zone where
works are being done. Where qualified staff is lacking in the surrounding area it is allowed to hire
the labor outside of the work zone.

Respect for work schedules
The Contractor must ensure that the work schedules respect the laws and national regulations in
force. All derogation is submitted, as far as possible, for the approval of the consultant, (except in

                                                 25
case of exception granted by the consultant), the Contractor must avoid executing works during the
hours of rest, Sundays and public holidays.

Protection and Safety of Construction work staff
The Contractor must place at the disposal of the staff protective clothing that are in a good state, as
well as all protective accessories and security appropriate for their activities (helmets, boots, belts,
masks, gloves, glasses, etc.). The Contractor must keep strict watch on the wearing of the
protective facilities in the works areas. A permanent control must be done to this effect and, in case
of default corrective measures (warning, penalization, and dismissal) must be applied to the
concerned staff.

Responsibility for Hygiene, Security and the Environment
The Contractor must designate a person responsible for Hygiene/Safety/Environment who will
ensure that the hygiene, safety and protection rules of the environment are followed rigorously by
all and at all levels of execution, for the workers as well as for the population and other people in
contact with the works area. He must put in place a medical and life saving service. The Contractor
must prohibit access of the works area to the public, and protect the area with fencing and road
signs to indicate the different entrances and to take all measures for order and security to prevent
accidents.

Measures against hindrances to traffic
The Contractor must avoid obstructing public access. He must permanently maintain the flow of
traffic and access for the residents during the construction . The Contractor will ensure that no
excavation or trench remains open when not in immediate use, without adequate sign boards
accepted by the consultant; and ensure that the temporary deviations allows movement without any
danger.

Care for the works area and re-organization
At handing over of the site, the Contractor should ensure it is clean for immediate use. He cannot
be relieved of his commitments and responsibility concerning their use without the good state of
the site having been confirmed. The Contractor will take care of necessary arrangements to restore
the site to a good condition. He is held responsible for the removal of all equipment and materials
and properly dispose off what may be considered as waste. The contractor cannot abandon them
on the site or in the vicinity. Once the works are completed, the Contractor must (i) withdraw the
materials, solid and liquid wastes, excess materials, fences etc. (ii) rectify the defects of the
drainage system and fill all the excavated zones; (iii) afforest the zones initially deforested with
suitable species, in collaboration with the local forestry services,; (iv) protect the remaining
dangerous works (wells, open trenches, protrusions, etc.); (vi) make the pavements, sidewalks,
gutters, rails and other works returned to the public; (vi) decontaminate the polluted soils (the
contaminated parts must be cleaned and covered with sand); (vii) clean and destroy the drainage
pits. After the withdrawal of all materials, minutes reporting restoration of the site must be written
and included in the minutes of receipt of works.

Protection of unstable zones
During the dismantling of the works in unsteady places, the Contractor must take the following
precautions not to accentuate the unsteadiness of the ground: (i) avoid any heavy circulation and
any overload in the area of unsteadiness; (ii) preserve as much as possible the plant cover or
reconstitute this latter by using local species adapted in case of risks of erosion.

Notification of reports
The consultant notifies the contractor in writing of all cases of defect or non execution of the
environmental and social measures. The Contractor must correct all defects in accordance with the
instructions duly notified to him by the consultant. The resumption of works or extra works
resulting from non respect of contract provisions are at the cost of the Contractor.


                                                  26
Sign boards for the works site
The Contractor should place, before the start of the works and every time the need arises, sign
boards a long distance from the site (exits, routes used by the engines, etc.) in accordance with the
laws and regulations in force.

Protection of the wet lands, fauna and flora
It is prohibited for the Contractor to put up temporary amenities (storage and parking areas, paths
for bypassing or work, etc.) in wet lands

Protection of sacred sites and archaeological sites
The Contractor must take all necessary measures to respect cult and cultural sites (cemeteries,
sacred sites, etc.) in the neighborhood of works and must not damage them. If during the works,
vestiges of worship, historic or archaeological interest are discovered, the Contractor must follow
the following procedure: (i) stop works in the concerned zone; (ii) inform immediately the
consultant who must make arrangements to protect the site to avoid any damage; a protective
perimeter must be identified and constructed around the site and no activity should be undertaken
in it; (iii) prohibit removal and displacement of the objects and vestiges. Works must be suspended
until the national body responsible for historical and archaeological sites grants authorization for
continuation of works.

Management of solid wastes : The Contractor must deposit domestic wastes in insulated trash cans
that should be emptied periodically. The Contractor must eliminate or recycle wastes in an
ecological and rational way, or send them, if possible, to existing dump sites.

Protection against noise pollution
The Contractor is required to limit the noises in the work area that could seriously be a nuisance to
the residents, either over a long time, or by their long duration outside of the normal hours of work.
The levels not to be exceeded are: 55 to 60 decibels during the day; 40 decibels at night.

Protection against STD/HIV/AIDS and illnesses linked to the works
The Contractor must inform and sensitize his staff on the risks linked to STD/HIV/AIDS. He must
provide staff with condoms against STD/HIV-AIDS. The Contractor must inform and sensitize his
staff on safety and hygiene at work. He must provide first aid facilities and provide basic medicine
to the work staff free of charge.

Pedestrian footbridges and river access
The Contractor must constantly ensure access to the coastal properties and must ensure the easy
entry by carts and pedestrians, stall for exhibition of goods, footbridges provided with guardrail,
placed the trenches or other obstacles created by works.

Public services and assistance: The Contractor must imperatively provide access to public and
emergency services in all places. When a street is blocked, the Contractor must study with the
consultant arrangements for the maintenance of the access for vehicles from the fire and ambulance
services.

Journal of building site: The Contractor must update a journal of the building site, in which will
be consigned the complaints, failures or incidents with a significant impact on the environment or
with an incident with the population. The Contractor must inform the public in general and the
bordering populations in particular, of the existence of this journal, with the indication of the place
where it can be consulted.

Sanction: In application of the contractual arrangements, the lack of respect of the environmental
and social clauses, duly observed by the consultant, could be a justification for termination of the
contract.


                                                  27
    6.4.2   Specific measures for the jetty works

Planning of the structures
In order to reduce the disruptions of the ecosystem, the embankments and the shelters at boats
should be arranged as far as possible:
     without mechanical excavation of the coastline;
     without embankment on the coastline and the bank of the stream;
     without installation of batardeaux.
    
Methods of work
The methods of work used should respect the following criteria notably:
     the machinery will be clean and in good condition, in order to insure that there will not be
        any trace or oil or gas leakage;
     Preferably oils that are not harmful to the environment will be used for the machinery that
        will be used in the water (ex.: biodegradable products);
     the company will have in its possession at all times a kit for recovery of oil products;
     if the banks of the river are disrupted by the works, the claimant will ascertain their
        immediate stabilization to prevent the extortion and transportation of sediments toward the
        water body;
     If it is necessary to install a borehole or if the suspension of sediments is unavoidable
        during the works, the works zone should have previously been isolated by a membrane to
        prevent the scattering of the residues and fine sediments from the drilling.
    
Implementation Calendar
The planning of the quays and boats shelters will be done while avoiding the critical periods for
existing fauna, that is,:
        fish fauna: reproduction period, juvenile period;
        bird (avian) fauna: migration and nest building period;
        Reptile fauna: period of reproduction.

Maintenance and repair
All care and effort must be taken to prevent loss or dropping of contaminating substances in the
water. Maintenance and repair of structures will be undertaken preferably in middle of the Earth.

     6.5 Procedure to follow in case of discovery of archaeological vestiges

If the monuments, ruins, vestiges of dwellings or old burial sites, writings or generally objects of
pre-historic, historical interest, art or archeology, are discovered during the works, the company
should make an immediate declaration to the competent administrative authority for the necessary
procedures to follow. Discovery of movable or immoveable object must be kept and immediately
reported to the administrative authority. The company should take reasonable precautions to
prevent its workers or any other person, from removing or damaging these objects or these things;
he must also inform the consultant about this discovery and carry out any instructions on how to
dispose of the objects. On the basis of information received at the end of this procedure, it will be
determined (i) if it will be necessary to include other specific actions before the company's
intervention, notably an assessment of the cultural resources through consultations with the
concerned authorities and the local inhabitants in order to identify either the known sites or
eventual sites that will be excluded and therefore not to be affected; (ii) if it will be necessary to
prepare a Cultural Resources Protection Plan in case works have to be done on the affected sites.

     6.6 Capacity building measures for environmental and social management

For project implementation and environmental monitoring, the proposed approach to manage
environmental risks aims to allow the local responsible persons to play their roles fully in the

                                                 28
planning, implementation and the management of the fisheries infrastructure. In order to achieve
this goal, the EES proposes capacity building, information and sensitization measures.
Implementation of the ESA will require institutional and technical measures, namely:
environmental assistance to the National Coordination Units of the Project; monitoring and
evaluation of implementation of the ESA and supply to the environment protection Agencies in the
twocountries.

    6.6.1   Institutional capacity building measures

National institutional strengthening measures
For the National Coordination Units (NCU) of the WARF, strengthening of the environmental and
social management will be conducted at two levels:
     Recruitment of an Environmental Expert (Consultant) to support the National Coordination
        Units;

       Reinforcing environmental and social appraisal within the national fisheries management
        institutions (National Bureau of Fisheries in Liberia and Directorate of Fisheries in Sierra
        Leone). This strengthening will permit, in time, to have an environmental service that will
        monitor the operation and environmental and social management of the fisheries
        infrastructure, as well as fishing activities in general.

       Reinforcing the capacities of the environment protection Agencies in the two countries
        (assisting in obtaining a legal advisor; developing guidelines and standards; etc.)

Role of the Environmental Expert
The Environmental Experts who will be recruited to support the National Coordination Units are
responsible for: (i) Implementing the ESMP; (ii) monitoring environmental and social activities of
the WARF and implementing the necessary corrective measures. These experts will receive support
and assistance from the national environmental services to undertake the following activities:
     To select the environmental and social activities to be conducted by the project;
     Preparation of the draft TOR for the activities of the WARF requiring separate
        Environmental and Social impact Assessments (ESIAs);
     Recruitment of qualified consultants to conduct the ESISESIS, if necessary,;
     Approval of ESIA reports in collaboration with the national environmental services;
     Dissemination of the ESIA reports to the appropriate institutions and to the concerned
        public;
     Conduct- of environmental and social monitoring of the activities of the WARF;
     Support development and application of environmental and social directives (types of
        clauses and code of good practices);
     Organization and conduct of information and training activities on the ESMP;
     Support the setting up of a "fisheries and environment" data base.

    6.6.2   Institutional measures at the jetties

Institutional measures at the Free Ports of Freetown and Monrovia
Environmental and social management of the jetties during their utilization will be the
responsibility of the FreePort of Freetown (Kissy) and Monrovia (Mesurado). Also, it will be about
reinforcing their capacities through the following measures:
     To establish an Environmental and Social Unit at the Ports of Freetown and Monrovia to
         ensure environmental and social management of the jetties at Kissy and Mesurado;
     To designate a person responsible for Hygiene, Safety and Environment for the Kissy and
         Mesurado jetties.



                                                    29
    6.6.3   Technical capacity building, training and sensitization measures

The technical measures are: (i) provision for the conduct of full ESIAs for the two jetties (Kissy
and Mesurado); (ii) provision for the elaboration of a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) for the jetty
of Kissy (Sierra Leone) (iii) the establishment of Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between
the NCU and national institutions in charge of the environment (SLEPA in Sierra Leone and EPA
in Liberia) for the training, sensitization and upgrading the project staff (National Coordination,
FPES/Fisheries, etc.); (iv) the development of manuals of good environmental practices for
execution of the activities in a sustainable way: (v) monitoring and evaluation of the activities of
the WARF.

       Provision for the development of a Resettlement Action Plan (RAP) : A RAP including
        compensation measures, would be required for the jetty of Kissy (Sierra Leone).

       Provision for assistance to the National Coordination Units
        Within the framework of construction and utilization of the jetties, it is proposed to provide
        Technical support to the national institutions in charge of environmental matters (SLEPA
        in Sierra Leone and EPA in Liberia) through an MOU, on training, development of
        sensitization and the environmental monitoring tools.

       Development of a manual of good practices for the management of the jetties and of
        execution of activities in a sustainable manner: This technical document will allow the
        application of the best existing practices in order to ensure better management and
        monitoring of fishing activities, as well as development of Hygiene, Safety and
        Environment Regulation;

       Monitoring and Evaluation of activities at the jetties
        The monitoring program will consist of permanent monitoring, supervision, final
        evaluation. The internal monitoring will be done by the Environmental Experts who will be
        recruited, with the support of the PFES at the Directorate of Fisheries. It is necessary to
        envisage a budget for this monitoring. The external monitoring should be conducted by the
        national institutions in charge of the environmental matters (SLEPA in Sierra Leone and
        EPA in Liberia) within the framework of their assistance to the NCU. There will also be
        coordination with the other concerned services such as health.

       Training and sensitization of the actors involved in the management of the jetties
        To ensure that the activities are conducted in a sustainable manner from the environmental
        and social view, an environmental and social capacity building, hygiene and safety at the
        jetties is proposed. In a bid to ensure ownership and the consolidation of the achievements
        of the project by the communities, as well as to accompany the preparation and of the work
        process, the NCU, should conduct information and sensitization campaigns to inform the
        beneficiary local stakeholders , fisheries organizations, on the environmental and social
        stakes linked to the activity of the sector. A national sensitization and awareness creation
        workshop will be organized in each country and should bring together all actors having to
        intervene or operate on the jetties.




                                                 30
     6.7 Monitoring – Evaluation Programme of the ESA

    6.7.1   Monitoring-Evaluation

The monitoring and evaluation are complementary. The monitoring aims to correct in real time,
through a continuous surveillance, the execution methods of interventions and utilization of the
infrastructure. The evaluation, aims at (i) verifying whether the objectives have been achieved and
(ii) learn lessons to modify the future intervention strategies. The monitoring will essentially be
about construction of infrastructures, but also on the operations and the environmental and social
management of the fisheries and landing sites.

    6.7.2   Monitoring Indicators of the Regional Coordination of the WARF

The indicators to be monitored by the Monitoring - Evaluation Expert of the WARF are as follows:
    Recruitment of Environmental Experts to ensure monitoring of works;
    Appointment of the FPES/Fisheries in the Directorate of Fisheries;
    Effectiveness of the environmental monitoring and reporting;
    Implementation of training and sensitization programs

    6.7.3   Indicators to be monitored by the National Coordination Units

During the jetties construction works
The indicators to be monitored by the Environmental Expert of the National unit of Coordination
are:
      Level of sensitivity of the sites before the works
      Numbers of actors trained/sensitized in environmental and social management
      Number of environmental and social monitoring missions conducted
      Number of reports on the environmental and social follow-up prepared
      Existence of systems for elimination of wastes emanating from of the works site
      Number and nature of social conflicts linked to the works;
      Number of accidents caused by the works;
      Level of application of good practices at the jetties;
      Level of conformity of the material and equipment on the jetties;
      Presence of cultural vestiges on the works sites;
      Quality and functionality of the infrastructures;
      Number of people affected by works;
      Level of compensation for people affected by the project.

During the construction works phase, monitoring will be on matters of hygiene: functionality of the
latrines, availability of drinking water points, environmental hygiene; management of the solid and
liquid wastes, safety of the facilities and people, etc.

    6.7.4   Institutions Responsible for monitoring of application of the mitigation measures

Works Phase, Internal monitoring will be done by the Environmental Experts who will be
recruited, with the support of the ESFP at the Directorate of Fisheries. It is necessary to envisage a
budget for monitoring. In the utilization phase, the internal monitoring will be conducted by the
Free Ports of Monrovia and Freetown that will establish environmental cells/committees facilitated
by Environmental Experts.




                                                 31
                6.7.5   The external monitoring should be assured by the national institutions in charge of the
                        environmental matters (SLEPA in Sierra Leone and EPA in Liberia) within the
                        framework of their assistance to the National Coordination Units of the WARF.

                6.7.6   6.7.6 Monitoring Indicators at the national level

            At the national level, these indicators and technical elements are proposed for monitoring by the
            ESFP/fisheries and EPA and SLEPA , and also the local collectivities and the fishers organizations.

            Table 1 :        Environmental and social monitoring indicators

Monitoring
               Types of indicators       Elements to be collected                   Periodicity      Responsibility
Elements
               State of                      Physico-chemical and                                      SLEPA in Sierra Leon and
Water          pollution/contaminatio         bacteriological parameters of the                          EPA in Liberia
                                                                                    Once a year
               n of marine water              water body (pH, BOD, DCO                                  Experts environment
               bodies                         heavy metals, bacteria, nitrates                          ESFPS (Ports authorities’)
                                                                                                        SLEPA in Sierra Leone and
                                                                                                         EPA in Liberia
Soils          State of pollution of the     Types and quantity of the discards Once a
                                                                                                        Experts environment
               sites                          (solid and liquid)                 quarter
                                                                                                        ESFP (Ports authorities)
                                                                                                        Local Collectivities
Vegetation/
               Evolution of the Fauna                                                                   SLEPA in Sierra Léone and
marine and                                   Marine biomass production
               and the state of the flora                                                                EPA in Libéria
coastal                                      Level of changes of the marin         Once a year
               of the marine and                                                                        Experts environment
fauna                                         habitats
               coastal biodiversity                                                                     ESFP (Ports authorities)
                                             Respects of the fisheries laws and
                                              regulations (nets, method)
                                             Level of adoption of good fishing
                                              practices                                                 SLEPA in Sierra Léone and
Systems,                                     Level of processing of fisheries                           EPA in Liberia
               Evolution of the
tools and                                     products                                                  Experts environment
               techniques and technical                                             Permanently
fishing                                      Volume of wood consumed (fish                             PFES (Ports authorities)
               performances
methods                                       processing)                                               Institutions of Surveillance
                                             Rate of adoption of sustainable                            (Marine, Capitainerie, etc.)
                                              fishing methods
                                             Rate of valorization of fisheries
                                              by-products
                                             Types and quality of wastes           Once a
                                              management (liquids, solids) from     quarter
                                              the activities (fishing and           Nota: the
                                              processing of products)               HSE officer
                                                                                    for each jetty
Human                                        Existence of a prevention
                                                                                    should be
Environmen                                    mechanism and regulation of                               SLEPA in Sierra Leone and
           Hygiene and health                                                       making daily
t                                             conflicts                                                  EPA in Liberia
           Pollution and                                                            inspections,
                                             Number of social conflicts on the                         Experts environment
               nuisances                                                            and the
                                              sites                                                     ESFP (Ports autonomes)
           Safety                                                                   environmenta
                                             Respect of protection equipment                           Local Collectivities
                                                                                    l units for
                                              by the port
                                                                                    each port
                                             Presence of illnesses linked to the   should
                                              unhygienic condition                  inspect every
                                             Respect of the hygiene measures       week or two
                                              on the site                           weeks




                                                                  32
              6.8 Institutional arrangements for implementation and monitoring of the ESMF

         This paragraph describes the roles and responsibilities relating implementation of the
         environmental measures envisaged for the WARF.
                The Sub-regional Coordination of the WARF (PCU/WARF) will assure the monitoring of the
                 strategic indicators of the project through its Monitoring-Evaluation Expert
                The National Coordination Units of the WARF (NCU-WARF): will coordinate the activities of
                 capacity building and environmental training of the PFES and the other technical structures
                 involved in the implementation of the project and is responsible for the application of the back-up
                 measures of the project.
                The Free Ports of Monrovia and Freetown: they should establish environmental
                 cells/committees facilitated by Environmental Experts to assure environmental and social
                 management during utilization of jetties.
                The national institutions in charge of environmental matters (SLEPA in Sierra Leone and
                 EPA in Liberia): they will provide technical support to the project coordination and will assure
                 the national external monitoring for implementation of the environmental measures at the jetties.
                 For Sierra Leone, institutions such as the Institute Of Marine Biology and Oceanography (IMBO)
                 should contribute to the studies, inventories and analyses of the marine environment.
                The organizations and other actors at the jetties: they should have and must apply the
                 procedures and good environmental fisheries practices of fishing and processing of products, so
                 as to ensure an ecological and sustainable management of the marine and coastal resources.

         6.9 Estimated costs of implementation of the environmental and social mitigation measures

         The estimated costs of taking into account of the environmental and social mitigation measures consist of
         the following activities, a total amount of:
              $US 50 000 for the Mesurado jetty in Liberia;
              $US 100 000 for the Kissy Jetty in Sierra Leone.

         Table 2 : Estimated costs of the Environmental and Social Management Framework
                               Activities                                                  Total Cost ($US)
                                                                            Liberia (Mesurado) $US    Sierra Leone (Kissy)
                                                                                                      $US
   To elaborate a Hygiene, Safety and Environment Regulation;
   To elaborate procedures/directives for environmental
    management                                                              10 000                        10 000
   Development of a manual of good practices
   Provision for the conduct of full ESISESIS                              -                             -
   Provision for the development of a Resettlement Action Plan             -                             30 000
    (RAP)
   Provision for assistance to the National Coordination Units of          20 000                        20 000
    the project
   Training and sensitization of the actors involved in the                                              20 000
    management of the jetties
   Evaluation (mid term and final) of the ESMP                            10 000                          10 000
   Permanent monitoring of the activities of the WARF                     10 000                          10 000
TOTAL                                                                      50 000                          100 000
      NOTE : All these costs should be included in the costs of the projects of construction of the two jetties.
    7. CONSULTATION

The environmental and social studies in the two countries were done on the basis of a participatory
methodological approach that was based on firstly ‘on-the-site visits’, desk review of relevant existing
documents and secondly, on meetings, interviews with the various Ministries, Departments, technical
institutions, local authorities and some local players at targeted sites.

During each of the meetings that were held, the content of the project in terms of economic, social,
cultural and environmental mitigation and improvement were presented to the groups consulted. This
process was initiated early in the environmental study. Hence, opinions and comments from the
populations and target groups were included in the ESIA.

The various meetings held by the Consultant with relevant authorities and officials at national and local
levels manifested the importance and the priority placed on this project by the Governments of both
countries and local officials. However, it has raised fears among some local stakeholders at sites targeted
by the project. Overall, the following recommendations were made for the preparation and
implementation of the project:

                           Summary of the meetings held with stakeholders

Action Plan

       Consultation, collaboration and synergy with other local projects
       Collaboration / coordination prior to construction
       Capacity building of stakeholders in environmental and social management
       Involvement of all stakeholders in the work
        Awareness of people and social support

Implementation

       Securing the selected sites to prevent their gradual occupation
       Compensation for displacement
       Better management of targeted areas (rationalization) for extension
       Commencement of the activities as quick as possible
       Safety measures to control pollution and nuisances within the work site
       Measures to protect water bodies at work sites
       Environmental and social monitoring throughout the construction phase
       Involvement of environmental services (EPA and SLEP) in monitoring the implementation

Management and operations of jetties

       Environmental Function in piers
       Institutional arrangements should be clearly defined
       Training of jetty users in environmental and social management




                                                    34
     8. ANNEXES

     Annex 1: Details of consultations with stakeholders

N°   Institution               Points discussed, suggestions and recommendations
     Sierra Leone
1    Department of Fisheries         Importance of the project to the Government
     (MFMR)                          Environmental and social function at MFMR, Port and jetties
                                     Training of fisherfolks
                                     Commence the activities as quick as possible
2    Artisanal Fisheries             Security measures, control measures against pollution and nuisances at
     Development Project              work
     (MFMR)                          Measures to protect water bodies within work site
                                     Environmental and social monitoring throughout the construction phase
3    Sierra Leone Port               Securing selected sites to prevent further occupation
     Authority                       Safety measures, control measures against pollution and nuisances at work
                                      site
                                     Measures to protect water bodies within work site
                                     Environmental and social monitoring throughout the construction phase
                                     Port Environmental Functions
                                     Training of resource users
4    Institute of Marine             Inventory of marine biodiversity screened in the area
     Biology and                     Measures to protect water bodies during work
     Oceanography (IMBO)             Environmental and social monitoring throughout the construction phase
                                     Involvement of IMBO in monitoring of the implementation phase
5    SLEP                            Safety measures, control measures against pollution and nuisances at work
                                      site
                                     Measures to protect water bodies within work site
                                     Environmental and social monitoring throughout the construction phase
                                     Involvement of SLEP in monitoring of the implementation phase
6    Kissy                           Information and awareness raising for users of sites
                                     Compensation for displacement
                                     Better management of targeted areas (rationalization) for extension
     Liberia
1    UNC/WARF                        Importance of project for the Government
                                     Training of fisherfolks
                                     Commence the activities as soon as possible
2    Port of Monrovia                Safety measures, Measures to control pollution and nuisances at work site
                                     Port Environmental Function
                                     Training of resources users
3    Bureau Of Fisheries             Environmental monitoring at work
                                     Training of fishing FRO
4    Bureau of Maritime              Monitoring of vessels at sea
     Affairs                         Improved infrastructure for waste management on the banks
5    EPA                             Measures to protect water bodies at work
                                     Environmental and social monitoring throughout the construction phase
                                     Involvement of EPA in monitoring of the implementation phase




                                                 35
   Annex 2: TOR for the preparation of the resettlement plans (RAP)

Resettlement Action Plan
    Introduction
    Objective for the Assignement
    Description of the project.
    Scope of Services
          o Potential impacts.
          o Objectives.
          o Socioeconomic studies.
          o Legal framework. The findings of an analysis of the legal framework,
          o Institutional Framework. The findings of an analysis of the institutional framework
          o Valuation of and compensation for losses.
          o Resettlement measures.
          o Site selection, site preparation, and relocation.
          o Housing, infrastructure, and social services.
          o Community participation
          o Integration with host populations.
          o Grievance procedures.
          o Organizational responsibilities.
          o Implementation schedule.
          o Costs and budget.
          o Monitoring and evaluation.
    Reporting and Output
    Qualification of Consultant(s)
    Facilities to be provided by Client
    Contract Terms

Abbreviated Resettlement Action Plan
    a census survey of displaced persons and valuation of assets;
    description of compensation and other resettlement assistance to be provided;
    consultations with displaced people about acceptable alternatives;
    institutional responsibility for implementation and procedures for grievance redress;
    arrangements for monitoring and implementation; and
    a timetable and budget.




                                                  36
     Annex 3   Persons met and consulted

N°    Name and surname                                             Institution
      Sierra Leone
1     Alpha Bangura, Director                                      Department of Fisheries (MOFMR)
2     Dr. Salieu SANKOH, Coordinator of the WARF                   Department of Fisheries (MOFMR)
3     Mohamed BUSHURA, Technical and Administrative Officer        Artisanal Fisheries development
                                                                   Project (MOFMR)
4     Mohamed MANSARAY, Fisheries Technician                       Department of Fisheries (MOFMR)
5     Captain SAWYERR, Director General Port Authority             Sierra Leone Port Authority
6     Ismael KANU, Director of Planning and Development            Sierra Leone Port Authority
7     Dr. Ernest T. NDOMAHINA, Director                            Institute Of Marine Biology and
                                                                   Oceanography (IMBO)
8     Abdulai G. BOCARIE,                                          IMBO
9     Momodu E. BAH, Director of Field Operation                   SLEPA
10    Edward BENDU, Responsible of IEC                             SLEPA
11    Almamy BANGURA, Current Chairman of sand miners at Kissy     Kissy
12    Mohamed Abass KAMARA, Sand Miner, Kissy                      Kissy
13    Nathaniel Metzget, Agent Municipal, Kissy                    Kissy
      Liberia
14    ISSAH Braimah, Coordinnator                                  UNC/WARF
15    Sheck SHERIF, Monitoring, Control and Surveillance Officer   UNC/WARF
16    Jeffrey Georges, Deputy Director of Operation                Port Autonome de Monrovia
17    Joyce KUMAH, Focal Point Environment                         Bureau Of Fisheries
18    William BOEH, Director of Fisheries                          Bureau Of Fisheries
19    Glasgow B. TOGBA, Division of Marines fisheries              Bureau Of Fisheries
20    Samuel M. LYNCH, Chief Safety and Navigation                 Bureau of Maritime Affairs
21    Mme Anyaa VOHIRI, Executive Director                         EPA
22    Varney L. CONNEH, EIA Coordinator                            EPA
23    Johnathan DAVIES, Inspector                                  EPA




                                              37