Networking by arden000

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									Samba Client - Manual Configuration
This section covers how to manually configure and connect to a SMB file server from an Ubuntu
client. smbclient is a command line tool similar to a ftp connection while smbfs allows you to
mount a SMB file share. Once a SMB share is mounted it acts similar to a local hard drive (you
can access the SMB share with your file browser (nautilus, konqueror, thunar, other).

Connecting to a Samba File Server from the command line

Connecting from the command line is similar to a ftp connection.

List public SMB shares with

smbclient -L //server -U user

Connect to a SMB share with

smbclient //server/share -U user

Enter you user password.

You can connect directly with

smbclient //server/share -U user%password

but your password will show on the screen (less secure).

Once connected you will get a prompt that looks like this :

smb: \>

Type "help" , without quotes, at the prompt for a list of available commands.

Connecting using CIFS
CIFS is included in the smbfs package and is a replacement for smbfs (I know, the terminology
here is a little confusing).

Reference : http://linux-cifs.samba.org/

As above, install by any method, smbfs.
Allow non-root users to mount SMB shares

By default only root may mount SMB shares on the command line. To allow non-root users to
mount SMB shares you could set the SUID, but I advise you configure sudo. You should
configure sudo with visudo

You may either allow the group "users" to mount SMB shares, or add a group, samba, and add
users you wish to allow to mount SMB shares to the samba group.

sudo groupadd samba
sudo adduser user samba

Change "user" to the username you wish to add to the samba group.

sudo visudo

In the "group" section add your group you wish to allow to mount SMB shares

Add a line in the "group" section :
## Members of the admin group may gain root privileges
%admin ALL=(ALL) ALL
%samba   ALL=(ALL) /bin/mount,/bin/umount,/sbin/mount.cifs,/sbin/umount.cifs

Change "%samba" to "%users" if you wish to allow members of the users group to mount SMB
shares.

The following will mount the myshare folder on myserver to ~/mnt (it will be in your home
directory):

mkdir ~/mnt
sudo mount -t cifs //myserver_ip_address/myshare ~/mnt -o
username=samb_user,noexec

Note: "samba_user" = the user name on the samba server (may be different from your log-in
name on the client).

The "noexec" option prevents executable scripts running from the SMB share.

You will be asked for BOTH your sudo and then your samba_user password.

To umount,

sudo umount ~/mnt

Automagically mount SMB shares

In order to have a share mounted automatically every time you reboot, you need to do the
following:
With any editor, create a file containing your Windows/Samba user account details:

gksu gedit /etc/samba/user

KDE users must use kdesu rather than gksu and instead of Gedit they can use Kwrite as editor.

... it should contain two lines as follows:

username=samba_user
password=samba_user_password

Note: "samba_user" = the user name on the samba server (may be different from your log-in
name on the client). "samba_user_password" is the password you assigned to the samba_user on
the samba server.

Save the file and exit gedit.

Change the permissions on the file for security:

sudo chmod 0400 /etc/samba/user # permissions of 0400 = read only

Now create a directory where you want to mount your share (e.g. /media/samba_share):

sudo mkdir /media/samba_share

Now, using any editor, and add a line to /etc/fstab for your SMB share as follows:

sudo cp /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.bak
gksu gedit /etc/fstab

Add a line for your SMB share:

//myserver_ip_address/myshare /media/samba_share                  cifs
credentials=/etc/samba/user,noexec 0 0

The share will mount automatically when you boot. The "noexec" option prevents executable
scripts running from the SMB share.

To mount the share now, without rebooting,

sudo mount /media/samba_share

You can unmount the share with :

sudo umount /media/samba_share

If you wish to increase security at the expense of convenience, use this line in /etc/fstab
//myserver_ip_address/myshare /media/samba_share                    cifs
noauto,credentials=/etc/samba/user,noexec 0 0

The noexec" option prevents executable scripts running from the SMB share.

Edit /etc/samba/user, remove the password (leave just the samba user).

Now the share will NOT automatically mount when you boot and you will be asked for your
samba password.

Mount the share with :

sudo mount /media/samba_share

CIFS may cause a shutdown error.

CIFS VFS: Server not responding.

There is a fix in the troubleshooting section of this forum post.

Back to top

Connecting using SMBFS (deprecated)
Note: This method still works, but as outlined under the "CIFS" section above is "deprecated"
(no longer maintained and pending removal from the kernel).

Mounting a share on the local filesystem allows you to work around programs that do not yet use
GnomeVFS to browse remote shares transparently. To mount a SMB share, first install smbfs:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install smbfs

To allow non root accounts to mount shares, change the permissions on the smbmnt program
thus:

sudo chmod u+s /usr/bin/smbmnt /usr/bin/smbumount



Note: This may be a security risk as after setting the SUID bit anyone can mount a SMB share. I
advise you configure sudo, as above.

The working line in /etc/sudoers is as follows (see CIFS section above):

%samba   ALL=(ALL)
/bin/mount,/bin/umount,/sbin/mount.cifs,/sbin/umount.cifs,/usr/bin/smbmount,/
usr/bin/smbumount
This allows any user in the samba group to mount SMB shares (you will need to create a samba
group and add users).

The following will mount the myshare folder on myserver to ~/mnt (it will be in your home
directory):


mkdir ~/mnt
smbmount //myserver/myshare ~/mnt

To umount,

smbumount ~/mnt

In order to have a share mounted automatically every time you reboot, you need to do the
following:

Open a shell as root

sudo -s

Create a file containing your Windows/Samba user account details:

vi /etc/samba/user

...it should contain two lines as follows:

username=george
password=secret

Change the permissions on the file for security:

chmod 0600 /etc/samba/user

Now create a directory where you want to mount your share (e.g. /mnt/data):

mkdir /mnt/data

Now edit the file system table (/etc/fstab) and add a line as follows:

//server/share         /mnt/data      smbfs     credentials=/etc/samba/user,rw,uid=bob
0   0

...where 'bob' is the non-root user you log into ubuntu with, 'server' is the name or address of the
Windows machine and 'share' is the name of the share.

To mount the share now, just use the following command as root. It will mount automatically on
subsequent reboots.
mount /mnt/data

to be continued...

Ubuntu Client

On the Ubuntu client using the menu at the top, go to "Places" -> "Network". You will see an
icon "Windows network" and should be able to browse to your shared folder. You will be asked
for a password, leave it blank. Click the "Connect button.

(no need for a password).

If you would like to mount your SMB share using your (server) hostname rather than the IP
Address, edit /etc/hosts and add your samba server (syntax IP Address hostname).

192.168.1.100        hostname

Where "hostname" = the name of your samba server.

Windows Client

On Windows open "My Computer" and navigate to "My Network Places". Navigate to your
Ubuntu server and your share will be available without a password.

Alternate : From the menu at the top select "Tools" -> "Map Network Drive". Select an available
letter for your SMB share (Default is z: ). In the "Folder:" box enter
\\samba_server_ipaddress\share. Tic (Select with the mouse) the option "Reconnect at login" if
you want the share to be automatically mounted when you boot Windows. Click the "Finish"
box. A dialog box will appear, enter your samba user name and password. Click "OK".

If you would like to mount your SMB share using your (server) hostname rather than the IP
Address, edit C:\WINDOWS\system32\drivers\etc\hosts and add your samba server (syntax IP
Address hostname).

192.168.1.100        hostname

Where "hostname" = the name of your samba server.

								
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