Recreation Services Assessment Report - NIU by chenmeixiu

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									                                      Northern Illinois University
                                      Division of Student Affairs
                                         Recreation Services
                               Assessment Summary Report for FY05-FY09
                                           November 2009

1. Departmental History

Recreation Services (RS) fosters personal development, enhances academic productivity, and enriches
the quality of life for a diverse university community through excellence in programs and services.
Seven distinctive areas contribute to the department's mission including Aquatics (AQ), Fitness and
Wellness (FW), Facilities Operations (FO), Intramural Sports (IM), Open Recreation (OR), Outdoor
Adventure (OA), and Sport Clubs (SC). Established in 1976 as the Office of Campus Recreation (OCR), the
department has experienced dramatic growth and change. Influential in the department's advancement
has been its response to student participation in self-directed (drop-in) activities and exercise which has
increased from 73,375 uses in 1977-78 to 324,320 uses in 2008-09, reaching 2,500 daily uses during high
use times. Responding to incremental growth in student participation, RS opened an indoor facility in
1985 and expanded in 1995. Providing dedicated space and equipment for the campus community to
pursue their recreational pursuits enhanced the quality of life on NIU's main campus. The Chick Evans
Field House, renovated in 2004, offers overflow recreation space four evenings per week and offers
unique activities such as indoor soccer and floor hockey.

In 2008-09, RS offered 3,006 diverse recreation opportunities serving approximately 11,359 students
and 41,985 individual participations. Additionally, recreation facilities served as a venue for 129 rentals
providing dedicated space for student organization and group activities. Students have expanded their
involvement from seven Sport Clubs in 1977-78 to 21 clubs in 2008-09. Since Group Fitness classes were
first offered in 1981-82 with three classes and 83 participants, this program has grown to 33 weekly
classes with 6,232 participants in 2008-09. Intramural Sports, a long-standing program, offered 786
contests to 3,894 students, with total individual participations of 10,443 in 2008-09. Originating in 1978,
the Outdoor Adventure program has immersed students in the natural environment to enhance their
outdoor skills. Student leaders provided 1,076 rental gear transactions and hosted 33 trips, culminating
in 4,651 contact hours with their peers in 2008-09. Educational and instructional activities such as
nutrition education, personal training, yoga, dance, and cooking classes reflect the department's efforts
to diversify programs that meet the ever-changing needs of students.

Since the new Director's arrival in August 2006, the department restructured the organization to better
align job responsibilities with programmatic and work flow needs. Efficiency is reflected in the
department's efforts by: (a) streamlined business operations, (b) increased program accountability, (c)
improved fiscal responsibility, (d) implementation of new technologies, and (e) elimination of
underutilized programs. Recent improvements include a redesigned website, on-line program

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   registration, cardio/weight room floor replacement, digital locks for lockers, streamlined cardio theatre
   area, upgraded fire alarm system, and multi-function fitness stations with reduced footprints to
   maximize limited cardio and strength training areas.

   2. Mission, Goals and Objectives
      Mission Statement:
      In alliance with the educational mission of NIU and the Division of Student Affairs & Enrollment
      Management, Recreation Services engages students in achieving lifelong appreciation for pursuing
      healthy lifestyles by providing comprehensive programs, employment, and leadership development
      opportunities.

       Department Program Goals:
       Goal 1: Provide a learning environment to engage individuals in educational and/or healthy lifestyle
       pursuits.
       Goal 2: Encourage individual improvement of health, wellness, and personal growth.
       Goal 3: Provide a customer-centered environment that is welcoming, responsive, and inclusive.
       Goal 4: Provide an aesthetically-pleasing, safe, and comfortable environment conducive for
       recreation.
       Goal 5: Provide appropriate space, equipment, and supervision to support patron recreational
       needs.
       Goal 6: Promote and support staff development (student, part-time, and full-time).
       Goal 7: Be good stewards of resources by maximizing programs and services, streamlining
       operations, and seeking appropriate revenue generation and resource opportunities.

   3. Methods

   DATA COLLECTION TIMELINE TABLE

       Note: The RS staff recently revised the department’s five year assessment plan. The table
       incorporates previous assessments with an expanded plan that reflects a more thorough approach
       to assessing learning and program effectiveness for a comprehensive recreation program.

                                                                                    Person(s)           Goals
   Method                         Description                    Timeline
                                                                                  Responsible         Addressed
Benchmarking      Program and Policy Review - a study of         Every 3           Respective        1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
                  approximately 10-15 schools to be               years          Coordinator,            6, 7
                  reviewed including activities, fees, hours,   beginning:     Assistant Director,     Note: To
                  equipment, staffing, training, safety, and                   Associate Director      address
                  risk management for each program area:                       per program area        current
                  o Aquatics                                       FY12                              needs, goals
                  o Facilities Operations                          FY11                                 will be

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                  o Fitness and Wellness                          FY13                                determined
                  o Intramural Sports                             FY12                                 each year.
                  o Marketing (features, methods of               FY12
                    tracking data, media types,
                    sponsorships, and technology)
                  o Open Recreation                               FY12
                  o Outdoor Adventure                             FY11
                  o Sport Clubs
                     o Safety & Risk Management                   FY10
                     o Travel                                     FY10
                     o Administration, Membership                 FY11
                        Guidelines, Office Services
                     o Finances, Facilities, & Equipment          FY11
                  o Student staff leadership program              FY08
                  o Risk Management Committee                    Every 5
                                                                  years
                                                                beginning
                                                                  FY08
Benchmarking      Department Benchmarking for Division – a       Every 5         Director               TBD by
                  study of approximately 20 schools will be       years                                 specific
                  reviewed. Topic(s) will be determined.        beginning:                            topics that
                                                                  FY11                                    are
                                                                                                       selected.
Document          Budgets – review expenditures, income         Annually      Director, Staff              7
Review            generation, refunds, and fees by program      beginning         Clerk
                  area to ensure economic structure               FY08
                  supports program needs.
                  Business Operations – review business          Every 3                                  3, 7
                  operations processes and support systems        years
                  including technologies.                       beginning
                                                                  FY10
                  Facilities Operations – audit policies,        Annually       Associate             3, 4, 5, 6, 7
                  procedures, and facility/equipment            beginning:   Director, Facility
                  conditions to maintain a long-term plan                       Operations
                  that addresses:
                      o Facility access, security, and safety     FY11
                      o Cardio/strength training equipment        FY10
                      o Work Orders                               FY10
                      o Building interior and systems             FY11
                      o Reservations/Rentals                      FY10

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                   o ADA Accessibility                        FY11
               Marketing:                                   Annually    Assistant Director             3
               Materials – reviewed content to ensure       beginning   Fitness, Wellness,
               information conveyed accurate                 FY2008       and Marketing
               description and effectively promoted
               department’s mission, programs, and
               services.
               o General Brochure
               o Program Guide
               o Program Specific Brochure(s)
               o Memberships
               o Website Design/Features                                                               7
               Sponsorships - reviewed sponsorship          Annually
               types, value, contribution                  beginning
                                                              FY10
               Program Policies and Procedures –           Every two        See below:            See below:
               reviewed policies and procedures to          years as
               ensure compliance with university,          indicated
               department, and recreation guidelines.        below:
               Ensured employee responsibilities
               reflected programmatic needs.
               o Aquatics                                                   Associate
                   o Patron Policies                          FY09       Director, Facility          3, 4, 5
                   o Employee Manual                          FY10          Operations               4, 5, 6

                o Fitness and Wellness                                  Assistant Director
                  o Patron Policies                           FY14      Fitness, Wellness,           3, 4, 5
                  o Employee Manual                           FY15        and Marketing              4, 5, 6

                o Intramural Sports                                     Assistant Director,
                  o Patron Policies                           FY13      Intramural Sports            3, 4, 5
                  o Employee Manual                           FY14        and Sport Clubs            4, 5, 6

                o Open Recreation                                       Coordinator, Open
                  o Employee Manual                           FY10         Recreation                4, 5, 6
                  o Patron Policies                           FY13                                   3, 4, 5

                o Outdoor Adventure                                     Assistant Director,
                  o Employee Manual                           FY10           Outdoor                 4, 5, 6
                    Patron Policies                           FY12          Adventure                3, 4, 5

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                  o    Sport Clubs                                           Assistant Director,
                       o Safety & Risk Management                FY11        Intramural Sports       1, 4, 5
                       o Travel                                  FY11         and Sport Clubs          1, 5
                       o Administration, Membership              FY12                               3, 4, 6, 7
                          Guidelines, Office Services
                       o Finances, Facilities, & Equipment       FY12                                  5, 7
                  Risk Management Plan - Review risk            Every 5          Director,            4, 5, 6
                  management plan based on External              years       Associate Director
                  Consultant and internal standards and       beginning
                  develop/change plan.                           FY10
Internal/         Internal/External Review -                    Every 5      Director; Internal    1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
External          Per the Student Affairs & Enrollment           years         Review: NIU             6, 7
Review            Management Assessment Strategy Grid,        beginning         Colleagues;
                  the review is conducted using the              FY12.       External Review:
                  elements of the CAS (Council for the       Last review         External
                  Advancement of Standards) during the fall      FY02;          Colleagues
                  semester. An External Review team            timeline
                  reviews the Internal Review report and    adjusted per
                  completes an on-campus review of            Divisional
                  departmental facilities, programs, and      rotation.
                  services during the spring semester.
External          External Risk Management Review -             Every 5      Director; External       4, 5, 6
Review            External consultant evaluates and              years          Consultant
                  provides recommendations for improving      beginning
                  risk management practices.                     FY09.
Interviews        Exit Interviews - analyze feedback to
                  improve Graduate Assistant and internship
                  programs.
                  o Graduate Assistant                        Annually            Director             1, 6
                                                              beginning
                                                                 FY10

                  o   Internships                                Annually        Respective            1, 6
                                                                 beginning     Coordinator,
                                                                   FY10      Assistant Director,
                                                                             Associate Director
                                                                             per program area
Observations      Activities – assess effectiveness of leader    Annually        Respective
                  delivery method, equipment, facility          beginning:     Coordinator,
                  space, and patron engagement utilizing a                   Assistant Director,
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                  pre-determined checklist. A minimum of                   Associate Director
                  two activities evaluated each semester.                  per program area       3, 4, 5, 6
                  o Intramural team and individual sports        FY12
                  o Fitness classes                              FY11
                  o Facility Rentals (large groups)              FY11
                  o Group fitness instructors                    FY10
                  o Nutrition consultations                      FY11
                  o Open Recreation activities                   FY10
                  o Outdoor Adventure trips                      FY13
                  o Personal training sessions                   FY11
                  o Sport club games or practices                FY11
                  o Wellness classes                             FY12
                  NexTalk Proficiency – ensure staff can use     FY07           Director              6
                  NexTalk as a medium to communicate to
                  patrons who are hearing impaired.
Participation     Participation Rates – participation and      Annually        Respective            3, 7
Rates             service hours are compared to previous       Beginning     Coordinator,
                  years. Trends are analyzed to determine                  Assistant Director,
                  program utilization:                                     Associate Director
                  o Aquatics (classes and open recreation)       FY10      per program area
                  o Fitness and Wellness (group fitness and      FY10
                     instructional classes; nutrition,
                     personal training, and wellness
                     sessions; and passes sold)
                  o Huskie Pup Camp (type of attendee per        FY10
                     session)
                  o Intramural Sports (games, participants,      FY10
                     total participations, and forfeits)
                  o Marketing (type of sponsorships, value,      FY10
                     website usage, and outreach activities)
                  o Open Recreation (hours and                  FY2010
                     participation rates)
                  o Outdoor Adventure (gear rentals and          FY10
                     trips by type and contact hours)
                  o Facility Rental (type of renter, hours       FY10
                     rented, and income generated)
                  o Sport Clubs (teams, types of activities,     FY10
                     practices, and competitions)
                  o UNIV 101 tours and Activities (tours,        FY11
                     activities, and activity types)

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                  o RS Annual Recognition Program –                FY08            Director               7
                      number of awards, attendance, award
                      type.
Retention         Retention Rates – repeat participants          Annually         Respective            3, 7
Rates             tracked by program area                        Beginning      Coordinator,
                  o Aquatic classes                                FY10       Assistant Director,
                  o Fitness and Wellness – group fitness                      Associate Director
                      and instructional classes, nutrition and                per program area
                      personal training sessions
                  o Huskie Pup Camp campers
                  o Intramural Sports (players and officials)
                     o Flag football officials in FY2006
                  o Outdoor Adventure trips
                  o Sport Clubs participants
Activity          Participant Activity Evaluations –               Each           Respective        1, 2, 3, 4, 5,
Evaluations       participants evaluate activity effectiveness   semester       Coordinator,            6, 7
                  by rating activity, space, equipment,          beginning:   Assistant Director,
                  student staff’s knowledge and ability to                    Associate Director
                  conduct program. Participants identify                      per program area
                  skills learned or enhanced as a result of
                  the experience. Participants provide
                  suggestions for program improvement.
                  Demographics evaluated to determine
                  population served (beginning Spring
                  2010).
                  o Aquatics classes                               FY10
                  o Fitness and Wellness – group fitness
                      (Beginning FY2007) and instructional
                      classes, nutrition and personal training
                      sessions, wellness outreach sessions,
                      and instructor training.
                  o Huskie Pup Camp – parents and                  FY10
                      campers (summer)
                  o Intramural Sports                              FY10
                  o Outdoor Adventure Trips                        FY06
                  o Sport Club Workshops                           FY10
                  o UNIV 101 tours/activities                      FY11
                  o RS Student Staff Fall Retreat                  FY09           Director            1, 3, 6
                  o Facility Renters (dance groups in              FY10       Associate Director     3, 4, 5, 7
                      FY2006 only)

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                  Student Staff Activity Evaluations and         FY10           Respective        3, 4, 5, 6, 7
                  Learning Outcomes - student staff                           Coordinator,
                  members evaluate and provide                              Assistant Director,
                  suggestions for their respective program                  Associate Director
                  areas by rating overall program                           per program area
                  effectiveness, space, and equipment.
                  Student staff members share what skills
                  were learned or enhanced as a result of
                  their work experience (FY2008).
                  o Aquatics
                  o Fitness and Wellness
                  o Intramural Sports
                  o Marketing
                  o Open Recreation
                  o Outdoor Adventure
                  o Sport Clubs
                  o Student Supervisor Leader Workshops         FY08
Student Staff     Student Staff and Participant Tests –        Annually         Respective            1, 6
and Participant   Student staff and participant knowledge     beginning:      Coordinator,
Tests             tested to ensure that necessary                           Assistant Director,
                  knowledge has been obtained to perform                    Associate Director
                  job or participate in program. The                        per program area
                  following areas are addressed:
                  o Cross-training Participants               FY07 (only)

                  o   Intramural Sports Officials on sport       FY10
                      rules and game management
                  o   Intramural Sports Team Captains on         FY10
                      sport rules
                  o   Fitness Education Participants - ACE    FY08 (only)
                      on-line articles
                  o   Life Enhancing Eating and Exercise      FY07 (only)
                      Program (LEEP) Participants
                  o   Nutrition Consultations                    FY10
                  o   Open Recreation Student Staff              FY11
                  o   Outdoor Adventure Student Staff            FY06
                      (Wilderness First Aid)
                  o   Sport Club Presidents on hazing            FY07
                  o   Outdoor Adventure Trip Participants -      FY08

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                      Leave No Trace Concept
Reflective        Reflection of learning experiences –          Annually         Respective             6
Journals          student staff members reflect on their        beginning      Coordinator,
                  work experiences and share what they                       Assistant Director,
                  learned as a result of the experience.                     Associate Director
                  o Outdoor Adventure Staff Training              FY07       per program area
                      Week
                  o Group Fitness Instructor Training             FY11
                  o Internships                                   FY11
Surveys           Participant surveys - participants provide    Annually         Respective           3, 4, 5
                  feedback on condition of facility,            beginning      Coordinator,
                  equipment, staff, hours offered, and give                  Assistant Director,
                  suggestions for improvement.                               Associate Director
                  o Aquatics Open Recreation                      FY09       per program area
                  o Open Recreation (SRC & FH)                    FY09
                  o Cardio and strength training demo             FY09
                      equipment
                  o Sport Clubs                                   FY10

                  Activity Interest Surveys – all program         FY07                                  3
                  areas conducted on-line interest surveys
                  to assess interest in current and future
                  programs (FY 2007 only, except Outdoor
                  Adventure).

                  Cross-Training Program – participants        FY07 (only)                            1, 2, 3
                  responded to a questionnaire to measure
                  their interest and current activities in
                  relation to cross-training.

                  RS Comment Cards – analyzed patron              FY09            Director            3, 4, 5
                  feedback regarding programs, services,
                  staffing, and facilities.

                  Needs Assessment for Student Supervisor         FY08         Director and             6
                  Leadership Training – student supervisors                   Coordinator of
                  and full-time staff assessed.                              Open Recreation

                  Needs Assessment for Students with              FY07       Associate Director       3, 4, 5
                  Physical Disabilities (FY 2007 only)

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               RS Needs and Satisfaction Survey              Every 5    Director           3, 4, 5
               Patrons provided feedback on the usage of      years
               programs and facilities, and satisfaction    beginning
               with services, with an emphasis on the         FY09
               academic, social, emotional and health-
               related outcomes of recreation programs.

               NIU Services for Living Well – Recreation     Every 2    Director           3, 4, 5
               Services Section of Community of Practice      years
               Survey                                       beginning
                                                              FY09




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  GOALS BY METHODS MATRIX

                                             Internal                           Partici-
                 Bench-         Document     External                 Observ-   pation     Retention       Activity            Reflective
Goals            marking         Review      Review     Interviews     ations    Rates       Rates       Evaluations   Tests    Journals    Surveys

Learning
                     X             X            X            X                                                 X        X                     X
environment

Individual
                     X                          X                                                              X                              X
growth

Customer-
                     X             X            X                        X         X          X                X                              X
centered

Comfortable
                     X             X            X                        X                                     X                              X
environment

Appropriate
space,
equipment,           X             X            X                        X                                     X                              X
and
supervision

Staff
                     X             X            X            X           X                                     X        X          X          X
development

Stewardship
                     X             X            X                                  X          X                X
of resources




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  Division of Student Affairs                 Northern Illinois University
  & Enrollment Management
4. Evidence by Goal/Objective or Priority/Target (Results, Available Data)
5. Use of Results by Goal/Objective (and Other)

Department Program Goal 1: Provide a learning environment to engage individuals in
educational and/or healthy lifestyle pursuits.

FY07
Annual Priority 1:
Increase the nutrition knowledge of students who participate in the Life Enhancing Eating and Exercise
Program (LEEEP) through one-on-one nutrition consultations provided by Recreation Services.
Targets:
1. Completed 25 one-on-one nutrition consultations.
2. 100% of clients demonstrated increased nutrition knowledge of 85% or better on post-test
    questionnaire (see Appendix A) at the time of completed consultation.
Results:
1. Ten nutrition interns from the School of Family, Consumer, and Nutrition Sciences provided 43 one-
    on-one nutrition consultations (18 above assessment target). There was no evidence that LEEEP
    participants were program recipients because demographics were not collected. Staff’s leave of
    absence resulted in no demographics being collected.
2. Clients indicated they increased their nutrition knowledge during one-on-one consultations by
    learning the following:
    a. Increased knowledge of USDA Pyramid Food Groups (31 at 72%).
    b. Caloric contents of foods (19/44%).
    c. Methods incorporating USDA Food Groups into daily diets (26/60%).
    d. Strategies for incorporating a variety of foods in daily diets (34/79%).
    e. Importance of exercise or increasing activity levels to manage weight (18/42%).
3. 100% of clients achieved scores of 85% or better on post-test questionnaire upon completion of
    final consultation. Results from pre-test to post-test questionnaires indicated the following:
    a. 30 (70%) clients improved test scores.
    b. 13 (30%) clients had no change in test scores.
    c. Table below summarizes changes from pre-test to post-test scores.

                               Client (Pre/Post) Test Scores
                               Scores     Pre-test        Post-test
                               40-59            6               0
                               60-79            9               0
                               80-99           16               4
                               100             12              39
Use of Results:
Initially planned to continue and improve the program as follows:
1. Collect client demographics to measure whether program recipients were from the targeted
     population.
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2. Establish specific program learning outcomes.
3. Expand and improve marketing techniques with LEEEP participants by illustrating what previous
    clients learned and how that positively impacted their lives.
4. Develop pre-test and post-test questionnaires to discern more specifically what students already
    know prior to the initial one-on-one consultation and what they learned after completing the final
    consultation.
5. Develop a staff performance evaluation that provides participant feedback regarding nutrition
    intern knowledge and skills.
6. Perform a correlation between pre-test and post-test questions to determine whether the
    information provided is appropriate and sufficient for the desired learning outcomes.
7. Distribute a three-month follow-up survey to clients to determine what diet changes were made
    and how that has impacted their daily living.
Note: This program was conducted in partnership with Health Enhancement. Health Enhancement
dropped the program due to the loss of grant funding and significant decline in participation and
interest from targeted group.

FY07
Annual Priority 3:
Create and implement an anti-hazing workshop for Sport Club presidents.
Targets:
Sport Club president hazing workshop participants will achieve 85% or better on anti-hazing post-test
(see Appendix B).
Results:
1. Thirteen Sport Club presidents completed the program with the following test scores: (a) 50% of
    attendees scored 85% or better on the pre-test. (b) 100% of attendees scored 85% or better on the
    post-test. (c) 2 attendees had 100% score on the pre-test and post-test. (d) 5 attendees improved
    their scores by 4-14 points. (e) 5 attendees improved their scores by 22 points. (f) 11 attendees had
    100% score on the post-test.
Use of Results:
1. Develop learning outcomes for program.
2. Collect and integrate additional workshop materials.
3. Develop a different interactive activity.
4. Develop a program evaluation for participant feedback of program and instructor.
5. Expand workshop to include Sport Club Vice-Presidents.
6. Further develop pre-test and post-test to assess more specific learning outcomes.
Note: Hazing workshop was postponed due to staff vacancy. Hazing workshop initiated again in FY10.

FY07
Annual Priority 5:
Increase student knowledge on the benefits of incorporating cross-training into personal workout plans.
Increase the number of NIU students who begin and maintain a cross-training workout plan.
Targets:

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Through a post-test assessment (see Appendix C) non-cross trainer participants will achieve the
following:
1. 65% will be able to identify department services and programs to incorporate cross-training in their
     exercise plans.
2. 65% will be able to identify three benefits of incorporating cross-training into their workout plan.
3. 25% will report initial behaviors of incorporating cross-training into their work out plan.
Results:
1. Overview of Survey Results: (a) 49% (176 of 356) self-identified as non-cross trainers (90 females/86
     males). (b) 34% (60 of 176) read educational materials and completed survey). (c) 19% (33 of 176)
     participated in one cross-training activity. (d) 14% (25 of 176) completed program and final survey.
     (e) Program participation and survey results indicate student interest in learning more about cross-
     training.
2. 100% of participants completing the program indicated the following: (a) At least three Recreation
     Services programs or services that they could incorporate cross-training into their workout plan. (b)
     Three benefits of incorporating cross-training into their workout plan. (c) Plans to incorporate cross-
     training in their workout plan.
3. Identification of Recreation Services programs and services: The top cross-training programs
     participants identified as intending to use: (a) A combination of two or more different types of
     activities; (b) Strength Training; Cardiovascular exercise; and Stretching.
4. Participants surveyed indicated they learned these items when incorporating cross-training
     techniques: (a) Proper use of strength training equipment. (b) The benefits of using selectorized
     weight machines. (c) Proper use and different types of exercise bikes. (c) Pacing oneself during a
     workout. (d) Yoga uses different muscle groups. (e) The importance of muscular endurance to
     personal health. (f) A variety of conditioning methods. (g) Cycling with resistance contributes to
     strength and cardiovascular.
Use of Results:
Plan to continue and improve the program as follows:
1. Identify two cross-training educational articles and learning outcomes for fall and spring semesters,
     and publish on Recreation Services website.
2. Inform patrons of cross-training articles through announcements published in Northern Star,
     bulletin board in SRC, and e-mails distributed through Recreation Services student listserv.
3. As funding is available, offer three cross-training programs and develop learning outcomes per
     semester to teach students new activities.
4. Continue to improve survey instruments by: (a) Demonstrating achievement of learning outcomes
     for article reviews and programs. (b) Seeking participant interests for potential cross-training
     programs and desired offering times. (c) Providing multiple-choice options to improve response
     analysis. (d) Evaluating whether staff interaction and guidance influences student participation.
Note: Program suspended until staff resources can be identified to re-initiate this goal.

FY08
Annual Priority 3:


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Apply “Leave No Trace” (LNT) concepts and techniques to minimize environmental impact when
participating in outdoor trips, as established by the Leave No Trace Organization and supported by the
Association of Outdoor Recreation & Education.
Targets:
1. Post-test: 100% of Outdoor Trip Coordinators will take test (see Appendix D) and demonstrate
    evidence that 85% of material and teaching strategies are learned.
2. Educational Materials: published AORE "Leave No Trace Materials" distributed to 90% of
    participants on appropriate outdoor trips.
3. Program Evaluation: 90% completed program evaluations (see Appendix E) for each training session
    including 85% evidence of AORE achieved learning outcomes.
4. Observation: Written trip reports indicating participant's behaviors are at 90% compliance with
    "Leave No Trace" techniques.
Results:
1. Post-test: (a) 100% of Outdoor Trip Coordinators demonstrated that 85% of material and teaching
    strategies were learned. This learning outcome was modified slightly as listed in b and c below. (b)
    & (c) The teaching strategies were discussed by the Assistant Director of Outdoor Adventure and the
    Outdoor Trip Coordinators in two staff meetings. Teaching strategies were not utilized as part of the
    written documentation of a learning outcome. (d) 100% of Outdoor Trip Coordinators demonstrated
    an overall average test score of 92.6% for 7 LNT principles and 36 LNT concepts which is 7.4% above
    the 85% assessment target.
2. Educational Materials: Outdoor Trip Coordinators distributed 37 LNT educational materials to all
    outdoor trip participants.
3. Program Evaluation: (a) 28 out of 37 participants (76%) completed the program evaluations
    including the LNT assessment, which is 4% below target of 80% return rate. (b) 6 of 28 (21%)
    respondents demonstrated knowledge of one or more LNT principle on pre-test. (c) 26 out of 28
    respondents (93%) demonstrated learning one or more LNT principle or concept on post test, which
    is 8% above 85% target. (c) Program effectiveness was not measured by participants; this was
    inadvertently omitted from the program evaluation. (d) Asking participants for suggestions was
    inadvertently omitted from the program evaluation. However, four participants indicated in the
    comments section that the LNT program was good and it was great that the university is teaching
    the concepts.
4. Observation: Documenting the 43 LNT behaviors was found to be infeasible and incompatible with
    maintaining adequate supervision of trip participants. However, trip leaders provided verbal input
    that they observed participants in compliance with the LNT principles.
Use of Results:
1. Outdoor Recreation staff and participants found LNT principles and concepts to be a valuable part of
    the outdoor adventure trip experience. Staff training and participant education will continue to be
    incorporated into applicable outdoor adventure trips.
2. LNT principles and concepts incorporated into all appropriate Outdoor Adventure trips in FY09.
3. Listed LNT seven main principles on program evaluation to allow patrons to more easily identify
    principles they learned as a result of the trip experience.


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4. Added a program evaluation question to allow patrons to evaluate student staff’s effectiveness of
   communicating environmental practices.
5. RS Sustainability Committee is determining the feasibility of incorporating LNT principles into future
   sustainability educational endeavors. This includes incorporating concepts on SRC bulletin boards
   and the RS website.
6. A future initiative being considered is to ask student staff to rate trip participants’ application of the
   seven LNT principles during the trip. The staff is trying to determine the feasibility of developing a
   rubric that can be utilized during the trip to ascertain participants’ skill application.

FY08
Annual Priority 4:
Develop and implement an online program to teach students the benefits of exercise.
Targets:
1. Educational materials: Post on Recreation Services Website before introduction and promotion of
    the program.
2. Post-test: 75% completion of tests (see Appendix F) by participants demonstrating 85% test success.
3. Program Evaluation: - 85% completed program evaluations (see Appendix G) for on-line program
    including 75% evidence of achieved learned outcomes. 90% completed program evaluation for
    focus groups including 85% of achieved learning outcomes.
4. Focus Groups: Conduct two focus groups of 6 - 8 people and prepare written report on feedback.
Results:
1. Educational Materials: Recreation Services identified four articles from the American Council on
    Exercise (ACE) Fitness Collection and published online from March 31st – May 2nd. Sought
    Kinesiology and Physical Education (KNPE) and Family Consumer and Nutrition Science (FCNS)
    faculty input regarding value of articles and content; did not receive feedback from designated
    faculty.
2. Post-test: (a) Target was not met because staff members were not able to measure the number of
    participants who read articles but did not complete online test(s). (b) 75% (target) of respondents
    scored 85% or more on the four online post-tests as follows: (1) Stress article – 89% (33 of 37 total
    participants) scored 85% or more (4% above target). (2) Free Weights vs. Cardio Machines article –
    92% (38 of 41 total participants) scored 85% or more (7% above target). (3) Battling Boredom article
    - 94% (33 of 37 total participants) scored 85% or more (9% above target). (4) Catching a Cold article
    – 97% (39 of 40 total participants) scored 85% or more (12% above target).
3. Program Evaluation: (a) 52% (24 of 46 total participants) completed program evaluations, which is
    2% above the 50% target. (b) Participants were not asked to rate program effectiveness. Instead
    participants provided program effectiveness feedback as follows: (1) 100% respondents liked the
    online method of learning about health and wellness topics. (2) 100% respondents indicated that
    reading articles and completing quizzes took a reasonable amount of time. (3) 54% respondents
    indicated a preference for on-line education about health and wellness topics as compared to in-
    person individualized instruction or group instruction. (4) 45% respondents indicated a preference
    for regularly obtaining health and wellness on line rather than from magazines, newspapers,
    television or other information media. (c) Program evaluation respondents recommended the

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     following to improve the online fitness articles and tests: (1) Easier web link access, publicize, more
     appeal. (2) Add more articles/quizzes; focus on male and female issues. (3) More quiz questions;
     more challenging. (4) No improvement; good article length; good topics and quizzes, applicable
     length of articles good; (d) Program evaluation respondents recommended the following for
     Recreation Services to assist students in learning more about health and wellness topics. (1)
     Publicity: Posters, E-mails & e-newsletter, Handouts, Northern Star, Channel 8; short videos. (2)
     Programs: Group workshops, Programs with incentives, Nutrition office open more.
Use of Results:
1. The online method of educating students on health and wellness topics seems to be one of the
    preferred methods of learning for students. Participant suggestions have been incorporated into the
    following FY09 goals to improve the program:
2. Offer a minimum of 40 articles and appropriate quizzes published on the Wellness/Fitness page of
    the RS website.
3. Identify a variety of topics, including some particular to male and female issues.
4. Continue to offer incentives for completion of articles, quizzes, and program evaluations.
5. Explore the potential for a monthly newsletter that can be distributed via e-mail, available on RS
    website, and at SRC service counter.
6. Develop a series of monthly posters with wellness/fitness tips to be posted at SRC, Residence Halls,
    and around campus.
7. Develop information slides for SRC main lobby television and Channel 8.
8. Explore potential of opening a nutrition office in the afternoon/evenings twice a week.
9. Offer 3 workshops per semester on a wellness/fitness topic (free).
10. Explore potential to develop short videos (year 2).
Note: Due to staffing issues in FY09, program postponed until FY10.

Department Program Goal 2: Encourage individual improvement of health, wellness, and
personal growth.

FY08
Annual Priority 2:
Develop opportunities for students, staff, and faculty with disabilities to participate in Recreation
programs and activities.
Targets:
1. Needs Assessment: Two new programs (activities or services for students, faculty, and staff with
    disabilities) will be implemented from the FY07 needs assessment (Appendix H) findings.
2. Observation: Through facilitator/instructor observations, 75% of participants will demonstrate
    beginning level skill proficiency in each program or activity.
3. Program Evaluation:
    a. 50% of participant program evaluations will be returned.
    b. 80% of evaluations will show achievement of one (or more) learning outcome(s).
    c. 75% of evaluations will rate program effectiveness as good or excellent.
    d. One item will be identified to improve the program in the future.
Results:
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1. Due to the February 14, 2008, incident, no data were analyzed prior to deferment of this goal to
   FY09.
2. RS could not identify a student who desired a Fitness Specialist internship.
3. Yoga class was discontinued during Spring 08 due to lack of participation.
Use of Results:
1. Internship pursued in FY09.
2. RS continued to collaborate with the CAAR staff during FY09 to develop programs for this student
   population.

FY09
Annual Priority 2:
Develop opportunities for students with disabilities to participate in recreation programs.
Targets:
1. Needs Assessment: Intern will perform a fitness assessment on 100% of participants. Intern will
    develop a fitness program for each student with disabilities to achieve their own personal fitness
    goals.
2. Observation: Intern will monitor 100% of participants’ progress every two weeks and provide
    written and verbal suggestions to all participants to achieve their fitness goals.
3. Program Evaluation: (a) 80% of participants will complete program evaluations and 75% of
    participants will rate program effectiveness good or excellent. (b) 75% of program participants will
    identify at least three strategies for maintaining or achieving fitness goals.
Results:
1. Internship: In collaboration with KNPE faculty and Center for Access-Ability Resources (CAAR) staff
    developed an internship (see Appendix I) to assist students with disabilities in engaging in a fitness
    program. Secured a KNPE intern for Spring 2009. Intern completed 200 hours of work in this area.
2. Promotions: (a) CAAR office could not provide appropriate meetings for intern to attend to promote
    program and seek student engagement. (b) Instead, intern staffed informational tables on January
    14, 2009, and March 4, 2009, at CAAR Office. Low traffic of students and low interest resulted in no
    one willing to participate in program. (c) Created two fliers between January 14, 2009 and March 4,
    2009, and distributed via e-mail to registered students by CAAR staff. (d) CAAR and RS websites
    incorporated links to both homepages and a landing page about accessibility programming provided
    by RS.
3. Activities: In collaboration with CAAR staff, offered four activities to assist in engaging students with
    disabilities. Students did not participate in programs offered: (a) Yoga - April 7, 2009; 8:30 - 9:30
    p.m. (b) Volleyball - April 8, 2009; 7:00 - 8:00 p.m. (c) Small Group Fitness Orientation - April 13,
    2009; 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. (d) One-on-one Personal Training Session - April 14, 2009; 3:30 - 6:30 p.m.
4. Program Evaluations: None due to no participation.
5. Additional findings: (a) For promotion purposes, RS was unable to obtain student names and e-mail
    addresses from the CAAR staff due to CAAR staff concerns about disclosing student names and e-
    mails to RS staff. (b) It was difficult to obtain face-to-face contact with CAAR students since the
    CAAR office is not a typical gathering place for CAAR students. (c) Lack of CAAR staff minimized
    opportunities for support and assistance in facilitating student engagement with RS. (d) CAAR-

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& Enrollment Management
    registered students are more concerned about obtaining academic support services from CAAR
    staff. (d) Colleagues from Campus Recreation profession and CAAR staff have indicated that there
    are difficulties in providing recreation programming to this population across the country.
Use of Results:
Recommendations by the Assistant Director for Fitness, Wellness, and Marketing and the Fitness Intern:
1. CAAR internal review may address issues that, if alleviated, will: (a) Create better opportunities for
   CAAR staff to assist RS in student recruitment and engagement. (b) Improve academic support
   services for students which may help students devote time for other developmental opportunities.
2. Benchmark other institutions to identify strategies that staff has used to engage students with
   disabilities to participate in recreation.
3. Explore technology options for reaching students (e.g., podcasting or video-casting might be a better
   media method for this population).
Note: Program suspended until staff resources can be identified to re-initiate this goal.

Other Evidence by Goal:
FY07
Incentive-Based Group Fitness Program
Results:
1. 50 participants signed up for the program.
2. 15 participants completed the program.
3. Participants expressed excitement to have a fitness goal.
4. Although many participants did not complete the program, they tried other class formats.
Use of Results:
1. Postponed developing a new incentive program until FY10.
2. Due to the lack participation in FY07, staff changed the focus of the incentive program. Originally
    the incentive program was designed to motivate participants to try different class formats as a
    means of increasing participation and retention.
3. The new goals focused primarily on continual participation instead of trying to influence students to
    participate in different class formats. Preliminary findings indicated increased participation in the
    FY10 incentive program.
4. Staff members are in the process of developing a patron feedback form in FY10 for incentive
    participants to determine if the program motivated them to continue their exercise program.

Department Program Goal 3: Provide a customer-centered environment that is welcoming,
responsive, and inclusive.
FY07
Annual Priority 2:
1. TTY (Nextalk Text Telephone) upgrade and installation.
2. Assess recreational interests and needs of students with disabilities and adjust services to increase
    recreational opportunities for students with disabilities.
Targets:
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1. TTY Upgrade and Installation: 100% of student, graduate assistant, and professional staff will
   demonstrate NexTalk proficiency use.
2. Assess Students with Disabilities Recreational Needs: Implementation of two new or modified
   activities/services that better serve students with disabilities recreation needs.
Results:
1. TTY Upgrade and Installation
   a. 100% of graduate assistants and full-time staff members attended NexTalk training.
2. Assess Students with Disabilities Recreational Needs (Appendix I)
   a. 41% (53 of 129) students surveyed.
   b. Students surveyed indicated the following:
        i. 49.1% (26 of 53) currently use Recreation Services and indicated participation in five top
             activities: basketball, volleyball, cardio/strength training, and/or walking/jogging.
        ii. 50.9% (27 of 53) do not use Recreation Services and indicated three top reasons for no
             participation: unaware of programs, no time, and/or disability prevent participation.
        iii. 30% indicated no knowledge of barriers and no previous visit to SRC.
        iv. 17% indicated no knowledge of current program offerings.
        v. Most significant suggestions were:
             a. Offer group fitness classes of varying difficulty.
             b. More volleyball and tennis open play times.
             c. More cardio and strength training equipment.
             d. Increase marketing of programs and services.
3. Note: Due to departmental leadership changes, the needs assessment was not developed and
   implemented until spring 2007.
Use of Results:
a. TTY Upgrade and Installation: In FY07 planned to continue and improve the program as follows: (a)
   Coordinate annual training to all graduate assistants and full-time staff, and expand training to
   include all service counter staff. (b) Develop a centralized tracking system to measure usefulness. (c)
   If funding is available install Ethernet connection (as needed) and NexTalk clients on SRC, FH, and
   Outing Centre (OC) service counter workstations.
   Note: Staff vacancies for FY08 and FY09 postponed this initiative until FY10. In FY10 department is
   reviewing initiatives listed above to determine if there is a patron need for this service.
b. Assess Students with Disabilities Recreational Needs: (a) In FY08 published an accessibility services
   statement on the department website and inserted accessibility services statement in the
   department brochure informing targeted population of available recreation assisted services. (b)
   Since FY08, RS staff distributes brochures at organizational fairs, the Employee Wellness Fair, new
   student Orientations and Open Houses annually.
c. Program Changes Based on Needs Assessment: (a) In consultation with Accessibility Resources staff
   and students with physical disabilities, Recreation Services hosted visually impaired class at Neptune
   Hall. The class was well received at first, but then student participation declined. Recreation
   Services eliminated the class at the end of the fall semester due to lack of participation. In addition,
   RS developed a new annual priority in FY08 to address programming needs for students with

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    physical disabilities. (b) Since FY07: Expanded volleyball open recreation times from morning and
    evening priority times to being available all the time. An additional volleyball court is added when
    needed. Also added a volleyball court at the Field House during high-use times. Tennis times have
    not changed due to limited court space. (c) Purchased ADA compliant strength and cardio
    equipment as follows: arm or foot Ergometer, Cybex Total Access – swing out seat for wheelchair
    access; adjustable functions – 5 machines (Bicep Curl, Overhead Press, Chest Press, Seated Row, and
    Pulldown); Dual Pulley Cable Stations (8); Free Weight Stations – Smith Machines (2); and
    Dumbbells; and (d) Redesigned website to include accessibility page. (c) In FY09: redesigned cardio
    and weight room areas so that 100% of stations were accessible.

FY07
Annual Priority 4:
Develop and implement online surveys (see Appendix J) for each programming area of Recreation
Services (outdoor, intramurals, fitness, and sport clubs) to assess interest in current and future
programs.
Targets:
1. Completion of 100 online surveys for fitness, outdoors, intramurals, and sport clubs.
2. 100 valid student e-mail addresses for distributing program information.
3. Consider new or modified programs if requested by 25% of survey respondents, if resources permit.
Results:
1. Surveys Overview: Completed 1930 online program survey questionnaires with valid e-mail
    addresses for notifications of program information: Fitness (793), Intramural Sports (449), Sport
    Clubs (271), and Outdoor Adventures (417). Note: 1212 students completed more than one survey.
2. Fitness – 793 respondents: (a) Results indicated strong interests in: Cardio 85% (688), Toning 75%
    (599), Mind/Body 67% (531). (b) Analysis of Findings: (1) No new programs identified from results.
    Already offering these programs. (2) Respondents interested in group fitness do not reflect number
    of FitPasses sold this year (519). (3) Lower interests in personal training (84), Massage Therapy (80),
    Nutrition Counseling (73), and Acupressure (36).
3. Intramurals – 449 respondents: (a) Results indicated strong interests in: Volleyball 43% (193),
    Softball 37% (168), Dodgeball 36% (161), Basketball 32% (143), Flag Football 32% (142). (b)
    Comparing 2006-2007 participations with surveyed interests these findings indicate: (1) Number of
    intramural teams for volleyball, softball, basketball, flag football, indoor soccer (30%-133), and floor
    hockey (23%-103) reflect survey interests. (2) Higher survey interests in dodgeball, badminton (25%-
    111), tennis (23%-104), and racquetball (12%-57) than actual participation. (3) Kickball 25% (113)
    and wallyball 14% (64) survey interests indicate potential new programs. Although wallyball results
    do not reflect target percentage, targeted potential users are typically at a lower percentage than
    more popular team sports. This percentage is a good indicator of the percentage of population that
    would be interested in playing the sport.
4. Sport Clubs – 271 respondents: (a) Results indicated strong interests in: Swimming Club 32% (84),
    Ultimate Frisbee Club 30% (80), and Fencing Club 19% (51). (b) Analysis of Findings: (1) Swimming
    Club and Ultimate Frisbee interests indicates potential growth for the club.(2) Interest survey results
    indicated that the majority of clubs received between 10%-20% interest equating to 25-50 potential
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& Enrollment Management
   new club members. (3) Respondents indicated minimal interest in other sport clubs not currently
   offered at NIU ranging between 0.4%-1.1%
5. Outdoor Adventures – 417 respondents: (a) Results indicated strong interests in: Climbing 57%,
   Camping 52%, Night Hikes 49%, Canoeing 45%, Kayaking 44%, Backpacking 42%, Spelunking (caving)
   38%. (b) Analysis of Findings: (1) Climbing, night hikes, canoeing, backpacking, and caving interest
   survey results reflect current participant interest. (2) Survey results indicate significant interest in
   camping. Recreation Services has offered camping clinics and incorporated 20 nights of camping
   into weekend trips such as rock climbing and canoeing. (3) Survey results indicate significant interest
   in kayaking, but it has been difficult obtaining qualified staff to facilitate a kayak trip.
Use of Results:
1. Further survey development for each program area to identify current program interests, new
   programs, and participant needs regarding program types, offering times, etc.
2. Reevaluate the 25% threshold to discern significant interest levels. Some programs such as wallyball
   and kickball may be small programs reflecting smaller interest percentages.
3. Develop a more intentional comprehensive marketing plan.
4. Program area recommendations in FY07 were:
   a. Fitness
        i. Ask respondents if they previously purchased a pass, currently have a pass, or plan to
             purchase a pass.
        ii. Ask respondents who indicated an interest in purchasing a fitness class but did not, why
             they chose not to purchase one.
        iii. Create an on-line notification system for FitPass holders to register for notifications of class
             information, upcoming events, and articles.
        iv. Update since FY07: Lack of staff resources prevented continuing conducting on-line interest
             surveys. In FY10, staff has implemented sending participant e-mail announcements about
             fitness schedule changes and upcoming events. Additionally, individuals who register for a
             fitness class and have participated in the free week of classes are required to note that on
             the new Event Based Management Software (EBMS) when registering. This data will allow
             staff to assess whether the free week participants are motivated to register for a class.
   b. Intramurals
        i. If budget permits, add kickball and wallyball to the intramural schedule.
        ii. Intentionally focus on marketing of sports demonstrating high interest and low participation
             (dodgeball, badminton, tennis, and racquetball).
        iii. Update since FY07: Lack of staff resources prevented continuing conducting on-line interest
             surveys. Staff is monitoring low participation sports. Implementation of the RS Program
             Guide, Reconstructed Website, and an Intramural Sports Facebook has assisted staff in
             marketing all sports. As of the fall of 2009 there are 555 student participants on the
             Intramural Sports Facebook site. Additionally, Dodgeball entry fees were reduced in the
             spring of 2009; however, reduced costs did not increase participation. Students have
             complained about having to pay to participate in Intramural Sports. Other institutions have
             dedicated recreation fees that support Intramural programming, which translates to either

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            no or minimal entry fees for participants. Other institutions have reported a decline in
            individual and dual Intramural participation. Kickball and wallyball have not been added to
            the schedule due to a lack of resources. Individual sports will be offered in the spring of
            2010 for free in an effort to encourage participation.
    c. Sport Clubs
       i. Conduct fall and spring marketing and recruitment workshops for Sport Club officers.
       ii. Ask survey respondents to indicate if they are interested in helping to organize a new club
            not currently formed.
       iii. Continue to list sport clubs not currently offered to monitor interest levels.
       iv. Update since FY07: In FY08 RS published procedures illustrating to students how they can
            start a new sport club in the RS fall and spring semester program guides and on the RS
            redesigned Website. Staff vacancy and other priorities postponed other work on this
            initiative until FY11. Plans for FY11 include: (a) conducting a fall member recruitment and
            retention workshop for Sport Club officers; (b) facilitating a Sport Club Open House at the
            SRC for club promotion through club demonstrations.
    d. Outdoor Adventures
       i. Identify current staff to be trained as kayak trip leaders.
       ii. Concentrate on programs (trips and clinics) that have strong interest level
       iii. Update since FY07: As of the fall 2009, three student staff members have kayaking skills to
            appropriately lead trips. Staff is exploring potential kayak sites.

FY09
Annual Priority 3:
Develop and implement a comprehensive student, (see Appendix K) faculty, and staff survey to study
the impact of recreation services on these populations. Survey will examine the usage of programs and
facilities, and needs/satisfaction with services, with an emphasis on the academic, social, emotional and
health-related outcomes of recreation programs. Note: Health-related outcomes refer to respondents'
self-perception of improved fitness levels, physical strength, feeling of well-being, weight control, and
overall health as it relates to participation in recreation.
Targets:
1. Needs Assessment: 35% students, faculty, and staff will complete a needs assessment survey.
2. Benchmarking: report will identify best practices from national survey participants. Three best
     practices will be identified and incorporated into final recommendations.
3. Departmental Analysis: final report will include data analysis; identify top three reported unmet
     needs of students; and top three 'feasible' recommendations for meeting reported unmet needs.
Results:
1. Needs Assessment: (a) Reviewed potential standardized comprehensive recreation needs
     assessment surveys in January to determine feasibility and whether potential data results would
     meet the NIU needs. (b) In February, after review of other surveys, designed own surveys (student
     and faculty/staff) in an effort for a more comprehensive assessment of RS (See Appendices IV and
     V). (c) Obtained Institutional Review Board approval on February 24, 2009. (d) Distributed survey

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   electronically to a random 2,989 sample of 81% undergraduate, 17% graduate, and 2% law students
   on April 4, 2009. Distributed two reminders On April 10 and 17 encouraging students who had not
   completed or only partially completed the survey to complete it. Kept survey open through June 3,
   2009 (note: left open until had time to begin analysis). (e) Faculty/staff survey has been developed;
   however, in consultation with the Assistant Vice President for Health and Wellness, RS decided to
   postpone the distribution of the survey until the fall at a more appropriate time of the year that may
   maximize the response rate. (f) Student survey data have been analyzed; however, please note that
   insufficient response numbers do not allow RS to generalize to the NIU student population.
2. Benchmarking: RS did not choose a standardized survey due to the lack of depth of these type
   surveys. Therefore, there is no opportunity for comparing NIU with other similar institutions.
3. Results: 74 partial and 224 completed surveys of 2,989 distributed; 9.96% return rate. Data analysis
   not completed. Insufficient data does not allow for findings to be utilized.
Use of Results:
1. Due to the insufficient number of student responses, RS will revisit this goal and determine the
   feasibility of a shorter survey provided by a commercial vendor in the field of recreation. If funds
   are available, RS will request survey implementation, collection of data, and analysis in FY11 for both
   students and faculty/staff.

Other Evidence by Goal:
FY05
Outdoor Adventure Program Evaluations (see Appendix L)
Results (Composite Evaluations from August 2006 to May 2009):
From a 1 (poor) to 5 (excellent) scale rating:
1. Respondents (548) gave a 4.87 overall rating for OA trips.
2. Respondents (548) gave a 4.80 for trip organization.
3. Respondents (561) rated staff trip leader effectiveness: trip leader at 4.89, assistant trip leaders at
   4.90, and support staff at 4.93. Additionally, 100% of the respondents (472) rated trip leader(s)’
   knowledge and skills to be satisfactory.
4. Of the 505 respondents, 502 (94%) indicated the staff drove safely and three (0.6%) reported that a
   staff member was driving unsafely.
5. Respondents (546) indicated that the staff: 34 (6.2%) overemphasized safety; 507 (92.9%) properly
   stressed safety; 5 (0.9%) did not emphasize safety enough; and 1 (0.2%) ignored safety.
6. Of the 516 respondents, 507 (98.3%) indicated that staff stressed environmentally (LNT concepts)
   sound practices. Four (0.8%) indicated that staff did not stress LNT concepts and six (1.2%) indicated
   that this was not applicable to their experience.
7. Respondents (521) rated staff’s abilities to provide appropriate information before the trip to
   prepare participants for the trip: 471 (90.4%) indicated yes; 6 (1.2%) indicated information was not
   helpful; 38 (7.3%) indicated not receiving information; and 5 (1%) indicated the need to provide
   more information.



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8. Respondents (519) indicated whether the pre-trip participant meetings were helpful: 261 (50.3%)
    indicated yes; 6 (1.2%) indicated no; and *252 (48.6%) indicated there was no meeting. *Note: Pre-
    trip meetings are not conducted for day trips. These respondents were day trip participants.
9. Respondents (548) rated the experience and indicated that the trip was: *167 (30.5%) even better
    than expected; 379 (69.2%) met my expectations; 1 (0.2%) did not meet my expectations; and 2
    (0.4%) partly met my expectations. *Note: This rating was added in FY06.
10. Respondents (558) rated the overall trip experience as: 424 (76%) very enjoyable; 130 (23%) as
    enjoyable; 4 (0.7%) as average; and 0 (0%) as not enjoyable.
11. Respondents (665) indicated the level of physical effort required for the trip: 26 (3.8%) too difficult;
    617 (93%) adequate difficulty; and 23 (3.4%) as too easy.
12. Respondents (539) indicated whether the equipment used on the trip was satisfactory: 511 (94.8%)
    yes, 21 (3.9%) no, and 11 (2%) yes and no.
13. *Respondents (310) indicated whether meals were satisfactory: 303 (97.7%) yes and 9 (2.9%) no.
    Question added November 11, 2005.
14. Respondents (535) indicated whether the location of the trip was satisfactory: 531 (99.8%) yes and 1
    (0.2%) no.
15. Respondents (534) indicated how they found out about OA trip opportunities. The top five
    responses were: e-mail (178), friend (163), internet (112), brochure (91), and word of mouth (82).
16. Participants indicated they learned about program opportunities from: E-mail (33.3%), Friend
    (30.5%), Internet (21 %), and Word of Mouth (15.4%).
Use of Results:
1. Two participants expressed concern about unsafe driving on two separate incidents. These issues
    were addressed with the indicated staff members. Written and practical driving tests have been
    incorporated in FY10. In addition, staff members must sign an agreement of complying with safe
    driving standards. The importance of safe driving is discussed regularly in staff meetings.
2. Overemphasizing safety has been discussed in staff meetings. Safety is of paramount importance
    and staff is instructed to confront participants who are behaving unsafely. Overemphasis, however,
    can result in participants not listening.
3. When participant ratings indicate that staff members have not implemented environmental
    practices, then it is addressed in meetings. Topics have included: talking too loud and not picking up
    garbage.
4. When participant ratings indicate the information was not distributed or appropriate, staff discusses
    this issue. On occasion it has been observed that participants have received information but they
    indicate on the evaluation that they did not.
5. Pre-trip meetings are critical to ensure that all participants have the necessary information to
    prepare for the trip. This information is not as helpful for the more experienced participant. The
    pre-trip meeting question was deleted from program evaluations for trips not requiring a meeting.
6. Some participants reported that the trips were too difficult or easy. Most trips are designed for
    beginning levels, and this is communicated in pre-trip meetings. When reports indicate participant
    dissatisfaction, staff members discuss it at staff meetings. Staff members work on being flexible
    with activities in an attempt to accommodate varying participant skill levels. Staff members have

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   observed that sometimes students report possessing higher level skills than actually demonstrated.
   Students' inability to demonstrate accurate self-appraisals may be influenced by their evaluation of
   the trip's difficulty level. Part of the outdoor experience provides students opportunities to learn
   how to more realistically appraise their skills.
7. Some participants reported that they would prefer that the Outing Centre purchase more innovative
   equipment. When funds are available, the staff takes this into consideration. However, budgetary
   constraints limit the ability to overhaul the equipment program.
8. The Outdoor Adventure e-mail listserv continues to assist in promoting the program.

FY07
Group Fitness Class Program Evaluations and Learning Outcomes (see Appendix M)
Results:
1. Program evaluations were distributed October 9-30, 2006 and March 26 – April 5, 2007.
2. Number of evaluations collected: October - 70; March/April – 65; 26% of FitPass holders (135/519)
3. Results:
          Learned Outcomes/Evaluation          Fall       Spring
          One new exercise                     87% (61)
          Proper exercise form                 90% (63) 86% (56)
          More about fitness                   75% (53) 68% (44)
          Strength training principles         Yes        68% (44)
          Importance of cardiovascular
                                               -          55% (36)
          training
          Exercise safety                      -          65% (42)
          Heart rate zones and monitoring
                                               -          38% (25)
          heart rate
          Muscle identification                -          48% (31)
          Other (yoga, Pilates, flexibility,
                                               Yes        -
          balance, and core strength.
          Stretching/flexibility               Yes        Yes

4. Participant suggestions: (a) More dance classes (salsa/hip hop); (b) More spinning classes at night;
     More Abs, Glutes, and Thighs (AGT) group fitness classes.
5. Other Findings - Spring semester respondents: (a) Only 38% reported knowing how to monitor their
     exercise heart rate. (b) Only 48% could identify muscles. (c) Only 55% reported importance of
     cardiovascular training. (c) Only 65% reported exercise safety. (d) Only 68% reported learning
     strength training principles.
Notes: Participants are asked what they learned and not what they already knew before taking the class.
Fall semester participants listed their own learned outcomes. Spring semester participants were
provided a list of learned outcomes and an area to list other outcomes.
Use of Results:


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1. Consistently facilitated Group Fitness Program Evaluations since FY07. Changes were made as
   follows:
   a. During instructor training, taught instructors how to convey importance and appropriate
        teaching methods: (a) How and when to monitor heart rates during exercise; (b) Muscle
        identification; (c) Cardiovascular exercise; (d) Exercise safety; and (e) Strength training
        principles.
   b. Group Fitness Evaluations have been separated into two distinctive surveys: (a) class and
        instructor evaluations and (b) program evaluations to identify patrons’ time and day
        preferences.
   c. Listed learning outcomes for participant ease in identifying what he/she learned as a result of
        the experience.
   d. To further identify patron preference of class times and days, several options have been listed
        on the program evaluation.
   e. Developed an on-line survey in the fall of 2008 and offered incentives to increase the response
        rate; however, received a poor response rate. Returned to using paper surveys in classes.
   f. Developed a more consistent time frame for distributing and collecting evaluations. Began
        distributing surveys after the first month of classes for a two-week period in FY09. Also,
        distributed surveys for two weeks, one month after classes have changed at mid-semester.
   g. Added more dance, spinning at night, and AGT (toning) classes.

FY07
Recreation Services UNIV 101 Orientation Program
Results:
1. 34 tours were conducted by Recreation Services staff
2. 34 relaxation, group fitness or sport activity exercises were facilitated by Recreation Services staff
    members
3. 13 health/wellness topics were presented by Recreation Services staff
4. 573 UNIV 101/201 participants
5. 353 completed surveys (Appendix N) (65%) indicating: (a) Only 23% of those indicated visiting the
    SRC prior to the orientation (67 of 288). (b) 21% of respondents indicated no prior visits to the SRC
    (75 of 353). (c) Although 82% of respondents indicated visiting the SRC prior to the tour; students
    indicated that they learned something new during the program (288 of 353). (d) The top five areas
    students indicated learning something new: (1) Intramural sports (88), (2) Fitness/wellness (68), (3)
    Open Recreation (58), (4) Personal trainers (41), (5) Outdoor adventure (33). (e)Respondents
    provided positive unsolicited feedback regarding the tour and activity.
Use of Results:
1. Develop specific learning outcomes.
2. Further develop survey demonstrating students’ general understanding of programs, services,
    where to obtain information and how to register for programs.
3. Integrate a program evaluation to assess program usefulness and staff performance.
4. Develop an interactive activity to engage participants during walking tour.
Note: Continually implemented the program; however, department priorities and staff changes
prevented further program development. Staff members have discussed programmatic and staffing
issues. Program redesign will occur in the spring of 2010 and will be implemented in the fall of 2010.
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& Enrollment Management
Program development will address: identifying learning outcomes; appropriately training student staff
for implementation; applicable interactive activities; and program evaluations to include program
effectiveness, staff performance, and learning outcomes.

FY07
Develop New and Innovative Outdoor Adventure Trips
Results:
1. After reviewing benchmarking and facilitating staff discussion for the development of new trips the
   following trips were designed: Plein Air Day Hike (hiking and sketching nature); Yoga Day Hike
   (hiking and yoga exercises in nature setting); Star Gazing (NIU observatory); Geocaching (GPS to find
   “treasures” or caches that have been hidden); Beginning camping/hiking/backpacking weekend
2. The following offerings were canceled due to lack of registrants: Plein Air Day Hike and Geocaching
3. Trip evaluations yielded the following:
   a. Yoga Day Hike (2 trips) – 12 participants. 67% reported learning basic yoga poses, 33%
        fundamentals of Plein-Air art, 33% about White Pines State Park, 67% about Matthiesson and
        Starved Rock Sate Parks.
   b. Star Gazing – 10 participants. 100% reported learning how to identify stars, constellations,
        galaxies, and planets. 14% reported learning navigation tools to locate stars, constellations,
        galaxies, and planets. 86% reported learning about the Davis Hall Observatory.
   c. Beginning Camping/Hiking/Backpacking (2 trips) – 15 participants. 100% reported learning
        basics of camping and hiking, campsite set-up, food preparation, hiking trails offered at White
        Pines, and tent set-up and take-down.
Use of Results:
Update since FY07:
1. Due to lack of interest, no longer offer Geocaching or Plein Air hikes.
2. Interest in stargazing has waned; therefore, will exclude this from the schedule.
3. Continual exploration of creative outdoor opportunities have resulted in staff concentrating on a
   more educational focus of the outdoor adventure experience: (a) Wolf Park Hike: see wolves, learn
   how wolves are treated by people, and how wolves behave in the wild; (b) Urban Canoe Adventure:
   canoe downtown Chicago and get a new perspective of the city; (c) Chicago Botanical Gardens:
   explore the ecological surroundings of plant and tree life; (d) snowshoeing; (e) eagle watching; and
   (f) Service Trip: Clean-up Shabbona Lake.

FY07
Document Review of RS and Program Area Brochures
Results:
1. RS Brochure listed program areas and activity areas (limited information).
2. Program areas offered individual program brochures. Analysis indicated that there was
   inconsistency in style, format, and language. Additionally, it was not evident that all program areas
   connected to department initiatives.
Use of Results:

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FY07:
1. Created a general RS Brochure (see Appendix O) describing program areas, membership benefits,
    accessibility, and risks involved in participating.
2. Distributed brochures to faculty/staff, New Student Open Houses, Summer Orientation, and other
    tabling events.
FY08:
1. Created RS Fall and Spring Program Guides (see Appendix P) representing all program areas, which
    included events, activity dates, registration deadlines, and costs.
2. Created an Outdoor Adventure brochure providing description of events and rental gear
    information.
3. Distributed RS Guides and OA Brochure to residence hall mailboxes, at SRC, and at tabling events.
4. Developed a RS Annual Banquet Sponsorship Brochure describing donation opportunities and
    distributed to perspective sponsors.
Future Considerations:
1. To further promote the RS Website, reduce printing (improve sustainability ), maximize resources:
    a. Postcards instead of brochures for New Student Summer Orientations, Residence Hall
        Mailboxes, and New Student Open Houses.
    b. Incorporate OA Brochure into RS Program Guide.

FY08
RS Website Document Review
Results:
1. Difficulty finding information
2. Format not consistent with NIU new website format.
3. Poor written quality – not concise.
4. Lacked photos and graphics.
5. Lacked forms that patrons could download and print for convenient access.
Use of Results:
1. In FY08 converted to NIU format providing: easier navigation; distinctive left navigation buttons
   more explicitly defining programs; distinctive top navigations buttons for specified user groups (i.e.,
   students, faculty and staff, alumni and friends, and community and guests); more concise language);
   added graphics and photos
2. In FY09 added: patron forms for more convenient access; on-line program registration; graphic icons
   to emphasize various programs.
3. Future considerations: surveys and forms submitted on-line, links to You-tube video.

FY09
2008 Student Survey of NIU Services for Living Well – Recreation Services Section of Community of
Practice Survey (see Appendix Q)
Results:
1. Distributed to 3,000 random student sample students in fall 2008 with a 22% return rate.

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2. Results indicated:
        a. 61% of respondents reported using Recreation Services
        b. 63% of students who do not use RS facilities are unaware of programs and services.
        c. 80% of respondents indicated “no wait time” to use RS facilities and equipment influences
            their participation.
        d. 74% and 76% of respondents indicated that high quality and variety of RS equipment,
            respectively, influence their participation.
        e. Respondents indicated the likelihood of increasing participation if these were improved: (1)
            Cardio equipment – 40%, (2) Indoor jogging track – 35%, (3) Strength training equipment –
            33%, Outdoor fields – 29%, and (4) Aquatics – 27%.
        f. Respondents indicated the likelihood of increasing participation if these areas were
            expanded or added: (1) Cardio equipment 33%, (2) Aquatics connected to SRC – 32%, (3)
            Outdoor Adventure climbing area – 30%, and (4) Strength training equipment 34%.
        g. Reasons for not participating in RS: (1) No time – 51%, (2) Cardio & Strength training areas
            too crowded 32%, (3) Not currently, but would like to 29%, (4) Availability of activities do
            not match schedule 19%, and (5)No skills/knowledge to participate 10%.
Use of Results:
1. Need to develop a marketing plan to increase awareness of programs and services.
2. Will continue efforts in securing funds for quality equipment. Equipment for funding was increased
   by 25% in FY08 and FY09. Department needs will be communicated to the Student Association and
   Finance and Facilities.
3. Need to develop long-term plans/strategies to expand areas.
4. Beginning fall 2009, certified personal trainers are available for students 12 hours per week. Need
   to identify staff resources to create an educational plan to teach students how to: (a) prioritize and
   make time for recreation (not addressed yet) and (b) use cardio and strength training equipment

FY09
Open Recreation Patron Survey (see Appendix R)
Results:
Students, faculty, staff, community, and alumni members who used the Student Recreation and/or Field
House in the fall of 2008 were surveyed. The surveys were distributed for four weeks in October, 2008.
There were 110 respondents—62 male and 48 female; 90% students, 8% faculty/staff, and 2% Alumni
Members; 25% freshmen, 17% sophomore, 19% junior, 33% senior, and 8% grad/post grad.
Top Results indicated:
1. SRC Use: 43% four times per week; 30% six times per week; 19% two times per week (males tended
    to use the SRC four to six times per week when compared to females who used the SRC two to four
    times per week).
2. FH Use: 24% two times per week (females used FH 6% more than males).
3. Men (85%) reported using free weight areas more than women (32%).
4. The cardio/strength training areas are used far more than any area in the facility. Respondents
    reported participating in the following in priority order: (1) Cardio (85%), (2) Strength Training (77%),

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     Jogging Track (63%), Basketball (32%), Racquetball (24%), Tennis (15%), Volleyball (12%), Wallyball
     (5 %), Dodgeball (3%), Badminton (3%), and Table Tennis (2%).
5.   Also, women (75%) reported using the jogging track more than men (45%).
6.   Regarding availability of check-out equipment, respondents gave an overall rating of 1.86 from a
     scale of one (always available) to five (never available). Respondents reported lower availability
     ratings for wallyballs (2.05), basketballs (2.04), and table tennis paddles (2.00).
7.   Regarding check-out equipment quality, respondents gave an overall rating of 1.90 from a scale of
     one (very good) to five (poor). Respondents reported lower quality ratings for hockey sticks (2.50)
     and racquetball racquets (2.06).
8.   Regarding sport and fitness equipment in the facilities, respondents gave an overall rating of 1.95
     from a scale of one (very good) to five (very bad). Areas of reported concerns were: Stretching Mats
     (2.30), Steppers (2.22), Treadmills (2.10), Bikes (2.09), Stability Balls (2.06), Medicine Balls (2.02),
     and Ellipticals (2.00).
9.   Regarding facility cleanliness, respondents gave an overall rating of 1.91 from a scale of one (very
     clean) to five (not very clean). Areas of reported concerns were: Bathrooms (2.29), Free Weight
     Room (2.27), Power Lift Room (2.13), and Locker Rooms (2.10).

Use of Results:
1. It is evident that cardio, strength training areas, and the jogging track are high-use areas. Currently
   there are no plans to expand these spaces due to funding limitations. However, RS has conveyed to
   the Student Association, Finance and Facilities, and the Division of Student Affairs & Enrollment
   Management that most universities of similar enrollments have three times the square footage
   dedicated to cardio and strength training spaces. When RS has an opportunity to renovate and/or
   expand, the staff will convey the importance of adding space and equipment to more appropriately
   accommodate students.
2. The jogging track is a high use area, especially for women. This track length is small in comparison
   to newer facilities, and other students cross the track to gain access to the courts. This is an ongoing
   issue that can only be resolved by a major renovation. Typically jogging track areas are on a second
   level that overlooks gymnasium and fitness areas to alleviate students from crossing the track to
   access other spaces. RS staff will note this for a future renovation.
3. RS staff is researching ways to educate the female population about the benefits of free weight
   strength training. Additionally, RS staff needs to address how to reduce women’s feelings of
   intimidation in using a space that is primarily used by men.
4. As a result of the survey, the equipment check-out process has been improved. Open Recreation
   staff are inspecting equipment daily to ensure that equipment is in good condition and there are
   appropriate numbers to check out. Damaged or worn equipment is being replaced immediately
   from an in-house supply. Lost equipment is being replaced within two weeks. Typically lost
   equipment has been returned in three to six days. The Director has asked the Coordinator of Open
   Recreation to develop a system that provides a quicker replacement time for lost equipment instead
   of waiting for a returned item.


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5. Hockey sticks are typically checked out during Intramural Sports. However, since there is a need for
   seasonal drop-in use, the Director has asked the Coordinator of Open Recreation to determine the
   feasibility of purchasing hockey sticks for Open Recreation equipment check out.
6. The Associate Director has had conversations with the Building Services Supervisor and indicated
   there were cleanliness concerns in the locker room. The Associate Director and the Building
   Services Supervisor are conducting periodic facility inspections to identify and address problem
   areas.
7. The Coordinator has implemented a more stringent cleaning schedule both in the cardio/strength
   and free weight strength training areas. The Coordinator is currently working on a cleaning schedule
   to address issues in the Power Lift Room.

FY09
Open Recreation Aquatics Patron Survey (see Appendix S)
Results:
1. 110 patrons completed the survey.
2. Patrons reported optimal times to use pool: (a) 7:00-8:00 a.m. (13, 11%); (b) 8:00-9:00 a.m. (15,
   14%); (c) 9:00-10:00 a.m. (17, 16%); (d) 10:00-11:00 a.m. (33, 30%); (e) 11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. (38,
   35%); (f) 12:00-1:00 p.m. (45, 41%); 1:00-2:00 p.m. (42, 38%); 2:00-3:00 p.m. (27, 25%); 3:00-4:00
   p.m. (25, 23%); 4:00-5:00 p.m. (13, 12%); 5:00-6:00 p.m. (21, 19%); 6:00-7:00 p.m. (27, 25%); 7:00-
   8:00 p.m. (25, 23%); 8:00-9:00 p.m. (19, 17%); 9:00-10:00 p.m. (7, 13%).
3. Patrons reported optimal days to use pool: Monday-Friday (51, 46%); Seven days a week (29, 26%);
   Monday, Wednesday, and Fridays only (24, 22%); Tuesday and Thursday only (3, 2.7%); Mondays
   and Tuesdays only (1, 0.9%); and Mondays and Sundays only (1, 0.9%).
4. Comments included: (a) Want more hours (30, 27%); (b) Want longer lap swim hours (21, 19%); (c)
   Doing a great job (15, 14%); (d) More accessible locker area (15, 14%); (e) Cooler water temperature
   (10, 9%); (f) Better backstroke flags (6, 5.5%); (g) More professional equipment (5, 4.5%); (h)
   Warmer showers (4, 3.6%); (i) Cleaner facilities (3, 2.7%); (j) Expand Open Swim one hour longer (2,
   1.8%); (k) Offer wider variety of times to meet everyone’s schedule (2, 1.8%); (l) Better signage
   informing patrons of hours and pool maintenance updates (2, 1.8%); (m) Earlier hours on Sunday (1,
   0.9%); (n) More evening hours (1, 0.9%); (o) More consistent pool temperature (1, 0.9%); and (p)
   Dedicate 30 minutes per day for faculty staff swim only and specify lanes for therapy swimmers and
   slower swimmers (1, 0.9%).
Use of Results:
1. Added lap swim time. Expanded from 12:00-1:30 p.m. to 11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Monday through
   Friday. Note: Funding limitations to pay for personnel limit the number of hours RS can expand
   hours.
2. Addressed cleanliness issue with Building Services staff.
3. Addressed the need for warmer showers and pool temperature with the Heating Plant staff.
4. Improved communication with patrons of pool conditions by posting daily temperature and
   chemical readings. Established appropriate temperature ranges between 65° - 75° Fahrenheit.
5. Post the name of the lifeguard on duty for patrons.

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6. Purchased and installed backstroke flags.
7. Purchased water equipment such as water dumbbells and weight belts.
8. Note: In addition to survey, patrons complained about not having access to lockers. Upon
   investigation current staff discovered that the lockers had not been managed or maintained. RS
   staff cleaned out lockers and implemented a day-use and long-term use locker system. In addition,
   posted day use, locker rental, and locker room use policies in locker rooms. Patrons have provided
   positive feedback on gaining access to locker use. Identified lockers that needed repair (i.e.,
   handles, latches, doors, etc.) and currently Physical Plant craftsmen are repairing them.
9. RS future considerations as resources become available:
   a. Offer a morning swim a couple of days of the week.
   b. Expand and improve patron aquatic equipment.
   c. Improve locker area accessibility.

FY09
Evaluation of Open Recreation Aquatic Swim Participation FY2007-FY2009 (see Appendix T)
Results:
1. Analyzing FY09 men’s participation was 4,476 (64%) and women’s participation was 2,563 (36%).
2. Average number of participants per swimming lane at Gabel pool within 1/2 hour was six people.
3. Anderson pool was closed twelve times during the year.
4. When comparing FY09 participation numbers to FY07 and FY08:
        a. Monthly numbers increased each month except for July, April and May.
        b. Annual numbers increased by 25% when compared to FY08 and 38% when compared to
            FY07.
        c. Average pool participations per shift increased 73% from 11 in FY08 to 19 in FY09.
Use of Results:
1. Currently exploring methods of promoting aquatics program to women to increase participation
    among women.
2. As resources become available: expand hours to accommodate being overcrowded.
3. Aging aquatic areas are increasingly becoming a problem. In the future, RS needs to address
    potential renovation/expansion to accommodate students, faculty, and staff.

FY09
RS Customer Feedback (see Appendix U)
Results:
1. Developed a customer feedback card system to allow patrons an opportunity to provide input and
    suggestions.
2. Developed procedures to ensure that patron comments were recorded, addressed by the
    appropriate professional, and appropriate responses provided to customers indicating their wish to
    receive a response.
3. In FY2009 37 patron comments were collected and concerns were addressed.
Use of Results:

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4. Some noted improvements, changes, and staff reminders are highlighted:
      a. Ceiling leaks - Roof Section 2 was replaced in Fall 2009 which eliminated this problem.
      b. Wallyball net not set-up on time - reminded staff of responsibilities.
      c. Cardio-Fitness Machines in Need of Repair (3) - indicated status of projected repair time.
      d. Install hand sanitizers in fitness rooms (3) - completed fall 2009.
      e. Not enough badminton racquets for check-out - monitoring number of racquets available
         for checkout and equipment condition more closely.
      f. Not enough racquetball racquets for check-out (4) - monitoring number of racquets
         available for checkout and equipment condition more closely.
      g. Need more 65cm stability balls - purchase the spring of 2009.
      h. Considering returning to old locker systems allowing patrons to bring own locks instead of
         using digital locker system. Also, lock digital pads are not cleared when students are done
         using them resulting in a lack of available day-use lockers (6) - many other patrons have
         complimented staff for installing the digital locker system. RS developed procedures to
         ensure staff conducted more routine checks of appropriate use of day-use lockers.
      i. Vending machine did not properly dispense product - informed patron of refund procedure.
      j. Uncomfortable room temperature - asked patron to inform staff at time of situation so that
         it can be addressed.
      k. Dissatisfaction with TV channel selection in cardio area: RS staff controls TV channel
         selection on eight televisions and monitors stations for appropriateness to general public.
         Asked patron to inform staff of needs or inappropriate programs.
      l. RS staff seen opening locker for patron without requesting ID - New procedure employed to
         record when staff opens a locker. Patron identification is noted on form and patron must
         sign document demonstrating the transaction.
      m. Lack of signage in track area - RS updated and posted new signs.
      n. Inquiry about accuracy of women's weight scale - informed patron how RS periodically tests
         the scale for accuracy.
      o. Not enough space to play volleyball - other patrons indicated same in Fall 2009. Added
         another timeslot for volleyball at SRC and when needed staff will set-up a volleyball net up
         at FH.
      p. Large floor fans needed in cardio area for improved ventilation - floor fan placed to
         temporarily remedy ventilation issues.
      q. Not enough towels and spray bottles in cardio room - staff checked supply; reminded staff
         to monitor supply; asked patron to inform staff when supply running low.
      r. Enforce patron time limit for cardio machine use (2) - RS staff reminded to monitor and
         enforce policy. Asked patron to inform staff at time of violation of this policy so that it can
         be addressed appropriately.

5. Items not resolved:
       a. Incorporate fitness class fees into recreation fee - currently no dedicated recreation fee to
          fully support RS programs.

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        b. Open earlier on weekends - budgetary limitations restrict RS from opening earlier.
        c. Open longer of Fridays - budgetary limitations restrict RS from staying open later on Fridays.
        d. Badminton priority times not optimal (2) - need to install badminton standards floor sleeves
           in lower use areas to accommodate badminton users.
        e. Do not like the new bench press - limitations of bench press will be considered in future
           purchase.
        f. Wiser spending of funds for equipment and equipment repairs (2) - annual funding
           allocation does not support adequate equipment replacement with anticipated equipment
           lifecycles. Currently attempting to improve repair time.
        g. Music in fitness rooms not good - RS provides music that is non-offensive and with
           mainstream genre. RS exploring option of offering no music and asking patrons to use own
           IPods (other institutions are moving in that direction - reduction of noise pollution). Almost
           all cardio equipment has headset access for music and television.
        h. Enforce patron time limit for cardio machine use (2) - RS staff reminded to monitor and
           enforce policy. Asked patron to inform staff at time of violation of this policy so that it can
           be addressed appropriately. RS staff currently exploring other methods of managing this
           policy.
        i. Large floor fans needed in cardio area for improved ventilation - floor fans temporarily
           remedy ventilation issues. RS staff exploring ways to improve ventilation in this area with
           Heating Plant staff.
        j. Install punching and speed bags - RS staff exploring appropriate location. When resources
           become available will purchase equipment to add this to the Open Recreation program.

Department Program Goal 4: Provide an aesthetically-pleasing, safe and comfortable
environment conducive for recreation.
FY09
Annual Priority 4:
Through an external consulting group, complete a risk assessment (Appendix V) of RS and compare
results to benchmark institutions.
Targets:
1. Risk Assessment On-Line Survey- completion of self-assessment survey for external risk
    management review.
2. Off-site External Review of On-Line Survey - as agreed by Recreation Services, off-site consultant will
    provide a report of risk assessment survey findings and make five recommendations for
    improvement.
3. Benchmarking - consultant will compare similar client institutions’ risk management practices with
    NIU RS risk management practices.
4. Departmental Analysis - will complete analysis of consultant report and provide report.
5. Goals - RS staff will develop a minimum of five short-term or long-term goals to improve the risk
    management program.
Results:


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1. Risk Assessment Online Survey: By June 15, 2008, RS completed the online risk assessment survey
   provide by an external consultant (McGregor and Associates Consulting Group) for all recreation
   facilities and program areas.
2. Off-site External Review of Online Survey and Benchmarking: By June 30, 2008, consultant provided
   a risk assessment report which included an explanation of key risk areas; current key risk
   management issues in sport and recreation today; role of risk management committee; importance
   of consistency; perspective on value of report; data analysis with comments and the department's
   score; score comparisons with other universities; consistency issues; priority recommendations; and
   top five priorities for NIU. Findings indicate that all program areas should be reviewed to determine
   if plans may be improved in the areas of documented risk management plans, safety awareness, in-
   service trainings, supervision ratios, employee certification requirements, lesson plans, risk
   management forms, signage, transportation, and the role of the Risk Management Committee.
3. Department Analysis: Director shared program analysis and discussed findings with each program
   director by November 1, 2008.
Use of Results:
1. RS is in the process of completing a detailed Risk Management Plan that includes both short-term
   and long-term goals. The plan identifies the issues, goals, person responsible to facilitate its
   completion, and a timeline for implementation. Please note that these tasks will take a considerable
   amount of staff time to complete; and therefore, goals and tasks will be prioritized as indicated by
   the Risk Management Plan.

Other Evidence by Goal:
FY08
Facility Audit – Cardio/Strength Training Room Flooring
Results:
1. Cardio/Strength Training Room area was carpeted. Carpeting is not an appropriate floor surface for
    an exercise area. Although the carpet was cleaned on a regular basis, it had an unpleasant odor.
Use of Results:
1. The carpet was replaced with a Mondo (synthetic product) floor product appropriate for exercise
    areas. Perspiration does not penetrate floor surface and is easy to maintain. Department has
    submitted a subsequent capital project to replace two free weight areas with same flooring product.

FY08
Risk Management/Emergency Response Committee (see Appendix W):
Results:
1. A Risk Management/Emergency Response Committee was identified.
2. Committee responsibilities and membership were defined
3. An Annual Responsibility Timeline was developed to begin in FY09.
4. Existing written risk management materials for each program area were reviewed by the Risk
    Management committee.
5. Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 priorities were developed.

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& Enrollment Management
6. A draft department policy was developed.
7. A draft department Incident/Accident/Theft report was developed.
8. University Assessment Panel funds were identified for an external consultant to perform a
   department online risk assessment.
Use of Results:
Due to staffing issues, goals for FY09 were postponed until FY10:
1. Review and revise documents, listed above (1-8).
2. Submit documents to Student Affairs & Enrollment Management and NIU legal counsel for approval.
3. Online risk assessment outcomes will be incorporated into risk management committee as
   appropriate.

FY09
Assessment of Gabel Pool Regulations (see Appendix X):
Results:
1. Analyzed pool regulations from twelve aquatic programs: Texas Tech University, Kishwaukee YMCA,
   DeKalb Park District, Ohio State University, Nebraska Lincoln, Montana Mazola, Bowling Green
   University, Ball State University, Washington State University, DeKalb High School, Rutgers
   University, Oregon State University, and Illinois State University.
2. Identified eleven rules that needed to be updated or added.
Use of Results:
1. As a result of this analysis developed more comprehensive pool regulations:
   a. Lifeguard has the authority to make and enforce the rules necessary to ensure the safety of all
        those present during RS program time.
   b. Pool use will only be permitted during RS sponsored programs when a RS lifeguard is on duty.
   c. All children under the age of 17 must be accompanied by an adult 18 years or older.
   d. Street shoes are not permitted on the pool deck.
   e. Shoulder length hair or longer should be pulled back or in a cap.
   f. T-shirts may be worn but they must be a solid color (no screen print on shirts).
   g. No glass on deck.
   h. Rough play/foul language/ or failure to comply with any rules may be grounds for dismissal from
        the pool area.
   i. For lap swim, lane assignments may be changed to fit the needs for those present (i.e., grouping
        fast swimmers together).
   j. When more than two swimmers are in a lane, laps must be "circle swim" (clockwise within a
        lane).
   k. Toys/floats may be used during open swim times as long as the guard's vision is not impaired
        (i.e., crowded pool use making it difficult for toys and floats to be used at that time).

Department Program Goal 5: Provide appropriate space, equipment, and supervision to
support patron recreational needs.


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Division of Student Affairs           Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
FY05
Annual Priority 1:
Complete FH renovation and open facility for use. Increase recreation opportunities through the
expansion and added versatility of the FH.
Targets:
1. Complete renovation and open facility for use.
2. Provide adequate space for Indoor Soccer and Floor Hockey by completing the in-line activity courts
    at the FH.
3. Provide adequate space for Sport Club activities.
Results:
1. Opened FH in fall 2004 and Grand Opening ceremony held in September 2004.
2. Hosted intramural indoor soccer and floor hockey competitions with approximately 20 teams
    participating in each sport. Offered new opportunities for Open Recreation Indoor Soccer and Floor
    Hockey, not offered before.
3. Approximately 200 sport club participants utilized the FH for practices during spring 2005.
Use of Results:
1. In FY05 the average daily participation was 300 users. In FY09 the average daily participation was
    400 users. The department continually evaluates student use. Indoor floor hockey and soccer are
    popular drop-in activities. Consistently, women use the small weight/cardio room. Courts and track
    are used but not at the same rates of participation as other activities. The department has shifted
    its intended use of the facility. Intramural Sports has been allocated space for its activities in an
    effort to increase facility use. Since Intramural Sports is a “destination” program, the department
    can easily redirect the location for this program.

Other Evidence by Goal:
FY09
Cardio and Strength Training Equipment Analysis:
Results:
Recreation Services is unable to keep pace with appropriate replacement of fitness equipment. On the
average other institutions replace fitness equipment: (a) cardio equipment every five years and (b)
strength training equipment every ten years. As of the Fall 2009, RS stations past lifecycles are: (a)
cardio machines – 70% (64 of 92 stations), (b) strength selectorized stations – 30% (12 of 28 stations);
and (c) free weight stations – 40% (23 of 34 stations).
Use of Results:
An inability to replace fitness equipment during its appropriate lifecycle continues to be a challenge.
Recreation Services continues to present equipment issues to the Student Association, Finance and
Facilities, and the Student Affairs & Enrollment Management Office. As a result of these conversations
capital equipment allocation had increased 25% in FY09 and FY10.

FY09
Patron Feedback of Trial Cardio and Strength Training Equipment:


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Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
Recreation Services collaborated with a Fitness Company to bring in different cardio and strength
training machines which gave students and other patrons an opportunity to provide feedback regarding
the functionality of the stations. The results were:
Fall 2008 (for a two week period):
Results:
Precor Glide (see Appendix Y)
Responses were – Did you like it? Yes (79); No (4). Positive responses included: multi-purpose, efficient,
awesome, versatile, additional station like this is good; provides more private area for workout; and
wide range of exercises. Negative response included: pulleys too far apart for arms; too close for chest;
and seems cheaply built.
Use of Results:
Reponses affirmed that students and patrons wanted this type of machine. Six machines (two different
models) were purchased which provided 12 workout stations and unlimited exercises. These stations
replaced an older style station that required three times the floor space. This purchase reduced the
amount of floor space needed for each station, thus maximizing fitness space. Numbers of stations
were increased from two to twelve.
Fall 2009 (for a two week period):
Results:
Matrix Treadmill (see Appendix Z)
Responses were: Buy it! (9); It’s Okay (2); I’ll Pass (0). Insufficient responses, while mainly positive,
indicated that further research of other models and patron trials are needed before a purchase decision
can be made. Positive comments on this model included: smooth function; nice touch screen; user
friendly; iPod connectivity. Patrons suggested adding a TV monitor to the machine.
Matrix Upright Bike (see Appendix Z)
Responses were: Buy it! (4); It’s Okay (2); I’ll Pass (3). Insufficient responses indicated that further
research of other models and patron trials are needed before a purchase decision can be made. Patrons
indicated that the seat was very uncomfortable.
Matrix Recumbent Bike (see Appendix Z)
Responses were: Buy it! (5); It’s Okay (0); I’ll Pass (0). Insufficient responses indicated that further
research of other models and patron trials are needed before a purchase decision can be made.
Positive comments on this model included: smooth function; nice touch screen; user friendly; iPod
connectivity. Patrons suggested adding a book tray to the machine.
Matrix Ascent Trainer (see Appendix Z)
Responses were: Buy it! (23); It’s Okay (3); I’ll Pass (1). Overall positive responses indicated that the
machine performed well, machine was smooth, provided a better workout, displays workout summary,
and has iPod connections. Patrons reported that heart rate monitor did not work. Also patron
suggested adding a book tray. There is a need for newer cross trainers; therefore, this model will be
considered in a future purchase.
Use of Results:
Matrix Treadmill
Staff will research other models and find a TV monitor option before next trial and/or purchase.

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Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
Matrix Upright Bike
Staff will research other models and find a more comfortable seat option before next trial and/or
purchase.
Matrix Recumbent Bike
Staff will research other models and find a book tray option before next trial and/or purchase.
Matrix Ascent Trainer
Although there were a moderate number of responses, the overall response was positive. There is a
need for newer cross-trainers. This model will be considered for future a purchase; however, the heart
monitor functionality and adding a book tray needs to be investigated prior to purchasing.

Department Program Goal 6: Promote and support staff development (student, part-time,
and full-time).

FY06
Annual Priority 5:
Increase the number of Intramural Sport Flag Football officials.
Targets:
24 Flag Football Officials for Fall 2005 Flag Football Program.
Results:
Marketing efforts included advertising in the Northern Star, flyers in the residence halls, and
announcements at other sport official training sessions. New officials increased by twelve, and those
were retained at 100%; and unsportsmanlike conduct incidents decreased as a result of improved game
management. Increase in officials accommodated six more Intramural Sport teams.
Use of Results:
Staff vacancy postponed targeted efforts to increase flag football officials. Staff members are revisiting
strategies for recruiting officials in various sports.


FY06
Annual Priority 1:
Create and implement a coordinated RS student employee training program for all building staff
members.
Targets:
1. 60% positive response rate from customer comments.
2. 85% passing scores on student training quizzes.
3. 85% of supervisor reports and duties forms are complete and accurate.
Results:
1. Revised training manual and employee forms.
2. Delivery methods for training expanded to include discussion of procedures, walk-through
    instruction, hands-on training and written testing.
3. Risk management training incorporated a process for when to contact the Department of Public
    Safety. CPR/AED and First Aid certification classes were offered.
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& Enrollment Management
4. Forty-eight Open Recreation staff completed area-specific exams with 8-10 questions, and 100%
    achieved 85% or better.
5. Patron satisfaction questions conducted in all three areas indicated that 94% of the patrons rated
    employees as performing their job at good or excellent.
Use of Results:
Changes in staff in FY08 and FY10 have shifted the focus of this goal. New staff member is charged with
redesigning staff training program for FY11.

FY06
Annual Priority 2:
Certify all student trip leaders with Wilderness First Aid.
Targets:
1. All student trip leaders will be certified in Wilderness First Aid by the end of the spring semester
    each year.
2. Assess suitability of program for professional presentation in FY07.
Results:
1. Assistant Director of Outdoor Adventure obtained the instructor certification for Wilderness First
    Aid.
2. After obtaining instructor status, the Assistant Director trained all Outdoor Adventure Trip Leaders,
    and all participants achieved 100% on the exam.
Use of Results:
1. All Outdoor Adventure Trip Leaders have been certified in Wilderness First Aid prior to leading a trip
    since FY06.

FY08
Annual Priority 1:
Develop a leadership program for student supervisors including facility supervisors, intramural
supervisors, student managers, and graduate assistants.
Targets:
1. Needs Assessment Survey (Appendix AA): (a) 70% of student employees and 100% of Graduate
    Assistants and full-time staff members will complete a published needs assessment survey. (b) A
    detailed report and executive summary will illustrate staff perceptions of needed employee skill
    development.
2. Benchmarking: report will identify best practices and recommendations of topics to be
    incorporated.
3. Other: Published leadership training program.
4. Program Evaluation (Appendix BB): (a) 90% completed program evaluations; (b) 85% effectiveness
    for each training session
Results:



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& Enrollment Management
1. Needs Assessment Survey: (a) 65% of student employees completed the needs assessment, 5%
    below target of 70%. (b) 100% of graduate assistants completed the needs assessment (target
    100%). (c) Staff needs assessment was deferred to FY09 due to the February 14 incident.
2. Benchmarking: Limited research conducted prior to 2/14. James Madison University Recreation
    uses a leadership program requiring a substantial purchase.
3. Annual Leadership Program: Two completed sessions and dates set for spring sessions indicated that
    a program was developed and partially implemented.
4. Program Evaluations:
    a. Session I: (1) 8 out of 17 participants completed the program evaluation at 47% return rate
         (target 90%). (2) 100% of program evaluation respondents demonstrated they achieved one or
         more of the established learning outcomes for the program (target 90%). (3) Participants
         completing program evaluations gave an overall rating of 4.6 out of 5. (4) 100% of respondents
         rated the program good or excellent (target 75%). (5) The top three things that participants
         reported learning in Session I were: (a) 5 Practices of Leadership; (b) Top 4 traits to be a leader;
         (c) Everyone has different leadership skills; people we interact with everyday are leaders who
         have influenced our lives.
    b. Session II: (1) 11 out of 15 participants completed the program evaluation at 73% return rate,
         which is 17% less than the projected target of 90%. (2) 93% of program evaluation respondents
         (14 of 15) demonstrated they achieved one or more of the established learning outcomes for
         the program (target 90%). (3) Participants completing program evaluations gave an overall
         rating of 4.3 out of 5. 93% of respondents (14 of 15) rated the program good or excellent
         (target 75%). (4) The top four things that participants learned in Session II were: (a) My
         leadership style, strengths, and weaknesses; (b) Different leadership styles; (c) Effective
         communication; (d) working with people who are different from me. (5) Participants’
         suggestions for improvement: (a) More activities and interaction; (b) More individual/group
         discussion; Audio/visual presentation/aids; More narrow and in-depth focus; Outside speakers.
         (6) Post-tests were conducted after each session to determine whether participants were able
         to understand the basic concepts of each session.
Use of Results:
This information was used as a foundation to develop the FY09 leadership program. Some suggestions
were as follows:
1. Conduct needs assessment prior to first session.
2. Distribute reading materials in advance to participants so they have time to read the material prior
    to attending the session.
3. Incorporate interactive, group discussion, and experiential learning activities into each session.
4. Develop a three-year leadership plan to enable the sessions to have a more narrow focus and in-
    depth understanding of topics.
5. Identify external parties who can speak to the group about various leadership topics.

FY09
Annual Priority 1:

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Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
Develop a leadership program for student supervisor positions including facility supervisors, intramural
supervisors, student managers, graduate assistants, and other identified employee leaders. This group is
called the Student Leadership Team (SLT).
Targets:
1. Benchmarking: Report will identify best practices of Student Leadership Training Programs. Top
     three common topics will be incorporated into curriculum.
2. SLT Needs Assessment (see Appendix CC): 70% of SLT participants will complete a NA survey.
     Report will summarize student training needs.
3. Professional Staff Needs Assessment (see Appendix DD): 100% of professional staff will complete a
     NA survey. Report will summarize professional staff needs.
4. Program Evaluations (see Appendix EE): (a) 90% of participants will complete program evaluations,
     and 75% of participants will rate program effectiveness good or excellent (for all six sessions). (b)
     90% of participants will complete post-tests and achieve 85% or better on all six tests.
Results:
1. Benchmarking: Conducted web review in August 2008 to identify best practices of recreation
   leadership training programs. Only programs found were: James Madison University, Ohio University,
   Portland State University, University of North Dakota, and Washington State University. Common
   topics identified were: leadership, professional development, interpersonal relations, group
   dynamics, ethics, decision making, and community involvement. All except community involvement
   were incorporated into NIU RS sessions.
2. SLT Participant Needs Assessment: Completed a needs assessment survey by September 25, 2008, to
   identify SLT participant skills that were important to their respective recreation employee position
   and future career. Results indicated: (a) 78% of participants completed the needs assessment, 8%
   above 70% target. (b) Topics identified by SLT participants were ranked according to frequency (most
   frequent to least): (1) Oral Communication, (2) Problem Solving, (3) Leadership, (4) Organizational
   Skills, (5) Ability to Multi-task, (6) Program Development – Planning, (7) Ethical Decision Making, (8)
   Advising, (9) Supervision, (10) Time Management, (11) Group Facilitation, (12) and Training and
   Presentation Skills.
3. Professional Staff Needs Assessment: Completed a needs assessment by September 30, 2008, for
   professional staff to identify skills that were important for SLT participants to learn. Results indicated:
   (a) 100% of professional staff completed a needs assessment survey. (b) Topics identified by
   professional staff were ranked according to frequency (most frequent to least): (1) Leadership, (2)
   Oral Communication, (3) Crisis Management, (4) Organizational Skills, (5) Problem Solving, (6) Ability
   to Multi-task, (7) Time Management, (8) Teamwork/Building, (9) Conflict Resolution – Mediation, (10)
   Multi-cultural Competency, (11) Collaboration, (12) Assertiveness – Confrontation, (13) Interpersonal
   Relations, and (14) Written Communication.
4. Professional and Student Staff Needs Assessment: discussed needs assessment survey results and
   assisted in determining final topics as follows: (1) Leadership; supervisory leadership; and Kouzes and
   Posner Leadership Challenge, (2) Communication, (3) Conflict resolution/transformation, (4)
   Counseling/interpersonal communication/mediation, (5) Critical thinking, (6) Ethics, (7) Realistic self-
   appraisal, and (8) Team-building.
5. SLT Sessions: Conducted five leadership sessions: September 14, 2008; October 12, 2008; October 26,
   2008; November 16, 2008; and January 11, 2009. Note: Spring semester session was an extended
   session and incorporated five topics.
6. Program Evaluations: Facilitated four program evaluations as follows:

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& Enrollment Management
   a.   September 14, 2008: (1) 58% (14 of 24) participants completed program evaluations, 32% below
        90% target. (2) 50% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or excellent, 25% below
        75% target. (3) Suggestions included: more discussion; interactive and real-life activities; more
        program specific; and no Sunday evening sessions. (4) Participant likes included: discussion;
        openness; power point slides; learning about others; and hands-on activities. (5) Post-test
        results indicated: (a) 94% of participants achieved 85% or better on test, 4% above target. (b)
        (6) Top six things learned: (a) Five practices of leadership: Model the Way; Inspire a Shared
        Vision; Challenge the Process; Enable Others to Act; and Encourage the Heart. (b) Teamwork
        concepts: individual differences contribute to team; care, listen, and get to know team
        members; and group dynamics. (c) Leadership principles: we all influence others; others
        influence me; leadership is relational; leadership is important; employee positions require
        leadership. (f) Four leadership traits: Honesty, Forward Looking, Inspiring, and Competent. (e)
        Being credible/reliable is important in being a leader; do what you say you will do. (g)
        Communication is an important tool; find your voice and let it be heard.
   b.   October 12, 2008: (1) 71% (12 of 17) participants completed program evaluations, 19% below
        90% target. (2) 83% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or excellent, 8% above
        75% target. (3) Suggestions included: more real-world situations/ scenarios; more imagery; a
        different presenter. (4) Participant likes included: power point slides - informative, detailed,
        organized, and easy to understand; music and interactive activities; learning more about self;
        building relationships with others; and learning how to improve flexibility skills. (5) Post-test
        results indicated: (a) 75% of participants achieved 82% or better on test, 15% below target and
        3% below target test scores. (6) Top four things learned: (a) Four different personality types and
        strategies to use when working them. (b) Behavior flexibility involves the leader changing and
        adapting to interpersonal situations. (c) Flexibility meets both leader and others' needs and
        involves tact, and reasonable and understanding interactions. (d) Importance and complexity of
        flexibility.
   c.   October 26: (1) Guest speaker failed to provide program evaluations as requested.
   d.   November 16, 2008: (1) 100% (20 of 20) participants completed program evaluations, 10%
        above 90% target. (2) 95% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or excellent, 20%
        above 75% target. (3) Suggestions included: more group activities and role-playing situations;
        more program specific topics; discuss topic with others in own program area; and less paper. (4)
        Participant likes included: group activities; real-life situations; discussion; and applicability. (e)
   e.   Participants discussed overall progress and suggestions for spring sessions and indicated the
        following: (1) Allow student leaders and graduate assistants to lead or co-lead sessions and
        assist in developing topics for more professional development opportunities. (2) More
        interactive activities; real-life situations; and program specific examples. (3) Schedule 1/2 day or
        extended sessions at the beginning of fall and spring semesters. (4) While school is in session,
        offer multiple week-night sessions, no Sundays. Post-test results indicated: 100% of participants
        achieved 100% on test, 10% above target.
   f.   Participants reported learning these top things: (1) Leadership Practices Inventory (LPI) -
        differences of self appraisal and observer evaluation; acknowledgement of strengths/weakness;
        and how individuals perceive others differently. (2) Conflict Transformation - principles and
        components of conflict; and strategies for conflict transformation.
   g.   January 11, 2009 (no tests conducted, instead asked students what they learned):
        1. 100% (20 of 20) participants completed program evaluation, 10% above 90% target.
        2. Team Building Session Program Effectiveness: (a) 89% of participants (16 of 18) rated
             program effectiveness as good or excellent, 14% above 75% target. (b) Top three things

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& Enrollment Management
             learned: Communication, patience, and listening are important elements for effective
             teams.
         3. Counseling/Interpersonal Session Program Effectiveness: (a) 95% of participants (18 of 19)
             rated program effectiveness as good or excellent, 20% above 75% target. (b) Top three
             things learned: techniques for building relationships; listening techniques; and five keys for
             counseling others.
         4. Ethics Session Program Effectiveness: (a) 80% of participants (16 of 20) rated program
             effectiveness as good or excellent, 5% above 75% target. (b) Top three things learned: Key
             elements in making ethical decisions; differences in values/backgrounds impact perceptions;
             and consequences of unethical decisions.
         5. Conflict Resolution Session Program Effectiveness: (a) 100% of participants (18 of 18) rated
             program effectiveness as good or excellent, 25% above 75% target. (b) Top three things
             learned: Different conflict types/situations; techniques to manage conflict; and methods for
             seeking resolution.
         6. Critical Thinking Session Program Effectiveness: (a) 79% of participants (15 of 19) rated
             program effectiveness as good or excellent, 4% above 75% target. (b) Top three things
             learned: Critical thinking involves challenging assumptions, asking questions, understanding
             different perspectives, and seeking possible solutions.
         7. Workshop suggestions: allow students to help lead activities; less paper handouts; and more
             activities; do not require participation, instead let student staff volunteer after work to
             participate in program.
         8. Things liked: Learned new skills; different presenters.
Use of Results:
Recommendations from program evaluations and participant face-to-face discussions:
1. Paper program evaluations during sessions may increase response rate.
2. Student Development Committee will be formed to offer student leaders and graduate assistants
    more opportunities for professional development through assisting in planning program sessions
    and leading or co-leading activities.
3. Increase the number of interactive activities; real-life situations; and program-specific examples for
    each session.
4. Continue to streamline handouts for better clarity, information, and organization.
5. Electronic version of LPI; self-appraisal in first two weeks of work; observers’ appraisals of student
    employees later in semester.
6. Schedule 1/2 day or extended sessions at the beginning of fall and spring semesters. While school is
    in session, offer multiple weeknight sessions, no Sundays.
7. Change required participation to voluntary; funding issues prevent participants to be paid during
    work hours.
8. Incorporate some topics into new trainee sessions because some topics need to be covered prior to
    supervisors working solo.
Note: Due to staffing changes and limited staff resources this priority has been postponed until staff
members can dedicate time to develop this program so that it is more effective and impactful for
student staff members.



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& Enrollment Management
Other Evidence by Goal:
FY07
New Group Fitness Instructor Training Program
Results:
1. Students completing training sessions: (a) Four (4) – fall session, (b) Eight (8) – spring session
2. 100% of participants completed training sessions and advanced to the shadow teaching (next step of
   training).
3. 100% of participants shadow taught with other instructors for the remainder of the semester.
4. 100% of participants passed a final audition.
5. 11 of the 12 students plan to teach Recreation Services group fitness classes in the 2007 fall
   semester (92% retention rate).
Use of Results:
1. The instructor training course is a valuable tool for recruiting and training student group fitness
   instructors.
2. Continued Group Fitness Instructor Evaluations in FY08 and FY09.
3. Evaluation form (see Appendix FF) was expanded/redesigned to include all program components
   needed for effective program delivery.
4. Trainees were evaluated at auditions at the end of the training and the end of team teaching.
5. Goals in FY11 include:
   a. Implementing a written test to assess learning of basic instruction, anatomy, and physiology.
   b. Develop a method for trainees to give feedback about program effectiveness and learned
        outcomes.

FY07
Group Fitness Instructor Evaluations:
Results:
1. 100% of instructors were evaluated (see Appendix FF) by the Graduate Assistant or Assistant
   Director of Fitness and Wellness, and their class was videotaped.
2. 100% of instructors watched the videotape of their class and completed a self-evaluation (see
   Appendix GG).
3. 100% of instructors met with the Graduate Assistant or Assistant Director of Fitness and Wellness to
   discuss written evaluations.
4. Instructors indicated that the evaluation process was valuable and helpful.
5. Although it was difficult for instructors to watch themselves teach on video, they expressed ease in
   identifying strengths and weaknesses.
6. Each instructor was able to find at least one thing to improve their teaching.
Use of Results:
1. This process has proven to be an excellent learning and teaching tool.
2. Continued Group Fitness Instructor Evaluations in FY08 and FY09.
3. Evaluation form was expanded/redesigned to include all program components needed for effective
   program delivery.

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& Enrollment Management
4. Formalized instructor evaluation process and time periods. Evaluations occur after one month of
   classes beginning and instructors are notified in advance of process, intent, and timeline. It takes
   approximately one month for the evaluation process to be completed.

FY07
New Outdoor Trip Student Staff Training
Results:
1. Five new student staff members planned and implemented the trip, and six veteran staff members
   participated and evaluated the trip.
2. By observing new outdoor trip student staff application of educational sessions, the Assistant
   Director determined that all new student learned how to:
   a. Select an appropriate outdoor adventure trip location.
   b. Select and plan trip activities (rock climbing, backpacking, caving, canoeing, etc.)
   c. Select appropriate routes to gain access to camping, rock climbing, canoeing, etc.
   d. Select and pack gear and equipment.
   e. Identify participant needs for personal gear and equipment.
   f. Create a food menu.
   g. Develop a daily itinerary.
   h. Prepare and present educational session during the pre-trip meeting:
        i. Packing a backpack
        ii. Route planning
        iii. Leave no trace
        iv. Blister management
        v. Weather forecasting
        vi. Dressing appropriately for activity/weather
        vii. Poisonous plant and animal identification
   i. Execute the trip.
   j. Demonstrate teamwork in trip planning and execution.
   k. Prepare and present educational sessions during the trip as follows:
        i. Stoveology
        ii. Astronomy
        iii. Meteorology
        iv. Bear Bags
        v. Campsite set-up
        vi. Climbing techniques
        vii. Fire building
        viii. Poop school
        ix. Water purification
        x. Top rope set-up
        xi. Leave No Trace Principles
   l. Evaluate trip planning and implementation.
   m. Evaluate responding to trip issues
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& Enrollment Management
   n. Identify improvement items
   o. Complete self-reflection journals
3. From program evaluations 100% of new student staff indicated learning the following: (a) Climbing
   opportunities at Garden of the Gods. (b) Backpacking opportunities at Garden of the Gods. (c) Usage
   of the River to River Trail. (d) Feasible backpacking/climbing options for future student
   programming. (e) How to get to location and time needed to drive to location. (f) Planning skills
   needed to implement daily activities. (g) Teamwork skills needed to plan and execute activities.
4. In journals, new and veteran outdoor trip student staff (11) reported learning the following:
   Following the trail; Always bring a compass on a backpacking trip, Games to play with participants to
   get them engaged and have fun; To be a better teacher; Interpersonal skills and patience; Don't
   trust map quest directions; How to make bread on a camp stove; Always bring a map (18%-2);
   Belaying skills (9%-1); Setting and using safety climbing gear (9%-1); Knot tying/ Figure 8's (9%-1);
   Familiarity with each other and their leadership styles (9%-1); How to be more prepared for future
   trips (9%-1); Communication needs is important (18%-2); Everyone has different skills and we can
   utilize them differently (9%-1).
5. From group discussion, program evaluations, and journals, veteran outdoor trip student staff
   critiqued the trip as follows: (a) New student trip staff forgot to bring compasses. (b) Maps and
   routes need to be reviewed more thoroughly. (c) Need to plan for alternative activities and
   locations. (d) Need to decide on a trip location that is unknown to student staff planning trip so that
   they gain better investigative and exploratory skills.
6. Further Findings: (a) New and veteran staff learned about the geographic area selected for the trip.
   (b) All student staff indicated recognizing that staff members possess different leadership styles. (c)
   Assistant Director observed new student staff actual skills and application of knowledge during
   planning and implementation trip phases and noted the following: (1) All student staff learned new
   skills and knowledge. (2) All student staff improved proficiency in interaction skills.
Use of Results:
1. Spring Break Staff Training was conducted in FY08 and FY09.
2. The following improvements have been incorporated into the program:
   a. Veteran staff members assist in providing feedback in trip planning phase.
   b. Trip educational session developed to focus on leadership styles and teamwork skills.
   c. Developed a follow-up training program to address skill deficiencies of new student staff.
3. In FY11: Observation rubrics will be developed to better assess student staff skill levels.

FY08
Establish and evaluate effectiveness of Recreation Services Student Employment Recognition
Program:
Results:
1. 50% of student employees attended the banquet.
2. Twenty-nine student employees were presented awards for their contribution to Recreation
    Services (4 above the target).
3. 100% of graduating seniors were recognized for their employment service during the awards
    presentation and in the program.
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& Enrollment Management
4. 100% of student employees who assisted after the February 14 incident were recognized with a
   certificate of appreciation.
5. 100% of major sponsors were recognized in the program, slide presentation, and during the
   program.
6. Professional staff and graduate assistant staff met, discussed, and made recommendations for
   improvement:
   a. Better define the criteria for each award.
   b. Solicit student employee and patron nominations.
   c. Seek more sponsors with the objective of paying at least 65% of total cost in 2nd year.
   d. Publicize award criteria to student employees in beginning of year to motivate employees to
        perform.
   e. Publicize the date early in an effort to increase attendance.
Use of Results:
1. An RS Student Employment Recognition Committee was established in FY09.
2. Committee responsibilities included:
   a. Assessing award type and criteria for each award.
   b. Selecting appropriate awards for each category.
   c. Formalizing a system to solicit nominations, evaluate nominees, and select honorees.
   d. Creating slide presentation illustrating employees’ positive impact and contribution on behalf of
        the department.
3. Committee performed the following:
   a. Reduced the number of awards to avoid redundancy.
   b. Better defined the criteria for each award.
   c. Standardized award type and ensured that the value of recognition related to type of award.
   d. Provided a formal venue for student and professional staff to nominate employees.
   e. Collaborated with professional staff members to evaluate nominees’ qualifications.
   f. Selected honorees.
   g. Created a slide presentation.
4. In FY10, Committee will solicit nominations from patrons as well.

FY08
Student Employee Learning Experiences
Results:
1. Eighty-six student employees submitted learning outcomes from their respective work experiences.
2. A summary of student employees’ learning outcomes are described in Appendix HH. The top eleven
    items most reported by employees as learned outcomes are as follows: (a)Program knowledge and
    skill development (24); (b) First aid, emergency and crisis response (22); (c) Leadership skills and
    personal style (21); (d) Teamwork and collaboration (21); (e) Customer service skills (19); (f) Program
    preparation (16); (g) Rules, regulations, and procedures (9); (h) Communication skills (8); (i)
    Motivation skills (others) (8); (j) Listening and comprehension skills (7); (k) Strategizing to optimize
    participant progress (7).
3. Student employees did not always describe their learning in detail. Instead some students used
    more general terms such as leadership and team work skills.
Use of Results:
1. Staff collected learning outcomes in FY09.
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2. Staff is in the process of analyzing information from FY08 and FY09.
3. These results may be used in the following ways: (a) Verify importance of student employee work
   experiences and its impact on their overall development. (b) Produce a marketing tool to recruit
   students who want to learn and develop their skills. (c) Improve communication with students to
   enhance future staff retention. (d) Assist staff in identifying future staff training needs.
4. Recommendation for Improvement: In order to better understand student employee learning
   outcomes, it is recommended that student employees more specifically describe the leadership
   skills that they have developed through their work experience since leadership is a very general
   term.
5. In FY10:
   a. OA developed a form to enable students to more appropriately identify and differentiate
        between outdoor adventure and leadership skills.
   b. RS developed a form to enable students in other areas to more appropriately identify outcomes
        as a result of their work experience:
             i.  Skills improved or obtained
            ii.  What students learned about themselves
           iii.  What students learned about others
           iv.   An opportunity to assess and provide feedback on the following (as it relates to their
                 own program area):
                 1. Quality of Equipment
                 2. Quantity of Equipment
                 3. Facility Space
                 4. Program Policies
                 5. Staff Procedures
                 6. Patron Procedures
   c. FY08, FY09, and FY10 results will be analyzed. Data will be evaluated annually and all three
        years will be compared to identify themes, similarities, and differences. This data will assist in
        developing a more formalized leadership training program.

FY09
RS Student Staff Fall Retreat Program Evaluation (see Appendix II):
Results:
1. Staff Retreat: (a) Retreat conducted on August 20, 2009, from 8:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. (b) 54 student
    employees in attendance.
2. Program Evaluation:
    a. Purposeful Community: (a) 96% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or
        excellent, 21% above 75% target. (b) Top three things learned: work together towards a
        common goal; all staff plays a role in fulfilling the purpose of RS; my job experience at RS can
        translate to my career.



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   b. Open Community: (a) 100% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or excellent,
        25% above 75% target. (b) Top three things learned: importance of building relationships; ways
        to positively engage patrons; communication is key.
   c. Just Community: (a) 94% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or excellent, 21%
        above 75% target. (b) Top three things learned: individuals contribute to team; rely and trust
        your co-workers; working together is important.
   d. Disciplined Community: (a) 96% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or
        excellent, 21% above 75% target. (b) Top three things learned: discipline promotes safety and
        order; self-discipline is important; watching for potential problems.
   e. Caring Community: (a) 90% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or excellent,
        15% above 75% target. (b) Top four things learned: how to approach students who are showing
        signs of stress; referrals for students having challenges; stress impacts emotional and physical
        well-being; how to show others you care about them.
   f. Celebrative Community: (a) 98% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or
        excellent, 23% above 75% target. (b) Top three things learned: importance of recognizing
        employee contributions; characteristics of outstanding employees; how to be support co-
        workers.
   g. Overall Workshop: (a) 91% of participants rated program effectiveness as good or excellent, 16%
        above 75% target. (b) Workshop feedback: shorten length of program; include aquatics; change
        session formats to mix-up. (c) Things liked: Fun; organized; valuable; educational; getting to
        know other staff; how present can help with future; liked being groups by major.
Use of Results:
1. These improvements were implemented in FY10:
   a. Shortened length of retreat.
   b. Two undergraduate student employees assisted in planning and leading a program session.
2. Considering the following for FY11:
   a. Incorporate more undergraduate student employee leaders to assist in planning and leading
        program sessions.
   b. Incorporate more program areas (e.g., Sport Club officers, personal trainers, and group fitness
        instructors).

Department Program Goal 7: Be good stewards of resources by maximizing programs and services,
streamlining operations, and seeking appropriate revenue generation and resource opportunities.

FY05:
Annual Priority 3:
Implement the use of a credit card system to enhance customer satisfaction and convenience in
registering for programs.
Targets: No targets established.
Results: In collaboration with the OneCard staff, installed and implemented a credit card system that
accepts VISA, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover cards at the SRC main desk and the Outing
Centre (OC) desk. In FY05, approximately 40% of financial transactions were credit card transactions.


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Use of Results: Recommend annual review of credit card use in comparison to cash operations. Look at
potential avenues to inform patrons of abilities to use credit cards instead of cash for program
registrations.
Note: Due to staff vacancies and other priorities, this was not analyzed. Analysis will be conducted
annually beginning FY10. Marketing strategies will be developed and implemented in FY11.

Annual Priority 5:
Develop and implement RS facility scheduling software.
Targets: No targets established.
Results: RS staff met with NIU ITS staff to discuss facility scheduling software needs. RS staff needed to
obtain more information about potential software packages on the market to determine features and
feasibility of its application to current business processes.
Use of Results: Facility Reservation systems utilized by campus recreation programs across the country
are expensive. Department resources restrict opportunities to purchase a comprehensive facility
reservations program. Instead, an affordable Event Business Management Software (EBMS) system was
implemented in the Fall 2009 to support program registrations. In addition, the facility software module
is being utilized until a more comprehensive system designed specifically to meet campus recreation
needs can be purchased.

Other Evidence:
FY08
Evaluation of Expenditures and Income Generation by Program Area:
Results:
Assessed program area expenditures and income generation by program area as it related to
participation. Determined the following:
    a. RS offered 41 Group Fitness classes weekly; however, approximately 11 classes had one to three
         regular participants.
    b. Outdoor Adventure had not established a minimum number of participants for trip income to
         pay for expenses.
    c. RS program areas had not consistently projected income generation and personnel expenses for
         each activity to more appropriately fund programs.
Use of Results:
1. Reduced Group Fitness classes from 41 to 30 weekly.
2. For the spring 2010, RS staff has developed a method of monitoring adequate participation numbers
    in each class. Target rates are being developed for each class which will be determined by room
    capacity and anticipated expectations as it relates to time offered. A street stoplight (green, yellow,
    and red) will be used as visual to communicate weekly class capacity status to instructors and
    patrons. Classes maintaining a 75% targeted capacity (green) will continue to be offered. RS staff
    will communicate with class participants when a class participation rate falls within the 30% - 74%
    (yellow) capacity rate and ask instructors and participants to encourage others to attend. Classes
    that reach less than 30% targeted capacity will be monitored for two weeks and if numbers do not
    increase above the 30% target rate, the class will be canceled for the semester.
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& Enrollment Management
3. Minimum capacity numbers have been established for all Outdoor Adventure trips.
4. Beginning in FY09, all RS program areas have projected income generation and expenditures for
   each activity, and fees have been established to support events for each fiscal year.

6. Further Information Needed & Timeline
   RS staff members have learned a great deal as a result of this assessment process. Professional staff
   members agree that departmental goals need to be reviewed to eliminate redundancy and provide
   a more clear direction that meets the needs of seven program areas. RS staff members need to
   review the expanded assessment plan, demonstrated in Section 3 of this document, to determine if
   assessments appropriately measure intended outcomes and correlate to revised program goals.
   Once the plan is agreed upon by staff, the Director will format the plan so that all seven program
   area staff will understand their assessment goals within the five-year assessment structure. A more
   formalized approach to the collection of data, data analysis, and changes implemented as a result of
   assessment needs to be incorporated into the administrative structure of the department to ensure
   that assessment is documented and changes are implemented. Additionally, RS staff needs to
   ensure that assessment initiatives address all department program goals. Also, RS staff needs to
   develop and incorporate observation rubrics and tests that directly measure learning. In addition,
   similar assessments need to be linked, analyzed, and interpreted longitudinally to better understand
   trends. RS staff members need to find methods of collecting data that measure program retention.
   Also, the department needs to increase participation in national studies that more clearly compare
   NIU’s Recreation Services department with similar programs across the country.

Items that Need to be Addressed                       Timeline
RS Program Goals                                      April 2010
RS 5-Year Assessment Plan with schedule               June 2010
Collection, Analysis and Summary Assessment           July 2010
Format Established

7. Resources Needed
Participation in the National Intramural Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) Campus Recreation
Assessment study would give NIU Recreation Services staff members a deeper understanding of its
current impact of programs and services on NIU students. The study measures:
         The impact of campus recreation offerings on student recruitment and retention
         Student utilization of different recreational facilities, activities, and programs
         Student satisfaction with facilities, activities, and programs
         Recreational needs and expectations of students and other constituents
         Social, academic, emotional, and health-related outcomes of utilizing campus recreation
         Operational issues such as promotion of recreation activities and accessibility of facilities
            and programs
         Professional development of staff and student employees
         Cost effectiveness of programs and services
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& Enrollment Management
 In addition, national and peer comparison data is available at the conclusion of the study enabling NIU
Recreation Services to compare itself among other comparable institutions. The estimated cost to
conduct this study is approximately $3,000.
Item                                                  Deadline
Collect Survey Data                                   February 2011
Data Analysis                                         June 2011
Benchmarking Data                                     June 2011
Short-term/Long-term plan                             December 2012

8. Appendix
A.    Nutrition LEEP Pre/Post Test (FY07)
B.    Sport Club Presidents Anti-Hazing Pre/Post Test (FY07)
C.    Cross-Training Post Assessment (FY07)
D.    Outdoor Trip Coordinator Leave No Trace Post Test (FY08)
E.    Outdoor Trip Sample Program Evaluation (FY08)
F.    Exercise Benefits On-Line Test (FY08)
G.    Exercise Benefits Program Evaluation (FY08)
H.    Students with Disabilities Needs Assessment (FY07)
I.    Fitness Specialist Internship (FY07)
J.    Program Interest Surveys (FY07)
K.    Recreation Services Student Survey (FY09)
L.    Outdoor Adventure Program Evaluation Summary (FY06 to FY09)
M.    Group Fitness Program Evaluations and Learning Outcomes (FY07)
N.    UNIV 101 Orientation Program Surveys (FY07)
O.    Recreation Services General Brochure (FY07)
P.    RS Fall and Spring Program Guides (FY07)
Q.    Recreation Services Section of NIU Student Survey of NIU Services for Living Well (FY09)
R.    Open Recreation Patron Survey (FY09)
S.    Open Recreation Aquatics Patron Survey (FY09)
T.    Open Recreation Aquatic Participant Data (FY07-FY09)
U.    Customer Feedback Form (FY09)
V.    Risk Assessment (FY09)
W.    Risk Management Committee Responsibilities (FY08)
X.    Gabel Pool Regulations (FY09)
Y.    Precor Glide Patron Feedback (FY09)
Z.    Matrix Treadmill, Upright Bike, Recumbent Bike, and Ascent Trainer Patron Feedback (FY09)
AA.   Leadership Program Needs Assessment (FY08)
BB.   Leadership Program Evaluations (FY08)
CC.   Student Leadership Team Needs Assessment (FY09)
DD.   Professional Staff Needs Assessment (FY09)
EE.   Student Leadership Team Program Evaluations (FY09)
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& Enrollment Management
FF.     New Group Fitness Instructor Evaluation (FY08, FY09)
GG.     Group Fitness Instructor Self-Evaluation (FY07)
HH.     Student Employee Learning Outcomes (FY08)
II.     Student Staff Fall Retreat Program Evaluation (FY09)
JJ.     Glossary




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                                                                                        Appendix A
                                  Nutrition LEEP Pre/Post Test FY07



1. How many servings of whole grains should you get every day?
   a. 11 servings
   b. At least half your total grains for the day
   c. All of your grains should be whole grains
   d. 2 servings

2. Which food is a good source of fiber?
   a. Oatmeal
   b. White Rice
   c. White Bread
   d. Cornbread

3. How many vegetables should you have each day?
   a. 1 cup
   b. 2.5 cups
   c. 4.5 cups
   d. 5 cups

4. Which is part of the meat group?
   a. Beef
   b. Pinto Beans
   c. Black Beans
   d. All of the above

5. How much fruit should you have each day?
   a. 1.5 cups
   b. 2.5 cups
   c. 3.5 cups
   d. 4.5 cups

*What are two things you learned from your session that you can use immediately to improve your
eating habits?




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                                                                                                    Appendix B

                                        Sport Club Presidents Anti-Hazing Pre/Post Test FY07


T     F       1. Hazing not only happens at the college level, but also in high schools, middle schools,
                 and homes.

T     F       2. Someone has died on a college campus every year since 1970 because of hazing.

T     F       3. Hazing is a problem for Fraternities and Sororities primarily.

T     F       4. Hazing is no more than foolish pranks that sometimes go wrong.

T     F       5. As long as there is no malicious intent, a little hazing should be O.K.

T     F       6. Hazing is an effective way to teach respect and develop discipline.

T     F       7. If someone agrees to participate in an activity, it can’t be considered hazing.

T     F       8. Hazing is a criminal offense in all 50 states.

T     F       9. Sleep deprivation is a form of hazing.

T     F       10. If you were hazed, it’s OK to haze other members, because it is tradition.

T     F       11. In Illinois, hazing can result in a Class A misdemeanor, but not a felony.

T     F       12. Most people who haze others have a low self image/self-esteem.

T     F       13. If a coach/instructor is either aware or involved with the hazing, then it is ok for
                  members to participate.

T     F       14. All hazing incidents should be reported to the Assistant Director for Sport Clubs, only in
                  person.




    Modified from original quiz at http://www.campuspeak.com/programs/hazing/documents/hazingquiz.doc


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                                                                                             Appendix C
                                   Cross-Training Post Assessment FY07

1. What is your first and last name?

2. What activities did you participate in before you participated in the cross training program?

    a.   Group Fitness Classes
    b.   Basketball
    c.   Indoor Soccer
    d.   Indoor Hockey
    e.   Tennis
    f.   Racquetball
    g.   Badminton
    h.   Volleyball
    i.   Wallyball
    j.   Table Tennis
    k.   Jogging/Walking
    l.   Other (please specify):

3. Name one thing you learned from the weight training orientation, Spinning Class, or sports

    conditioning class you tried that you could use in your current exercise program.

4. What do you feel is the biggest benefit of cross training?

5. Identify three programs and/or services Recreation Services can offer to help you begin or add cross

    training to your workout.

6. Based on the articles you read, what, if anything, do you plan to add to your current exercise

    program?




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                                                                                               Appendix D
                      Outdoor Trip Coordinator Leave No Trace (LNT) Post Test FY08

Name: _______________________________________ Score ___________/100
Instructions: Place a circle around each of the 7 principles of the LNT (the first principles is “Dispose of
Waste Properly” as number 1. Then, number each principle from 2 – 7 from the top of this page on
down (6 points each). Then, number each of the teaching concepts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 to each of the
corresponding principles (2 points each).

___________ Know the regulations and special concerns.
___________ Control pets at all times or leave them at home.
___________ Avoid wildlife during sensitive times: mating, nesting, raising young, or winter.
___________ Leave rocks, plants, and other natural objects as you find them.
___________ Campfires can cause lasting impacts to the backcountry. Use a light-weight stove for
            cooking and enjoy a candle lantern for light.
___________In popular areas keep campsites small.
___________ Protect riparian area by camping 200+ feet from lakes and streams.
___________ Repackage food
___________ Good campsites are found/not made.
___________ Visit in small groups (split into groups of 4-6).
_____1_____ Dispose of Waster Properly.
___________ Prepare for extreme weather.
___________ Let nature’s sounds prevail. Avoid loud voices and noises.
___________ Plan ahead and prepare.
___________ Be courteous. Yield to other users on the trail.
___________ To wash yourself or dishes, carry water 220+ feet away from water and use small amounts
            of biodegradable soap. Scatter strained dishwater.
___________ Be considerate of other visitors.
___________ Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them.
___________ Where fires are permitted, use established fire rings, fire pans, or mound fires.
___________ Durable surfaces – trails, campsites, rock, dry grasses, and snow
___________ Avoid introducing or transporting non-native species.
___________ Respect wildlife
___________ Take breaks and camp away from trails and other visitors.
____1______ Pack it in, pack it out: inspect campsite for trash or spilled food. Pack out all trash,
            leftover food, etc.
___________ Never feed animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviors, and
            exposes them to predators and other dangers.
___________ Travel and camp on durable surfaces
___________ Do not build structure, furniture, or dig trenches.
___________ Burn all wood and coals to ash. Put out campfires completely and then scatter cool ashes.

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& Enrollment Management
                                                                                           Appendix D
               Outdoor Trip Coordinator Leave No Trace (LNT) Post Test FY08 (continued)

___________ Protect wildlife and your food by storing rations and trash securely.
___________ Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products.
___________ Step to the downhill side of the trail when encountering pack stock
___________ Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6-8 inches deep at least 200+ feet from water,
            camp, and trails. Cover and disguise catholes when done.
___________ In popular areas, walk single file in the middle of the trail, even when trail is wet or
            muddy.
___________ Minimize campfire impacts.
___________ In pristine areas, disperse use to prevent the creation of campsites and trails.
___________ Schedule your trip to avoid times of high use.
___________ Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience.
___________ Leave what you find
___________ Preserve the past by examining, but don’t touching.
___________ Use a map and compass.
___________ In popular areas, concentrate use of existing trails and campsites.
___________ Keep fires small. Only use sticks from the ground that can be broken by hand.
___________ In pristine areas, avoid place where impacts are just beginning.




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                                                                                                  Appendix E
                        Outdoor Adventures Trip Sample Program Evaluation FY08

Trip: ______________________________                                    Date(s) of Trip: ___________________


Trip Leader:____________________                    Assistant Leader(s):_____________________________

(Please circle the appropriate response unless noting anything)

1) Evaluate the staff

        Rate the following         (1 as poor to 5 as excellent)

        Leader:_____ Assistant leader: _____ Support Staff: _____

        Organization of trip: _____ Trip in general: _____

        Were the trip leader's knowledge and skills satisfactory?        Yes      No

        Was the trip leader's driving satisfactory?      Yes    No     (if not, note on back)

        How was safety emphasized?

                 Overemphasized        Stressed properly       Not emphasized enough

        Were environmentally sound practices stressed?           Yes     No

2) Trip Preparation

        Was the information provided helpful?            Yes    No      No info

        Was the pre-trip meeting helpful?                Yes    No     No Meeting

3) Evaluate the trip

        Was your experience what you wanted or expected?

                 Yes      No      More than I expected

        How was the overall experience?

                 Very enjoyable      Enjoyable    Average       Not enjoyable

        What was the level of physical effort?

                 Too difficult       Just right   Too easy

        Was the equipment satisfactory?

                 Yes     No      (please note what was bad)________________________________

        If meals were provided, were they satisfactory?
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                                                                                               Appendix E
                  Outdoor Adventures Trip Sample Program Evaluation FY09 (continued)

                  Yes    No   (please note what was bad)________________________________

        Was the location satisfactory?     Yes      No

4) What do you think you learned during this session?

        Use of Equipment?      Canoe      Paddles      PFD’s

        Techniques?      Paddle strokes    Avoiding canoe tipping

        Safety?    With your equipment      For others on the water

        Leave No Trace principles?

                  Plan Ahead and Prepare         Travel and Camp on Durable Surfaces
                  Dispose of Waste Properly      Leave What You Find         Minimize Campfire Impacts
                  Respect Wildlife               Be Considerate of Other Visitors

        Please indicate anything else you learned?__________________________________________

        ____________________________________________________________________________

        How many other trips have you participated on with the Outing Centre?_________

5) General Info

        How did you find out about trips? (Please circle any/all that apply)

                  Direct E-mail Dorm flyer       Poster    Newspaper       Hand Flyer   Brochure   Internet
                  Word of mouth Friends

        Are you interested in other outdoor trips?         Yes      No

        Are you on our e-mail list for future trips?       Yes        No

        If no, and would like to be, please neatly write down your e-mail address:

        _______________________________________________________________________
6) On Back of this questionnaire please respond to: “How does this program enhance your
college experience?”


If you have any questions, compliments, criticisms, or concerns, please don’t hesitate to write that
information on the back of this page. We are always looking for ways to improve our program. Once you
have completed this evaluation, please return to the Outing Centre at the Student Recreation Center.




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                                                                                               Appendix F
                                     Exercise Benefits On-line Tests FY08

Stress Quiz
Benefits, Risks, & Informed Consent
Thank you for your interest in participating in FitQuiz. Recreation Services created this program to
educate students on various health and wellness topics. For each quiz that you complete, you receive a
chance to win 1 of 4 $50 cash prizes. There are 4 quizzes giving you up to 4 chances to win! The FitQuiz
requires you to read the article on the Recreation Services website (www.rs.niu.edu) and then answer a
short quiz regarding that article. Your personal information (e-mail) will only be used to notify you about
winning a prize. Participation in the raffle is only valid by entering your e-mail address. If you have any
questions regarding this program please contact Recreation Services by phone at 815-753-0231.
*I have read the above statements and understand what is required to participate in this program. I
hereby give my informed and free consent to be a participant in this program.

           I agree.
Based on what you read in the article, try your best to answer the following questions.

1. Exercise reduces stress in most individuals.
             True
            False
2. How does exercise reduce stress according to the most popular theory?
             It makes you sweat reducing your blood pressure
             Neurotransmitters are released in the brain that control mood
             Exercise makes you tired and sleepy
             Exercise doesn’t really relieve stress but is like a placebo
3. What are the four ways that exercise controls stress? (Select the four correct answers from the list
  below.)
             It makes your muscles tense
             It makes you feel better about yourself
             It decreases neurotransmitters in the brain
             I can relieve anxiety
             It stimulates chemicals that increase heart rate
             It makes you more relaxed
             It usually makes you eat healthier
             It makes you anxious


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                                                                                             Appendix F
                              Exercise Benefits On-line Tests FY08 (continued)

Stress Quiz (continued)

4. How much aerobic activity is required at a minimum to reduce stress?

             20 minutes, six-seven days per week

             60 minutes, 3 days per week

             20 hours, six-seven days per week

              20 minutes per week
5. Yoga helps you relax because of the way the large muscle groups contract and relax as well as send a
  signal to the brain to release neurotransmitters.

             True

             False
6. Recreational Sports can reduce stress and are offered through the Student Recreation Center.

             True

            False
7. What place would you generally NOT exercise in order to reduce stress?
             At home
             At the gym
             Outside
             At work

8. How often should you take a break at work?

             Every 4 hours
             Every 90 minutes
             Every 90 seconds
           Every 5 minutes
9. Please enter your email address ________________________________________________.
Note: Your email will be used strictly for the raffle and will remain confidential.




Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                       Page 64 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                               Appendix F
                              Exercise Benefits On-line Tests FY08 (continued)

Free Weights versus Cardio Machines Quiz
Benefits, Risks, & Informed Consent
Thank you for your interest in participating in FitQuiz. Recreation Services created this program to
educate students on various health and wellness topics. For each quiz that you complete, you receive a
chance to win 1 of 4 $50 cash prizes. There are 4 quizzes giving you up to 4 chances to win! The FitQuiz
requires you to read the article on the Recreation Services website (www.rs.niu.edu) and then answer a
short quiz regarding that article. Your personal information (e-mail) will only be used to notify you about
winning a prize. Participation in the raffle is only valid by entering your e-mail address. If you have any
questions regarding this program please contact Recreation Services by phone at 815-753-0231.
 *I have read the above statements and understand what is required to participate in this program. I
hereby give my informed and free consent to be a participant in this program.

           I agree.
Based on what you read in the article, try your best to answer the following questions.

1. Which is better, a machine or free weights?

             The machine because it makes you do the exercise properly
             Free weights because you get a better workout
             Both are equal, they will give you the same workout
             It all depends on the person and their goals
2. What is an advantage of using free weights?

             They make me look cool in the weight room
             They are more versatile
             They are more fun
             There are none, I can do more on machines
3. What is an advantage of using a machine?
             They are generally easier and safer
             They are good for rehabilitation of specific muscles
             They force beginners to do the exercise properly
             All of the above




Recreation Services                    FY10 Assessment Summary Report                        Page 65 of 109
Division of Student Affairs               Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                 Appendix F
                              Exercise Benefits On-line Tests FY08 (continued)

Free Weights versus Cardio Machines Quiz (continued)

4. What is a disadvantage of free weights?

             They can be more difficult and dangerous if not used properly
             They are intimidating
             They will make women build muscle like a man
             There are no disadvantages, free weights are the best
5. What is a disadvantage of using a machine?

             They involve moving weight in fixed pattern or direction
             They are more limited allowing one exercise each
             Not everyone can use them due to different body types and sizes
              All the above
6. If you are a beginner it is generally better to start out by using a machine instead of free weights.

             True
            False
7. Good technique is very important in order to reach your strength training goals and to reduce risk of
  injury.

             True
               False
8. It is okay to ask someone who works at your fitness center questions or for assistance.

             True
           False
9. Please enter your email address ________________________________________________.
Note: Your email will be used strictly for the raffle and will remain confidential.




Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                           Page 66 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                               Appendix F
                               Exercise Benefits On-line Tests FY08 (continued)

Battling Boredom Quiz
Benefits, Risks, & Informed Consent
Thank you for your interest in participating in FitQuiz. Recreation Services created this program to
educate students on various health and wellness topics. For each quiz that you complete, you receive a
chance to win 1 of 4 $50 cash prizes. There are 4 quizzes giving you up to 4 chances to win! The FitQuiz
requires you to read the article on the Recreation Services website (www.rs.niu.edu) and then answer a
short quiz regarding that article. Your personal information (e-mail) will only be used to notify you about
winning a prize. Participation in the raffle is only valid by entering your e-mail address. If you have any
questions regarding this program please contact Recreation Services by phone at 815-753-0231.
*I have read the above statements and understand what is required to participate in this program. I
hereby give my informed and free consent to be a participant in this program.

              I agree.
1. To battle exercise boredom, what should you do if you always exercise indoors?

             Continue to workout inside
             Try outdoor activities
             Play an indoor sport
              Stay at home
2. If you aren’t seeing results with small changes in your workout routine make a large change in your
  routine, such as trying a new activity.

             True

             False
3. If you normally workout alone, what can help break boredom?

             Talk to yourself
             Listen to music
             Read a book or magazine
             Exercise with a friend
4. What is an example of challenging yourself or setting goals regarding your workout?

             Run a 10K race
             Participate in intramurals
             Compete in a triathlon
             All the above


Recreation Services                    FY10 Assessment Summary Report                        Page 67 of 109
Division of Student Affairs               Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                 Appendix F
                              Exercise Benefits On-line Tests FY08 (continued)

Battling Boredom Quiz (continued)

5. Cross-training is when you substitute an activity or exercise with another activity or exercise.

             True
             False
6. Can trying a new piece of equipment make your workout more fun?

             Yes
           No
7. Please enter your email address ________________________________________________.
Note: Your email will be used strictly for the raffle and will remain confidential.




Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                           Page 68 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                               Appendix F
                              Exercise Benefits On-line Tests FY08 (continued)

Catching a Cold Quiz
Benefits, Risks, & Informed Consent
Thank you for your interest in participating in FitQuiz. Recreation Services created this program to
educate students on various health and wellness topics. For each quiz that you complete, you receive a
chance to win 1 of 4 $50 cash prizes. There are 4 quizzes giving you up to 4 chances to win! The FitQuiz
requires you to read the article on the Recreation Services website (www.rs.niu.edu) and then answer a
short quiz regarding that article. Your personal information (e-mail) will only be used to notify you about
winning a prize. Participation in the raffle is only valid by entering your e-mail address. If you have any
questions regarding this program please contact Recreation Services by phone at 815-753-0231.
*I have read the above statements and understand what is required to participate in this program. I
hereby give my informed and free consent to be a participant in this program.

            I agree.
1. What are some factors that are associated with an impaired immune system?
             Driving, talking, walking, sleeping
             Working, watching TV, reading, listening to music
             Old age, smoking, stress, lack of sleep
            Eating healthy, drinking water, yoga
2. Research has shown that during moderate exercise various immune cells circulate through the body
  more quickly and are better able to kill bacteria and viruses.

             True
             False
3. If you have symptoms of a cold (without a fever), what should you do in regards to exercise?

             Workout at a light to moderate intensity exercises such as walking
             Load up on Airborne and lock yourself in your room
             Workout just as if you aren’t having symptoms
             Only do weight training
4. What should you do if there are symptoms or signs of the flu (i.e., fever, extreme tiredness, muscle
  aches, etc)

             Sweat it out
             Eat chicken noodle soup
             Take aspirin
             Take at least two weeks off from exercising until symptoms are gone

Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                         Page 69 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                              Appendix F
                              Exercise Benefits On-line Tests FY08 (continued)

Catching a Cold Quiz (continued)

5. What are the four main ways to strengthen your immune system regarding fitness?

             Eat soy products, take diet pills, stay up late, exercise in the mornings
             Lots of exercise, lots of water, lots of sleep, lots of human contact
             Eat a balanced diet, avoid rapid weight loss, get adequate sleep, avoid overtraining and
             fatigue
           Eat lean meats, gain weight, sleep a few hours, workout occasionally
6. Please enter your email address ________________________________________________.
Note: Your email will be used strictly for the raffle and will remain confidential.




Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                        Page 70 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                            Appendix G
                               Exercise Benefits Program Evaluation FY08

Fit Quiz Challenge Feedback Survey

Please answer each question honestly and where appropriate write in detail. Thank you for
participating.
1. Did you like this method of learning health & wellness topics (online article/quiz)?

             Yes
             No
        If no, please explain: _____________________________________________________________

2. In your opinion, did reading the articles and completing the quizzes take a reasonable amount of
  time?

             Yes, it took a reasonable amount of time
           No, it took too long
3. Which method of learning do you prefer for health & wellness topics?

             Online
             In person individualized instruction
             In person group instruction
            Other
       If other, please explain: ___________________________________________________________
4. Where do you regularly get your health & wellness information?

             Internet searches/websites

             Magazines/newspapers

             TV news

            Other
       If other, please specify: ___________________________________________________________
5. What recommendations do you have to improve the Fit Quiz Challenge?
6. What can Recreation Services do to help you learn more about health & wellness topics?
Thank you for helping us improve our programs!




Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                        Page 71 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                 Appendix H
                              Students with Disabilities Needs Assessment FY07
                                             Telephone Survey



Purpose

To identify student needs and assess Recreation Services programs and facilities that would enhance
participation of students with disabilities. This survey will be distributed to students with physical and
health disabilities who are registered with the Center for Access-Ability Resources. Your participation in
this survey will assist Recreation Services staff in identifying programs, services, equipment and facilities
that would provide more opportunities for your involvement in recreation. We appreciate any
suggestions, comments or ideas you offer.



Questions

   What type of recreational activities do you enjoy?
   Do you currently use Recreation Services programs?
   If so, how often? What activities do you participate in?
   If not, why not?
   Are there any barriers to your participating in Recreation Services at NIU?
   What suggestions do you have for improving current programs or services?
   What programs, equipment, or services would you like for Recreation Services to add?
   What other activities have your participated in that are not offered at Recreation Services?
   Have you participated in any Adaptive Recreation programs at other places?
   If so, what activities did you participate in? Where?
   Would you like us to contact you with additional information or future programs? If so, please
    provide your name, email and/or phone.
   Additional Suggestions/Comments?




Recreation Services                    FY10 Assessment Summary Report                          Page 72 of 109
Division of Student Affairs               Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                    Appendix I



Fitness Specialist
Internship Description

Student Affairs & Enrollment Management Mission: In alliance with the educational mission of
Northern Illinois University, the Division of Student Affairs & Enrollment Management creates student
learning opportunities beyond the classroom that inspire intellectual, personal, and civic growth for
leadership in a diverse and complex world.

The Position: This 200-hour Fitness Specialist intern will report to the Assistant Director of Recreation
Services, Fitness and Wellness. The successful candidate will be responsible for supervising the adapted
recreation program, create marketing for the program, and seek out educational opportunities about
adapted exercise. The internship is for the fall semester of 2008.

Responsibilities: Characteristic duties and responsibilities of the Fitness Specialist include:

       Interpersonal Relations: Interact socially with program participants during exercise. Motivate
        and encourage each individual.
       Collaboration: Work with faculty and staff from Recreation Services, KNPE, and CAAR to further
        develop the program, consultation, accommodating the needs of each patron, and to pursue
        educational opportunities.
       Organizational Skills: Maintain participant files. Schedule meetings with participants,
        supervisors, KNPE faculty, and CAAR staff.
       Leadership: Provide leadership within Recreation Services by providing support to student staff,
        the Assistant Director for Fitness/Wellness and Marketing, and the Graduate Assistant for
        Fitness and Wellness.
       Creativity: Assist in marketing initiatives and promotion of the adapted recreation program.
       Assessment/Evaluation: Assist in developing and assessing participation data, program
        evaluations, and prepare reports that include recommendations for improvement.
       Crisis Management: Assist and respond to emergency situations at the Student Recreation
        Center or Chick Evans Field House.
       Research: Become educated about the field of adapted recreation through various resources.
        Review of literature and conducting of interviews related to adapted recreation.

Supervision
The position reports to the Assistant Director for Fitness/Wellness and Marketing and Graduate
Assistant for Fitness and Wellness.
Requirements:
     Graduating from Kinesiology or Physical Education
     Completion of KNPE coursework for intended major
Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                              Page 73 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                               Appendix I
Fitness Specialist Internship Description (continued)

Qualifications:
    CPR/AED/First Aid certified
    FERPA trained (can be provided)
    Emergency procedures training (can be provided)
    Experience working with students of diverse educational, racial, ethnic, and cultural
        backgrounds
    Experience in utilizing exercise equipment and recreational facility services
    Good organizational skills
    Good written and oral communication skills
    Willingness to work with adults and students with disabilities

Starting Date, Remuneration, and Application
This position is for the fall semester for 2008. This internship is not compensated. To apply send a letter
of application, resume, and a list of three current references including names, addresses, e-mail
addresses, and phone numbers to: Attn: Becky Lewis, Northern Illinois University, Student Recreation
Center, DeKalb, IL 60115. Contact: Becky Lewis; rlewis@niu.edu; (815) 753-9421; Fax: (815) 753-0245.
Electronic applications must be submitted in Word format.
                       “NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY is an EEO/AA INSTITUTION”




Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                          Page 74 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                              Appendix J
                              Recreation Services Program Interest Survey FY07
Interested in staying active? Let us help you out! Print your name and email neatly. We’ll email you when
things are happening for what you checked off. Never tried it? Now’s the time. The rates are low. Much of
the programming is designed with the beginner in mind.
Name (last, first):
E-mail:
   Outdoor Adventure            Fitness and Wellness        Intramural Sports          Sport Clubs
          (all__)                       (all__)                  (all__)                   (all__)
____Rock Climbing            Fitness Programming           ____Basketball       ____Equestrian
____Kayaking                   ____Cardio (Spinning®,        ____Softball        ____Men’s Rugby
____Canoeing                   Kickboxing, Step, etc.)       ____Flag Football   ____Fencing
____Cross-Country              ____Mind / Body (Pilates,     ____Floor Hockey    ____Women’s Rugby
     Skiing                    Yoga, etc.)
____Snow-Boarding              ____Body Toning (Core         ____Indoor Soccer   ____Swimming
____Back-Packing               Training, Total Body          ____Volleyball      ____Men’s Soccer
                               Training, etc.)
____Night Hikes &              ____Personal Training         ____Tennis          ____Ice Hockey
     Star Gazing
____Spelunking (caving)        Wellness Programming          ____Dodge Ball      ____Ultimate Frisbee
____Mountain Biking            ____Massage Therapy           ____Racquetball     ____Water Polo
____Camping                    ____Acupressure               ____Badminton       ____Table Tennis
                               ____Nutrition Consultation    ____Kickball        ____Men’s Lacrosse
                                (Diet analysis, one-on-one   ____Wallyball       ____Men’s Volleyball
                               sessions)                                         ____Aikido
                                                                                 ____Women’s Lacrosse
                                                                                 ____Tae Kwon Do /
                                                                                 Hapkido
                                                                                 ____Tae Kwon Do
                                                                                 ____Shotokan Karate

Is there anything else you would like to see Recreation Services offer?




 Recreation Services                     FY10 Assessment Summary Report                     Page 75 of 109
 Division of Student Affairs                Northern Illinois University
 & Enrollment Management
                                                                                                  Appendix L
                        Outdoor Adventure Program Evaluation Summary FY06-FY09

    Total      Average                                     TRIP STAFFING ELEMENTS
                              Rate the Following (Based on 5-Excellent down to 1-Poor)
    548          4.80              Organization of Trip
    548          4.87              Trip in General
    561          4.89              Leader
    537          4.90              Assistant Leaders
    405          4.93              Support Staff
    472                       Was the trip leader'(s) knowledge and skills satisfactory?
    472         100.0%             Yes
     0           0.0%              No
    505                       Did you feel safe with your driver?
    502          99.4%             Yes
     3           60.0%             No
    546                       Was Safety
    34           6.2%              Overemphasized?
    507          92.9%             Stressed Properly?
     5           0.9%              Not emphasized enough?
     1           0.2%              Ignored?
    516                       Were environmentally sound practices stressed?
    507          98.3%             Yes
     4           0.8%              No
     6           1.2%              N/A
                                                              TRIP PREPARATION
    521                       Was the information provided helpful?
    471          90.4%             Yes
     6           1.2%              No
    38           7.3%              No Info
     5           1.0%              More info needed (11/11)
    519                       Was the pre-trip meeting helpful?
    261          50.3%             Yes
     6           1.2%              No
    252          48.6%             No Meeting
                                                              EVALUATE THE TRIP
    548                       Was experience what you wanted?
    167          30.5%             Even Better! (Originally written in., included as of 2006)
    379          69.2%             Yes
     1           0.2%              No
     2           0.4%              Yes and no
    558                       How was the overall experience?

Recreation Services                      FY10 Assessment Summary Report                         Page 76 of 109
Division of Student Affairs                 Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                    Appendix L
                         Outdoor Adventure Program Evaluation Summary FY06-FY09

     424        76.0%           Very enjoyable
     130        23.3%           Enjoyable
       4         0.7%           Average
       0         0.0%           Not enjoyable
     485                   What was the level of physical effort? (Added 11/11/05)
      26         5.4%           Too difficult
     451        93.0%           Just right
       8         1.6%           Too easy
     539                   Was equipment satisfactory?
     511        94.8%           Yes
      21         3.9%           No
      11         2.0%           Yes and no
     310                   If meals were provided, were they satisfactory? (Added 11/11/05)
     303        97.7%           Yes
       9         2.9%           No
     535                   Location of trip satisfactory?
     531        99.8%           Yes
       1         0.2%           No
     534                   How did you find out about this trip (Multiple entries allowed)
     178        33.3%           E-mail
     112        21.0%           Internet
      33         6.2%           Hand Flyer
      91        17.0%           Brochure
      10         1.9%           Newspaper
       6         1.1%           NIU Calendar
      24         4.5%           Dorm Flyer
     163        30.5%           Friend
      38         7.1%           Poster
       0         0.0%           Channel 7
       5         0.9%           Outing Centre Staff member
      82        15.4%           Word of Mouth
  Comments
 Awesome, stupendous, better than I thought it would be, really fun, what I wanted and much
 more, great , a blast, peach, perfect, loved it, just what I needed, beautiful, outstanding (46)
 Trip leaders made the trip a lot of fun, amazing trip leaders, excellent trip leaders, easy to learn
 from, upbeat and friendly, patient, developmental and focused on learning and enjoyment, kind,
 professional (9)
 Good introduction to outdoor activity, comfortable for first time (4)
 More complex than imagined, very challenging (2)
 I'm looking forward to other trips (2)
Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                           Page 77 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                        Appendix L
                         Outdoor Adventure Program Evaluation Summary FY06-FY09

 The human body can fit in TINY spaces (2)
 I learned how not to give up.
 Mind over matter
 I didn't know it existed! Now I know
 Do trips more often!
 NIU really needs a rock climbing wall
 Very informative
 I would recommend it!
 The music selection was megafantastical
 Had trouble finding the pool.




Recreation Services                 FY10 Assessment Summary Report                Page 78 of 109
Division of Student Affairs            Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                              Appendix M
                  Group Fitness Class Program Evaluations and Learning Outcomes FY07

Instructor Name: ___________________________________________________________

Class Title/Format: ____________________Class Day and Time: ____________________

Please rate the following questions according to the scale provided.

3=above average           2=satisfactory         1=needs improvement 0=no basis for judgment

The instructor…
1. Gives clear directions and cues.                                                              3   2   1   0
2. Provides information on safety and encourages participants to go at their own pace.           3   2   1   0
3. Is motivating and makes the class enjoyable for everyone.                                     3   2   1   0
4. Is prepared for class and begins and ends class on time.                                      3   2   1   0
5. Asks how participants are feeling and/or checks heart rates at least one time during class.   3   2   1   0
6. Uses the microphone or can be heard clearly.                                                  3   2   1   0
7. Uses routines that include a variety of moves, are well organized, and are easy to follow.    3   2   1   0
8. The overall impression of the instructor.                                                     3   2   1   0
9. The overall impression of the class.                                                          3   2   1   0
10. I learned the following by taking this class (check all that apply):

□ At least one new exercise                              □ Proper exercise form and technique
□ Strength training principles                           □ Importance of stretching, flexibility, and
balance
□ Importance of cardiovascular training                  □ Importance of core strengthening
□ Exercise safety                                        □ Muscle identification
□ How to monitor my exercise heart rate                  □ Other
        ________
□ How to interpret and use heart rate training zones

11. Do you have any suggestions to improve group fitness classes (schedule, times, formats, etc.) for
future semesters?



11. Please share any additional comments you have about Group Fitness at the Student Recreation
    Center on the back of this form. Thank you!
12.



Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                        Page 79 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                             Appendix N
                              UNIV 101 Orientation Program Survey FY07

1. Prior to today’s tour and activity, have you been to the Student Recreation Center (SRC) before?
       Yes                         No
2. Did you visit the Student Recreation Center during NIU’s Summer Orientation?
       Yes                         No

3. What have did you do during your previous visit(s) to the SRC?

4. Identify the Recreation Services program areas you are interested in (check all that apply):
         Fitness/wellness                                   Intramural Sports
         Outdoor Adventure                                  Sport Clubs
         Open/Informal Recreation

5. Please describe you what learned during your visit to the SRC today:
   __________________________________________________________________________________
   __________________________________________________________________________________
   __________________________________________________________________________________
   __________________________________________________________________________________
   __________________________________________________________________________________
6. Please provide any additional comments:
   __________________________________________________________________________________
   __________________________________________________________________________________
   __________________________________________________________________________________
   __________________________________________________________________________________




Recreation Services                 FY10 Assessment Summary Report                          Page 80 of 109
Division of Student Affairs            Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                             Appendix R

                     Open Recreation Patron Survey (Facilities and Equipment) FY09

Gender:           Male_____             Female_____

Membership Status:        Student_____ Faculty / Staff_____     Community_____          Alumni_____

Year in School:
Freshman_____             Sophomore_____        Junior_____     Senior_____     Grad / Post Grad_____

How often do you use the Recreation Center?             How often do you use the Field House?
1-2X per week_____                                      1-2X per week_____
3-4X per week_____                                      3-4X per week_____
5-6X per week_____
7+ per week _____

Please indicate the areas that you use (Please rank your top four with one being the most used):
Recreation Center                                                        Field House
Fitness / Cardio Room _____              Track             _____         Fitness / Cardio Room _____
Free Weight Room        _____            Racquetball court _____         Track                   _____
Power Lift Room         _____            Activity Room(s) _____          Multi-purpose court(s) _____
Multi-purpose court(s) _____                                             Activity Room(s)        _____

Please indicate what activities you participate in (Please rank your top four with one being the most
used):
        Recreation Center                                                  Field House
        Cardio Exercise          _____                                     Cardio Exercise        _____
        Strength Training        _____                                     Strength Training      _____
        Jogging                  _____                                     Jogging                _____
        Racquetball              _____                                     Basketball             _____
        Tennis                   _____                                     Volleyball             _____
        Basketball               _____                                     Dodge Ball             _____
        Volleyball               _____                                     Indoor Soccer          _____
        Badminton                _____                                     Floor Hockey           _____
        Dodge Ball               _____
        Table tennis             _____
        Wallyball                _____




Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                        Page 81 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                 Appendix R
               Open Recreation Patron Survey (Facilities and Equipment) FY09 (continued)

Please rate the availability of check out equipment you use (1 = always available - 5 = never available)
Basketballs               _____            Racquetball rackets    _____
Volleyballs               _____            Badminton rackets      _____
Wallyballs                _____            Dodge balls            _____
Tennis rackets            _____            Hockey sticks          _____
Table tennis paddles _____

What other pieces of equipment do you think we should provide for check-out use?
_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Please rate the quality of check out equipment that you use (1 = very good - 5 = very poor)
Basketballs              _____           Racquetball rackets     _____
Volleyballs              _____           Badminton rackets       _____
Wallyballs               _____           Dodge balls             _____
Tennis rackets           _____           Hockey sticks           _____
Table tennis paddles _____

Please rate the quality of facility equipment that you use (1 = very good    - 5 = very poor)
Volleyball nets / poles _____             Treadmills      _____             Stretching mats          _____
Tennis nets / poles      _____            Steppers        _____             Medicine balls           _____
Wallyball nets /poles _____               Bikes           _____             Stability balls          _____
Soccer goals             _____            AMT             _____
Floor hockey goals       _____            Elliptical      _____
Badminton nets / poles _____

Strength machines (list top four used)                    Free Weights (list top four used)
1. ____________________          _____                    1. ____________________          _____
2. ____________________          _____                    2. ____________________          _____
3. ____________________          _____                    3. ____________________          _____
4. ____________________          _____                    4. ____________________          _____

Please rate the cleanliness of the following areas that you use (1 = very clean - 5 = not very clean)
Recreation Center                                         Field House
Fitness / Cardio Room _____                               Fitness / Cardio Room _____
Free Weight Room         _____                            Track                     _____
Power Lift Room          _____                            Activity Room(s)          _____
Track                    _____                            Multi-purpose court(s) _____
Racquetball court        _____                            Locker rooms              _____
Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                            Page 82 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                              Appendix R
               Open Recreation Patron Survey (Facilities and Equipment) FY09 (continued)

Activity Room(s)          _____                         Bathrooms                _____
Multi-purpose court(s)    _____                         Lounge                   _____
Locker rooms              _____
Bath rooms                _____
Meeting room(s)           _____

Do you have any suggestions (About the facilities in general, the type or quantity of equipment, etc)?

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________________________




Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                         Page 83 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                           Appendix S
                             Open Recreation Aquatics Patron Survey FY09
                       (October 6 – December 5, 2008 & January 19 – April 3, 2009)


Aquatics Patron,

Please take a moment to complete this brief survey regarding operation days and times for lap and open
swim.

    Relative to Time(s) of the day
“When would you prefer the pool to be open?”




    Relative to Day(s) of the week
“When would you most likely use the aquatics facilities?”




    Comments/Suggestions
“What can Recreation Services do to improve the Aquatics Program?”




Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                      Page 84 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                  Appendix T
                              Open Recreation Aquatic Participant Data FY07-FY09

                                        Annual Participation Counts
  FY2007          FY2008            % Change         FY2009       % Change              % Change FY2007-
                                                                                             FY2009
      5,054            5,450                  8%             7,039           29%                       39%

                                   Average Pool Counts
           FY2008                        FY2009                        % Change
                           11              19                            73%

                                 Monthly Participant Analysis FY2007-FY2009
                                             % Change                    % Change               % Change
  Month         FY2007         FY2008     FY2007-FY2008 FY2009 FY2008-FY2009                  FY2007-FY2009
   July             76               220               189%      94                 -57%                24%
  August            56                91                63%     272                 199%               386%
September          612               879                44%    1046                  19%                71%
 October           567               536                 -5%    721                  35%                27%
November           523               416               -20%     531                  28%                 2%
December           157               157   -------------------  215     -------------------             37%
                              *No record
                                  – used
                                 FY2007
  January            509             620                22%     894                  44%                 76%
 February            484             562                16%    1144                 104%                136%
   March             736             608               -17%     805                  32%                  9%
    April            938             970                  3%    905                   -7%                -4%
    May              342             391                14%     244                 -38%                -29%
    June             104             159                53%     168                    6%                62%
   Totals           5104            5609                10%    7039                  25%                 38%

                                Daily Lap Swim Participant Analysis FY2009
Time                Mondays          Tuesdays         Wednesdays           Thursdays                    Fridays
# Days Open            38               39                 37                 36                           36
                 Total Average Total Average         Total Average      Total Average                Total Average
12:00 p.m.         211        6    214          5      236          6    198          6               184        5
12:30 p.m.         345        9    357          9      356        10     325          9               269        7
1:00 p.m.          367       10    367          9      359        10     315          9               375       10
1:30 p.m.          190        5    197          5    1128           5    168          5               137        4
Totals           1,113       29 1,135         39 1,128            30    1006         28               965       27
                   Average Number of Swimmers Per ½ Hour            6
Recreation Services                     FY10 Assessment Summary Report                          Page 85 of 109
Division of Student Affairs                Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                       Appendix T
                              Open Recreation Aquatic Participant Data FY07-FY09

                        Men/Women Participation FY2009
    Semester            Men       %        Women                 %         Total
Fall                      1798     68%          848                  32%     2646
Spring                    2353     61%         1506                  39%     3859
Summer                     326     61%          208                  39%       534
Totals                    4476     64%         2563                  36%     7039




Recreation Services                     FY10 Assessment Summary Report               Page 86 of 109
Division of Student Affairs                Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                              Appendix U
                                     Customer Feedback Form FY09


Hey Recreation Services Staff
I…
     am impressed                            am mad as heck

     am pleasantly surprised                 need more information

     am just checking in                     have a question

     am a bit annoyed


We appreciate hearing your comments, questions, and concerns. Your information will be reviewed and
submitted to the appropriate staff member for action.

Thank you for your time and input!

Recreation Services Staff

Date
Submitted

Name

Address

Phone

Email Address

Comment(s)




Would you like a reply via e-mail                 Yes                  No




Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                          Page 87 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                           Appendix V
                                         Risk Assessment FY09

1. What does ‘Key Risk Areas’ mean?

As a starting point in determining how to approach risk management in the sport and recreation setting,
it is useful to break risk management into six key risk areas:
      o General Administration
      o Emergency Response Plan
      o Supervision
      o Training
      o Facilities and Equipment
      o Documentation

2. What are the Key Risk Management Issues facing sport and recreation today?

Within each area, there are a number of key risk issues:

General Administration
   o Functional Risk Management Committee
   o Staff job descriptions incorporating safety responsibilities
   o Rental process, contracts and certificate of insurance
   o Special events procedures and training
   o Proper construction of waiver documents
   o Transportation policies and procedures
Emergency Response Plan
   o Documented comprehensive department-wide plan
   o Documented, specific, program plans
   o Documented emergency procedures
   o Documented training requirements
   o Communication protocol in event of serious emergency
Supervision
   o Supervision of programs and facilities, especially high-risk
   o Supervision ratios for high risk programs
   o Instructor qualifications
   o Lesson plans and progressions for high-risk instructional activities




Recreation Services                 FY10 Assessment Summary Report                       Page 88 of 109
Division of Student Affairs            Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                            Appendix W

                              Recreation Services, Northern Illinois University
                Risk Management/Emergency Response Committee Responsibilities FY09

The Risk Management/Emergency Response Committee is responsible for the development, review, and
on-going assessment of the risk management and emergency response policies and procedures related
to all of the program areas and facilities that comprise Recreation Services. The committee serves as an
assessment and recommendation board that reports to the Director of Recreation Services, and is
chaired by the Associate Director for Facility Operations. Committee members meet frequently
throughout the academic year to thoroughly monitor and review risk management and emergency
response for Recreation Services. Membership of the committee should be representative of staff and
students with experience in the following areas: risk analysis, emergency response, recreation policies
and procedures, and education and training.
Program areas include: Aquatics, Intramurals Sports, Fitness, Sport Clubs, Open Recreation, Outdoor
Adventures, Summer Camps, and Wellness
Facilities include: Student Recreation Center, Evans Field House, Anderson Pool, Gabel Pool, and the
recreation fields.
Major responsibilities of the committee:
       Design and continually update a comprehensive, department-wide risk
        management/emergency response manual
       Annually review written risk management/emergency response policies (including travel &
        program specific policies)
       Annually review risk management/emergency response procedures (including travel & program
        specific policies)
       Make recommendations regarding new policies and/or procedures needed
       Review and recommend updates to risk management/emergency response forms, contracts,
        and waivers
       Review equipment (strength training, cardio, car pool and other program specific equipment)
        maintenance schedules and reports; report any concerns and include related feedback
       Design and conduct all risk management /emergency response trainings for the department
       Design and conduct periodic drills to test effectiveness/efficiency of staffs’ emergency response
       Continually discuss standard of care that should be expected of employees in various emergency
        situations; develop new policies/procedures if needed
       Design and continually update a pre-employment checklist outlining risk
        management/emergency response responsibilities, as well as related certifications and trainings
       Review annual certification workshop schedules (CPR, first-aid, AED & blood borne pathogens)
       Review appropriate certification of personnel (life guards, personal trainers, & massage
        therapists)
       Annually review job descriptions for all staff (full-time, graduate students, and students) to
        assure appropriate safety responsibilities are clearly outlined
       Complete a periodic comprehensive risk assessment/audit for all facilities (listed above)and all
        operations
       Review and evaluate emergency responses as they occur; provide feedback to enhance current
        practices
Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                       Page 89 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                            Appendix W

         Risk Management/Emergency Response Committee Responsibilities FY09 (continued)

       Serve as an active advocate for Recreation Services related to funding/policy requests that
        support the safety of facility users
       Maintains accurate minutes of all meetings


Committee Representation:
Chair:
Recreation Services Associate Director for Facility Operations

Members:
Recreation Services Intramural Sports Professional Staff or Graduate Assistant Member
Recreation Services Sport Clubs Professional Staff or Graduate Assistant Member
Recreation Services Outdoor Adventure Professional Staff or Graduate Assistant Member
Recreation Services Open Recreation Professional Staff or Graduate Assistant Member
Recreation Services Fitness & Wellness Professional Staff or Graduate Assistant Member
Department of Public Safety Representative
Environmental Health & Safety Representative




Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                        Page 90 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                           Appendix X
                                     Gabel Pool Regulations FY09

Entry Into Pool Area

     Lifeguard has the authority to make and enforce rules necessary to ensure the safety of all those
      present during Recreation Services use only.
     Pool use will only be permitted during RS Sponsored programs when a RS Lifeguard is on duty.
      (This includes all clubs and special events using the pool).
     All persons entering the pool area must show their pass and sign in. (passes include valid NIU
      OneCard, RS Pool Pass, and RS Guest Pass).
     All children under the age of 17 must be accompanied by an adult 18 years or older.

Appropriate Attire

     Street shoes are not permitted on the pool deck.
     Showers are encouraged before entry into the pool.
     Shoulder length hair or longer should be pulled back or in a cap.
     Proper Swimming Attire required! No exceptions: no cutoffs, sweatpants, or diapers. Please use
      plastic pants/swim diapers if infants will be using the pool.
     T-shirts may be worn but they must be a solid color.
      (No screen print on shirts).

Deck Rules

     Food, drink, gum are not allowed in the pool area or locker rooms.
     No glass on deck.
     Rough play/foul language or failure to comply with any rules can be grounds for dismal from the
      area.
     Running is not permitted on the pool deck or in the locker rooms.

Lap Swim/Open Swim Rules

     Diving is not allowed in the shallow end at any time for any reason.
     For lap swim, lane assignments may be changed to fit the need of those present. (i.e. grouping
      fast swimmers together).
     When more than 2 swimmers are in a lane, laps must be “circle swum” (Clockwise within a
      lane).
     Lane lines are not floatation devices; no one should be hanging on them.
     Toys/floats that are brought in may be used for open swim at times when the lifeguard’s vision
      of the entire pool is not impaired (i.e. crowded).




Recreation Services                 FY10 Assessment Summary Report                       Page 91 of 109
Division of Student Affairs            Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                       Appendix X
                              Gabel Pool Regulations FY09 (continued)

Illness

     Individuals with skin lesions or communicable disease may not swim unless given written
      permission from a doctor and written proof shown to aquatics management. (Three copies to
      keep on file are required and need to be submitted prior to pool use).
     Please report any illness or injury to the lifeguard on duty.




Recreation Services               FY10 Assessment Summary Report                     Page 92 of 109
Division of Student Affairs          Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                Appendix Y
                                     Precor Glide Patron Feedback FY09
                                    Survey Conducted October 2-31, 2008

                        Recreation Services Precor Glide Demo Patron Feedback
Do you like this Dual Cable Column?                       Yes                           No
Comments:



What did you like or dislike?




                                         Precor Patron Responses
Do you like this Dual Cable Column?
  Yes          79                          No        4
                                                 Comments
                         Positive                                            Negative
Awesome! (3)                                            Garbage machine.
Buy a lot of these!                                     I'd rather you replace the existing tower in the
                                                        other room (free-weight).
Cool s***                                               The existing equipment is good, it’s just too old!
                                                        Too far apart for arms, too close for chest.
Exactly what the Rec needs, a full body                 Yes, but it doesn't seem solid…
combination machine. Very useful, very cool.
F***ing awesome. (2)                                    Yes, but get machines that don't mark the weight
                                                        to be twice as heavy as they actually are.
For sure son (get it).                                  Yes, but it is already breaking though. The clip is
                                                        screwed up." (checked & fixed)
Get 79 of these! Love it!                               Yes, but pull-up bar needs to be at least 1/2 foot
                                                        higher and not as thick!
Great addition. (2)                                     Yes, It displays different exercises but it feels
                                                        cheaply built.
Great machine, many possibilities. Would love to                                 Other
have it here.
I like it a lot!!                                       But change the music here!!!!!
I love you! Birth my children.                          Change the music. Nobody likes this junk.
If you can dream it, you can do it!
Illy! Keep! PS - More burritos.
It gives you a wide range of exercises on one

Recreation Services                    FY10 Assessment Summary Report                         Page 93 of 109
Division of Student Affairs               Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
machine so you don't have to wait for one
machine.
It has a nice variety of cable exercises also it will
keep the other cable pulleys less crowded.
It helped cover all the basic muscles that people
would want to work in one machine. Hope it stays
at the Rec.
It helps to have another dual cable machine.
It's functional.
It's great!
Keep it! (6)
Keep it! Cable machines are always taken or broke.
Need another cable system like this!
Keep this s***!
King me!
Like different muscle workouts.
Love it, please get one and fix it when it breaks!!
Multi-purpose and very efficient.
Need a machine like this. Can do many different
exercises.
Need more of these! Perfect!
Nice design, buy more of them or other models; its
better than the current cable machines.
Nice.
No interruptions by people walking through your
exercise because it’s a small space for you just to
fit in and work out.
Pull-ups are very comfortable.
Really a workout.
Sweet. Very useful.
Used for shoulders (secondary work). Tough to get
the hang of it at first (vague directions) but good
for stabilizing muscles. A good workout.
Very accessible, a lot of space
Very nice!!
Very versatile.
We should have this in the gym!
When are we getting it?
You sunk my battleship!


Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report    Page 94 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                              Appendix Z

      Matrix Treadmill, Upright Bike, Recumbent Bike, and Ascent Trainer Patron Feedback FY09


               Matrix A5x Ascent Trainer                           Matrix R7x Recumbent Bike

    How do you like it?                                      How do you like it?

    Buy it!         Its Okay      I'll Pass                  Buy it!         Its Okay     I'll Pass

    Comments                                                 Comments
    _______________________________                          _______________________________
    _______________________________                          _______________________________
    _______________________________                          _______________________________
    _______________________________                          _______________________________
    _______________________________                          _______________________________



                 Matrix T7x Treadmill                                   Matrix U7x Upright Bike

     How do you like it?                                     How do you like it?

     Buy it!         Its Okay     I'll Pass                  Buy it!         Its Okay     I'll Pass

     Comments                                                Comments
     _______________________________                         _______________________________
     _______________________________                         _______________________________
     _______________________________                         _______________________________
     _______________________________                         _______________________________
     _______________________________                         _______________________________




Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                       Page 95 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                    Appendix Z

      Matrix Treadmill, Upright Bike, Recumbent Bike, and Ascent Trainer Patron Feedback FY09

                                      Matrix Ascent Trainer Responses
How do you like it?
Buy it!                               It’s Okay                             I’ll Pass
23                                    3                                     1
Positive                                                 Negative
Best one in here.                                        Too hard to get used to it.
Better than other elliptical machines here!              Other
Excellent!! (2)                                          Heart rate monitor did not work.
Great features, great progress, & summary of             Heart rate wouldn't show up for me.
workout.
It's a better workout than the elliptical. I like that   Nice, needs magazine rack though!
it shows a detailed workout summary & that it has
iPod connections because sometimes mine dies in
the middle of my workout.
It is a nice machine. It is new and therefore            Precor bikes would be a good investment.
performs better than #12 or #13.
I love this. I can watch my movies from my iPod.         You guys should get rid of the old ellipticals - 6, 7,
                                                         8, 9 - and get more like 10 & 11. Everyone is
                                                         always on these. Thanks!
It was very smooth and I could feel it working.
The best I have seen. It's really good. I never
cared to write a review for any machine but this
one is the first and the best.
Love the fan!
Smooth but couldn't get the heart rate monitor to
work.
Very nice.
Very smooth!
Works legs really well! It's different, but really
neat! =)




Recreation Services                    FY10 Assessment Summary Report                             Page 96 of 109
Division of Student Affairs               Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                    Matrix Treadmill Responses
How do you like it?
Buy it!                             It’s Okay                       I’ll Pass
9                                   1                               0
Positive                                          Negative
Awesome, smooth run. Love the iPod                It didn’t work.
hookup…Now hook it up to the TV!!
Awesome!
Easy to use, really liked using it.
Fan and touchscreen are great. TV would be nice
too!
Good.
I love this machine!
It’s great.
The touch screen is super nice.
Very smooth track and sweet features.
                                  Matrix Upright Bike Responses
How do you like it?
Buy it!                          It’s Okay                          I’ll Pass
4                                2                                  3
Positive                                          Negative
Made exercising more fun.                         Seat is very uncomfortable.
Good handlebar set-up.                            The seat was very uncomfortable! Fix it!!
Like it.                                          Arm bars are awkward and it gives you a less
                                                  intense workout.
                                                  Uncomfortable!
                                                  Other
                                                  Seems cool but I couldn't get it to work.
                                 Matrix Recumbent Bike Responses
How do you like it?
Buy it!                            It’s Okay                        I’ll Pass
5                                  0                                0
Positive                                          Negative
Gives you a lot of feedback on workout. Nice
touchscreen.
Badass!                                                                  Other
Great machine, iPod accessory is awesome!         Chicks dig scars. ?
Perfect for cyclists!
Smooth and nice. Could use a book tray though.

Recreation Services               FY10 Assessment Summary Report                       Page 97 of 109
Division of Student Affairs          Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                                     Appendix BB
                                           Leadership Program Evaluation FY08


Program Name:                                                           Date:

Presenter:                                                              Location:

Please rate the following items. 1 is a low score, 5 is a high score. Circle the number that best fits your opinion about the
program.

                                                                                    Low…………………………………………..High

    Program presentation met my expectations                                       1       2          3         4         5
    Information was presented clearly                                              1       2          3         4         5
    Presenter had a through knowledge of the                                       1       2          3         4         5
      subject matter or topic of discussion
    Presenter answered questions clearly and concisely                             1       2          3         4         5
    What would you rate the program overall?                                       1       2          3         4         5


Please answer the following questions. Use the back of this sheet if you need more room.

What were three things you learned from this program?




How could this program have been improved?

What did you like about this program?

Please give us your ideas and suggestions for future programs.

Other comments.




Recreation Services                           FY10 Assessment Summary Report                                         Page 98 of 109
Division of Student Affairs                      Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                             Appendix FF
                          New Group Fitness Instructor Evaluation FY08 and FY09

Instructor Name __________________________________________
Semester and Date _______________________________________
Class format _____________________________________________

Class Performance:                                               Needs           Meets              Exceeds
                                                              Improvement     Expectations        Expectations

Prepared for class (music, stereo, equipment ready, etc)

Stated his/her name and explained the objectives of the
class

Asked if there were any new participants

Started class on time

Comments:


Started class with enthusiasm and excitement

Started with a proper warm up (initial movement,
dynamic stretching, specificity of class format)

Demonstrated proper form and gave necessary safety
cues during stretches

Comments:


Cued on time to allow participants to follow easily

Used a mix of auditory and visual cues (pointing,
counting, directional, etc.)

Cued correct form, alignment, and safety

Used universal group fitness and step terminology

Voice was motivating and projected loudly throughout
the room


Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                          Page 99 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
Participants could follow instructor’s cueing without
difficulty

Comments:


                                                                 Needs         Meets           Exceeds
                                                              Improvement   Expectations     Expectations

Selected a routine/exercises appropriate for the class

Demonstrated intensity modifications frequently

Routine was creative and instructor provided variety

Adequately broke down choreography

Participants could follow instructor’s routine without
difficulty

Comments:


Demonstrated proper form and alignment throughout the
entire class

Showed full range of motion in all movements

Demonstrated exaggerated, strong, precise movements

Pushed heels down throughout the class

Stayed on-beat with the music throughout the class

When off beat, was able to quickly get back on beat

Moved on the 32 count phrase

Music was the appropriate speed (BPM) for the class
format

Music was tasteful and appropriate for the class




Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                    Page 100 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
Comments:


                                                                  Needs         Meets           Exceeds
                                                               Improvement   Expectations     Expectations

Ended class with a cool down, lasting at least 3-5 minutes

Adjusted music volume or changed music to create a
relaxing atmosphere

Demonstrated and cued safety and form for all stretches

Held stretches for at least 10 seconds

Stretched all necessary muscles

Ended class on time and thanked participants for coming

Was available for questions from participants at the end

Comments:


Made eye contact with participants and smiled frequently

Appeared to enjoy teaching the class and had confidence

Left the “traditional instructor spot” at least one time
during class

Aware of participant’s fitness level and gave individual
attention when necessary

Was encouraging and motivating throughout class

Overall Comments:



Instructor Signature:

Evaluator Signature:




Recreation Services                   FY10 Assessment Summary Report                    Page 101 of 109
Division of Student Affairs              Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                            Appendix GG
                              Group Fitness Instructor Self-Evaluation FY07

Instructor Name_________________________________________

Semester and Date_______________________________________

Class Format___________________________________________



After viewing your video tape, please respond to the following items:

From what you see on the tape, are you…



Motivating and enthusiastic right from the start of class?

        Needs Improvement       Meets Expectations               Exceeds Expectations



Organized and prepared for the class (routine does not seem made up on the spot)?

        Needs Improvement       Meets Expectations               Exceeds Expectations



Providing intensity modifications so participants of all levels can get a safe and effective workout?

        Needs Improvement       Meets Expectations               Exceeds Expectations



Please list two or more strengths related to your instruction that you saw on the tape.




Please list two or more weaknesses related to your instruction that you saw on the tape.




Was this evaluation process helpful in making you a better instructor?


Recreation Services                  FY10 Assessment Summary Report                       Page 102 of 109
Division of Student Affairs             Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                                       Appendix HH
                        Recreation Services Student Employee Learning Outcomes FY08

Employees – Intramural Supervisors, Facility Supervisors, Building Staff, Lifeguards, Group Fitness Instructors, Personal
Trainers, Outdoor Adventure Trip Leaders and Outing Centre Staff (86)
Administrative skills (2)                                      Maturity
Assess participant fitness levels                              Motivation skills (others) (8)
Assess subordinates performance (3)                            Multi-tasking (6)
Attention to detail (3)                                        Observation skills (2)
Communication skills (8)                                       Organizational skills (4)
Compassion                                                     Overcoming obstacles
Completion of tasks (2)                                        Patience (3)
Compromise                                                     Personable
Confidence                                                     Personal fitness level
Conflict Resolution                                            Personal health
Consequences of poor performance                               Positive attitude (maintaining) (2)
Client recruitment and retention (2)                           Present at national conference (2)
Critical thinking skills                                       Problem solving skills (4)
Customer service skills (19)                                   Professionalism in challenging situations(6)
Decision making (3)                                            Professional conference (attendance & networking) (3)
Delegation skills                                              Program knowledge and skills (24)
Dependability                                                  Program preparation (16)
Difficult Situations (managing) (3)                            Public speaking skills (3)
Diversity, acceptance of differences/others (6)                Recreation professional career (4)
Environmental Ethics (3)                                       Relationship Building (3)
Equipment use and adaptations (8)                              Respond to various situations (3)
First Aid, emergency and crisis response (22)                  Responsibility (4)
Flexibility (2)                                                Risk management (3)
Following instructions                                         Rules, regulations, and procedures (9)
Follow-through                                                 Safety
Group interaction                                              Seek progressive responsibilities
I can make a difference in people’s lives                      Self-confidence
Importance of clean environment (2)                            Staff selection
Importance of input in the improvement process                 Strategizing to optimize participant progress (7)
Interpersonal skills (5)                                       Supervision skills (3)
Inventory management (2)                                       Teaching methods (2)
Job retention                                                  Team work and collaboration (21)
Leadership skills & personal style(21)                         Time management (6)
Learning from mistakes and correcting mistakes                 Understanding self
Listening and comprehension skills (7)                         Variety in programs
Managerial skills (3)                                          Work ethic
Marketing (2)                                                  Work experience in health related profession



   Recreation Services                     FY10 Assessment Summary Report                             Page 103 of 109
   Division of Student Affairs                Northern Illinois University
   & Enrollment Management
                                                                                          Appendix II

                              Student Staff Retreat Program Evaluation
                                           August 19, 2009


Name _____________________________ Primary Position_________________________________

Your suggestions/comments will assist the staff in planning future retreats.

Session 1: Getting to Know You

Presenter: Lynniece Carter

Please rate the following items. 1 is a low score, 5 is a high score. Circle the number that
best fits your opinion about the program.
                                                Low…………………………………………..High

     Information was presented clearly                        1      2     3      4         5
     Activities related to subject matter                     1      2     3      4         5
     Presenters facilitated program                           1      2     3      4         5
     What would you rate the presentation overall?            1      2     3      4         5


What were two things you learned from this program?

(1)                                                                                          ______

(2)                                                                                          ______

How could this presentation have been improved?                       _____________________
         ______________________________________________________________________________

Session 2: Assimilating into a Supervisory Position

Presenters: Karen Helm, Jonathan Higdon & Clint Svatos

Please rate the following items. 1 is a low score, 5 is a high score. Circle the number that
best fits your opinion about the program.
                                                Low…………………………………………..High

     Information was presented clearly                        1      2     3      4         5
     Activities related to subject matter                     1      2     3      4         5
     Presenters facilitated program                           1      2     3      4         5
     What would you rate the presentation overall?            1      2     3      4         5

Recreation Services                 FY10 Assessment Summary Report                     Page 104 of 109
Division of Student Affairs            Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                      Appendix II

                       Student Staff Retreat Program Evaluation (continued)

What were two things you learned from this program?

(1)                                                                            _____________

(2)                                                                                      ______

How could this presentation have been improved?                          ___________________
         ______________________________________________________________________________

Session 3: Communicating is at the Core of Your Effectiveness
Presenters: Brad Szlezak

Please rate the following items. 1 is a low score, 5 is a high score. Circle the number that
best fits your opinion about the program.
                                               Low…………………………………………..High

     Information was presented clearly                       1      2   3     4         5
     Activities related to subject matter                    1      2   3     4         5
     Presenters facilitated program                          1      2   3     4         5
     What would you rate the presentation overall?           1      2   3     4         5


What were two things you learned from this program?

(1)                                                                                      ______

(2)                                                                                      ______

How could this presentation have been improved?                                ____________
         ______________________________________________________________________________




Recreation Services                FY10 Assessment Summary Report                  Page 105 of 109
Division of Student Affairs           Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                     Appendix II

                       Student Staff Retreat Program Evaluation (continued)


Session 4: Scavenger Hunt – Learning RS Programs and Services

Presenters: Michael Lower

Please rate the following items. 1 is a low score, 5 is a high score. Circle the number that
best fits your opinion about the program.
                                                Low…………………………………………..High

     Information was presented clearly                       1      2   3    4         5
     Activities related to subject matter                    1      2   3    4         5
     Presenters facilitated program                          1      2   3    4         5
     What would you rate the presentation overall?           1      2   3    4         5


What were two things you learned from this program?

(1)                                                                                     ______

(2)                                                                                     ______

How could this presentation have been improved?                                         ______
         ______________________________________________________________________________

Session 5: How to be a Professional – It’s About the Entire Package

Presenters: Kevin Wenberg

Please rate the following items. 1 is a low score, 5 is a high score. Circle the number that
best fits your opinion about the program.
                                                Low…………………………………………..High

     Information was presented clearly                       1      2   3    4         5
     Activities related to subject matter                    1      2   3    4         5
     Presenters facilitated program                          1      2   3    4         5
     What would you rate the presentation overall?           1      2   3    4         5




Recreation Services                FY10 Assessment Summary Report                 Page 106 of 109
Division of Student Affairs           Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                         Appendix II

                       Student Staff Retreat Program Evaluation (continued)


What were two things you learned from this program?

(1)                                                                  ______                 _____

(2)                                                                                         ______

How could this presentation have been improved?                                   _____________
         ______________________________________________________________________________

Session 6: Pro-Rec & NIRSA

Presenters: Ashlea Wilson

Please rate the following items. 1 is a low score, 5 is a high score. Circle the number that
best fits your opinion about the program.

                                                 Low…………………………………………..High

     Information was presented clearly                       1      2        3   4         5
     Activities related to subject matter                    1      2        3   4         5
     Presenters facilitated program                          1      2        3   4         5
     What would you rate the presentation overall?           1      2        3   4         5


What was one thing you learned from this program?

(1)                                                                                         ______

How could this presentation have been improved?                                   _____________
         ______________________________________________________________________________




Recreation Services                FY10 Assessment Summary Report                     Page 107 of 109
Division of Student Affairs           Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                                     Appendix II

                       Student Staff Retreat Program Evaluation (continued)


Session 7: Boyer’s Principles of Community – Your Contribution to a Caring Environment

Presenters: Katie Johnson & Shana Stringfellow

Please rate the following items. 1 is a low score, 5 is a high score. Circle the number that
best fits your opinion about the program.
                                                Low…………………………………………..High

     Information was presented clearly                       1      2   3    4         5
     Activities related to subject matter                    1      2   3    4         5
     Presenters facilitated program                          1      2   3    4         5
     What would you rate the presentation overall?           1      2   3    4         5

What were two things you learned from this program?

(1)                                                                                     ______

(2)                                                   ______________                    ______

How could this presentation have been improved?                                         ______
         ______________________________________________________________________________
                                                   Low…………………………………………..High

How would you rate the Student Staff Retreat Overall? 1              2   3    4         5

Comments or Suggestions

_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________
_____________________________________________________________________________________




Recreation Services                FY10 Assessment Summary Report                 Page 108 of 109
Division of Student Affairs           Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management
                                                                        Appendix JJ
                                                Glossary

ACE:     American Council on Exercise
AQ:      Aquatics Program
CAAR:    Center for Access-Ability Resources
IM:      Intramural Sports
FCNS:    Family Consumer and Nutrition Science Department
FO:      Facilities Operations
FW:      Fitness and Wellness Program
KNPE:    Kinesiology and Physical Education Department
NIRSA:   National Intramural Recreational Sports Association
OCF:     Office of Campus Recreation
OR:      Open Recreation
OA:      Outdoor Adventure
RS:      Recreation Services
SC:      Sport Clubs
SLT:     Student Leadership Team
TTY:     Nextalk Text Telephone




Recreation Services                 FY10 Assessment Summary Report    Page 109 of 109
Division of Student Affairs            Northern Illinois University
& Enrollment Management

								
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