Docstoc

FAQ

Document Sample
FAQ Powered By Docstoc
					               Yamaha Thundercat YZF600R

             Questions, answers and links to answers




                                             This version – April 2004


April 2004                                               Page 1 of 37
Table of Contents
1      Background & Introduction ............................................................................................... 4
    1.1     Introduction to this document ................................................................................... 4
    1.2     Forums in the Thundercats MSN group................................................................... 4
    1.3     Thundercat – facts and figures................................................................................. 4
    1.4     What is a B1,B2,B3, SWMBO etc ? ......................................................................... 4
    1.5     Why should I buy a Thundercat? ............................................................................. 5
2      How to .. ............................................................................................................................ 6
    2.1     How to change your bar grips .................................................................................. 6
    2.2     How to remove your bar ends .................................................................................. 6
    2.3     How to clean your pride & joy .................................................................................. 6
    2.4     How to fit a Scottoiler ............................................................................................... 7
    2.5     How to fit an instrument light bulb ............................................................................ 8
    2.6     How to fit mini indicators .......................................................................................... 8
    2.7     How to fix a broken speedo/ refit the cable.............................................................. 8
    2.8     How to replace the battery in your alarm remote control ......................................... 9
3      Spares............................................................................................................................. 10
    3.1     Decals .................................................................................................................... 10
    3.2     Fairings................................................................................................................... 10
    3.3     Front Forks ............................................................................................................. 10
    3.4     Header pipes .......................................................................................................... 10
    3.5     Online parts catalogue ........................................................................................... 11
    3.6     Rear Shock Absorber............................................................................................. 11
    3.7     Salvage companies used by members .................................................................. 12
4      Accessories..................................................................................................................... 13
    4.1     Alarms .................................................................................................................... 13
    4.2     Alarms – service mode on Datatool Veto Evo ....................................................... 13
    4.3     Cans - road legal .................................................................................................... 14
    4.4     Double bubble screens .......................................................................................... 14
    4.5     Heated grips ........................................................................................................... 14
    4.6     Luggage – general advice...................................................................................... 15
    4.7     Luggage - hard ....................................................................................................... 15
    4.8     Luggage - soft ........................................................................................................ 15
    4.9     Magic mushrooms .................................................................................................. 16
    4.10    White instrument dials............................................................................................ 16
    4.11    Speedo conversion kph to mph.............................................................................. 16
    4.12    Two way radios ...................................................................................................... 16
    4.13    Yamaha Insurance Service .................................................................................... 17
5      Cat specific advice .......................................................................................................... 18
    5.1     Carb Icing ............................................................................................................... 18
    5.2     Engine Oil............................................................................................................... 18
    5.3     Headlights .............................................................................................................. 19
    5.4     Haynes manual – torque settings........................................................................... 19
    5.5     Owners manual ...................................................................................................... 20
    5.6     Sprocket nuts ......................................................................................................... 20
    5.7     Tyres - recommendations ...................................................................................... 21
6      Maintenance ................................................................................................................... 23
    6.1     Alloy bits - preservation.......................................................................................... 23
    6.2     Bleeding brakes...................................................................................................... 23
    6.3     Braided hoses ........................................................................................................ 23
    6.4     Brake calipers......................................................................................................... 24
    6.5     Brake calipers – cleaning in detail.......................................................................... 24
    6.6     Brakes discs – cleaning ......................................................................................... 26
    6.7     Brakes seizing up ................................................................................................... 26
    6.8     Carburettor balancing............................................................................................. 26
    6.9     Chain & sprockets(1).............................................................................................. 27
    6.10    Chain & sprockets(2).............................................................................................. 27
    6.11    Clutch problem? ..................................................................................................... 27
    6.12    Cost of dealer servicing.......................................................................................... 28
    6.13    Engine running rough – loose battery .................................................................... 28



April 2004                                                                                                                Page 2 of 37
  6.14   Fairings – refitting................................................................................................... 28
  6.15   Front forks .............................................................................................................. 29
  6.16   Keys in Ignition ....................................................................................................... 29
  6.17   Lifting the bike ........................................................................................................ 30
  6.18   Quick release fasteners ......................................................................................... 30
  6.19   Painting a hugger ................................................................................................... 30
  6.20   Rear Shock............................................................................................................. 31
  6.21   Rear suspension linkage/swingarm bushes........................................................... 31
  6.22   Repairing plastics ................................................................................................... 31
  6.23   Spark Plugs - changing .......................................................................................... 32
  6.24   Suspension............................................................................................................. 32
  6.25   Wheel alignment..................................................................................................... 33
7    General biking tips .......................................................................................................... 34
  7.1    France – riding tips................................................................................................. 34
  7.2    Oil – insider information ......................................................................................... 35
  7.3    Riding position........................................................................................................ 36
  7.4    Security while parking on the road ......................................................................... 36
  7.5    Warnings re:documents ......................................................................................... 36
  7.6    Warnings re:tyres ................................................................................................... 37
8    Group Character ............................................................................................................. 37
  8.1    Poetry ..................................................................................................................... 37




April 2004                                                                                                          Page 3 of 37
1 Background & Introduction
1.1 Introduction to this document
This document has been written to spread the shared knowledge in the MSN Thundercats group.

The comments from the group are attributed where possible.

The Q&A is published for recreational use and enjoyment only. Any person who relies on any
statement herein, or within any site to which a link appears in the Q&A, does so solely at
his/her own risk. All liability (whether by statute, in tort, or however arising, and whether or
not by the negligence of any person) on the part of the author or any contributor to the Q&A,
is hereby excluded.

This document is maintained and is the owned by members of the MSN Thundercats community.
Redistribution should always include reference to the original source.



1.2 Forums in the Thundercats MSN group
From the Group Managers - Keith (diesel), Tel (oldcat), Bea (Stuntin_B), Andy (andymac)
“To compliment the General forum we've just added some new ones to the site.

Please post in:
Technical for any tech issues, tips, enquiries, etc...
Products/Service for info and enquiries about bike gear, helmets, accessories, good shops, etc...
For Sale/Wanted to place an ad or let others know of one.
Rideouts/Meets to let people know dates, times and locations.
Jokes/Funnies if you want to tickle our funny bone.
and the Suggestion Box to get feedback from you.

If you prefer the 'old style' YamahaThundercats@groups.msn.com, have no fear just click here. It will
display the topics from all of the forums at once.”


1.3 Thundercat – facts and figures

“Launched in 1996. Never the top seller - about 2500 max. sold a year before the R6 in 1999ish, then
about 600 a year, so I reckon there have been about 12000 sold in the UK. Sales in UK stopped in 2003
when new EU legislation was introduced.

A detuned version of the Thundercat engine is used in Fazer 600.”

“Most dealers will tell you that the Cat is a steady seller and sells well second hand. For many owners
the Cat is a first bike or the first bike if Born again (sorry) and everyone has a good thing to say about
the experience.”

1.4 What is a B1,B2,B3, SWMBO etc ?
    “B1 is short for “the Big One” – the first big meeting for members of this group. This was naturally
    followed on by B2 (September 2002) , B3 ….”

    “I've been dreading asking this but as m8s here don't know, what does SWMBO mean??”

    “From: BlakCat - She Who Must Be Obeyed - usually in reference to the "better half"...”

    “From: entwisi – see http://www.freewarehof.org/acronyms.html”



April 2004                                                                                  Page 4 of 37
1.5 Why should I buy a Thundercat?
A - “From: Tigra - They be friendly peeps on this ere Thundercat site, so why not get a Cat and join our
    community!

    I went from a GPZ 500S to a Cat, as I was redlining it all the time and thought I either get a bigger
    bike or blow me Kwak up! Popped into me local bike showroom, Alf Englands in Bedworth, saw
    the Cat and it was lust at first site! Didn't really know much about them, apart from my bike
    Instructor had told me they were a good bike... just relied on my fantastic female intuition!!

    Had to have the seat cut down cos I'm vertically challenged, but is still comfortable for long rides.
    It has plenty of low down torque and amazing brakes, two things that can easily get you out of
    trouble! My better half Si    (Boika) is 6ft 5 and used to ride a Cat, he has now defected to a
    Ninja, but he reckons the Cat was well comfy. He had a go on mine recently and commented on
    how much comfier it was than his Kwak and that's with the cut down seat!

    The Cat is a great all rounder.. you don't feel like you have to rev the nads of it all the time, it is
    feckin quick, it glides effortlessly round lovely twisty roads, it stops quickly and looks feckin
    gorgeous! Only downside I can think of is that the headlight is crap, so stick someone on a Ninja in
    front of you for night riding and that makes it a lot easier!! LOL!”

“From: jake - would agree with previous replies, I’m 5' 9", the cats very comfy on long runs would
    only fault it (like Tigra) on headlight, I fitted a double bubble screen which made it more comfy at
    ton+,.”

“From: vanx11 - Excellent bike to move up to, do it you won't be disappointed.
    Comfort was a high priority on my list (cos I'm an old git) and the Cat came up trumps, managed to
    do 14000 in a year, which included one days ride of 500 mile down to Spain last year, the only
    pain I had was from hot leathers on me arse!!! but that’s another story !!! LOL       ”

    “I'm 6ft2in tall. I find the Cat great to tour on. Did 3600 miles to Italy, 2800 miles to Sweden &
    back last year no problems. Have even done London to Munich in one hit. Try the Cat, you'll like
    it.”
A – “From: jake(2) - I      my . It does what its told, is fast as hell, great two up, doesn’t brake my
    wrists, don’t need to stop every hour and get petrol, looks fantastic and isn’t a ball breaker, it evens
    comes with its own hugger. If it didn’t I would go out into the car park and hug it myself.”




April 2004                                                                                    Page 5 of 37
2 How to ..
2.1 How to change your bar grips
    “From: malossi - ok - tech tip No.1 - if you are changing your grips then cut off the old ones
    with Mr Stanley’s blade and then clean the bar underneath. wrap double sided sticky tape (ala blue
    peter) around the bar, peel off the backing paper then cover the bar in thinners. slide the new grips
    on (easier than a knife through butter because of the thinners) and that's it. once the thinners
    evaporates the new grips will stick to the tape for many years to come!”

2.2 How to remove your bar ends
Q - From: chris_stan - Can someone give me an idea on the best way to replace the bar ends? They
    seem to have an allen key hole at the end though it does not seem to turn. Do I need to unscrew
    them with a pliers instead? Chris
A - From: jake - best to soak the bar ends inside and out with WD40 every night for 3 days then go
    back to it with the allen key and a ring spanner for leverage, pliers would probably brake them and
    leave the inside part stuck in, leverage is the key

A - From: Mick - You need a big f.off Allen key. If they're really tight, they'll try to turn the handlebars
    on their clamps.

2.3 How to clean your pride & joy
    “ From: funderkat - Serious advice from someone seriously unqualified to give it:
    1 Get a Haynes manual
    2 Tools I've had to get (for minimal maintenance) are paddock stand (Abba type for me) and bottle
    jack (to lift front wheel), sockets (including the big one for the back wheel), and a fairly hefty
    torque wrench (again need for the back wheel, if only for chain adjustment).
    3 Don't use a pressure washer (unless you really know what you are doing & where to point it) -
    can jet water past seals and generally knacker chains and anything mechanical
    4 Wash off salt as religiously as you can. (for general cleaning I use Autoglym bike cleaner which
    I find the dogs...; degreaser for cleaning swingarm & back wheel, but careful where you spray it)
    5 Keep brake calipers clean - you can unbolt them and pull them off the disks (unclipping the pads
    first - see Haynes for how-to's) to clean around the pistons - be very careful what you use to clean
    with (I use proprietary brake cleaner) and with (if the pistons are scratched or the seals around the
    pistons damaged then you'll soon get brake fluid leaking onto the disks - not good.
    When the calipers are loose DO NOT OPERATE the brake lever, else the pistons will be forced
    right out of the calipers - stick a bit of plywood or summat in the middle to prevent this. Carefully
    clean the gunge away from around pistons - in some cases it may be as well to allow the pistons to
    be pushed out slightly beyond their normal position to aid clean - provided you have a means to
    push them back (eg. special tool) so you can get them back onto the disks.
    If you don't clean the calipers, the pistons will seize up, then things get expensive.
    Don't leave the calipers hanging and straining on the hoses, or pull on the hoses when your
    working on the callipers
    6 Read carefully what products you can use where (eg. normally you can use only paraffin and not
    petrol or anything for chain cleaning, else you can knacker the seals)
    7 Add 'Dryfuel' (from Halfords) to the tank - works wonders for cold starting (aiding) and carb
    icing (preventing) by removing water & damp from the tank and fuel system (not on a commission
    - honest!)
    8 Seek out a nice warm garage for all of the above (not succeeded on the that myself yet).”




April 2004                                                                                  Page 6 of 37
2.4 How to fit a Scottoiler
    “After recommendations from TCat sites, I bought a Scottoiler this weekend for the Cat.
   The instructions on fitting the thing were more than a little sketchy and confusing to say the least
   when I first opened her up. So I thought I would write how I fitted it for anyone else who maybe
   thinking of buying one.

   The vacuum take off from the carbs was really confusing me at first. The Scottoiler instructions
   stated that there should be some screw to remove and replace with one of theirs on a carb. Have
   you seen how many screws there are? A little trip to the local dealer wasn't much help but showed
   me some points on some other bikes.

   Low and behold the vacuum screw on the carbs on a TCat are well hidden and inaccessible.
   However, the lovely people at Yamaha have connected a length of blanked off hose and remoted
   10cm to 4 clips on the inside of frame. 2 each side. Once that was realised it was easy to remove a
   single blanking plug and connect the vacuum tube to the oiler RMV.

   I fitted the RMV in the tray that is meant to hold the front of a U-Lock under the seat.
   The breather tube runs down the inside of the left rear cowling.
   The tubing to the dispenser was fed down the inside of the sub-frame and left rear cowling, round
   the front of the swing arm pivot and glued to the underside of the swingarm.
   The dispenser was also glued to the underside of the swingarm.

   Overall a professional looking job. You can’t see that you have a Scottoiler fitted except a very
   small tube (approx 3cm) appearing from the back of the swingarm to the chain.”

    “I run 800 miles per week on my cat, and have plumped for a standard Scottoiler. One of the best
   pieces of kit I ever had fitted!!!! Don't delay... do it, do it, do it!!

   I had my reservoir fitted under the seat, but right at the back on the vertical plate that backs onto
   the tail light area, it doesn't waste any space, and allows approx a 45 degree mount angle, giving a
   good feed.

   and if you're interested, I've had my cat just over a year, done 20,000 miles (from new) I had my
   Scottoiler fitted on the bike from new, I've never had to adjust the chain between standard 4000
   mile services and there is still practically no wear on my original chain.

   It's worth paying the extra £15 or so to have the double injector adaptor too, so rather than just
   dropping on the one side of the chain, it will drop on both sides.

   Normally it's a case of don't believe the hype, but with a Scottoiler, my experience has been to
   totally believe it... and then some!!”

   “Weasley m8 you want to fit a scotty. Remove right hand side panel, just behind the coolant
   expansion tank as this the ideal place to fit it. Use the 2 clear plastic circular holders and glue them
   to the side of the rear mud guard at an angle.

   Remove the retaining bar that holds the tank down and loosen the hinge pin that the tank pivots on.
   Lift the arse end of the tank and turn the petrol tap off , then release the fuel line. If the tank has got
   2 other black hoses fitted these are the breathers, release them.

   Remove the hinge pin then remove the tank ,arse end up and pull back. Looking down you have
   the air filter box with 4 carbs below it. R/H carb your see a black hose at the back of it going into a
   tee piece. One way goes left to the next carb the other is a short piece of pipe with a bung in it. It
   lies to the right of the carb. This is where you pick up the vacuum using the straight connector
   supplied.

   All you got to do now is feed the pipe down to the rear sprocket. To do this without it looking crap
   is an art in itself. Hope this helps as it's piss easy.”




April 2004                                                                                   Page 7 of 37
2.5 How to fit an instrument light bulb
Q - From: Simon: Anyone else had any problems with speedo bulbs ? When I got the bike, I noticed
    that the bulb for the upper half of the speedo was dead, so headed off to my local dealer and picked
    up a couple of replacements. I ripped off all the fairing and fitted the new bulb. 3.5k later, coming
    back from a very long trip, the bulb was dead again. I'm planning on servicing the bike later today
    so I will replace the bulb again.
    What I wanted to know is if anyone else has this problem. Also the whole speedo dial is far less
    bright that the rev counter or temp gauge lights - is this normal ? Simon

A - From: Mussels: first you do not need to remove the fairing to change the bulbs, just take out the
    screen and you should be able remove the instrument panel. I haven't noticed that the speedo is
    darker on mine and apart from the obvious (lamp not in right, another blown etc.) I can't think why
    yours would be.
     I have replaced about 8 instrument bulbs in a year, they do blow after a while.

A - “From: Savoury - all you need to do mate is;

    •  Take the screen off
    •  Take the two pieces of black plastic over the intake pipes off
    •  Take the clock surround off - this is a tight squeeze to get off but as its plastic has a bit of give
       will come out with a bit of persistence and patience.
    Once done you get to the bulbs really easily, changed mine a few times so I know it works.”

2.6 How to fit mini indicators
    “From: yzf600r - I put mini indicators on my old cat, front and rear.

    To put the front indicators on you need to remove the front side fairing panels. I then made a
    template of the oval shape recess that the old indicators fitted into. From the template I cut out 4
    pieces of black plastic (from a paint tray for roller brushes , cause the plastic is soft and not brittle).
    Then drilled holes through each plastic shape to take the indicator stem and placed one piece of
    plastic either side of the fairing panel and tightened them together with the locking nut for the
    indicator. The two pieces of plastic you have cut for each side will grip the edge of the fairing
    panel and fill the gap making it look the business. The electrical connections are no problem.”


    “From: malossi man - Regards fitting the flush mounts - remove the fairing one side at a time and
    disconnect the wires for the indicators. The originals then unbolt from the inside. Then offer up the
    flush mount base to the panel and mark the position you want. If the ones you have are the same as
    mine they will have two mounting holes which are also used for the lens to screw into. This means
    that each time you need to change the bulb then you will have to remove the fairing! What I did
    was drilled an extra two holes in the mount and the fairing to attach the base securely with two
    short bolts and nuts. Then the lens can screw into the original two holes independently. Then
    thread the wires through and connect up to the existing bullet connectors. They will probably not
    match for size so may be an idea to purchase some matching bullets before you start the job so this
    doesn't hold you up.

    DO NOT use the sticky pads as an easy option because the recess in the fairing leaves very little
    contact surface between the flush mount and the fairing. It would have to be awful sticky -
    especially at a ton-up! Davie”

2.7 How to fix a broken speedo/ refit the cable
    “Speedometer and mileometer just stopped working.
    It will be one of three things...
         a) The speedo itself (Pray it's not!)
         b) The cable
         c) The drive from the front wheel



April 2004                                                                                     Page 8 of 37
   You can test both a and b together by unscrewing the speedo cable from the drive at the left-hand
   end of the front spindle. There should be a small square inner to the cable. If you turn it one way
   or the other the speedo needle should flick up a bit. That proves they're ok.
    If not, take the other end of the cable off the back of the speedo and see if it's turning in sympathy
   with the bottom end. If it is, the cable's fine and it's the speedo. Mine went a few months ago and
   it turned out to be the drive on the spindle. This has two very flimsy dogs that locate in the wheel
   and turn with it, thus driving the cable and the speedo head.
    Drive was about 30 quid or thereabouts, but they fixed it for free as it went 10 miles after they'd
   put a new front tyre on for me... Result!”
From: BlakCat - Yesterday, while riding into work, noticed my speedo had died. A little while later,
   another rider pointed out the cable dangling by my front wheel. Fine, I thought, that explains it -
   must've pulled it out while checking my tyres at the petrol station earlier that day. Screwed it back
   in place when I got to work, but still no life. Is there something more complicated then replacing it
   required?
From: DAF - Blakcat - I had the same problem as well. My bike has only done 2000 miles but the
   cable came unscrewed and the drive cable fell out. I tried to claim under the warranty but with no
   luck.
   I ended up having to buy a complete thing for £7.96 as you cannot buy the centre cable. When i
   came to fitting it, instead of replacing the whole cable I just pushed the centre up through the outer.
   Even now it is still loose every time I check it, so I am going to try using a bit of threadlock on the
   fitting.
From: PEBS - just a quick question is there a easy way of fitting a speedo cable, it's just that the
   manual advises taking the whole fairing off and that seems a lot of hassle for a cable.
From: Simon - I have just changed the WHOLE cable last week without taking off the whole fairing. If
   you slide the screen out (by removing the screen hosing nuts, plastic fairing on the left hand side
   under the handlebars and loosen the fairing on the screen underside), you can see the end of the
   speedo cable.
   Using a pair of long nose pliers at an angle (or better still a pair of right angle pliers) you should be
   able to loosen the speedo cable. You can then unscrew it with your fingers. Unscrew the bottom
   end of the cable from its mount and then unclip the cable from the inside of the fairing by the
   wheel. My cable was also clipped on by a special bracket clip (just needed a prod with a
   screwdriver) and a removable cable tie. You can slide the new cable in and reclip, retighten the
   clock and wheel ends and then re-assemble.
    One note, be sure to see where the original cable is routed, as I initially routed it on the outside of
    some cables or frame and it fouled the forks when on full lock. ( didn't notice until putting fairing
    bits back on - damn )
    With all that said, if you could swap the inner cable I probably would do. I couldn't as mine had
    sheered off a couple of inches up the cable and I wouldn't have been able to swap it without taking
    off the cable anyway.
From: Savoury - yep as Paws says use some thread lock on the bottom of the cable. Mine was for ever
   coming undone until I done this, stayed there for 6 months and presume it still is. The cable fell out
   the first time on mine, and took a few minutes to slide a new inner up once I got it engaged
   properly at the clock end. Haynes manual is notorious for telling you to go the long way round.
   There’s a lot you can do without having to take the front fairing off.

2.8 How to replace the battery in your alarm remote control
“From: BlakCat - Re: DataTool Veto Evo. Does anybody have one of these on their Cat? The battery's
    dying on my remote, but i can't get the case open. Have taken out the screw, but there seems to be
    something stopping it opening fully at the other end - any ideas?”
“From: funderkat – mate - has the box got a sticker on the back? if so, peel it off, 'cos the other screw is
    under there!”




April 2004                                                                                   Page 9 of 37
3 Spares
3.1 Decals
     “{PRIVATE}After today’s adventure I need to replace the Decals on my lower fairing , does
    anybody know where I can get hold of some copies as the real ones are a rip off for what they are.
    Cheers “
    “Try looking in the classifieds in MCN. I used a company called image works for my Suzuki
    GS500. Good price and fairly quick service. Cost me £30 instead of £160. Must be worth a look”
From: Thelonious - I need one of those "Aero super sport" decals that goes along the seat panel, in
   white. Anyone got any idea where I can get one?
From: Mussels - I have seen them for sale on E-bay on occasions, other than that I think it will have to
   be OE stuff.
From: Savoury – there’s a few places in MCN, the for sale supplement thingy. I got a few for a mates
   bike, but buggered if I can remember who they were, image.. somit I think. They have most if not
   all bike decals on file.
From: McGroital - I got this reply from a company who do the decals.

    A full set will be £65. the tail unit only would be £22

    The Image Works
    Block 4 Merlin Way
    Quarry Hill Ind. Est.
    Ilkeston
    Derbyshire
    DE7 4RA
    England
    Tel : 0115 944 3111
    Fax: 0115 944 3222

    Here's their email address :enquiries@the-image-works.co.uk


3.2 Fairings
“From: tadhg - Try www.fairings.co.uk they do a fibre glass replacement for £50 according to their
    website. Don't think you'll find anywhere cheaper.”

3.3 Front Forks
    Comment from supplier Maxton

    The forks feel very notchy and harsh and kick off small bumps, this is because they have too much
    compression damping over small movements, however when you brake very hard you can feel the
    forks bottom out, this is because the springs in the forks are too soft, we increase the rebound
    damping and we fit harder springs to suit your rider weight and also to suit what type of riding you
    do. We also modify the cartridges of the forks increasing the range of adjustment in the damping.
    Many people complain about the lack of feed back or feel front the front end, the conversion cures
    this problem and stops the front feeling vague. The conversion £215.00 plus worn parts i.e. Seals -
    £20.00 and Bushes - £20.00. A service on the forks would cost £50.00 plus worn parts. ALL
    PRICES EXCLUDE V.A.T. (2003 prices)

3.4 Header pipes
“From: Mick - Repatched the exhaust again (bike's done nearly 60,000 now) and, I guess, I'll need
    some headers soon. Any recommendations?”




April 2004                                                                              Page 10 of 37
“From: Eddie - Motad do stainless steel pipes for £240. There's no link between the header pipes, but
    they are better than stock performance-wise (a bit more go at the top-end) and should last forever.”

3.5 Online parts catalogue
“From: Burnsy - Chaps (and chapeses) if you want to see part numbers and exploded (not literally)
    views of Yamaha YZF600R parts may I suggest you look at this site
    http://216.37.204.203/Yamaha_OEM/YamahaMC.asp?Type=13&A=154&B=1
    It gives parts lists for each year of manufacture.”

3.6 Rear Shock Absorber
“From: rugbycat - I am currently riding a '96 N reg Blue/Silver Thundercat which has so far covered
   25K miles. The rear shock gives me no confidence in the bike what so ever and so I am after
   replacement options. At the moment the bike is in bits with the swing arm off and the shock out
   ready to send to a company called Falcon Shock Absorbers Ltd. They assure me that they can
   rebuild the original unit back to its original greatness (??) for £150 worst case. Before I send it has
   anyone had similar work done or can recommend better units??”
“From: Mick - I'd save your pennies and get a Maxton or Ohlins. I've had two Yam shockers, and they
   do the job, but they're not as good as the Maxton or Ohlins - by a huge margin - and you will notice
   a difference.
   Now I'm on a Maxton. Correctly sprung (the stock Yamaha spring's too hard for most people, so
   they'll spring it to suit your weight and riding style) and I can adjust the rebound/comp, etc,. It
   makes a difference now, whereas on the old unit, it would just introduce a problem elsewhere.
   Also, you can adjust ride height without touching spring pre-load. On the stock unit, all you do is
   wind the spring up, so the bike gets skittish on bumps, and on bends it'll feel as if you've got a
   banana skin under your rear tyre, as all the sag's used up.
   I don't think the Hagon at about £200 has many adjustments, and I'd be surprised if anyone could
   overhaul the stock shocker as-new. (Maxton 'serviced' mine for £25, so I have a replacement I can
   use if the Maxton unit needs a spruce up, or something.)
   If you sell your bike, you can take the new unit with you and, usually, with small modifications –
   different rod, etc – it can be used on another model (check first!). I think, too, that a new stock unit
   is priced pretty much the same as a Maxton or Ohlins, which is outrageous.”
“From: Suspension specialist Maxton - The standard [rear] shock is fitted with a spring that is too stiff
   for most people (depending on the weight of the rider). It is possible to fit a softer spring. If the
   bike is going to be raced or used for track days, it is better to replace the shock and also the tie
   bars. Our Maxton shock is a high pressure gas shock which works on a shim system. It has an
   adjustable ride height built into it and should only be used with the new tie bars which we supply.
   The reason for changing the shock length and tie bars is to obtain a more constant shock ratio. The
   cost of our shock is £405 plus VAT without remote”

“From: clagnut - I’ve just fitted an Ohlins shock and first indications (weather an all) are its the pods.
   My OE shock was pogoing me out the saddle so a new OE was 350 notes, which made an Ohlins
   look reasonable at £430. Its fully adjustable has a ride height adjuster and is rebuildable. It has a
   remote reservoir which Maxton doesn’t for the same price
   Roads where I live are choppy and I ride 2up a lot so considered the outlay worthwhile.
   Recently been out on my own, and on stock settings the difference is immense, I also raised ride
   height to improve turn in and the bike now tracks well and maintains a steady line without drifting
   wide.
   When 2up with the missus (who isn’t svelte) the shock was more sensitive to this than OE which
   has an over hard shock. I could ride 2up without increasing preload which I can’t get away with
   now.
   Haven’t really given it plenty as the roads are too wet, got a bit carried away though and things got
   squirrelly with the front losing it a bit. Not seriously but enough for my arse to give the saddle a
   nasty nip.
   Uprating the rear has really shown up the forks which I will attend to in the new year. Cheers y`all
   Andy “




April 2004                                                                               Page 11 of 37
   From: pcspxp - Ok, brand new Hagon shock built for a 17 stone rider fitted (what a friendly,
   helpful mob they are, too!) £245 for a standard one, £286 for the uprated one, fitted it myself in
   about 3 hours and nothing broke, bloody miracle! It's like having a new bike. Strange how you
   never notice how bad things are until you fix 'em!

3.7 Salvage companies used by members
   Salvage yard - 01773 765051
   Parts Finder - 09060 300100
   Partsearch - 09061 119999




April 2004                                                                              Page 12 of 37
4 Accessories
4.1 Alarms
Q - “From: mowgley - Looking to get an alarm fitted to the bike but don't know what to buy. What
     have you got, would you recommend it,……..”

A - “From: entwisi - Meta M357, Excellent piece of kit, my insurers were more than happy with it,
    Don't know how much it saved but they recognised it as one of the better ones.

    In today’s MCN/ Riossi pullout they are doing it for £270 fitted”

A - “From: weasley - I have a Datatool System 3 alarm/immobiliser - not had it long but I have some
    initial comments.

    It was fitted by Riossi for £300 - job was done OK but I would have placed the LED somewhere
    else if I'd been asked. It's sat on top of the tail piece, behind the pillion seat. It's nice and visible,
    which is good, but I don't know how it will get on with having luggage on top of it... we'll see.

    The motion sensor is incredibly sensitive - if an ant farts in Japan it'll detect it. This doesn't set it
    off though, it just emits a short beep in warning. Too many warnings and it will sound off. The
    sensitivity is adjustable by a dealer.

    It has a low battery drain and a sleep mode. I went to it the other day after sitting for about a
    month. The alarm had gone to sleep but as soon as I took the seat off it went off (and scared the
    living bejesus out of me). It started first time.

    It has a passive arming cycle of about 20 seconds. Small problem here - you need to take the key
    out of the ignition to open the seat to get your lock out to secure the bike. As soon as the key is out
    of the ignition the clock is ticking. I can just about get the lock out and the seat replaced before it
    arms, but it's close. I don't know what would happen if the seat was still off when it armed.

    It has a "ferry mode", which disables the motion sensor but leaves the rest armed (seat switch, hot-
    wire sensor etc). It also has a service mode, which is essentially an "off" switch, for use when you
    need to work on the bike. You'll soon get ticked off by the incessant "bleep........ bleep........
    bleep........ bleep........ bleep........ bleep........ bleep........ bleep........ bleep........ bleep........ bleep........
    bleep........ bleep........ bleep"... see, told you.

    The unit is quite large but fitted under the seat quite well, taking up the square compartment
    designed for the Yamaha U-lock bottom crosspiece.

    You can set a PIN so that if you lose the blipper you can still disarm the unit. When you return to
    the bike and disarm it it will tell you if the alarm has gone off. You can then interrogate it to find
    out what set it off (motion sensor, hotwire attempt etc). There are a number of advanced functions
    which I haven't explored yet.

    Oh, the blipper is really cool too - it shines a real bright white when you push the button. Overall -
    maybe a bit steep in price terms, but worth the peace of mind. A clever bit of kit but unknown
    reliability.”

4.2 Alarms – service mode on Datatool Veto Evo
Q - From: MikeA - Does anyone else have this alarm/immobiliser? Came fitted to my cat, I'm f*$%ed
    if I can find out how to get it into service mode...no instructions came with it!

A - From: funderkat - To turn off the motion sensor, press the triangle button once (the
    alarm/immobiliser will still function if you try and start the bike). press the circle button to disarm
    the alarm, and the next time the alarm turns itself back on the motion sensor will be reactivated.




April 2004                                                                                                   Page 13 of 37
    To enter service mode, press the circle button continuously for 5 seconds - the alarm will sound,
    the LED light will illuminate continuously, and every 15 seconds the alarm will beep - which will
    eventually drive you and/or your neighbours insane.... in service mode you can disconnect/replace
    the main battery...to reactivate press the circle button again (to disarm) and wait for it to re-arm (or
    whatever). Pete

4.3 Cans - road legal
Q - From: YZF 600R Steve - I have just purchased a 2002 cat, I would like to replace the can with
    something with a bit more noise but remain road legal. Is there anything suitable?
A - From: simian - I've got a Scorpion stainless can on mine and it sounds pretty good. I would
    recommend it as legal but still quite noisy. I also have a Blue Flame stainless in the loft. The Blue
    Flame has much more 'bass' and is overall much noisier (being a straight through pipe). I didn't
    really notice the performance difference but then again there are so many other factors involved
    that it is no big deal. I never had an OEM can so no idea what that sounds like. However, my mate
    has a Fazer 600 and I think that has the same can and is pretty quiet. El Simian

4.4 Double bubble screens
Q - Are double bubble screens much better? Do they really make any difference and finally what do
    they do?
A – “From: Savoury - Double Bubble is the shape of the screen, they have an extra curve in them to
    provide more wind protection. Really depends on your height, the type of riding you do etc etc. For
    me on the Cat, it didn’t really matter as I'm a short arse and never had a problem getting down
    behind the standard screen - although I did have a double bubble anyway.
    But on the R6 the screen is a lot smaller and lower, so I've gone for a DB screen. People have
    different views on them, some don’t notice the difference, some think they're ugly.”
Q - From: psalliss - can someone recommend a good double bubble screen for the cat and where they
    got it from?
A - From: mowgley - Bought mine at the NEC show from Powerbronze. £60.00 and looks the Biz in
    Black tint.
A - From: whiter - I got mine at Ally Pally £45 in amber from www.skidmarx.co.uk

A - From: Burnsy - I just ordered a grey tint one from http://www.busters-accessories.co.uk/ at £39.95.

4.5 Heated grips
Q – “From: jake - interested to know your thought on these over the grips style heaters, are they hard
    to fit, what’s involved, how much and do they bloody work cause I’m getting frostbite here and in
    places id rather not, any blokes out there wishing you could heat up you tank (especially the bit
    closest to the tank), now there’s a marketing idea if ever i heard of one”
A – “From: Savoury. A mate fitted some to his and they were really easy to do, I just found them a bit
    too bulky with thick winter gloves on but for long journeys I would definitely get some as they aint
    that expensive.”
A – “From: numbskull. I've got the Hein Gericke ones and they're the best £50 I've spent on the bike.
    Used them all through last winter. I hear the Oxford ones can fall apart quite quickly and the
    switch is a bit dodgy. You might want to consider the wraparound ones instead. You can take them
    off in the spring and you don't have to cut the original grips off.”
A – “From: rtjwilliams - I have just fitted some of the Oxford hot hands. I wired them into the fuse box
    (make sure you get the ignition side). There are a number of supplies there, lights, electric fan, and
    indicators. I opted for the indicators as if something goes wrong they are the one thing that I can do
    without, no headlight, not good, likewise with fan (although logic says you will only be using them
    in the winter so should not need the fan but better to be safe than sorry). Quite easy to fit.”




April 2004                                                                                 Page 14 of 37
4.6 Luggage – general advice
“From: Savoury - I don’t really use my panniers when I'm on my own. Find it a pain to secure them
    properly, its only when SWMBO is sitting on the traps I feel a bit more comfortable with them.
    I'd go for either a tailpack or tankbag. Tailpacks are good if you're gonna do a lot of green lanes,
    twisty roads cos then you get yaself over the tank easier - tankbags tend to stop you from doing
    that. I'm gonna buy myself a tailpack at Ally Pally for this reason, the tankbag is good for two-up
    but riding to work I'd rather have the tailpack.
    If anyone has got one can you tell me if it gets in the way when wearing a rucksack. When I've got
    a helmet strapped to the back wearing a rucksack is a real pain at traffic lights.”
“From: Mussels - I tend to use a tank bag for work as my Oxford Tailpack is a bit of a pain to fit and
    take off. The bungees only just reach and I need to use a paintwork protector as the hooks have
    already dug into the side panel paint. Though, I much prefer it whilst riding lanes for the same
    reasons as Savoury and it holds much more than the tank bag. Another problem is it clashes with
    my rucksack (I don't like wearing those anyway).”
“From: numbskull - I've got all three, Givi tank bag, and Oxford Sports tailpack and panniers. I've only
    used the panniers when two up or when I've got serious luggage.
    Tankbag is good but can scratch the tank paint, which is why Baglux are good, but I mostly use the
    tailpack. Very expandable and you can use it as a rucksack when you're on foot.
    I would strongly recommend that you don't use a rucksack when riding. They have been known to
    cause serious back injuries if you come off and I find them very uncomfortable over longer
    distances.”

4.7 Luggage - hard
“From: petemj - I've had full Nonfango luggage for a while. You can get it from MPS.
    Using the top box daily now as I'm despatching at the moment.

    Top box (848) has 48L capacity and will take 2 helmets though my panniers (840) are too slim to
    take a helmet. Each has 40L capacity however. Generally only use the panniers if I'm away for
    the weekend / longer.

    The boxes are 100% waterproof. They have matching locks which some little #$%!£ tried to
    screwdriver when the bike was parked up in Fort William overnight. He was unsuccessful and
    didn't cause any real damage to the lock nor did he get into the box. It's great having somewhere
    secure to stash your kit when you're not on the bike.

    The indicators are sh!te however. I've ditched them and fitted mini indicators instead. You can
    keep the original ones if you are only fitting a top box.

    I've never been much of a fan of cars (sitting in the traffic gets me down too much) so I'd rather use
    a bike anytime. Hard luggage lets you use the bike on a lot of occasions when it wouldn't normally
    be practical.

    You may guess that I'm a bit of a fan of hard luggage.

    I've posted some photos of it - click on my username above to see them.”

4.8 Luggage - soft
    “Oxford panniers no problem on the cat, lots of have us them, pillion friendly etc, but do get the
    soft matting to protect the paintwork, I cut mine to shape so's not to have a load of excess flapping
    around, also the aftermarket waterproof covers are worth getting, the ones that come with the
    panniers don't last long, especially at speed, just ask Eccles who was spitting bits of mine out as
    they were getting ripped to shreds on the autobahns.”

From: Mussels - I went for the Oxford Sports luggage as it has more space than the humpback range
   and is cheaper.



April 2004                                                                               Page 15 of 37
From: topcatbones - I used Oxford 1st Panniers and found them to be excellent on the Cat. They are
   quite cheap as well.
From: Savoury - As for the [Oxford] bags themselves, excellent stuff, they're really tough and plenty of
   room for the two of us for 10 days including bringing back a bit of duty free. I've never really
   bothered with bungees though. Once SWMBO is on the bike they aren't gonna go anywhere - even
   on that 'private' road doing 140+. If anything she finds that the straps going across the seat give her
   more grip and stop her sliding into the back of me.
   The waterproof covers you get are ugly, but did work for most of the time. Absolutely pissed it
   down for 3 days all day, heavier than anything I've seen at home for years and the clothes were still
   dry.

    There are extra straps across the top as well which come in handy. We could roll our waterproofs
    up and strap them to the outside of the bag which saved a bit of room. It also saved us having to go
    through them to get them out every time the weather changed every 100 miles.

4.9 Magic mushrooms
“From: Eddie - Thought I should let you know - if anyone is planning on buying some of these, the
    frame fitted types - DON'T! The bolts supplied with the kit have a different thread to the engine
    mounting bolts they are supposed to replace, so don't fit. Motrax have been contacted, and they are
    looking into it. Will keep you posted of any developments.”
“From: Birdman - I fitted magic mushrooms made by R&G Racing Products to my 2001 Cat. I was
    surprised at how easy it was and how clear the fitting instructions were. Correct bolts and spacers.
    The only thing that was not included was the torque setting but that can be found in the Haynes
    manual or by asking at your local/favourite bike servicing shop. R&G Racing can be found at
    Farnborough, Hampshire.”

4.10 White instrument dials
Q- From: psalliss - does anyone know if you can get white dials for the cat and if so where.

A- From: andymac - Only place I know that makes them is Gauge Graphics in the states.

A - From: eccles291 - Have a look at the 'Custom Dials' section at

    http://www.redial-uk.co.uk/index.html

A - From: clagnut - Try www. superdials.com, it was in Performance Bikes


4.11 Speedo conversion kph to mph
From: Thundermark - Don't muck about with dial overlays, get a KMH to MPH gear converter. Screw
   into the speedo drive on the wheel then the cable goes into it. You don't notice it and it is pretty
   accurate. Motax £26-29 depending on where you get it from. M&P , good bike shop.
   PS. don’t get a top fitting unit (screws into the speedo).

4.12 Two way radios
“From: jake - Try and get one that is constant two way communication as the ones that are activated by
    voice means that communication is slow at best and about the same as this email, I bought a
    chatterbox for £18 and its great up to motorway speed then useless but at in town speeds its
    invaluable”
“From: oldcat - The PRO M1 kit from Autocom is an excellent piece of kit (but then I am bias as that’s
    what I have). It is expensive and I can vouch for being able to hear your pillion up to and including
    130 mph.
    You can either buy the Autocom bike to bike kit (at around £170 on top of the price of the Pro M1)
    or do as Frank has suggested and get a cheaper set and route it through the Pro M1




April 2004                                                                               Page 16 of 37
    I have never experienced the delay mentioned above with the VOX system (which is how the Pro
    M1 works btw), and an added bonus is that if you are listening to music through the system and
    either of you speak to one another it automatically mutes the sounds so you can hear each other
    talk. When you have stopped talking the music GRADUALLY comes back up to the volume you
    set it to.
    It can either be run on one of those square 9 volt batteries or wired up to the bike. I run on the
    battery, I've never timed how long it has lasted , but lets say days running into weeks rather than
    hours.”
“From: sswebb - The New AutoCom Prosport is the dogs danglies... it's the updated version of the Pro-
    M1... I bought it at launch (during the international bike show, NEC Birmingham) with a bike
    battery harness.... and it's been fantastic.... fully tested to 140mph... and no problems having
    conversation.”
“From: boots - Hi Jake, I bought the Nady MRC-11, this allows bike to bike, also allows rider to
    pillion. that was about £140 plus another £20 for the extra headset. You can also try the Nady
    PMC- 3 that is about £60 for just rider to pillion with FM radio. This works very well and am
    pleased with it.
    I got my headset from www.motohaus.co.uk they also do other intercoms. have a look on their
    website as they are quite good. Graham”

4.13 Yamaha Insurance Service
    From: MikeA - ...are my favourite people! Just taken loads off my other quotes, even including
    'ride it all over' class 1 business use.




April 2004                                                                               Page 17 of 37
5 Cat specific advice
5.1 Carb Icing
Q – “From: goblin - Evening all, Took the cat for a service today (Thetford to Peterborough) and just
    had to open it up a bit on the A1 on the way. Got up to about 10K revs, left the A1 onto sliproad
    and shut down to about 5k revs. Got onto the dual c/way and wanted a bit more on the revs. so
    opened it up....nothing, just spluttered a lot but wouldn't give me anymore, had to drop it down a
    couple of notches but still wouldn't give much more. Took about another 3/4mile before I could get
    the revs up. The bike was going in for 4000m service so its not that old. Had the service and the
    same thing happened on the way back, after opening up and getting a bit of a wellie on, back off
    the throttle and then splutter for a mile or so but corrected itself soon after. Is this carb icing I've
    often heard about?
    Any ideas would be appreciated! - It was bloody cold today..”
A - From: HHudson - Carb Icing is exactly right. It occurs more often when it is very cold and the air
    contains a lot of moisture, like fine mist/rain/fog. It happened to me over the weekend and I had to
    stop for a minute each time to let the carbs thaw. There are some past threads that suggest ideas for
    curing the dreading icing if you care to go back and look.

A – From Funderkat - I stick something called Dry Fuel (from Halfords) in the tank which removes
    damp from the fuel system to prevent carb icing and improve cold starting - I find it seems to do
    the trick used to get icing, but never noticed it while using this stuff.
    Other fuel additives, like Redex, are supposed to have a similar effect, though I haven't tried them.
    Yamaha are supposed to make their own 'fuel stabiliser' but I've never seen it for sale & it's
    probably expensive.

A – From Mussels - I started using Redex a few days ago and it seems to have done the trick

A – From: BlakCat - last night I put in the second half of a DryFuel bottle, I put the first half in about
    three months ago, but had a couple touches of icing in the last week, so figured it was time to top
    up.
A – From: funderkat - Ignoring the instructions completely, I tend to put in a third to a half of a bottle
    of DryFuel when the Carb-icing season first starts, then add a quick splash (1/8th-1/10th of a
    bottle) each time I fill-up with petrol until the weather warms up again.
A – From: goblin - Have been using Redex this year, seems to sort the problem as long as you
    remember to put some in that is, spluttered my way to work the other morning having forgotten
    again
A – From: Thelonious - A couple of capfuls [of Dryfuel] per tank seems enough to do the trick.
A - From: topcat64 - I use Silkolene FST and that seems to solve the problem of icing on my Cat

5.2 Engine Oil
Q - From: Number1: What engine oil have you lot been using of late?
A - From: Weasley: I have Silkolene Pro 4 (15W-50 semi-synthetic) in at the moment. It's due to be
    changed next month when I will be using Castrol GPS (10W-40 semi-synthetic) - I''ll be interested
    to see if I see improved start-up, fuel economy, and maybe half a bhp.
A - From: Ozwold: Castrol GPS (semisynth) here...
A - From: Thelonious: Motul fully synthetic -- it's good but it's £34 a bottle!!!




April 2004                                                                                 Page 18 of 37
5.3 Headlights
Q - From: boots: Does anyone know what the highest wattage bulb you can put in a 96 cat would be?
    Also is it a H4 fitting, I think it is but not sure
A - From: weasley : Ease of bulb replacement depends on the size and dexterity of your hands. I have
    relatively slender hands but it is still a bit of a pig. It isn't difficult, just awkward. The bulb is held
    in by a spring clip which won't clip back into place until at least the 30th attempt and needs to be
    lubricated with copious expletives. I don't ride at night anyway (well, not often) so my headlight is
    really only a "here I come, have you seen me?" warning light.
    Oh, and on this subject I always carry a spare, having had a headlight bulb blow at 80 mph on an
    unlit A road...
A – From: mechy – Hi. I am currently running an 80/100 watt bulb with no side effects, works great as
    well, lot lot better than standard, got it from a local motor accessories shop for 9.99(its one of the
    blue effect ones) - Pete
A – The safe option is probably a Philips Vision Plus bulb which is meant to be 30% brighter but is
   still 55/60W. Quite expensive though, £15 - £20.
A – From: syrup Never use anything higher than the 12v60/55w halogen, h4, if you do you will melt
   the headlight lens as it is only plastic. The extra bright Phillips ones are great, mine cost £10 from
   Yamaha main agent, that’s where the good advice came from.
A – “From: Weasley: I use the Halfords "Brilliance" bulb in mine (and in my car). They are 55/60 H4
    but use Xenon rather than the normal halogen gas inside - offers extra brightness at the same power
    rating by emitting a wider spectrum of light (therefore looking less amber). On the bike the
    difference is less impressive than on the car, as the main problem is the beam pattern rather than
    the amount of light.
    As for using more powerful bulbs - it is as illegal as a race can or mini number plate (ie, make your
    own choice), the bulb runs hotter (therefore possibly affecting the headlight materials) plus the
    extra power requires extra current to work, so possibly affecting the wiring and switches.”

A - From: MrBlissy : I been using a 100/80w bulb for the last few days and it is great in the dark. Way
    better than the legal one. Looking at the beam pattern it is no brighter than the newer cars.
A - From: marmacat : looks like Xenon may be the way to go.
A - From: M®ßlüë§måÑ™ : I fitted one of those Xenon bulbs and found it to be way better than the
    Cat's standard H4, however, it's still pretty scary on unlit twisties,
A - From: thunderdave : There’s a guy called Chris that does 100W xenon bulbs for £10.50 inc p+p or
    60w cheaper you can email him at info@autobulbsdirect.co.uk that’s only £5.25 each for 100w
    bulbs Dave
A - From: RAINUK : If anyone wants one I can do Unipart 55/60 megalight xenon which are legal and
    30% brighter I’ve got one in my cat and it does make it better £4.00 +p&p
A - From: Cat-aclysmic : I used to ride about with full beam on then I saw a 90/130W bulb in Halfords
    either £4.99 or £5.99 can't remember BUT WHAT A DIFFERNCE and now if ride around with
    full beam and I get cars flashing their lights … Simon
A - From: Catgut7 : Try Xenon bulb first, they are 30% brighter and it does make a difference.
    100/80W are not legal, but most MOT testers will not bother anyway. Never mind the headlight
    melting, that is only possible if you left your cat standing still with the lights on full for a very long
    time. Wind deflection at any speed will cool your headlamp enough. What you need to watch out
    for is the wiring loom and/or switches. If they are not rated @ 20amp or above, you can melt the
    wiring or burn out switchgear, especially on older bikes. Hope you find a H4 to suit, try Xenon
    blue if your cat is blue/ silver. Cheers, Chris.

5.4 Haynes manual – torque settings
    A copy of an email from Haynes (original names forgotten to protect the guilty)

    "Dear Thundercat owner

    Thank you for your e-mail concerning the torque setting of 54 Nm for the



April 2004                                                                                   Page 19 of 37
    engine front mounting bolts given in our YZF600R manual. I have checked
    this with Yamaha's own service literature and telephoned the UK Yamaha
    importer for clarification, and both agree with the 54 Nm setting. We
    can find no reference to a setting of 45 Nm.

    The unknown factor is what effect the longer bolt, and the composition
    of the crash bung material which it secures, might have on the specified
    torque setting. We can only suggest that you exercise caution to avoid
    overtightening when fitting the crash bungs to your machine.
    Alternatively, you could enquire with the manufacturer/supplier of the
    crash bungs if they can recommend a suitable torque setting.

    Penny Cox

    Motorcycle Editorial Manager


5.5 Owners manual
    An online copy of the owners manual could be found at http://www.msarch.co.uk/cat/ in February
    2003

5.6 Sprocket nuts
Q - From: PeteMJ : Yesterday morning on the way to work my front sprocket came off (while doing
    about 80). Thought I'd had a chain break - revs went high and I lost drive power. Pulled over
    sharpish to find chain was still on - looked ok. Began to think the worst - broken gearbox output
    shaft, etc!
    Using underseat toolkit I removed sprocket cover for a look before calling AA - front sprocket was
    loose (still with chain on it) and had slid off its splines to sit in the threaded section of the shaft
    (where the nut normally is).
    Thread doesn't look damaged and I'm getting a new nut and tab washer on Saturday. Pretty scary
    when you think what could have happened though!
    I've had a loose (though not actually OFF) sprocket nut before and have heard of others having
    similar experiences on YZF engines (not just Thundercats) so something to watch out for. I'd
    suggest those of you who change your own sprockets make sure you use a new tab washer each
    time and stick some Loctite on the thread too! … Pete.
A - From: Boika : When this happened to me I thought the thread would be OK too, but when I tried to
    torque it up - it just stripped. Hope yours goes better……Si
A - From: copout : Question, if you have a tab washer in good condition why use loctite? If you use
    loctite you will have an even more difficult job next time you want to get the sprocket off.
    When I did mine the locknut was on so tight I had to place a 2 x 2 timber through the swingarm
    and the bike in first gear to stop everything going round, and a long length of pipe on the 'T'bar
    before it would come undone, and when it finally did it did so with such an almighty crack that I
    thought something had broken, frightened the life out of me. I have since been told by a bike
    mechanic that heat is sometimes needed to get the nut undone.
    The sprocket nut will normally tighten itself on the shaft due to the direction of rotation, as long as
    everything is installed correctly.
    Also I wouldn’t advise you take a file to the thread as you will do more damage than there is
    already , unless you can get hold of a proper thread file. You should be able to get hold of a die
    which will be the best solution. …….Frank.
A - From: Boika : If I were you I'd just tidy up the threads and try the Loctite idea. I thought my tab
    washer would be enough but it wasn't. Wish I'd soldered it on!
    The problem with the die is that it cannot replace the solid thread where it has been squashed down
    (not to the same diameter anyway, you may me able to find a different sized sprocket nut?) so it
    would still be weaker……….Si
A - From: PeteMJ : Copout - I agree that the tab washer should keep the nut in place but the sad fact is
    that last time I did the C&S I used a new washer (costs peanuts) and torqued the nut to the



April 2004                                                                                Page 20 of 37
    specified torque and this still happened. I've changed C&S often enough before (including quite a
    few times on the cat - go through a few in 65k miles!) and had a nut loosen on me once before
    (though not come off). A mate had his done at a dealer (YZF750) and it still came off.
    I'd rather have the nut difficult to come off at changing time (get a heat gun on it and it'll break
    down the loctite) than have it come off at 80mph like last week - could have been very nasty. I
    normally just wedge the rear wheel with some wood and use a 3ft breaker bar on the nut (bought it
    specifically for this job) - tends to do the trick.
    Looking around for a die right now. It's an M16 so not too common All fingers crossed this
    works! …. Pete

5.7 Tyres - recommendations
    Popular combinations are:

    Front Bridgestone BT010            Rear   Bridgestone BT020
    Front Bridgestone BT010            Rear   Bridgestone BT010
    Front Bridgestone BT020            Rear   Bridgestone BT020
    Front Avon Azaro ST AV45           Rear   Avon Azaro STAV46
    Dunlop D208

    Comments made in the group include:

A - “Tyres - I have used BT020's on the back which last me 6000 miles and BT 010's on the front
    which last me almost 8000 miles.”

A - “From: Savoury - I've got Avons on mine, and on my 3rd rear one. Never had a problem with them
    myself, but then I have never tried anything else like Bridgestone so I have no comparison. I've
    used them cos I get them cheap, my girlfriends Grandad sells shed loads of them at his shop.
    The only thing I would say is they are soft. So if you intend on doing any real mileage on the bike
    then you might be better going for 020's, on the backside in the summer they stick to the road
    really well - not much help this time of year.
    Gary (blakcat) has got Avons as well, but again that’s all he has had so no comparison.”

A - “From: BlakCat - Just to add to Stu's comments, the Avons are good fun in the dry, but they've
    given me a few too many scary moments in the wet.”

A - “From: EDONE - Have run with the Avons V35/V36 with no problems. Rear lasted about 3500.
    front 6000. Now on Avons V45/V46. These are brill. Done 4000 up to now and the rear is still
    looking good for a further 4000 (However looks a little square at the mo ) Loads of grip wet or dry.
    A good choice for touring. “

A - “From: H Hudson - I use the Azaro ST versions. Had them over to the edges 2 up no probs.
    Brilliant in all weathers, never a dodgy moment. And last approx 6000m.

    Tried Bridgestone 020's on my last bike and again very good.”

A - “From: malossi man - Still need to get a new set of rubber so thought I would check back the old
    threads. Lot of people recommend BT010front / BT020rear combo. It's been indicated that the 020
    is a dual compound tyre with the middle bit "touring" and the edges the same as the 010. Sounded
    ok to me but a bit too idealistic so I called Bridgestone. They advised that the 020 is not a dual
    compound tyre and the compound is not as grippy as the 010 anywhere. the plus side is it is longer
    lasting with only a marginal trade-off with grip. Seemingly the compound is not that much harder
    so grip is only slightly less. The reason it is longer lasting is because it has deeper tread cuts, and
    this has been achieved by using more silicone so as not to introduce instability because of the
    deeper cuts. Also because the 010 has less silicone it heats up quicker so the extra grip you get
    also happens quicker than the 020.”




April 2004                                                                                Page 21 of 37
A - From: catlass: My tyre supplier deals mainly with mail order. I got my [Dunlop] 207's for £150
    ...£180 fitted. Name is BFM motorcycles. tel: 01274 532777 email: www.bfmmotorcycles.co.uk
    based near Bradford but mails to trade and public anywhere. gail xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

A - Remus 2 Went for new tyres intending to get the popular Bridgestone pairing of 010 front and 020
    rear. I was quoted £219 including vat and fitting (Jan 2004)! After I picked myself up off the floor
    the nice lady on the reception desk told me they had a special offer on D208's, £120 for the pair
    plus fitting. Didn’t take me long to decide on the 208's.
    I got about 5000 miles out of my last set of tyres D207's, but I'll be lucky if I get half that out of the
    208's, but am I complaining, no way! I think the 208's are brilliant, they are very rounded and roll
    you into the corners, which is a bit of a shock at first until you get used to them, they are very soft,
    they warm up quickly hence the grip and confidence they give you when cornering is brilliant! The
    only down side being the speed in which they wear away!

A - From: marmacat: D208s were fitted to my T-reg 'cat when I bought it last month... All I can do is to
    support your comments on how well they roll into the corners. Plenty of grip and confidence. Only
    done about 600 miles so wear is minimal at present. Have heard comments that they tend to get a
    bit uneven as they wear, due to varying compound across the tread. Tony

A - From: mowgley: D208s gave me a major confidence boost as soon as I fitted the rear. Excellent
    tyre and just about to replace the front (& rear again due to a puncture).

A - From: Mussels: I had a D208 fitted to the rear a couple of months ago and I am very pleased with
    it. I've hardly felt it slide unlike the 207 I had before, and I didn't ride that so hard. It's done 5000
    miles and now it's looking a bit knackered and I'll probably swap both for Battleaxes, to compare. I
    haven't ridden in the wet very much, but what I have done seemed good.




April 2004                                                                                  Page 22 of 37
6 Maintenance
6.1 Alloy bits - preservation
“From: malossi - If you want your alloy bits and pieces to stay nice and shiny then get them looking
    that way in the first place. Depending on condition this may involve a strip and remove and take to
    the polishers or just a really good "buffing" in the garage. (if your alloy looks like chrome then it's
    done properly). To preserve the shine it is advisable to give the parts a couple of coats of quality
    lacquer. Couple of choices here.......
    1. buy cellulose / acrylic lacquer at Halfords and spray away. (won't last that long though and won't
    be that shiny)

    2. buy 2K epoxy lacquer (what they use in bodyshops - mix 2 parts lacquer to 1 part hardener and
    spray on using compressor and gun) and use that if eqpt available or pay to have it done. (will last
    ages and look better too)

    3. find a vehicle paint shop that fills aerosols and ask them for 2K clearcoat in a tin ready mixed.
    they will advise against this as the paint will be solid in the tin about 4 hours after it is filled, but if
    you get it done then nip home straight away and paint then you won't have to find someone with a
    compressor etc.

    NB. 2K paint fumes are really bad shit so either get a get mask that does ammonia etc or don't
    spray it. bodyshops are required by law to use air-fed masks if using 2K's.
    Mind you when you see the results you'll probably think it's worth it!!!”

6.2 Bleeding brakes

From: copout - After spending hours trying to bleed the brakes on my FZR when I fitted braided hoses,
   I came up with the following idea. Place your bleed hose over the nipple and push a syringe (I used
   one that came with my inkjet printer refill) in the other end, open the nipple and slowly pull the
   syringe, close the nipple. After hours of trying the tried and tested method this worked perfectly in
   just 5 minutes

From: Thelonious - I've just finished bleeding the system 10 minutes ago after fitting new lines. Armed
   with nothing more than a bit of tube and a jam jar I didn't have any real problems. Make a hole in
   the jam jar lid, put in the tube, part fill the jar with fluid and make sure the end of the tube stays in
   it, that way it acts as a valve. The hardest part is getting the air out of the master cylinder end if you
   have changed hoses. Squeezing the hose from the reservoir to the master cylinder while turning the
   bars from side to side does the trick eventually. I actually have one of the £7.50 MPS bleed valves
   that worked fine last time but today it just didn't want to play. Save your cash! Theo

6.3 Braided hoses
Q - From: Bigun - I need new brake pads, no decision to make there.........EBC Double H every time
    but I also need new fluid so while I'm at it I was thinking of putting braided brake hoses on. Just
    wondering if they are worth the investment and what the difference in feel etc is.

A - From: RAINUK – I’ve got braided hoses on my Cat and apart from looking nice they make a vast
    improvement to the feel and power of the brakes. So all in all I think there really worth the extra
    cost

A - From: numbskull - I fitted (or had fitted) the Goodridge ones. They are superb. One finger braking
    is easy although I prefer two fingers for the added control. I went for the clear shrink-wrapped ones
    - look much better than coloured IMHO and they protect anything that would come into contact
    with the naked steel ones. Make sure you get the stainless steel unions




April 2004                                                                                    Page 23 of 37
A - From: numbskull - HEL are also a popular make and are about the same price and performance as
    Goodrich.

A - From: hughjanus24 - I put Goodridge braided on mine, they were twenty odd quid. Big
    improvement. Accidentally locked up the front when I first went out. Two finger action is all that’s
    needed to haul up to a rapid stop. Look good too.

6.4 Brake calipers
From: Mussels - I've just a caliper overhaul, and replaced the brake lines with braided Goodridge ones.
   The seals cost me about £100 in all for the back ones as well, the lines cost about the same (ouch) -
   get stainless, costs more but much better. My 'Cat has done 40k as well, and the calipers were in a
   bad way. The job was a right bitch to do, some of the pistons were so well seized that compressed
   air wouldn't get them out and I had to bleed the brakes to get each one out. I replaced the entire set
   as it is part of the 4 year service interval, but the Yam dealer told me I may not need to normally. It
   is common for the dust seals to go, but you can't buy them on their own from Yam. What he
   suggested was I brought in the best old seal that I had (one of each type) and they would try and
   match it with dust seals from other bikes to save money. After I stripped mine down I found all the
   inner seals were still in good condition. (When stripping it I found that the old dust seals
   disintegrated on the way out). After the calipers are out it is difficult to get the crap out from the
   groove that the dust seals sit in, you will need a strong and small implement to do it. I couldn't find
   anything non metallic that was up to the job, so I used an electricians probe. The garage told me
   the mechanics all had specially formed coat hangers. I thought £200 was a bit steep, but when I
   compared that to about £300 for a dealer to do it without replacing the lines I decided it was good
    value. And the brakes are soooooo much better now.        Bleeding the brakes is a right bitch of a
    job, and I found an acquired knack. If you haven't done it before then ask to find out how others
    have managed it.

    Alternatively if you don't want to do that yet......Pump each piston out a little bit and clean round
    the piston using a toothbrush and brake fluid/cleaner. Then push them back, you shouldn't need any
    tools to do that but it may be handy to have them kicking about.      (I use a couple of G clamps,
    some wood and an old padlock hasp        ).

6.5 Brake calipers – cleaning in detail
Q - From: PAWS : Just about to service my cat so thought i would give the brakes a clean while i was
    about it as it seems to be suggested quite regular on here. My question is how to go about it, the
    brakes seem to still perform very well but want them to remain that way.

A - From: jacurutu: First thing I'd suggest is get a Haynes Manual, and adapt the instructions in there -
    that's what I did. (You need to adapt the instructions 'cos they talk about completely dismantling
    the brake system, which you don't need to do.)

    Off the top of my head things you need:
    1) Spanner, sockets
    2) Pliers
    3) Copper grease (or proper brake grease)
    4) Brake and Clutch cleaner
    5) Toothbrush
    6) Length of string

    IMPORTANT: Don't get grease or oil on the pad's friction surface or the disks. (Disks can be
    cleaned, but once the pad is contaminated, their performance reduces and you'll have to replace
    them.)
    Preferably, remove the pads from the caliper - you'll have to extract the split pins (using the pliers)
    then the retaining pin and then remove the spring clip. Remember which pad was on which side -
    you'll want to put them back in the same way - and which way round the spring clip goes. Then
    unbolt the caliper from the bike, and using the piece of string, tie it to something (eg rear subframe,




April 2004                                                                               Page 24 of 37
    fork shrouds) to support it (don't let the caliper hang from the brake line). (If you can't get the pads
    out, then remove the caliper first to give you easier access to the pads.)
    Spray the brake cleaner all over the caliper, particularly around the pistons. Use the toothbrush to
    remove all the caked brake dust and road gunge. Gently pump out the pistons as far as you dare
    without popping them out of the caliper (otherwise you'll need to bleed the system), and clean
    them using brake cleaner/toothbrush. (You may need to hold 3 pistons whilst you pump the fourth
    out a bit further. Repeat for each piston.)
    Clean all the pins and the back of the pads (removing the spacers if fitted).
    To re-assemble, gently push all the pistons back into the caliper. Put a small amount of copper
    grease on the caliper bolts and bolt the caliper back onto the bike. Coat the back of the pads with
    copper grease (or proper brake grease, if you really want) and insert into the caliper (the same way
    they came out). Coat the retaining pin with copper grease, insert the spring clip on top of the pads
    (the same way it came out) and insert the pin. Insert the spring clips into the pin.
    Now pump the brakes gently until the pads contact the disk. (Otherwise you'll find the first trip out
    on the bike, you won't have any brakes!)
    Repeat for the other three calipers.
    The first time I did this, it took me several hours, but the bike had been ridden a lot over winter and
    needed lots of cleaning. As long as you keep on top of it, it's not a big job.

A - From: Ozwold: Sorry Kev if this is picky, but one amendment to the above I'd make is....
    Buy some Caliper grease (aka Rubber Grease)... as well as copper grease. Use the copper grease as
    described above. The caliper grease you should smear (just a small amount) around the pistons
    when they are very clean and in their pushed out state... then force the pistons back into the
    callipers. The caliper/rubber grease will help lubricate the caliper dust seals and prolong their life.
    Get a very small pot of caliper grease as you use very little and the small pot lasts ages!! Mine is
    over 2yrs old and I've used 1/3 to 1/2 of it... only a small pot too...
    Get a small piece of wood to fit between the pistons when you pump them out... that way you will
    pump them out far enough to see clean metal (ie you can be sure you'll get rid of all the crud)
    without the worry of popping the pistons out completely and having brake fluid everywhere!!
    In terms of which brake cleaner to use... I've recently used the Yoshimoto Anka-de-Manka spray
    and am fairly impressed. Supposedly biodegradable too... did the job nicely... although, as I was
    changing the brake seals and hoses (for Goodrich braided jobbies), I took the calipers into the
    kitchen sink and scrubbed the bodies with washing up liquid, hot water and a toothbrush... brought
    them up nicely... Wouldn't advise doing all of that unless you are going to completely strip the
    brake calipers though... as you get soapy water everywhere... inc on the inside of the seals! - Mark
    (Oz)
    ps. The brakes are MASSIVELY improved having done the above...

A - From: eccles291: I got Motorex brake cleaner and it seems pretty good. I was also planning to
    stick my calipers in the kitchen sink to give 'em a good clean too.

    I take it you completely stripped the calipers down? i.e. - pistons out, new seals etc? If so, did
    you pump the pistons out before you took the calipers off the brakelines? And how much of a job
    is it getting the seals out & then back in again?
    I took my calipers off the hoses then realised I hadn't pumped the pistons out! Might have to stick
    'em back on again to get them out as I don't have compressed air to blow them out. Unless you
    know another way? - Col

A - From: Ozwold : No, I removed the calipers complete... then scrubbed them down. Getting the pots
    out was an arse as it was LONG overdue and a couple were pretty seized!

    I used a standard FOOTPUMP! Easy! Used an airbed type adaptor (softish plastic... taps nicely
    into the thread on where the banjo bolt goes!) Got up to 80psi... plenty for all but one of the little
    shits!
    Block off pairs of pistons as you would when cleaning them... remove, clean up, swap seals etc in
    pairs... replace the new stuff then pop out the other pair... takes a while but not too bad. Getting the



April 2004                                                                                Page 25 of 37
    seals out (esp hydraulic one) can be a bit fiddly! Bet Yamaha have a lovely little tool for that! I
    was replacing the seals with new ones, so wasn't bothered about damaging the old ones... new were
    £70 for the lot.... not cheap... so if you can get the old out and back in all the better... mine were
    knackered!
    Hope it's easier for you than it was for me... had to put one caliper back on the bike, bleed the
    brakes (took ages!) and pump the git out past the hydraulic seal (but not the dust seal.. thus
    retaining the fluid and removing that in a not so messy way!!). Waste of brake fluid... but they're
    working a treat now!! Lovely job! Mark (Oz)

A - From: Mussels: I found most of mine were seized and my compressor couldn't get five of the pots
    out, so I had to bleed the brakes each time. That took a long time, and a lot of fluid.

    Col, Make sure the calipers are completely dry before putting the seals in. Oven at 100 degrees C
    does the trick.
A - From: jacurutu : Cheers for the extra info. I hadn't thought about using rubber grease on the pistons,
    but can see it might help. I'm also planning on fully stripping the calipers, hopefully cleaning up
    the original seals (and saving £70 - so I get a set of Goodridge lines), so all this advice will come in
    useful. – Kev

    PS If you're not stripping the calipers completely, a selection of bits of wood, old brake pads, G-
    clamps and long screwdrivers comes in handy for pushing the pistons back into the caliper.
    (Although I suspect if you need all these, it's probably time to strip the caliper completely - hence
    why I'll be doing it shortly.)

6.6 Brakes discs – cleaning
Q - From: catlass - what can I clean discs with? They've got rust deposits on from the rapidly sticking
    pads and I don't know what I can use. I thought I better ask first, rather than doing the usual (using
    the first thing to hand) and then nearly killing myself!!

A - From: Eddie - Get yourself a bottle of brake disc cleaner, about £4 from Halfords, it'll cut through
    (elbow) grease and light rust in no time. Spray it on to the disc directly, and wipe off with a clean
    cloth.

6.7 Brakes seizing up
Q - From: funderkat .. Found that the brake pads had well and truly rusted to the front disks - so
    much so that I twice checked to make sure that I'd removed all the disk locks and chains, wasn't in
    gear etc. cos' I couldn't shift the bugger. Eventually the pads (EBC double sintered & EBC disks)
    detached but still leaving a residue on the disks. The last time the pads stuck, the disks overheated
    and warped, so I'll be giving the calipers a good clean before I risk going anywhere. But does
    anyone else suffer from sticking pads (and if so how d'you stop it?).

A - From: HHudson I have also had sticky pad syndrome when I have left the bike wet. I solution that
    seems to work for me is to:

         a) Spray the calipers and disks with Auto Glym bike cleaner when you park it and rinse with
         cold water.
         b) Ride the bugger every day!!

6.8 Carburettor balancing
“From: Boika - I've got the Morgan Carbtune, (the one with the metal rods). I've used it on all me bikes
    and is nice 'n easy to use and accurate too. (gets a lot easier once you've done it a few times). The
    difference isn't that noticeable (unless someone’s *ucked them up) but it's better to have them
    balanced than not!”




April 2004                                                                                Page 26 of 37
6.9 Chain & sprockets(1)
Q – “From: tcatlee - Need a new chain for me cat, do I have to replace the sprockets at the same time??
    And is it a complete b'stard to do?”

A - “From: boostcat - Hi TcatLee, I had fitted D.I.D. 'X' ring chain and Renthal sprockets, it is
    generally a good idea to change the sprockets with the chain although they don’t always need
    changing.(Look for wear on the sprocket teeth as shown in Haynes manual) I had a friend fit my
    chain and he talked me through it. It isn’t hard to do so long as you have the right kit, i.e. chain
    breaker and riveter. After fitting the chain you need to adjust the chain tensioner after two hundred
    miles as the chain will stretch, oh and dont raz the bike for the first two hundred miles as you mite
    get tight spots in the chain, take it easy. I use a wax lube to reduce 'Fling' but my friend tells me
    thats okay but every 6 hundred miles i should apply a normal lube to free up any tight spots as the
    wax does stiffen up the chain. Hope this helps”

A – “From: rugbycat - changing the sprockets is not a difficult job. BUT...

    the nut for the front sprocket is incredibly tight. when trying to undo it i was actually lifting the
    back of the bike up - so the smart money turned the handle of the spanner 180 degrees so that i was
    pushing down to undo. Success - the nut undid, but the effort and momentum carried me
    downwards straight onto the clutch pushrod which broke rather too easily. SO my only advice is
    that if the nut is being a bitch and you have to what i did - - take the pushrod out first.

A – “From: drunknorgy - Get someone else to do it . Get the cover off and wheel the bike around to
    your nearest garage or kwik fit type place (you may have to put it back on to stop the oil leaking
    out). Persuade one of them to slacken the nut off with an air wrench. Slip them a couple of quid for
    the hassle and then wheel it back home to finish the job. Make no mistake, this nut is a right
    barstool to get of and you risk a lot of damage just leaning on a breaker bar. If this is not possible,
    borrow or buy an impact driver and big hammer. The first choice is my favourite choice and worth
    every penny.”

6.10 Chain & sprockets(2)
Q - “From: magicmonkeyman: Can anybody recommend a decent chain and sprockets? I have had my
    current chain for 8000 miles and it's buggered already!! I lube it regularly, but a recent trip to the
    South of France has taken its toll.

A - From: Mussels: For long life see if you can pick up an OE set for just over £100, and get a
    Scottoiler. I've done just over 5000 miles since mine was fitted and not had to adjust the chain once
    yet. Other than that go for DID stuff, they are the only two that mechanics have ever recommended
    to me.

A - From: copout: 8000 miles and knackered??? is it made of chewing gum? DID give a 12000 mile
    warranty with their chains, do you know what make and type of chain you have? Give 'Powerlinks'
    on 01425 472100 a call if you want a price for a replacement, tell them you got the number from
    me.

6.11 Clutch problem?

Q - “I was changing up into 5th and the bloody clutch goes! I managed to limp home with a couple of
    bumpy down changes but I am a tad concerned as to why it should go. I've only had the bike 4
    months. T reg, not even 4500 miles yet. There have been no hints of any problems with the clutch
    before this, it hadn't been slipping, it was smooth etc etc....

    The bike locked into gear but the cable seems to be functioning OK. The reason I don't think its the
    cable is 'cos when I try and pull the clutch in it makes a hellish whirring / grinding sound.

    Does anyone know what this might be? Plates? Cable? I'm so pissed off as I can't even ride it into a
    repair garage!!!!! Any info / advice would be really appreciated.”



April 2004                                                                                Page 27 of 37
A - “Things to check:
    Nothing too complicated here. Check your cable, is it ok at both end?
    Next take a look at the mechanism behind the front sprocket cover, even just the cover screws
    backing off would make the clutch inoperative.
    If everything is fine on that side, go over to the clutch cover itself and open that up, the problem
    will be in there, it might be the screws compressing the springs or, less likely, a problem with the
    pressure plate itself or maybe some broken clutch plates. Good luck.”

6.12 Cost of dealer servicing
Q - “From: jazzyboy My cat needs a 8000mile service now. Anyone know roughly how much i need
    to fork out and if there's any decent garages in the Gloucestershire region to do it. To be honest it
    doesn't really need a big service but i want the book stamped!”

A - “From: DAF When I was looking to buy a Cat I spoke to a few Yamaha dealers and they were all
    quoting about £100 for a minor service and £240 for a major one.

    I think 4K, 8K and 12K are minor and 16K is a major. Seem to remember them saying that service
    parts were included but anything else would be extra. The 16K service includes valve clearance
    adjustment if required, so top end engine strip and rebuild.”

6.13 Engine running rough – loose battery
Q - From: Readie - Hi all, - Had my Cat serviced (28K) in November, since then on anything more
    than trips around town, after about 15 miles I lose power as though it's running on 3 cylinders. This
    also happened while running the bike when cleaning it. When it warmed up it started to run rough
    again. I took it back to the dealer, they couldn't find a fault, but as the plugs were not changed
    during the service (they had been replaced at about 25K) they changed the plugs and reset up the
    carbs. As I don't use it for work, I have only today gone more than 15 miles on it and it still does it,
    only this time the rev counter kept dropping back to zero, then to the correct display and my clock
    lights flickered a little. I don't think the headlight was affected, but couldn't be sure. Any ideas ?

A - They've found the fault - loose connection on the battery. So after all this time and grief and lost
    hours on my bike over the break it now runs like it shouldn't (140 on the way home to check it
    works OK - IT DOES!)

6.14 Fairings – refitting
“From: Thundermark - I don’t normally have any probs with the fairing. R/H side first, Centre, L/H
    side. bow the centre so it clips under the L/H side panel. I push the main panels on the bungs then
    put in the main panel screw (centre back) and a couple at the top. when you have al 3 in position
    fix the middle 1st, then work back along a side panel. All sounds double dutch I know. Mark”
“From: HHudson - I think I know what the problem you had was. It happened to me once and had me
    swearing for hours.
    When replacing the side fairing, the top bit slides forward under the cockpit fairing. What you
    have to watch for is that the fairing top screw point is over the top of the body screw mount.
    If it goes underneath, it will seem right for a while (the top will fit, but the bottom won't) but you
    just can't refit the fairing properly. It had me going for hours once.
     The centre bit I normally leave till last and it is always a pain in the arse and ends up getting bent
    every which way to make it fit.”
“From: malossi man - little bit of grease on the fairing rubber clamps makes them a lot easier to
   refit. Also make sure that the screws are replaced correctly because they will all "fit" but not
   properly in the wrong whole. wee bit copper grease on all the threads doesn't go amiss either. I
   would go with exactly what Mark has posted, only addition is I find it easier to hold the bottom of
   the fairings on my toes and raise my foot to adjust the height needed to connect at the top. if you
   are doing the job yourself you'll know what I mean!”
“From: johnnygus - Thanks a lot guys, - some helpful tips here.


April 2004                                                                                 Page 28 of 37
    HHudson, your point about the top bolt is appreciated. That was one of the major things I was
    obviously doing wrong yesterday!
     Another thing I've learnt the hard way: Probably best to copper grease all the fasteners in one go
    cos if you do them one by one, as you put them back on, you get nice fat fingerprints all over your
    freshly waxed bodywork.....”

6.15 Front forks
From: hughjanus24 - Just stripped the forks and put in Ohlins springs and 10 weight oil in. Must admit
   I’m really amazed at the difference. I put an Ohlins shock in a while back and felt it showed up the
   forks, which now I can see how much. No more wallowing going round corners, braking left the
   front end composed with minimal diving and it just feels heaps better. I returned all my settings to
   standard and it feels well firm. If you don’t do anything else, do your forks the difference is
   brilliant.
From: hughjanus24 - Hi Col, didn’t do the re-valve thing just did the springs and oil and it all seems to
   work well. Somebody on the site has had their forks re-valved but can’t remember who. Doing the
   shock is more time consuming than anything else. You will need to suspend the rear, I used an
   Abba stand. The undertray needs to be dropped to release the remote reservoir and fit the new one
   which slots straight in with no trouble. Ohlins shocks have a ride height adjuster which I increased
   by 5mm which has improved turn in. Overall it has been quite expensive; shock £430, springs and
   oil £80 but I did it all myself and am well pleased with the results.
From: Mussels - There seems to be some confusion whether you are talking about forks or rear shock.
   The forks benefit most from Progressview springs (£90 on a recent thread). The rear shock benefits
   most from the correct weighted spring (what Maxton told me anyway). If the rear damping is OK
   (not fooked) then £70 on the correct spring will do it, unless you are on the track.
Q – From Thelonious : Looking for some tips for technically-minded peeps out there...
    I want to change the fork oil as it hasn't been done for yonks. I've done it before on a simpler bike
    where you could just take off the top fork cap and pull out the spring, but on the Cat there is the
    damper mechanism at the top. Does this just lift out with top bolt? I think I remember a warning
    about not dropping part of it into the fork.
    Also, has anyone managed to change the oil without removing the forks? I thought perhaps I could
    just stick a tube in and pump the old oil out. (Why don't they fit drain screws these days?)
    Any recommendations for oil? I am only 70kg, rarely take a passenger and ride a lot of bumpy
    roads so I was thinking of a fairly light oil. I've heard auto transmission fluid and even crisp 'n' dry
    recommended too ... Theo

A - From: Mick : Five grade will suit you; measure what comes out and add an extra 20ccs or so to
    allow for what's still in the forks. Ohlins is good; ATF is cheap and Silkolene (for me) poor.
    It's a fork tube out job, which isn't that hard and time consuming and you can even justify it if you,
    say, overhaul/clean the caliper pistons/ change the pads etc. In other words, if this is a job that's on
    the horizon, do the forks at the same time. Wheel out, mudguard off, 14mm bottom clamps and
    four Allen bolts at the top – then they slide out. Make sure you loosen the cap nut first (32 or
    27mm, can't remember) and back the preload right off (measure the flats first). Undo cap nut, stick
    leg upside down and be amazed at the crap that comes out. The cap nuts mark easily, so you may
    want to run some masking tape around the flats before you stick the spanner on.
    Note the height of the cap nut when the spring is uncompressed – if one's higher than the other,
    you ought to get new springs. There's a definitive post on this somewhere in the archives.
    I nearly got a drain plug tapped into the fork slides, but bottled it in case I weakened the structure.



6.16 Keys in Ignition
Q - From: Bostin - I seem to have a bit of a problem with the ignition key as it takes a lot of jigging
    about before I can turn it - and as for using the wheel lock - almost impossible to put on &
    impossible to get off!




April 2004                                                                                 Page 29 of 37
A - From: Thelonious - I think the locks gradually wear out over time, probably due to the key
    vibrating. Best not to have any other keys or large keyrings attached to it for this reason. Mine is a
    bitch to turn, but not so bad that I can be bothered to actually do anything about it of course.
    Pattern replacements are about £30 -- ouch! You will also need to carry two different keys. Out
    with the WD40...

A - From: Boika - Yeah, this is a known problem with Yamaha keys - they just wear out! Happened to
    mine too, try using the spare - that should sort it. (& keep the lock lubed)

A - From: Gadfly - Just a suggestion, but I find WD40 doesn't last 2 minutes before it dries out. I use
    engine oil (dip key in and insert in lock a few times) it works a treat, or I've got some old Graphite
    based lubricant in a jar. No idea what it is but apparently it's expensive stuff. This is the best I've
    used by a long way. Anyone got a clue what it might be or where we can get some?

A - From: Boika - I've asked the wise old man and he reckons that powdered graphite is the best thing
    you can use on locks....apparently....?

6.17 Lifting the bike
Lifting the bike
Q - “From: numbskull - Have any of you taken the swingarm out and, if so, how did you lift the bike?”
A - “From: copout - Although I haven’t had the swing arm out, I did change the rear shock which
    means that the bike needed suspending, I hung it from the garage roof.”

    I drilled a 20mm hole into the (timber) roof joist, then using some rope I tied it via the grab rails
    (protecting them with rag), I put the bike up on to the paddock stand, tied off the rope and lowered
    the paddock stand, hey presto, job done.”
A - “From: Mick - I've done it half a dozen times or so, as I've been tweaking the rear ride height. I use
    a couple of ratchet straps around the top of my multigym top arm. Works fine but unless lifted
    absolutely squarely, the bike can go sideways. I would suggest holding the front in place to keep
    the bike upright.”

A - “From: mechy - I have just done mine, put 2 axle stands under the frame bottom(at back of
    engine)with front wheel secured and a trolley jack under back of engine. You can with 2 mates lift
    the back of the bike up quite easily by the rear subframe onto 2 supports if you have no jack .”

6.18 Quick release fasteners

Q - From: clogboy - Am thinking of buying these as most of my screws holding on the fairing have
    now turned into a rusty mess. Anyway has anyone got these if so - How much? Easy to fit? Do
    they only go on the side of the fairing or can they also be attached behind the front wheel?

A - From: Savoury - Dan mate, I bought some of these a few months back and haven’t yet got round to
    fitting them. The problem is, they don’t fit onto the original fittings. They come with new clips that
    need to be riveted to the fairing (at least I think anyway, they might hold without rivets but haven’t
    tried) The fairings coming off this weekend so I'll have another attempt at them then.

A - From: petemj – “Got some dzus fasteners from M&P when I was giving the cat it's winter overhaul
    last year. They would have required some modification to the fairing to fit in most cases so I just
    fitted them to the two real problem screws - bottom front (behind front wheel) and bottom rear (at
    the very back of the fairing) as these ones always seized up on my bike.

    Verdict: The dzus fasteners are far easier to fasten, don't seize and make taking the fairing off a lot
    easier. Pain to fit though. Pete.”

6.19 Painting a hugger
“From: robmccoll - I painted my hugger. My cat is done in the 'virgin' colours. I forgot to send the
    hugger and chain guard in so I did it myself. I went to a paint shop and got the paint matched.


April 2004                                                                                Page 30 of 37
    Make sure you use a good primer for plastic and put two coats of primer. then paint it in very fine
    layers. Dust it on. It takes longer but it is the proper way to do it. I tried a rush job, 1 coat of primer
    and 2 thick coats of paint. It pealed and cracked in 1 week, so I had to do it again. Now it has not
    even a mark on it and it has been on there for 18 months. Give it a good polish then put lacquer on
    it. Go over it in a week with rubbing compound then polish it up nicely. Then it is ready for the
    bike.
    PS, my jet washer does not even take the paint off.”

6.20 Rear Shock
Q - From: Mussels - I have some of questions now I have a replacement shock.

    1) Is there an easy (or cheap) way to compress the rear shock spring so it can be changed? (I have
       a new spring coming from Maxton)
    2) I want to change my shock myself but I only have a swingarm paddock stand, how do I
       support the rear of the bike whilst I change the shock? If it involves spending money (i.e. on a
       different stand) then I will want to be able to dismantle the swingarm as well, I will also want
       it to work on most types of bike.
    3) Is there anything else (i.e. bearings) that should be changed whilst I have the back end apart,
       bearing in mind that my bike has done 35000 miles. Andy

A - From: Jace - I've changed my rear shock for an Ohlins. I supported the back of the bike as follows:
    I constructed a trestle out of wood using a pair of brackets. This cost in total £25!
    Remove the tail fairing and seat. You use your stand to lift the rear of the bike. Place the trestle
    The trestle has obviously got to be tall enough to fit over the back of the bike) over the bike rear
    and lash the bike to the underside using some rope.

    Carefully remove the stand (Keep your fingers crossed!). Replace shock!

A - From: Bigun - If you are handy and constructing things the cheap and easy way to do it is to get a
    Black and Decker Workmate, or two of your missus coffee tables, or construct a stand and put
    either side of the bike. Take rear panels off to expose the subframe and lift bike on your paddock
    stand. Now thread a piece of 4x4 joist or scaffold pole etc through the subframe and rest it on the
    supports on either side of the bike. Take the paddock stand away and there you go, one bike
    supported safely without ropes or expensive stands. Worked for me. I suggest putting a chock in
    front of the front wheel for piece of mind.

6.21 Rear suspension linkage/swingarm bushes
Q - From: Gadfly - I was considering stripping the linkage and swingarm bearings down to clean /
    grease them. Have any of you done this job yourselves or do you know how often it should be
    done. Also what type of grease should I use.

A - From: rugbycat - I have just completed the same job - as part of getting the rear shock rebuilt by
    Falcon shocks. the job is not especially difficult or time consuming - even for a novice "have a go"
    mechanic like me. I used the Haynes manual that was very clear and helpful. I supported the bike
    on sections of a cut-up wooden fence post under the engine. Just build a frame with enough spare
    wood to make it solid. As long as any tough nuts are undone and re-torqued up when on the
    paddock stand there will be no problems.

6.22 Repairing plastics
    “I can recommend 'JB Weld' for sticking bits of fairing plastic back together - when I bust by front
    mudguard again this morning with the disc lock less than 24 hours after putting the freshly re-stuck
    together and repainted thing back on, the weld held up beautifully, and it broke off in a completely
    new place.”
“From: Burnsy - Araldite seems to work fine as long as you roughen up the inner surface but there are
    also kits available from Busters On-line which do the trick.”




April 2004                                                                                   Page 31 of 37
6.23 Spark Plugs - changing

Q - From: REDMIST - any body changed their plug's, is it easy job or crappy job? any odd tool's
    needed & how long doe's it take, or should i let the dealer do it?????????

A - From: moriniman - Fiddly yes, crappy? I didn't think so. If you have the standard toolkit, the plug
    spanner works ok. No need to dismantle the fairing or other stuff. Hardest job is getting the plug
    caps on and off.

    Some tips:
       • ALWAYS use some 'never-seez' or 'copperslip' on the threads or they will be difficult to
            remove next time.
       • If it has been raining prior to you working on the bike, stand it upright for a few minutes
            before you start work so that the water that collects in the right hand plug cavities can
            drain out. T/Cat plugs from the right hand side usually have a dirt/rust line where the
            water lies!
       • If the plugs seem unusually tight to undo, warm up the engine first so that the head
            expands a bit.

A - From: Alo - Changed mine a couple of weeks ago, a bit awkward to get in at but not a massive
    problem. Read somewhere to use compressed air to clear area out so no crap falls in but not having
    a compressed air supply in my garage (who does?) I used a rubber pipe from my beer making kit
    with my lungs on the end of it and managed to blow out quite a bit of stuff that I wouldn't have
    liked to fall in. My tool kit was missing the plug remover so I used a socket set which I just
    managed with (using universal joint and extension piece). Good luck, Alan.

6.24 Suspension
    “ Standard Suspension Settings
     The following information has been worded for the benefit of those new to the Cat. I have
    underlined the standard settings for quicker reference.
     Note: It is essential that you Always have both forks set equally!!

6.24.1 Front Fork Pre – Load
     The Front Fork Pre- Load Adjuster Hex Nut is situated at the top of each fork, on the Thundercat
    this is usually a coloured hex nut with lines scored around the side and is situated above the top
    hex bolt which is alloy coloured and on the yoke.
     There are 8 lines (settings) on the coloured hex nut each representing a setting, the standard setting
    is with the 5th line just showing above top the hex bolt.
     To Increase the pre – load turn the adjuster nut Clockwise until the next line is just visible above
    the top hex bolt.
     To Decrease the pre – load turn the adjuster nut Anti-Clockwise until the next line is just visible
    above the top hex bolt.

6.24.2 Front Fork Rebound Damping
     The Rebound Damping Screw is situated at the very highest part of each fork and sits on top of the
    pre - load hex nut, this is a brass coloured screw with a H & S stamped next to it. The settings are
    from the number of clicks (anti-clockwise) from the fully screwed in position, there are 12 settings
    available.
     The standard setting is 7 clicks out anti – clockwise from the fully screwed in position.
     To Increase damping turn the adjuster Clockwise.
     To Decrease damping turn the adjuster Anti – Clockwise.

    Remember to set both forks equally !!

6.24.3 Front Fork Compression Damping
     The Compression Damping Screw is situated at the bottom of the forks next to the front discs, you
    will see a tubular protrusion facing towards the fairing in which is a brass coloured screw. The



April 2004                                                                                Page 32 of 37
    settings are from the number of clicks (anti-clockwise) from the fully screwed in position, there are
    12 settings available.
     The standard setting is 7 clicks out anti – clockwise from the fully screwed in position.
     To Increase damping turn the adjuster Clockwise.
     To Decrease damping turn the adjuster Anti – Clockwise.

    Remember to set both forks equally !!

6.24.4 Rear Shock Absorber Pre – Load
     The Pre – Load adjuster is situated on top of your shock absorber and has vertical slots that are
    numbered, look closely and you will notice that there is a small block sitting in one of the
    numbered slots. This is your current pre – load setting and can be adjusted using the ‘C’ spanner.”

    ** Remainder of this post missing ** - can anyone help provide this ??

    “Back by popular demand (well one anyway) - MCN suspension settings!!!!

    Front p/l - 3 and a half rings from hard
    Front comp. - 3 clicks from hard
    Front r/b - 5 clicks from hard

    Rear p/l - Max
    Rear comp - 4 clicks from hard
    Rear r/b - 5 clicks from hard

    Cold tyre pressure - front 34psi, rear 38psi”

6.25 Wheel alignment
    “From: Mick - Right. You need a 6 foot-ish bar (two would be better) and a couple of 4-6in blocks
    of block (four would be better – if you've got two bars). Bar MUST be straight, so a bit of wood's
    probably out. I used a weightlifting bar. I will get a square section bar from somewhere for the
    future, as it's easier to measure.

    Okay. Stick bike on a paddock stand. Put four inch or six-inch blocks beside front and rear wheel
    (place steering straight ahead). Push bar lightly bar against the two rear tyre contact points. A
    friend's helpful here, as he/she can just maintain a bit of pressure, while you check the front. Look
    at gap between front brake disc and bar. Repeat on other side, and adjust accordingly. If you had
    two bars, it'd take seconds. (Maxton sell a kit, but it's £60 though. Makes it look easy.)

    I had something like12mm on one side and 25 on the other.”




April 2004                                                                               Page 33 of 37
7 General biking tips
7.1 France – riding tips
    “Police in France take a very dim view if you exceed any limit by more than 25kph. On the
    autoroute, the limit is 130, so the 100mph mark is considered excessive. However, I've done about
    4000 miles at or above that speed this year with no problem.

    You just don't see the police out very much on safer roads. But you must stick to the town limits.
    That's an automatic 50kph on the entrance to a town (town name sign with a red border) and the
    gendarmes will get you there if they're on patrol. Particularly at weekends.

    The trick on the autoroutes is to break your journey between tolls - fuel, food, whatever. As the
    tickets are read, the machine automatically calculates your average speed. The building on the right
    just after the toll booths is usually part police station!”

From: copout - I’ve done a fair few thousand miles in France on bike & in car.

   Firstly get a good map of the areas and beyond. Quite a good one that we use a lot that is very
   small (just right for the bike) is the Michelin yellow road atlas of France, it only measures about 10
   x 13cm & costs about £4 to £5, also get a more detailed one finding the decent roads.
   Do a search for the Brittany & Normandy tourist offices, get them to send you info on things to do
   & places to visit, Normandy is famous for Calvados (apple brandy) plenty of places to taste the
   stuff, but not if you are riding/driving as it pretty powerful, there are some excellent virtually
   deserted beaches especially in Brittany, Mont St Michel is worth a visit, a bit commercial lower
   down but the monastery guided tour is worth the effort if you are into that kind of thing, watch
   where you park as the tide rushes in at a very fast pace, they say it's faster than a galloping horse.
   A trip down to St Nazair to see the WW2 submarine pens is another worthwhile visit.
   Always have 130 Euro in cash on you just in case you get pulled by the gendarmes, it makes life a
   lot easier but more than likely will not be needed, you can always spend it in the hypermarket on
   the way home. Frank.
From: Thelonious : Stay within or close to speed limits in towns and villages, but you can let rip in
   between. If no limit is posted on the village name sign it is 50 kph. The village name crossed out
   sign reverts to 90 kph. 80 kph if it is wet.
   Most motorists are really friendly to bikes, if there is a speed trap they will warn you miles (or
   should I say kilometres) in advance. Fixed cameras can't get you (yet!). Lots of motorists will see
   you and move over. Thank them with a wave of the foot as you pass.
   Yellow diamond -- you have priority (ie. normal set up). Yellow diamond crossed out -- give way
   to suicidal tractor driver about to cut straight out of tiny side turning across autoroute due to some
   ancient feudal right of way.
   Avoid autoroutes -- very boring, quite expensive and there is almost always a better parallel route.
   The N roads are great, somewhere between an English A and B roads.
   Don't be tempted to leave behind your boots and leathers in hot weather like the locals, they have
   special kevlar-impregnated skin that makes them immune to gravel rash. Don't be tempted to leave
   your helmet undone and/or perched on the top of your head like the locals. They have special
   titanium-lined skulls that make them immune to death.
   You must carry your licence, insurance and passport. You're supposed to have a bulb kit too but I
   have never heard of anyone being checked.
   The drink-drive limit is stricter than ours, not that you'd do that of course!
    Je suis vraiment desolé, Monsieur, il ne se produira pas encore = I am truly sorry sir, it won't
   happen again. Enjoy! Theo




April 2004                                                                              Page 34 of 37
7.2 Oil – insider information
From: weasley
   I'll start with my history, so you can judge whether or not to believe me. I have a chemistry degree
   and have worked in engine oil development and technical support for over 11 years, for one of the
   most famous brands there is (I won't say who - some here know but I'd rather not say so I can give
   objective advice that isn't taken as being a sales pitch for a particular brand).
   The very brief answer is no, the cheapo oil is NOT the same as the branded stuff. The big names
   spend millions on product development and the best way to get their money back is to sell it as a
   premium product and get premium money for it. There's no business sense in selling it as cheapo
   stuff. What does happen is that when a company has finished with a particular formulation they
   may let another company have it, so the cheap oil becomes a one-generation-old version of the
   good stuff. In most cases, unless your car is bang up-to-date and requires a specific oil, this will do
   fine. However, unless you have inside information then you will never know what the cheap oil
   used to be.
   Castrol don't refine oil, BP do, and BP owns Castrol. Having said this most oil companies trade
   base oil anyway and although they may have a preference for using their own, it isn't a given and
   they may well be able to get base oil on from competitors cheaper than they can get it from
   themselves.
   I'd like to know why we shouldn't be using Castrol GTX Magnatec? In my experience it is good
   stuff and does what it says on the can.
   My advice is to get the best you can afford, within reason, and change it regularly. If you run a 10
   year old beater then Mobil 1 is probably a waste of money, but I would go with a Castrol GTX
   rather than Acme All Seasons Engine Oil, even though they appear to be the same viscosity. As I
   always say in these matters, the oil is the most important component in your engine; a few microns
   of it is all that is stopping your engine from seizing. Why skimp on the cost? What will the £10
   you saved get you when you rebuild your engine... a few gaskets?
   Personally, I use a full synthetic 0W-30 in my 11 year old Honda CRX VTEC. Reason one is that
   I get it free (not a perk but part of an ongoing field trial) but even when I didn't get this I bought
   full synth. Halfords are doing a good deal at the moment on fully synthetic - I can't vouch for now,
   but in the past their full synth was an old Mobil 1 formulation
And there’s more …
   Some basics. All engine oils are blended by mixing together additives and base oils. The base oils
   form the bulk of the lubricant and there are usually two mixed together to achieve the correct
   viscosity. It is the base oil which is either mineral or synthetic.
   When you heat up oil it gets thinner. Typically, for the same range of temperature a mineral oil will
   change its viscosity more than a synthetic (putting aside certain speciality grades). What you want
   is for the oil to not get too thin as it heats up, so with a mineral oil we add something called a
   viscosity index improver, who's job is to prevent the oil thinning too much when hot. A typical
   synthetic (we're really talking about PAO here, which is the most common synthetic, although
   some companies take a mineral and refine/react it so much that it effectively becomes a synthetic)
   has a natural tendency to resist thinning when heated.
   Therefore a synthetic will have less of the VI improver (if, indeed, it has any), which is good,
   because the VII can breakdown and cause deposits in extreme temperatures.
   Secondly, because mineral oil is refined from crude oil it is full of all sorts of chemicals. Some will
   oxidise easily, some will polymerise easily and so on, meaning that the oil 'breaks down' and result
   in unwanted products (acids, sludges, varnishes, residues etc). These can collect on surfaces, block
   oil lines, clog filters etc. A synthetic is all the same chemical, very well-defined and with well-
   known properties.
   Having said this a mineral oil also contains naturally-occurring good molecules, with built-in anti-
   oxidancy and anti-wear properties. Synthetics don't have this and are, in fact, often worse in this
   respect. However a synthetic will respond very well to additives, so a little splash of antioxidant
   and anti-wear will have a huge effect.
   Volatility - due to the spread of different molecules in a mineral there is a range of boiling points.
   When heated some will evaporate and leave the engine via the crankcase breather. This is seen as
   loss of oil and so requires top-up; good for the oil company's profits but not for your pocket. In fact
   the top up injects some fresh additives too, so helps, but the evaporated oil can condense in the



April 2004                                                                               Page 35 of 37
    breathers, which are usually fed into the air intake for the engine so you can get oily residues in the
    throttle bodies and PCV valves etc. Synthetics resist this.
    The same spread of molecules mentioned above will also lead to low temperature issues with
    minerals. When cold some of the bigger, 'waxy' molecules will start to solidify and cause flowing
    problems. Additives can be added to counter this, but only to a certain degree. Synthetics will flow
    at much lower temperatures than minerals without the need for these additives (<-50°C in some
    cases).

7.3 Riding position
“From: numbskull - You should only have two pivot points between you and the bike - your arse and
    your feet, (OK that's three but you know what I mean).

    The handlebars should only be used for controlling the direction of the bike. This means that your
    upper body should remain loose and you should never be "hanging on" to the bars. If you do, then
    you end up transferring a whole load of spurious movement to the bike that upsets directional
    stability and handling. And it works both ways too: movements from the front of the bike get
    transferred to the rest of the bike through you instead of the headstock; movement from the rear
    suspension, wind buffeting, etc. gets transferred to the steering.

    If you find that your forearms ache after a while it means you're probably hanging on too tight. Use
    your legs and stomach muscles instead. It might feel odd at first but it will make your riding
    control much smoother.

    It's especially noticeable in corners. Try this out. Find your favourite medium speed corner with
    some bumps in it. Go round it first with your upper body tense and hanging tightly on to the bars.
    Now do it again holding the bars as lightly as you can.

    The point is that a bike is naturally very stable. You can sometimes see racers doing what you
    might consider daft things in the middle of a corner cranked right over, like pulling off visor strips.
    That's because they have set the bike up into the corner, they've got their weight in the right place,
    and the bike is just obeying the laws of physics. It needs no other input from the rider so the rider is
    free to concentrate on the housekeeping.”

7.4 Security while parking on the road
“From: clagnut - Those of you who park on the road may find the following of interest.
    Brother had his cat nicked from the road in front of his house recently, and not wanting to repeat
    the experience, asked the council if he could fit a ground anchor. They said he couldn’t do it
    himself but they would fit one. He and his neighbour had to contribute to the cost, about 50 quid,
    but in certain circumstances this can be waived. They fitted a huge 6inch diameter, waist high giant
    staple, concreted into the pavement. It all looks quite impressive. Apparently councils have a slush
    fund for this sort of thing to encourage people to use motorcycles and bicycles rather than cars.
    Might be an idea to ask if you live in a problem area. Regards Andy”

7.5 Warnings re:documents
“From: vanx-11 - Part-exchanged my bike at the end of August, with Mr George White and have just
    received a nice letter from the DVLA (Local Office) informing me that as my bike hasn't been
    Taxed for nearly 3 months and I haven't declared S.O.R.N I now owe them £25 by the 6/12. If I
    don't pay up by that Date it's then £45 then a summons to appear in Court with a max fine of
    £1000. So I rang the nice man at Whites and informed him of the DVLA's intention, to which he
    said "oh yeah this is always happening" so I replied "oh yeah so you'll be picking up the cost
    then?" He then suggested that I post him the DVLA letter and he would sort it. So I suggested that
    I wouldn't be doing that as if the can "Screw" up once they are sure as f%*k going to do it again,
    and I'll be the one going to court because they have overlooked it again. I don't blame the salesman
    but White's need to get this sorted. He did say it was their fault and that I wouldn't be liable and
    was surprised that I had heard from them, I explained that Hampshire now have a new policy, to
    CRUSH any untaxed Car on the road and serve SORN notices asap, because we are a poor
    County?? LOL So I thought I would mention it so if you have part-exchanged recently, it might be
    worth ringing the Dealer.”


April 2004                                                                                Page 36 of 37
7.6 Warnings re:tyres
“From: eccles291 - Just got this from a mate back up home... A mate at work bought a Ninja 9 second-
    hand from a bike shop & it had a set of new unused Koncorde remoulds on it, 3 months down the
    line & 3,000 thousand miles later he has just noticed that the front tyre has developed a split right
    along the centre (but not around the complete circumference). You can squeeze it open & closed
    with your hands, he is currently trying to get a refund. It looks like the firm have gone bust!
    Thought it was worth mentioning”

“From: chris - OK, I`d like to point out a few things here, firstly i work at a remould factory which deal
    in car & truck tyres so I do know a thing or two about this subject.

    The remould process goes something like this, the old tread is completely removed which leaves a
    `carcass` onto which a new tread is applied only after the `carcass` has been assessed for damages,
    penetrations, splits, blisters etc etc. when this new tread is applied the tyre goes through the exact
    same process as a newly made tyre but without the bit where the tyre is `assembled` from layers of
    protective fabrics, so basically it is the same as a new tyre however the underlying fabrics etc have
    seen quite a few miles and therefore would not be expected to deliver the same amount of mileage
    as a new tyre due to very long winded and very technical reasons which would send you to sleep
    but basically you could expect around 1/2 to 2/3 of the life expectancy of a new tyre. the split
    mentioned in this case would have happened on a new tyre with this particular `tread run` layed on
    it because it would have been exactly the same as what would be layed on a new tyre during
    construction, it was just a faulty `tread run` but a refund is definitely on the cards if the firm can be
    contacted. hope you are all now gently dozing off to sleep. c ya Chris “

8 Group Character
8.1 Poetry
       From: catlass
       An ode to winter biking

       Today is the day i shall do what i like,
       i shall have an adventure, go to work on my bike.
       It looks rather cold, but oh what the hell,
       it seems like we're having a slight sunny spell.

       It takes me so long to even get dressed,
       with the leggings & gloves & socks and warm vests.
       But hey, its so worth it to get on my bike,
       and blast through the queues (nearly) as fast as i like.

       But half an hour later my mood starts to alter,
       the grin on my face is starting to falter.
       The pain in my hands & and the pain in my heart,
       well I WAS enthusiastic right at the start!.

       Its freezing and wet, its bitter and foggy,
       my legs I can't feel and my feet are all soggy.
       My visor's so misty i can't see a thing,
       so 2 pints of tears I've lost in the wind!.

       And then to get home and start with the cleaning,
       to ensure my baby is all bright a gleaming.
       Why do we do it..... on these cold and wet days,
       COS WE CAN, COS WE WILL, COS WE DO.......... THEN WE PAY!!!!!!!!

       Just thought I'd share my day with you!!

       gail xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



April 2004                                                                                  Page 37 of 37