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									                             MANUAL No._____




SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC.




    EMPLOYEE SAFETY MANUAL
                          SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC.

                                        SAFETY POLICY

Safety is of primary importance in our operation. Each of us has the responsibility to make the
safety of ourselves and our co- workers a basic concern. This objective is fundamental to our
well being, as well as to the efficient operation of our business. This manual is intended to assist
you in performing your work safely. With few exceptions, every safety rule or practice in this
manual has evolved from experience and knowledge gained over many years in how to prevent
accidents and injuries.

Every employee has the responsibility to prevent accidents and injuries by observing established
working rules, by following the directions of supervisors, by practicing the safety rules of
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC., and by providing ideas on how our safety efforts
might be further strengthened.

SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. management recognizes its responsibility to
provide healthful and safe working conditions, safe working rules based upon experience and
safety knowledge, and competent work direction. SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC.
and its employees have the responsibility to comply with all federal, state, and local regulations
related to safety and health programs.

If you think something you are about to do is unsafe, do not do it. Stop Work and correct the
situation. If you cannot correct the situation, ask your supervisor for assistance. This is
important; it is your life that may be in danger.

If you see someone about to commit an unsafe act, stop them and discuss it with them. Help your
co-worker. Make your work environment safe for everyone.

Employees working for SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. shall be required to
comply with health and safety laws and regulations and to adopt the safety practices for
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC.

If you do not follow the safety rules, you could be dismissed.




                                                                                   H. L. Boyles, Jr.,
                                                                                          President
                                                                                 CONTENTS

SECTION 1 -- GENERAL SAFETY RULES ........................................................................................................6
    INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................................6
    INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES .......................................................................................................................6
      RULES AND REGULATIONS .............................................................................................................................6
             1. SMOKING .................................................................................................................................................................... 6
             2. INTOXICATING BEVERAGES, DRUGS, AND FIREARMS ................................................................................... 6
             3. REPORTING ACCIDENTS/INJURIES ....................................................................................................................... 7
             4. REPORTING UNSAFE ACTS & UNSAFE CONDITIONS AND NEAR MISSES ................................................... 7
             5. HORSEPLAY ............................................................................................................................................................... 7
             6. HOUSEKEEPING ........................................................................................................................................................ 7
             7. HEAD AND FACIAL HAIR POLICY ......................................................................................................................... 8
             8. WEARING APPAREL ................................................................................................................................................. 9
             9. CHEMICALS AND SOLVENTS ................................................................................................................................. 9
             10. OVERHEAD WORK ................................................................................................................................................. 9
             11. HOT WORK AND ENTRY PERMITS ...................................................................................................................... 9
             12. LOCK OUT - TAG OUT PROCEDURES ............................................................................................................... 10
             13. IRON SULFIDE ....................................................................................................................................................... 10
             14. ASBESTOS AND NORM ........................................................................................................................................ 10
             15. SCAFFOLDS OR PLATFORMS ............................................................................................................................. 11
             16. HOISTS .................................................................................................................................................................... 11
             17. TRUCKS AND FORKLIFTS ................................................................................................................................... 12
             18. OFFICE SAFETY ..................................................................................................................................................... 13
    GENERAL PRINCIPLES .......................................................................................................................................16
    SLIPS, TRIPS, AND FALLS ....................................................................................................................................17
    ELECTRICAL SAFETY ........................................................................................................................................18
    SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITIES .................................................................................................................19
SECTION 2 -- PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT .....................................................................................................21

INTRODUCTION .....................................................................................................................................................21
    HEAD .....................................................................................................................................................................21
    EARS ......................................................................................................................................................................21
    EYES ......................................................................................................................................................................21
    FEET .......................................................................................................................................................................22
    HANDS...................................................................................................................................................................22
    RESPIRATORY .....................................................................................................................................................22
    FALL PROTECTION .............................................................................................................................................23
SECTION 3 --............................................................................................................................................................25

TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT ....................................................................................................................................25
    LADDERS ..............................................................................................................................................................25
    SCAFFOLDING .....................................................................................................................................................26
    POWER TOOLS .....................................................................................................................................................26
    HAND TOOLS .......................................................................................................................................................27
    AIR POWERED EQUIPMENT ..............................................................................................................................27
    GROUNDING ........................................................................................................................................................28
    COMPANY VEHICLES.........................................................................................................................................28
SECTION 4 - ABRASIVE BLASTING AND SPRAY PAINTING......................................................................30
ABRASIVE BLASTING ...........................................................................................................................................30

SPRAY PAINTING ...................................................................................................................................................32

SECTION 5 -- WELDING AND CUTTING ........................................................................................................33
    COMPRESSED AIR ...............................................................................................................................................33
    BOTTLE GAS ........................................................................................................................................................33
    DANGER ................................................................................................................................................................ 33
    OXYGEN AND ACETYLENE ..............................................................................................................................34
    CUTTING EQUIPMENT .......................................................................................................................................34
    BURNING WITH OXYGEN AND ACETYLENE ................................................................................................ 35
    ARC WELDING .....................................................................................................................................................35
SECTION 6 -- FIRST AID .....................................................................................................................................37

INTRODUCTION .....................................................................................................................................................37
    NO BREATHING/CIRCULATION .......................................................................................................................39
    HEART ATTACK ..................................................................................................................................................40
    CHOKING ..............................................................................................................................................................41
    INHALATION OF TOXIC GAS OR SMOKE .......................................................................................................42
    ELECTRIC SHOCK ...............................................................................................................................................42
    BURNS ...................................................................................................................................................................42
    EXPOSURE TO CRUDE PRODUCTS (OIL, GAS, CONDENSATE) ..................................................................44
    SHOCK ...................................................................................................................................................................44
    SWALLOWED POISONS .....................................................................................................................................46
    INHALATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE (H2S) ............................................................................................... 46
Failure to observe applicable safety rules could result in serious injury to yourself or your
co-workers.
For this reason, unsafe work practices could result in discipline up to and including termination.

It is not within the scope of this Safety Manual to detail all government regulations or safety
procedures,
but provide an overview of our safety requirements.
                                    SECTION 1 --
                                GENERAL SAFETY RULES

INTRODUCTION

Always keep in mind that your primary responsibility as an employee is to perform your duties in
a safe manner in order to prevent injury to yourself or to your co-workers. You should become
familiar with the contents of this manual and MUST learn the approved safe practices applicable
to your work.

INDIVIDUAL RESPONSIBILITIES

Each employee is responsible for his/her own safety and for the safety of other workers.
Remember that one of the primary responsibilities as an employee is to perform duties in a safe
manner.

Employees must comply with rules and practices in performance of their job.

Report injuries/illnesses, unsafe conditions and other incidents immediately.

Assist in incident investigations as necessary.

RULES AND REGULATIONS

1. SMOKING

Smoking is permitted only in locations specifically designated at the facility. Employees must
never smoke outside of designated smoking areas whether "NO SMOKING" signs are posted or
not. Employees will observe all smoking rules at other locations.

2. INTOXICATING BEVERAGES, DRUGS, AND FIREARMS

Possession of illegal drugs, drug paraphernalia, intoxicating beverages, firearms or other
weapons is prohibited on company premises. "Company Premises" for SOUTHWESTERN
ELECTRICAL CO., INC. includes all property, facilitates, land platforms, pipe yards, buildings,
structures, fixtures, installations, boats, aircraft, automobiles, trucks, and all other vehicles,
whether owned, leased, or used by the company. This also includes any other work location or
mode of transportation to and from those locations while in the course and scope of
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. employment. Persons found to be in possession
of these items or under the influence of drugs or alcohol will be removed from the company
property. Entry into SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. property is conditioned upon
the company's right to conduct unannounced searches for such contraband.

Any employees caught with or under the influence of alcohol, drugs or firearms on the job site, or
in a company vehicle will be sent to the proper authorities and dismissed.

Employee using prescribed drugs must notify his/her supervisor before working.

3. REPORTING ACCIDENTS/INJURIES

All accidents and injuries, no matter how minor, must be immediately reported to your
supervisor.
An accident report must be completed within 24 hours.

If an accident occurs while at another location (while on company business) you must report the
accident to the location supervisor, and follow all the prescribed rules of that location. You must
notify your supervisor (SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC.) as soon as possible. You
must report all Company owned, leased, or rented vehicle, equipment and/or job related
automotive accidents, as soon as possible.

4. REPORTING UNSAFE ACTS & UNSAFE CONDITIONS AND NEAR MISSES

Unsafe Acts & Unsafe Conditions shall be reported promptly to your supervisor and corrected
accordingly. If on another work location report the unsafe condition to the local supervisor (and
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. supervisor).

Near miss accidents that could have resulted in injury or damage shall be reported immediately
so corrective action can be taken. An Employee Report of Unsafe Acts & Unsafe Conditions
must be filled out as soon as possible.

5. HORSEPLAY

Horseplay, such as wrestling, practical jokes, and etc can be dangerous and is prohibited.

Horseplay and fighting on "Company Premises" could result in dismissal of all employees
involved.

6. HOUSEKEEPING

Work areas shall be maintained in a neat and orderly manner. Trash, oil spills, etc., must be
cleaned up as soon as possible. Aisles and emergency exits must be kept free of materials at all
times. Free access to fire extinguishers and circuit breakers must be maintained at all times.

SHOP
- Tools, electrical cords, and hoses must be kept in their proper place when not being used. Air
hose and electrical cords must be inspected prior to using. Any hose or cord that is defective
must be repaired or disposed. If repairs can not be done they must be tagged and set aside for
repair. When using electrical cords and air hoses they must not be a tripping hazard.
- Put empty boxes, packaging materials, and other waste materials in the trash barrel. Never
allow the trash barrel to overflow.

- FLOOR AND WORK AREA
Keep floors swept up and other work areas clean. If there is a spill, cleanup as soon as possible.

PAINT STORAGE
- Only paint and paint products will be stored in the paint storage. All containers in the paint
storage must have a proper label.

NEVER STORE ANY REACTIVE MATERIALS IN THE PAINT STORAGE BUILDING.
Empty boxes and other packing material must not be stored in the paint storage.
Containers that have been opened must be secured (to prevent spilling).
Stack cans proper to prevent them from falling.
Report any leaking container to your supervisor, then follow cleanup procedure.

NEVER OPERATE ANY EQUIPMENT THAT NEEDS REPAIRS THAT COULD CAUSE
INJURY TO YOU OR OTHERS.

AIR COMPRESSORS
Check oil, and water daily.
Ground the air compressor each time you use it. Keep the air compressor clean. Oil spills can be
a hazard.

7. HEAD AND FACIAL HAIR POLICY

This policy has been adopted for all persons working in areas where a respirator may be required.

It prohibits long hair, long sideburns, long mustaches, beards, vandykes, goatees, etc. that will
affect the safe use of a respirator.
The following activities will require compliance with this policy:
   * Use respiratory equipment during work activities.
   * You are assigned the equipment or have equipment designated and available for their use.
   * You are expected to respond to and have been trained to participate in emergencies and/or
      rescue of personnel where such incidents require respiratory equipment.
   * You are expected to respond and assist with efforts to control a hazardous incident, where
      such efforts require respiratory equipment.
8. WEARING APPAREL

Clothing suitable for the job shall be worn. Ragged loose fitting clothing and jewelry (rings,
watches, necklaces, etc.) can catch on materials and cause serious injury. All clothing that
becomes saturated with petroleum products or hazardous chemicals must be removed promptly.
Flame retardant clothing (FRC) is required at many work locations. The company will furnish
FRC for those individuals that is required to wear FRC. At work locations that do not require
FRC you must wear long pants, and most locations require long sleeves.

9. CHEMICALS AND SOLVENTS

Material Safety Data Sheets will be available for chemicals used on the job site and personnel
will be instructed in their safe use. Protective equipment outlined on the MSDS will be provided
to and worn by exposed personnel.

Low flash point solvents such as gasoline shall not be used for washing and cleaning.

10. OVERHEAD WORK

When working over head, the area below shall be roped off or other equivalent measures taken to
protect workers on the work site. Signs reading "Danger - Work overhead" should be
conspicuously posted. Employees shall NEVER PASS UNDER A SUSPENDED LOAD.
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. employees are not permitted to work under any
overhead load unless it is supported.

11. HOT WORK AND ENTRY PERMITS

SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. PERSONNEL ARE PROHIBITED FROM
ENTERING ANY AREA WHERE TOXIC GAS MAY BE PRESENT, UNTIL THE AREA
HAS BEEN CHECKED AND DETERMINED TO BE FREE OF GAS. PROPER
PERMITS.MUST BE AT THE LOCATION

You are REQUIRED to obtain a hot work permit before you perform any of the following work,
at any location other than the normal work station.
   1. Welding
   2. Torching
   3. Grinding
   4. Chipping
   5. Sandblasting
   6. Spray painting near spark-producing equipment
   7. Any other spark producing operations

ENTRY PERMITS
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. employees are not permitted to enter a "Permit
Required Confined Space that is IDLH". All equipment that would be worked by
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. employees will be decontaminated prior to any
work being preformed.

DEFINITION: CONFINED SPACE
A confined space has a limited or restricted means of entry or exit, it is large enough for an
employee to enter and perform assigned work, and is not designed for continuous occupancy by
the employee. These spaces may include, but are not limited to, underground vaults, tanks,
storage bins, pits and diked areas, vessels, and silos.

A PERMIT-REQUIRED CONFINED SPACE
Is one that meets the definition of a confined space and has one or more of these characteristics:
(1) contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere,
(2) contains a material that has the potential for engulfing an entrant,
(3) has an internal configuration that might cause anentrant to be trapped or asphyxiated by
inwardly converging walls or by a floor that slops downward and tapers to a smaller cross
section, and/or
(4) contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazards.

12. LOCK OUT - TAG OUT PROCEDURES

A lockout/tagout system is required when equipment capable of producing energy is placed out
of service for repairs. In addition to electric panel boards and breaker boxes, hydraulic, steam,
high-pressure lines and other energy producing equipment are included. The lockout/tagout
system must be capable of preventing unauthorized start-up of the equipment being serviced.

You are REQUIRED to lock and tag any and all valves that are connected to the tank or vessel.

13. IRON SULFIDE

Iron sulfide is a scale deposit which can be found in any sour (crude oil or gas) production
equipment. It will ignite and burn spontaneously when exposed to air unless it is kept wet.
Should you encounter iron sulfide hose down the scale with water and consult with your
supervisor and/or the location supervisor.

14. ASBESTOS AND NORM

During maintenance activities which involve removing insulating materials or removing scale
deposits from production equipment, asbestos, man-made mineral fibers or naturally occurring
radioactive material (NORM) health hazards may be encountered. When either of these hazards
occur (or suspected) contact your supervisor.
ASBESTOS
Asbestos exposure is most likely to occur in areas where asbestos has become friable (brittle,
dried-out, easily broken up into tiny fragments) or where asbestos-containing material is being
disturbed or removed.

Asbestos is a known carcinogen (causes cancer). Inhalation is the primary route of exposure.
Asbestos fibers breathed into the lungs can cause cancer many years later.

N.O.R.M.
Workers may be exposed to possible external or internal radiation. External exposure can be
controlled by limiting exposure time. Internal hazard occurs when airborne radioactive materials
are inhaled, ingested, or enter the skin through open wounds. These hazards can be minimized
by properly wearing an approved respirator and by protecting wounds and cuts. Wetting the
loose material with water can also prevent inhalation. All additional safety precautions must be
followed when working with this type of hazard.

15. SCAFFOLDS OR PLATFORMS

All scaffolds or platforms used for maintenance or inspection shall be constructed/maintained
and used in compliance with the applicable occupational health and safety construction
regulations.

See Section 3 for additional information.

16. HOISTS

1. Each hoist operator is directly responsible for the safe operation of his/her hoist when moving
loads. When there is any doubt as to the safety, the hoist operator should stop his/her hoist
immediately, and should continue only when a safe condition exists.

2. A good rule for hoist safety is to assume_that_any suspended_load will fall at any moment. If
the operator keeps this possibility in mind, everyone will be safe around the operation of hoist in
the event the load should become unhooked or slip and fall. The operator shall not leave his/her
position at the controls while the load is suspended.

3. It is the responsibility of the hoist operator to see that the load is properly secured and hitched.
 It is also the operators responsibility to see that all materials, tools, or loose objects have been
removed from the load before the lift is started.

4. The hoist operator must obey EMERGENCY SIGNALS from anyone.

5. Worn or damaged slings (fiber, wire rope or chain) are not to be used. The supervisor should
be notified immediately. Slings must be inspected before each use.

6. Slings are not to be altered, only OSHA 1910.184 alterations can be made to slings.

7. Loads are never to be taken over the head of anyone working on the floor of the shop or yard.

8. Each employee is to be aware of the overhead lifts in his/her area, and move out of the way
when the hoist operator is moving an overhead load through his/her area.

17. TRUCKS AND FORKLIFTS

1. Only trained and authorized personnel shall operate any of motorized equipment.

2. Each truck and forklift operator is directly responsible for the safe operation of his/her vehicle.
 If there is any doubt of safety, the operator is to stop his/her vehicle immediately. He/she will
continue only when a safe condition exists.

3. If a helper is assigned to assist the operator, it is their responsible to see the load is properly
secured. It is his/her responsibility to see that all loose materials and/or tools have been removed
from the load before a lift is started.

4. The truck or forklift operator is to take signals from only one person during a lift or move, but
must obey EMERGENCY signals from anyone.

5. No driver will allow any person to ride on a truck, car or forklift outside the confines of the
cab.

6. Under no circumstances is an individual to ride on a load being hauled or lifted by a truck or
forklift.

7. Yard equipment must never be driven at excessive speed in the yard. The maximum speed
limit is ten (10) miles per hour.

8. The operator shall use extreme caution when driving into or near shop doors or other areas
where people on foot may step in the way of a moving vehicle.

9. Daily inspection of vehicles is a must. Report any problems to your supervisor. Slings and
wire rope (cable) should be inspected per OSHA 1910.184.

10. The helper (or anyone) should never place himself/herself between the truck and load.

11. The truck operator must know the winch capacity and the load capabilities of the vehicles.
They should also know the approximate weight of the load to be moved.
12. Forklift operators must know the weight capacity of their forklift, and the center of gravity.

13. Forklifts will have a pre-use visual inspection prior to use. In areas of multi-shift operations,
an inspection will be made at the start of each shift.
The lift truck operator will be responsible for checking the following:
     a. Battery and plug connections
     b. Brakes (emergency or park)
     c. Lights
     d. Horn and back-up alarm
     e. Hour indicator
     f. Steering
     g. Tires
     h. Hydraulic controls
     i. Motor oil level and pressure
     j. Water level and fan belts
     k. Fuel level
     l. The mast and fork will be checked for wear, warped or bent structures
     m. Check fire extinguisher
     n. Name plate or maximum lift weight must be posted on side of lift truck.

18. OFFICE SAFETY

     * Lifting
1. Plan Ahead

     a) Know your strength. When in doubt make it a two-person job.

     b) Make sure you have a place to put the heavy object and that doors are open and obstacles
        are out of your way before you start.

     c) Always make sure your footing is secure.

2. Lift and Carry the Right Way

     a) Use you arm and leg muscles, not your back. Keep your back straight and load close to
        your body.

     b) Grasp the object firmly. Hold it so that your fingers won't be pinched if the load shifts.

     c) Make sure that you can see. Have plenty of light and be able to look over your load.

     d) Set the object down using your arm and leg muscles. If it is a box, rest one corner first so
       that the hands don't get caught underneath.

     * Avoid Falls
     Most office falls are on the level floor and can be eliminated.

1.   Avoid overloading top draws of filing cabinets. This could bring the cabinet down on you.

2.   Close one drawer of a filing cabinet before you open another. With all drawers open the
     filing cabinet could fall on you.

3.   Keep filing cabinets and desk drawers closed when not in use.

4.   Keep the floor clean. Pick up everything. Remove all cords or securely tape them down.

5.   Clean up wet spots from beverages or water.

6.   Don't stand on chairs; use a ladder or step stool.

     * Avoid Machine and Equipment Accidents

1.   Keep fingers out of openings when closing drawers or doors.

2.   Read the instructions or listen to oral instructions carefully. Never use machines you don't
     know how to operate.

3.   Make sure that mechanical guards are in place every time you use a machine. If you remove
     a guard temporarily, be sure to replace it before you turn on the switch.

4.   Turn machines off while adjusting them or when not using them.

5.   Be alert for electrical hazards. If a machine overheats, smokes, or sparks, or if you feel a
     slight shock, unplug it and call a service man.

6.   Watch your clothes - long sleeves, scarf's. ties, hair, dangling jewelry, or even key chains are
     dangerous around machines with moving parts.

7.   Check the machine position before use. See that typewriters, duplicators, or adding
     machines are firmly on the working surface.

8.   Open packages the safe way. Inspect for sharp projections and rough edges, cut away from
     the body, and use the right tools for the job.

Avoid Cuts and Punctures
1.   Keep pointed objects in a box or drawer where they can't stab you.

2.   Don't try to cut too many sheets of paper at once in a paper cutter.

3.   Use rubber finger guards when working with stacks of paper. Use a sponge or sealing
     device to moisten stamps or envelopes.

4.   Sweep pieces of broken glass up instead of picking them up by hand, and then wrap the
     pieces in paper. Glass splinters can be picked up with a damp paper towel.

     * Housekeeping

Housekeeping makes work easier and conditions safer because the work area is clean, materials
are arranged properly and used materials are properly disposed.

1.   Place any shipping or packing materials in the proper garbage container.

2.   Store chemicals and flammables carefully. Make sure they are labeled and sealed in
     approved containers.

3.   Put knives and shears away for use.

4.   Keep heavy cartons at floor level out of walkways.

     * Be Alert for Fire Hazards

1.   If you smell smoke, be prepared for a fire.

2.   Know where fire extinguishers are located and know how to use them.

3.   If you spot a fire:
     a) Turn in the alarm.
     b) Alert others without causing panic.
     c) Use available fire fighting equipment (incipient stage fires only).
     d) Follow fire evacuation procedures.
     e) Keep out of the way when the professional fire fighters come.

1.   DO NOT wander about the shop unless your job requires you to do so, and you have been
     instructed to do so by your supervisor.

2.   Never interrupt anyone operating a machine or in the act of performing any other job as both
     the operator and you may be injured if their attention is divided.
3.   Walk, do not run, unless an emergency such as a fire or explosion occurs. Report all
     injuries, regardless how slight, to your supervisor.



GENERAL PRINCIPLES

1.   Adequate rest, exercise and proper diet will enhance your health and level of awareness
     which is helpful in avoiding accidents.

2.   Be alert to hazardous conditions. Whenever possible, correct or eliminate the hazardous
     condition yourself. Report to your supervisor all such hazards and the measures taken to
     correct them. If a hazard cannot be corrected immediately, clearly mark it until it can be
     corrected.

3.   When working alone, notify another person of your work location, and always try to
     anticipate any hazards that you might encounter. You should NOT attempt to do a job alone
     when safe working practices and common sense tell you help is needed.

4.   NEVER defeat the function of a safety device. Report all safety device malfunctions to your
     supervisor as soon as possible and flag the device immediately to warn other personal of the
     hazard.

5.   NEVER attempt to lift or move a heavy object that is beyond your capability to do so in a
     safe manner.

6.   Use the prescribed protective equipment for the work you are doing.

7.   DO NOT use makeshifts of any kind that could conceivably compromise safety.

8.   Be careful, when moving about the work area, to avoid slipping, or falling.

9.   Preoccupation with matters other than the work at hand causes accidents. When performing
     a job, concentrate on the immediate assignment. DO NOT be distracted by your emotions
     or by outside influences.

10. When on a duty away from the facility, you should become familiar with all emergencies
    procedures and escape routes at the work location.

11. Smoking is permitted in designated areas only.

12. Under normal operations, all operating machinery and electrical switch gear must have all
     safety guards, switches and alarms in place and be functional.

13. Operation of equipment having a "DANGER, DO NOT OPERATE" tag is prohibited.

14. Do not apply compressed air to yourself or others.

15. When ascending or descending stairways, use the handrail and take one step at a time.

16. Running in work areas, except for emergency purposes, is prohibited.

17. Use only proper tools and equipment maintained in good working condition.

18. Erect barricades/flagging around areas of hazardous work, such as holes in decking and
    work areas, trenches and overhead hazardous work.

19. Fire extinguishers and all other emergency equipment must be in good condition, inspect
    regularly and kept clear of any obstruction. You must have clear access to fire extinguishers
    and circuit breakers.

20. All chemical containers shall be properly labeled.

21. Approved hard hats shall be worn in the field operations and other designated areas. Metal
    hard hats are prohibited.

22. Approved foot protection is required in field operations and other designated areas.

23. Eye/face protection such as goggles, safety glasses with side shields, and/or a face shield
    shall be worn during grinding, welding, drilling, scraping or any operation where foreign
    object may enter the eye.

24. Hearing protection shall be worn in high noise areas (85 dB or higher).

25. Wear proper hand protection when performing tasks that may present injury to hands.

SLIPS, TRIPS, and FALLS

Slips, trips, and falls are a major contribution to injuries and lost time accidents. Be careful and
observe the following rules.

1.   The following situations should be avoided to help prevent slipping:
     a. Wet floors/decks
     b. Oily floors/decks
     c. Highly polished and waxed floors

2.   Remove any spilled liquid from the floor immediately.

3.   Good traction helps prevent slipping, wear shoes that provide good traction.

4.   NEVER run unless the situation is life-threatening.
5.   Take special precautions when working in a location without handrails (i.e., on rooftops and
     tanktops).

6.   Every opening in a deck, a floor, or the ground, and pits which a person could accidentally
     fall into must be well marked.

WALKWAYS

1.   All steps, walkways, and stairs MUST be kept free of obstructions and slippery materials,
     such as oil and grease.

2.   When walkways and steps are provided, they MUST be used. DO NOT take shortcuts.

3.   Tools, equipment, and materials MUST NOT be left on walkways.

4.   Secure hoses and electrical cords to the floor or ground whenever they are laid across
     walkways.

ELECTRICAL SAFETY

Personnel shall not be permitted to work in an area where they are likely to encounter electrical
hazards unless they have been trained to recognize and avoid the electrical hazards to which they
will be exposed.

1.   No worker shall approach, and no equipment shall be operated within 10 ft. of live overhead
     line conductor (50 KV) unless the overhead power line is equipped with conductors that are
     insulated or covered with insulation material rated for the maximum voltage throughout the
     area of potential exposure, in which case the minimum clearance shall be 3 feet.
2.   Only qualified person, or persons under the direct and continuous supervision of a qualified
     person shall enter any enclosure containing high voltage equipment where it is possible to
     come into contact with live high voltage conductors. Enclosures containing high voltage
     apparatus shall be kept locked.
3.   Switch gear must be kept clear of all obstructions and no materials may be stored behind, or
     on top of this equipment.
4.   All spare entries to switches fuse gear, or other equipment must be plugged, or blanked off.
     All covers, and cover bolts and nuts must be fixed in position and tight.
5.   Personnel, when operating electrical equipment, shall follow written or oral instructions. If
     the equipment does not operate properly, it should be turned off and the supervisor notified.
6.   When you are working with or around energized electrical equipment, be sure your hands,
     feet, and clothing are dry. Isolate yourself from live electrical parts where necessary by
     using dialectical mats and gloves.
7.   Never disconnect the main line switch on a motor while motor is running. Use the proper
     stopping control.
8.   Take care not to overload electrical wiring or equipment.
9.   Treat all electrical equipment as energized until determined otherwise.
10. Do not stand directly in front of a switch box when throwing a switch. There may be an
    unexpected flash.
11. Never use pennies, foil, wire or any other materials in place of proper fusing of electrical
    circuit.
12. In an emergency when power lines are down, consider every wire including fences and guy
    wires, live or "hot". Only qualified persons shall handle them.

ELECTRICAL SHOCK EMERGENCY

1.   Rescuing a victim of electrical injury is dangerous. If you contact the victim, you too could
     be electrocuted. Do not become second victim! Stop the flow of current to the victim
     without putting yourself in danger. High voltage current can arc as far as 20 feet. DO NOT
     TOUCH THE VICTIM WITH BARE HANDS, OR OTHER CONDUCTIVE MATERIAL.
2.   Artificial respiration should be applied immediately after a non-breathing victim has been
     released from the electrical contact, depending on the circumstances of the accident and in
     regards to the place.
3.   In many electrical accidents, the injuries are not from the electric shock but from the effects
     of burns. They should be treated in accordance with the instructions on first aid.
4.   Take the victim to a doctor or emergency room.

SUPERVISORY RESPONSIBILITIES

Supervisors or other SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. representatives in charge are
responsible for understanding the conditions of the job. They MUST ensure that
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. employees obey the safety rules.

All supervisors must understand that they have a definite responsibility to apply the policies of
the safety program in their own departments. The supervisors are expected to accept this
responsibility.

1.   The supervisor should ensure that all additions, removals, or alterations to
     SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. equipment is in accordance with the
     approved standards and applicable codes.
2.   Supervisors should hold daily safety meetings (tailgate/short meetings) when possible and
     when a new hazard is introduced into the work place.
3.   In areas where an inherent hazard exists and cannot be eliminated, the supervisor is
     responsible for familiarizing the workers with the situation and developing a means of
     coping with it.
4.   Supervisors should inform all employees under their supervision that all accidents of any
     nature are to be reported immediately. Management MUST be notified immediately in the
     event of a fatality, serious accident, lost time work injury, or a potential lost worktime
     injury.
5.   Supervisor should complete the "Employee Report of Unsafe Acts & Unsafe Condition"
     form and follow-up to insure all corrections are made.
6. Supervisors are to maintain a safe working environment by monitoring and enforcing
     SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. safety rules and regulations.
7.   A supervisor will accompany all injured employees to initial medical treatment in the event
     of an accident.
                                   SECTION 2 --
                               PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

INTRODUCTION

Personal protective equipment is vital to safety in your work location. The equipment should be
properly cleaned, inspected, and stored in clearly marked and properly designated areas.

Any equipment that no longer provides adequate protection should be repaired or replaced
immediately. Unusable equipment should be destroyed.

HEAD
1.      Head Protection (hard hats) shall be worn at all times in construction areas. Any
exception to this rule must be obtained by completing a job safety analysis which is signed by the
safety officer. The exception, if approved, will be task specific only.

EARS
1. Appropriate hearing protection is provided by the Company and MUST be worn by all
   personal in areas where signs are posted. Hearing protection should also be worn in areas
   that are suspected of temporary excessive noise, such as where abrasive blasting, grinding or
   any other loud noise producing activities is in progress.
2.   High noise levels MUST be routinely surveyed, and the supervisor should enforce hearing
     protection where notices are not posted, if noise levels are high.

EYES

1.   All employees and visitors MUST wear approved safety glasses at all times while on the job
     site, or in any location where the potential for eye injury exists.
2.   Southwestern Electrical will provide non-prescription safety glasses and will reimburse the
     cost of one set of side shields for prescription glasses per year.
3.   Impact-type goggles MUST be worn and a face shield should be worn when engaging in any
     activity that involves hazards to the unprotected eye from chipped or flying particles. Some
     examples are chipping, scrapping, buffing, grinding, etc.
4.   Individuals MUST wear splash proof (chemical) goggles when they are handling hazardous
     chemicals.
5.   To ensure maximum protection and comfort, eye protection should be adjusted properly to
     the face.
6.   Welding must not be watched without proper eye protection.
FEET

1.   Approved foot protection must be worn in any field or shop location. Approved foot
     protection consists of shoes or boots that meet ANSI standard Z41.1. Shoes or boots must
     have solid outer covering that are highly resistant to water, oil and chemicals and designs
     that support the ankle is recommended.

HANDS

1.   Wearing gloves prevent many minor injuries, wear gloves whenever possible.
2.   Appropriate gloves MUST be worn when acids are handled.
3.   Insulated or heat resistant gloves MUST be worn when regular gloves are not adequate.
4.   Refer to the material safety data sheet (MSDS) to determine the type of glove required for
     each chemical.


RESPIRATORY

1.   Employees MUST be taught how to use respiratory protection before its actual use is
     required. Training MUST be conducted in accordance with applicable regulations.
2.   Respirators MUST be worn when personnel are working in an atmosphere contaminated
     with harmful mists, gases, smokes, sprays, and vapors. Respirators must be one of the
     following types approved by the National Institute of Occupational safety and health
     (NIOSH):

     a.   Dust Respirators--Used to protect from nuisance and toxic dusts. Not to be used for
          vapors, mists or fumes unless specified by the manufacture.
     b.   Chemical cartridge respirators--Used to protect from mist or vapor such as paint spray.
     c.   Supplied air blasting hoods--Used in all abrasive blasting operation.
     d.   Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA)-- For use in high concentrations of toxic
          gases, in oxygen deficient atmospheres, or in any environment considered immediately
          hazardous to life.
3.   Respirators MUST be cleaned and disinfected and properly stored after each use.
4.   Connections on airlines which supply breathing air to hoods MUST be inspected frequently
     and maintained to ensure their integrity.
5.   Any employee working in an area where routine or emergency use of a self-contained
     breathing apparatus is required to perform his job MUST be clean shaven in the face-piece
     sealing area and MUST NOT have facial hair that could interfere with the function of the
     mask.
6.   The wearing of prescription glasses and contacts with a respirator is NOT PERMITTED
     (only special fitted for respirators).
7.   Refer to SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. Respiratory Protection Program for
     additional information.

FALL PROTECTION

Fall protection is required if personnel are working at heights greater than six (6) feet and the
potential for a fall exists.

Personal are not required to use fall protection if:

     a)   The work surface is protected by guardrails.
     b)   Temporary scaffolding and walking surfaces are protected by guardrails.
     c)   Working from portable and fixed ladders less than 20 feet.
     d)   Working from fixed ladders over 20 feet that are caged.

When using a fall arrest systems and body harness:

     a)   Before using, inspect the full safety harness for excessive wear or damage that could
          cause failure. Defective components shall be removed from service. (Destroy and
          discard harnesses and lanyards that are worn or damaged.)
     b)   Ensure that the harness fits properly around the chest, under the arms and under the
          legs.
     c)   Lanyards must be a minimum of 2 inch nylon or equivalent with a maximum length of
          no more than six (6) feet. The nominal breaking strength shall be at least 6,000 lbs.
          Lanyards should be equipped with shock absorbers.
     d)   Lifelines must be a minimum of 3/4 inch manila or equivalent rope with a minimum
          breaking strength of 6,000 lbs.. Steel cables are recommended for horizontal anchor
          lines with a minimum breaking strength of 6,000 lbs or five times the live load.
     e)   Fall arrest system components must be from one manufacturer - do not mix brands.
     f)   Protect components from cuts and abrasions.
     g)   Do not use fall arrest systems and components to hoist materials.
     h)   Fall arrest systems that have experienced impact loading must be immediately removed
          from service.
i)   Non-locking snap hooks are prohibited for use as part of a fall arrest system.
j)   Use a climb-assist system on a fixed ladder that is over 20 feet that is not equipped
     with a cage.
                                    SECTION 3 --
                                TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

All tools and equipment will be inspected prior to use. All tools and equipment that needs
repairs will be repaired or replaced before they are used. Inspection of tools is a very important
part of an employee’s job.

LADDERS

1.   Ladders MUST be maintained in good condition. When portable ladders are used on hard
     surfaces, they MUST be equipped with nonskid footing or securely fastened to prevent
     slipping. The top of the ladder should be secured, or the ladder should be held by another
     person. The base of the ladder should be placed away from the wall by a distance of
     one-forth of the working length of the ladder.

2.   Check the condition of the ladder before it is used and correct any defects. The combined
     weight of the employee and load should not exceed the load limit of the ladder. Remove
     any oil, grease or slippery material from the ladder and from shoes.

3.   Ladders MUST NOT be placed in front of doors that open toward the ladder.

4.   When climbing or descending a ladder, a person must face the ladder and hold the side rails,
     not the rungs.

5.   When working from a ladder, NEVER extend farther than your arms length can reach.

6.   NEVER work on an unsecured ladder in windy conditions.

7.   A person can not stand on the top two steps of the spreader on a step ladder.

8.   It is a good safety practice for someone to hold or steady a step ladder for someone working
     near the top.

9.   When raising a ladder, make sure it will not contact an electrical line.

10. Extension ladders should properly overlap between sections.

11. Ladders MUST NOT be used as scaffold members or for any purpose for which they are not
    intended.
SCAFFOLDING
OSHA 1910.28 states rules for scaffolding.

1.   Any scaffold parts damaged or weakened from any cause shall be immediately repaired and
     shall not be used until repairs are made.

2.   Footing and anchorage for scaffolds shall be sound, rigid, and capable of carrying the
     maximum intended load without settling or displacement. Unstable objects such as barrels,
     boxes, loose bricks, or concrete blocks shall not be used to support scaffolds or planks.

3.   Scaffold structure shall be capable of handling 4 times the maximum load. Do not exceed
     scaffold load limits.

4.   Employees shall not work on scaffolds during high winds.

5.   Do not work on scaffold covered with ice or snow unless all ice and snow is removed.

6.   Tools, materials, and trash shall not be allowed to accumulate and cause a hazard.

7.   Guardrails not less than 2" X 4" wood or manufactured guardrails will be placed between
     36" and 42" from planks. Midrail of 1" by 4" lumber or better will be provided between the
     guardrail and the planks. Toeboards of a minimum of 4" in height will be installed on all
     scaffolds above 10 feet in height.

8.   Inspect scaffold each day to make sure it is safe before use.

9.   Scaffold must be level and plumb at all times.

10. Do not use cross braces to climb scaffold.

POWER TOOLS

1.   Wear the required Personal Protective Equipment (PPE).

2.   Do not operate tools or machines unless all guards are in place.

3.   Before repairing, servicing, or changing components on any power tool, the power source
     MUST be disconnected.

4.   When there is a danger of fire or explosion, air-operated tools MUST be used. Combustible
     gas MUST NOT be used to operate air-powered tools.
5.   Hand held power tools MUST be equipped with a switch that is manually held in the on
     position.

6.   Tools with guards must be adjusted so the guard (rest) is 1/8 inch from the wheel.

7.   Do not exceed the maximum operating speed marked on the wheel.

8.   Do not wear loose clothes, ties, jewelry or gloves that could get caught in the machinery.
     Keep body parts and clothes away from the point of operations.

9.   Remove damaged power tools from service and tag them until properly repaired.

10. Store tools safely. Place sharp edges away from people.

HAND TOOLS

1.   Do not use tools with a loose or splintered handles.

2.   Do not tape cracked or split handles.

3.   Use the right tools for the job (example: using a screwdriver for a chisel).

4.   Do not alter tools, equipment, machines or remove guards unless you have permission from
     your supervisor. All alterations must meet the standard.

AIR POWERED EQUIPMENT

1.   When using air-operated tools, make certain that the supply pressure does not exceed the
     working pressure of the tool.

2.   All abrasive blast equipment shall be equipped with "dead man" controls.

3.   Air hose and connections used for air tools shall be designed for the service for which they
     are used.

4.   Only heavy-duty impact-type sockets shall be used on powered impact wrenches.

5.   When compressed air is used for parts cleaning purpose, reduce the nozzle pressure to 30
     psi.
6.   Do not use air hoses for hoisting or lowering tools.

7.   Do not use compressed air for cleaning clothes or part of the body.

GROUNDING

1.   Grounding the frames of portable electric tools and equipment (except U.L. - listed
     double-insulated tools) through either a third wire in the cable containing the circuit
     conductors or through a separate wire grounded at the source of the current.

2.   If outlets supplying power to portable electric tools are used outside or in wet locations,
     make sure there is a ground fault circuit interruption protection (GFIC).

3.   All extension cords MUST be checked before use. If damage it must be repaired or
     destroyed.

4.   Air compressors and sandblast pots MUST be grounded to the metal surface being blasted.

COMPANY VEHICLES

SPEED LIMIT IN THE YARD IS 10 MPH.

1.   All operators of Company vehicles MUST practice defensive driving when operating those
     vehicles.

2.   All operators of Company vehicles MUST have valid, appropriate driver’s licenses.

3.   The certificate of registration and other required documents should be carried in all
     Company vehicles.

4.   All drivers of Company vehicles MUST be familiar with and abide by state, federal and
     local traffic regulations.

5.   Seat belts MUST be worn by all occupants of Company vehicles.

6.   Picking up hitchhikers is dangerous and PROHIBITED.

7.   Any automotive accident involving a Company owned, rented, or leased vehicle, major or
     minor, MUST be reported as soon as possible.
8.   In the event of an accident, the driver is responsible for stopping and following the proper
     procedure in investigating the accident.

       1.  Stop immediately; do not move the vehicle until authorized by the police, unless by
           not moving it, additional accident or injury hazards are involved.
       2. If there are personal injuries, get medical attention.
       3. Get license number of other vehicles involved.
       4. Get name and addresses of every witness.
       5. Contact your supervisor as soon as possible.
       6. Make no statement about the accident to anyone except proper police authorities.
       7. A company accident reporting kit is located in the glove compartment of all
           Company-owned vehicles which contains appropriate forms.
       9. NEVER attempt to perform work or drive when you are impaired by alcohol,
           medication or illegal drugs.
       10. Check oil and tire pressures daily.
       11. Keep emergency telephone numbers in the glove compartment.
       12. Keep MSDS, of materials that you are using, in your truck (any time you are away
           from the shop).
                               SECTION 4 -
                  ABRASIVE BLASTING AND SPRAY PAINTING

ABRASIVE BLASTING

1.   All abrasive blasting equipment shall be in first-class condition.

2.   All air hose and sand blasting hose connections MUST be secured together to prevent them
     from coming apart.

3.   Dead man valves MUST be used in all abrasive blasting operations.

4.   Before changing a nozzle or hose, dead man valves MUST be disconnected to prevent them
     from triggering accidentally.

5.   Abrasive blast hose shall be of an approved static- dissipating type. The air compressor,
     abrasive blast hopper, hose, blast nozzle, scaffolding, and surface being worked on is to be
     grounded to a common ground.

6.   All abrasive blasters MUST wear supplied air positive pressure abrasive blast hoods
     furnished by SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC.
     Helpers_MUST_wear_approved_respirators when_around_abrasive
     blasting_operations_and_while_moving spent_abrasive.

7.   Spent abrasive shall be removed daily to prevent tripping or slipping hazards.

WARNING - FOR BLASTING SAND

DO NOT BREATHE THIS MATERIAL

NEVER USE THIS MATERIAL WITHOUT AN AIR-SUPPLIED RESPIRATOR

Blasting sands contains fine silica dust. If you breathe in this dust you can suffer severe,
irreversible lung damage and death. Some medical reports also link breathing silica dust to
crippling arthritis and skin and eye irritation. You must never use this material without have a
government-approved respirator. The work area must also be thoroughly ventilated by the use of
forced ventilation during and after the use of this material.

Prior to use of handling, you are advised to review and thoroughly understand all health
precautions outlined in the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) provided to your employer by the
supplier of this material.
RESPIRATOR PROTECTION
It is a violation of federal safety laws (OSHA) for employers to require workers to use this
material without full respirator protection. The federal laws that apply are: 29CFR 1910.134;
29CFR 1910.100; and 29CFR 1910.94.

It is recommended that users of the blast sand use OSHA - approved positive pressure, air-fed
breathing hood respirators. The positive pressure will prevent silica dust from being drawn into
the respirator. Continue to wear the respirator until all airborne silica dust has been exhausted
from the work area.

VENTILATION
Finely divided silica dust is nearly invisible. Work areas must be thoroughly ventilated with
forced Ventilation fans sufficient to exhaust all silica dust and provide a complete air exchange
every five (5) minutes. Continue ventilation even after sand blasting operations have been
completed.

OTHER PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
Silica dust can also be harmful to our skin and eyes. You need to wear tight goggles, heavy
rubber gloves. Clothing should be tight fitting at the cuffs, neck and ankles to prevent to prevent
silica dust from contacting you body. Clothing should be regularly washed to prevent dust
accumulation.

Warning Symptoms and First Aid

If you experience shortness of breath, coughing and lung and/or throat irritation these may be
early warning signs that silica dust is producing a medical condition such as silicosis. Avoid
further contact with the material and see your doctor at once if such symptoms occur (contact
your supervisor immediately). Swelling of joints, and joint pain, may signal that the start of
arthritis, which is also reported to aggravated by silica exposure. Again, if such symptoms occur
seek immediate medical attention.

If eye contact and irritation take place, flush your eyes continuously with clear cold water for at
least 15 minutes and then see your doctor for an examination and possible treatment.

Safety Notes: Federal safety regulations require that employers train workers in the safe use of
abrasive blasting materials and equipment and that they hold periodic safety meetings to assure
that safety precautions are being maintained.

Silica sand poses a health hazard to employees working around abrasive blasting operations,
Supplied air positive pressure hood MUST be worn while abrasive blasting. Cartridge type
respirators may be worn while removing spent abrasive as long as supplied air is not being used
to blow the spent abrasive.
SPRAY PAINTING

1.   When applying coating in an enclosed area, adequate ventilation is required to keep
     combustible vapors down. ir-fed hoods MUST be used while coating in an enclosed area.

2.   All painting equipment shall be grounded to a common ground to prevent static electricity.

3.   When painting interiors, Supplied air positive pressure respirators MUST be worn.

4.   When using airless spray equipment you MUST keep the spray nozzle from coming in
     contact with any part of the body. At such high pressure paint or any liquid will be injected
     into the body, causing severe injury or even death.

5.   If a hole develops while using airless equipment in the airless hose DO NOT try to stop the
     flow using your hands or feet, even if they are covered. Shut off the airless pump, then
     remove the bad section of hose and clean up area where paint was discharged.

     Paint fumes are hazardous, ALWAYS wear OSHA approved respirators or supplied air
     positive pressure hoods when around or while applying paints and coatings.

6.   A "Hot Work Permit" must be obtained before work is to begin in any hazardous area or
     where hot work is not normally preformed.

NO SMOKING OR OPEN FLAMES WHILE PAINTING.
                                    SECTION 5 --
                                WELDING AND CUTTING
COMPRESSED AIR

Compressed air is extremely dangerous. Under no circumstance should anyone use compressed
air to blow dust or foreign particles from their clothes or person. Thirty pounds per square inch
(30 PSI) of air pressure or higher may blow foreign particles right through an individual's skin,
causing severe body damage.

No one under any circumstances should allow anyone else to blow compressed air on another
individual. Compressed air and/or oxygen will tend to excite flammable material, and will cause
flammable material To ignite spontaneously at a lower temperature than they normally would if
the extra air or oxygen were not present.
BOTTLE GAS

Various types of bottled gases are used within our facility. Since all bottle gases are under
extreme high pressure, they are very dangerous.

Some of these gases are combustible, such as acetylene. Some gases will promote combustion,
such as oxygen. Some gases are inert and will neither burn nor support combustion, such as
carbon dioxide, argon, nitrogen and etc. However, all bottled gases should be treated safely
because they are extremely dangerous due to the high pressure contained within the bottles.
Before using any bottled gases, they should be fitted with the proper regulators and check valves
to control the pressure when the gas is released from the bottle.

All bottled gas should be stored or used in the upright position and always be secured from
falling over. Caps (valve covers) must be on when not in use. Never place an acetylene cylinder
in a horizontal position.

Any extra or empty bottle gases should be stored and chained in approved racks.

DANGER

A standard 250 cubic foot cylinder pressurized to 2500 PSIG can, after a cylinder valve is broken
off,
become a rocket attaining a speed of 34 MPH in 1/10 of a second after venting from the broken
cylinder connection.
OXYGEN AND ACETYLENE

Regulators are provided for oxygen and acetylene. Acetylene regulators, check valves, oxygen
pressure gauges are to be used for attaching cutting torch hoses. The threads on the hose
connections are different. Remember GREEN HOSE is always connected to the OXYGEN, and
RED HOSE is always connected to the ACETYLENE. Care should be taken in handling the
hoses and cutting torches to prevent damage to them, thus resulting in leakage of oxygen or
acetylene into the air. Always be on the alert for leaks.

Cutting torches should be treated in a safe manner, and not dropped or thrown, which could
result in damage to the control valves. After use, the cutting torch hand hoses should be coiled
up and placed back in their storage position. The cutting torches should be properly maintained
and the tips should be inspected prior to use, and replaced or repaired if necessary. Turn off gas
bottles when not in use.

******* NEVER USE OXYGEN AS REPLACEMENT FOR COMPRESSED AIR *****

CUTTING EQUIPMENT

The proper eye protection must be worn when using manual or automatic torch cutting
equipment. The operator should wear long sleeve clothing or arm protection and gloves. Any
helpers assigned to this work must be protected in a similar manner.

Oxygen and acetylene is not to be used for cleaning purpose, such as blowing dust off clothes or
blowing dust or particles away from the cutting area.

Never light a cigarette, pipe or cigar with any welding, cutting or burning equipment.

Oil or grease must never be used on oxygen, cylinders valves, regulators or hose connections.

Do not use a hammer or pipe wrench to open cylinder valves. A proper fitting wrench should be
used.

Do not allow a jet of oxygen to come in contact with greasy clothes, greasy surface or oil soaked
rags.

Greasy clothes should not be worn when handling oxygen and acetylene cutting equipment.

Oxygen and acetylene hoses having leaks must be taken out of service immediately. This also
applies to regulators, valves, gauges and torches.

Any leaks in oxygen or acetylene system should not be checked with an open flame. A soapy
water solution should be used on any suspected connections that may be leaking.

BURNING WITH OXYGEN AND ACETYLENE

Always wear goggles with side shields while burning.

If a gauge or torches leak, or equipment is faulty, report same to your supervisor immediately.
This is especially important if the leak is in the gas gauge.

Keep tanks as far away a possible from the point where you are burning.

When burning above the floor, be sure that you are standing clear of any pieces which may fall
off during burning.

Burning operations must not be performed on material lying on a concrete floor. The concrete
may explode and injury you.

Do not drop or bump cylinders.

Use a suitable cradle or platform for moving cylinders at all times. The cylinders must be
secured in the cradle to prevent them from falling out during moving.

Keeps sparks, flames, heat and oil away from cylinders at all times.

The top cylinders must be free at all times so there will be no obstruction to quick closing of
valves.

Use oxygen, acetylene and propane only for the purpose which they were intended.

Tampering in any manner with regulators is prohibited.

If you discover a leaking propane or acetylene cylinder, take it into the open air at once, and keep
it away from all fires. Notify your supervisor at once.

Cylinders protecting caps must be kept in place at all times when not in use.

Cylinders must always be chained or secured.

ARC WELDING

All leads to the arc welding machine should be properly installed and secured before use.
Any damaged worn leads or connections should be repaired before you use them. If repairs can
not be made then tag the equipment "DO NOT USE".

Proper welding hoods with good lenses should be used by welding operators. Any helpers
assisting in welding should also wear proper welding hoods.

Prior to welding, all hood lenses should be inspected for cracks and weld slag would obscure
vision. Lenses should be cleaned and replaced as necessary. An electrode or piece of electrode
should never be left in the electrode holder when the operator is finished welding. This presents
a safety hazard for anyone might trip over or fall on the electrode protruding form the holder if it
is left lying on the equipment or on the floor.
                                         SECTION 6 --
                                           FIRST AID

INTRODUCTION

The American Red Cross defines first aid as the "immediate and temporary care given the victim
of an accident or sudden illness until the services of a physician can be obtained." Effective first
aid consists primarily of common sense and a few simple rules.

"UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS"
ALL HUMAN BLOOD AND CERTAIN BODY FLUIDS WILL BE TREATED AS IF
KNOWN TO BE INFECTED OR HIV, HBV, AND OTHER BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS.

The following conditions require that basic life support procedures be used immediately.

       a.   Severe bleeding - If a large blood vessel is severed, enough blood can be lost in one
            or two minutes to cause death.

       b.   No breathing/circulation - Death or brain damage can occur in four to six minutes if
            breathing or circulation is not restored

       c.   Poisoning - Every second counts in preventing further injury.

GENERAL

1.   The primary objective in first aid is to sustain life by utilizing basic life support techniques
     to:
        a. Maintain an air way.
        b. Maintain breathing.
        c. Maintain circulation.
        d. Control breathing
        e. Treat for shock.
        f. Get medical treatment for the victim.

2.   The first aid provider MUST avoid panic, offer reassurance, inspire confidence, and do no
     more than necessary until medical help arrives.

3.   If there is no dispensary, clinic, or hospital in the near proximity of the work site to treat
     employees, one or more employees MUST be adequately trained to render first aid. First
     aid supplies are to be approved by a healthcare professional.
SEVERE BLEEDING
"UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS"
ALL HUMAN BLOOD AND CERTAIN BODY FLUIDS WILL BE TREATED AS IF
KNOWN TO BE INFECTED OR HIV, HBV, AND OTHER BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS.
WITH_THIS_THOUGHT_IN_MIND - ALWAYS WEAR PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
WHEN GIVING FIRST AID

5.   Severe bleeding results from wounds to large vessels. Bleeding MUST be controlled
     quickly Don't waste time -- apply direct pressure over the wound. The following procedure
     should be used in the event of severe bleeding:

       a.   Place a clean pad, handkerchief, or cloth over the wound and press firmly with your
            hands. If you do not have a cloth or bandage, close the wound with your hand or
            fingers.

       b.   Apply pressure directly over the wound.

       c.   Hold the pad firmly in place with a bandage, necktie, cloth strip, etc...

       d.   Raise the bleeding part higher than the rest of the body unless bones have been
            broken.

       e.   Keep the victim lying down.

       f.   Keep the victim warm. Cover the victim with blankets or coats, and put something
            under the victim when found lying on a cold or damp surface.

       g.   If the victim is conscious and can swallow, and if abdominal injury is not suspected,
            give plenty of liquids (such as water, tea, or coffee).

       h.   Get medical help.

6.   A tourniquet should only be used to treat severe, life threaten bleeding that cannot be
     controlled by other means. The procedure for applying a tourniquet is as follows:

       a.   Use only a strong, wide piece of cloth. NEVER use wire, rope, twine, or other
            narrow metals.

       b.   Place the tourniquet immediately above the wound, between the body and the edge
            of the wound. Some normal skin should be left between the wound and the
            tourniquet. If the wound is near a joint, place the tourniquet at the closest practical
            point above the joint.
       c.   Make sure the tourniquet is tight enough to stop bleeding. If possible, attach a card
            to the victim showing the time and place the tourniquet was applied.
       d.   Once the tourniquet has been applied, the victim should be taken to a medical facility
            immediately. The tourniquet should only be removed by a physician or medical
            personnel prepared to control bleeding.
       e.   Experience has shown that a properly applied tourniquet can be left in place for one
            to two hours without causing further damage to the extremity.

NO BREATHING/CIRCULATION

7.   A person whose breathing and circulating has stopped will die or suffer brain damage if
     these functions are not restored in four to six minutes. The initial evaluation of a victim
     should follow the procedures developed by the American Red Cross for basic life support,
     called the "ABC evaluation".

       a.   Airway - After assuring yourself that the victim is unconscious, open the airway by
            tilting the head back. Look into the mouth and remove anything that is blocking or
            could potentially block the airway. This includes gum, partial plates, and chewing
            tobacco.

       b.   Breathing - Determine whether the victim has stopped breathing or not. Do this by
            placing your cheek next to the victim’s nose and mouth to feel an exchange of air. At
            the same time, watch for any chest movement.

       c.   Circulation - Initially place the tips of two fingers on the larynx (voice box) and slide
            them gently into the groove between the voice box and the large muscle of the neck.

            This is the location of the carotid artery where you can feel if the heart is circulating
            blood.

            If breathing has ceased, begin mouth to mouth or mouth to nose resuscitation. If
            circulation has stopped, begin external cardiac massage. When combined, these
            procedures are known as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). To be performed
            effectively, they MUST be learned in a certified course. Although the procedures
            will be discussed in this section, the discussion is not intended to replace an official
            course.

8.   The following CPR procedure should be performed by a single rescuer after evaluation
     indicates that breathing and circulation have stopped.
       a. Deliver two quick breaths using mouth-to-mouth or mouth-to-nose breathing. Do
             this in such a way that the victim does not have a chance to completely exhale.
       b. Place the heel of one hand over the lower half of the breastbone and place the other
            hand on top of the first hand. Keeping the arms straight, deliver a quick downward,
            piston-like thrust to compress the victim’s chest 11/2 to 2 inches. This procedure
            compresses the heart between the sternum and the backbone, forcing it to circulate
            blood the rate of approximately 80 times per minute.
       c.   After 15 compressions, immediately tilt the victim's head back and deliver two quick
            breaths mouth-to-mouth.
       d.   Repeat the cycle of 15 compressions and two quick breaths until medical help
            arrives.
       e.   Once a minute, check the carotid artery for a pulse. Do this between compressions
            and the two breaths.
       f.   If you feel a pulse, deliver one breath every five seconds while ensuring that
            circulation is still present. If breathing and circulation return, keep close watch over
            the victim in case these processes are needed again.

9.   The following CPR procedure is used if a situation involves two rescuers:

       a.   One person does the ABC evaluation while the other rescuer prepares to deliver
            external cardiac massage.
       b.   The rescuer who has done the evaluation and found no breathing or circulation
            delivers two quick breaths by mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
       c.   When the two breaths are completed, the other rescuer starts delivering
            compressions at the rate of 60 times per minute.
       d.   After every fifth compression, the first rescuer delivers one breath mouth-to-mouth.
            The ratio then becomes five compressions to one breath until help arrives of a pulse
            is restored.

10. NEVER practice CPR procedures on real people. These are violent maneuvers that can
    injure a person if improperly executed. These procedures are learned in a formal CPR
    course in which life size mannequins are used for practice.

11. The following conditions can cause breathing and/or circulation to stop: electric shock,
    Inhalation of gas such as H2S, inhalation of smoke, lack of oxygen, heart attack, drowning,
    or a hard blow to the chest.

HEART ATTACK

12. For heart attack victims use the following procedure:

       a.   Do ABC evaluation. Begin CPR if breathing and circulation have ceased. Continue
            CPR until the vital signs have been restored.
       b.   If breathing and circulation are present, keep calm and reassure the victim.
       c.   Loosen the clothing and help the victim get into a comfortable position (usually
            halfway between lying and sitting). DO NOT carry or lift the victim more than
            necessary. Have someone call for medical help.

       d.   DO NOT give the victim any liquids without a doctor's advice.

CHOKING

13. DO NOT interfere with a choking victim who can speak cough or breath. However, if the
    choking continues without lessening, call for medical help.

14. If the victim cannot speak, cough, or breathe, take the following action until medical help
    arrives:

       a.   For a Conscious Victim:

       (1) Stand just behind and to the side of the victim, who can be standing or sitting.
           Support the victim with one hand on the chest. The victim's head should be lowered.
            Deliver four sharp blows between the shoulder-blades. If this technique does not
           lessen the choking --

       (2) Stand behind the victim, who can be standing or sitting. Wrap your arms around the
           victims middle just above the navel. Clasp your hands together in a doubled fist and
           press in and up in quick thrusts. Repeat this maneuver several times. If choking
           continues, repeat a cycle of four back blows and four quick thrusts until the victim is
           no longer choking or becomes unconscious.

       b.   For an Unconscious Victim:

       (1) Place the victim on the ground and deliver rescue breathing. If the victim does not
           start breathing and it appears that your air is not going into your victims lungs—

       (2) Roll the victim onto one side, facing you, with the chest against your knee. Then
           deliver four sharp blows between the shoulder blades. If the victim still does not start
           breathing----

       (3) Roll the victim face up and deliver one or more manual thrusts, place one hand on
           top of the other, with the heel of the bottom hand in the middle of the abdomen,
           slightly above the navel and below the rib cage. Press into the victim’s abdomen
           with a quick upward thrust. DO NOT press to either side. Repeat four times if the
           victim does not start breathing. Even if breathing begins

       (4) Clear the airway.
            a.  Hold the victims mouth open with one hand, using your thumb to depress the
                tongue.
            b. Make a hook of the middle finger of your other hand, and in a gentle sweeping
                motion, reach into the victim’s throat and feel for a foreign object that may be
                blocking the air passage. Repeat the following procedure until the air passage is
                clear: four abdominal thrusts, probe in the mouth, and try to inflate the lungs.

       (5) If the object has not been retrieved, but the victim seems all right, take the victim to
           the doctor anyway.

INHALATION OF TOXIC GAS OR SMOKE

15. Remove the victim from the contaminated area. DO NOT enter the contaminated area
    without respiratory protection. NEVER try to rescue a person by holding your breath and
    entering the contaminated area. Even with respiratory protection, it is dangerous to enter a
    contaminated area alone or with out stand-by help. DO NOT try to rescue someone by
    yourself if you can find help quickly.
    See rule 36-37 of this section.

16. As soon as you have the victim in a safe area, perform the following procedure.

       a.   Perform the ABC evaluation. If breathing and/or circulation has stopped, begin CPR.
       b.   If breathing and circulation are present, keep the victim lying down until medical
            help arrives.

ELECTRIC SHOCK

17. For a victim of electric shock perform the following procedure:

       a.   Throw the switch to turn off the current, or use a dry board or stick to remove the
            electric contact from the victim.
       b.   Do the ABC evaluation and begin CPR if breathing and or circulation have ceased.
       c.   If the breathing and circulation are present, remain with the victim until medical help
            arrives. It is important that an individual who has suffered an electric shock be
            evaluated by a physician, as electric shock can severely injure parts of the body.

BURNS

Burns can result from extreme temperatures (thermal burn) or from chemicals (chemical burn).
Burns are very painful and can be complicated by shock, contamination, and dehydration.
EXTENSIVE THERMAL BURN
18. For victims of extensive thermal burns, use the following procedure:

       a.   Wet the victim's remaining clothing with cool water as quickly as possible to reduce
            burning.
       b.   Place the cleanest available cloth over all burned areas to keep air away from the
            burn. Wet the burn with cool or cold water to reduce heat.
       c.   Make the victim lie down.
       d.   Place the victim's head and chest a little lower than the rest of the body, and raise the
            legs if possible.
       e.   If the victim is conscious and can swallow, give plenty of non-alcoholic liquids to
            drink (water, tea, soft drink, etc.).
       f.   Obtain the services of a physician as soon as possible.

SMALL THERMAL BURN
19. Use the following procedure on victims of small thermal burns:

       a.   Soak a sterile gauze pad of clean cloth in cool or cold water, preferably ice water.
            Place the cold pad over the burn.
       b.   DO NOT disturb or open blisters.
       c.   If the skin is not broken, immerse the skin in clean, cold water, or apply clean ice to
            relive the pain.

LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS (LPG) or COLD BURN
Liquefied Petroleum Gas is composed of ethane, propane, butane, and their isomers. These gases
are colorless and flammable. When they are handled or shipped as liquids, they have a vapor
pressure of 16 psig or 550 psig at 70 degrees F. They are low in toxicity, slightly anesthetic, and
have a mild odor ranging from aromatic to slightly disagreeable.

20. LPG produces injury by freezing, as does dry ice. Simple burns on the skin should be treated
    by flushing the skin with water. The burn maybe either bandaged or left open. Extensive
    burns should be examined by a doctor.

21. LPG is most destructive when if gets into the eye. Therefore, safety or chemical goggles
    should be worn when handling the liquid gas. If liquid LPG hits the eye, flush the eye with
    large amounts of water and refer the victim to a physician as soon as possible.

CHEMICAL BURN OF SKIN

22. Use the following procedure for victim of chemical burn:

       a.   Immediately flush the burn with water. Speed helps reduce the extent of the injury.
       b.   Apply a stream OF water to the burn while removing the victim’s clothes.
       c.   Place the cleanest available material over the burn.
       d.   If the burn area is extensive, make the victim lie down. Place the head and chest a
            little lower than the rest of the body, and raise the legs if possible. Extensive burns
            should be examined by a doctor.

CHEMICAL BURN OF EYE
23. Check the victim's eye for contact lenses. Remove them if they are present. Wash the eyes
    by plunging the head into a vessel of clean water and having the victim blink rapidly, or by
    allowing water from a drinking fountain or hose to flow into and flush the eyes. If neither of
    these procedures can be done immediately pour clean water into the victim's eyes from a
    drinking cup. It is a good practice to keep an eye wash bottle filled with clean water
    available for emergency use. If the victim's eyelids will not remain open, get another person
    to hold the lids open, and wash eyes for 15 minutes. Use only water to wash chemical burns.
     NEVER use another chemical to flush the burns, because this can increase the extent of the
    injury.



EXPOSURE TO CRUDE PRODUCTS (OIL, GAS, CONDENSATE)

24. An individual, overcome by vapors, MUST be removed from exposure immediately. A
    physician should be called. If breathing is irregular or stopped, administer artificial
    respiration.

25. If a liquid petroleum product is swallowed, DO NOT induce vomiting. Call a doctor
    immediately.

26. For skin contact, remove contaminated clothing and wash the skin with soap and water. If
    the petroleum products splash into the eyes, wash the eyes with clean water for 15 minutes
    or until irritation subsides.

SHOCK

Whenever someone suffers from trauma or emotional upset, shock maybe present. Shock MUST
be considered as a possible complication of every injury and severe illness. Shock occurs when
the circulation to vital organs of the body (especially the brain) slows down. This condition is
severe and can be life threatening if it is not corrected.

27. The symptoms of shock include the following:
      a. Cold, clammy skin
      b. Shallow breathing
      c. Rapid pulse
       d.   Victim feels cold; may be shaking
       e.   Weakness
       f.   Confusion or disorientation

28. Shock should be treated as follows:
      a. Make the victim lie down.
      b. Keep the airway open. If the victim vomits, turn the head to the side so the neck is
           arched with the chin pointing down.
      c. If the victim complains of being cold, use a blanket or coat for cover.
      d. Increase circulation to the brain by elevating the victim’s legs so that the head is
           lower than the body.
      e. Reassure the victim.
      f. If the victim is conscious and can swallow, administer liquids (water, tea, soft drink,
           etc.).
      g. NEVER give the victim alcoholic beverages.
      h. DO NOT give the victim liquids if you think the abdomen is injured.

HEAT EXHAUSTION

29. The symptoms of heat exhaustion include the following:
      a. Pale, cold, clammy skin
      b. Rapid, weak pulse
      c. Weakness, headache, or nausea
      d. Cramps in abdomen or limbs
      e. Excessive perspiration

30. Heat exhaustion should be treated as follows:
      a. Move the victim to a cool place in the shade.
      b. Make the victim lie down so the head is lower than the rest of the body.
      c. Give the victim water to drink and, if available, stir 1/4 teaspoon of salt into the
           water.
      d. Get medical help.

HEAT STROKE

Heat stroke is life threatening, and immediate measures MUST be taken to cool down the victim
and get medical care.

31. The symptoms of heat stroke include the following:
      a. Flushed, dry, hot skin
      b. Rapid, strong pulse
      c. Temperature is well above normal, and skin feels hot to the touch.
      d. Headache, dizziness, nausea.
       e.   Often the victim is unconscious.

32. Heat stroke should be treated as follows:
      a. Move the victim to a cool place.
      b. Treat for shock.
      c. Cover the entire body with cold water, using either a sponge or a hose. Cover the
           victim with ice, if it is available. Obtain medical help immediately.
      d. If the victim is fully conscious and can swallow, administer water, or if available,
           one quarter teaspoon of salt stirred into the water.
      e. DO NOT give the victim alcoholic beverages.

POISON PLANTS
Skin poison can result from contact with poison ivy, poison oak, or poison sumac.

33. Symptoms include itching, redness or blisters on the skin after contact with poison plants.

34. To treat contact with poison plants, take the following steps:
      a. Remove the victims clothing from the affected area. Be careful not to let the clothing
           drag across unaffected skin. It may be necessary to cut the clothing away from the
           affected areas.
      b. Wash the exposed area with mild soap and water. Lather and rinse several times.
      c. Sponge the affected area gently with rubbing alcohol, if some is available.
      d. If blisters appear on skin, call a physician.

SWALLOWED POISONS

It is impossible to cover the hundreds of kinds of poisoning and their respective guidelines for
treatment. Professional advice should be obtained as soon as possible.

35. The following treatment applies in most cases:
      a. Try to identify substance ingested.
      b. Induce vomiting by putting finger down victim’s throat, unless the substance
           swallowed is a hydrocarbon. In that case do not induce vomiting as this may
           aggravate the condition.
      c. Call a physician, emergency room, or poison control center for advice. If you cannot
           identify the poison, have the victim drink milk or a solution of milk and raw eggs to
           coagulate the material. Try again to induce vomiting by forcing the victim to gag.

INHALATION OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE (H2S)

36. The toxicity limits for hydrogen sulfide are as follows:
       a.   Up to 10 ppm (1/1,000 of 1 percent) --This amount can be smelled and is safe for 8
            hours of exposure.
       b.   Up to 100ppm (1/100 of 1 percent) --This amount may sting the eyes and throat. It
            killsthe sense of smell in 3--15 minutes.
       c.   500ppm (5/100 of 1 percent) --This amount can cause a loss of balance. It may
            cause respiratory paralyses in 30--40 minutes. It may require CPR.
       d.   1,000ppm (1/10 of 1 percent) --This amount may cause instantaneous
            unconsciousness. It can cause death or permanent brain damage as a result of oxygen
            deficiency.

37. H2S inhalation should be treated as follows:

       a.   First, be sure rescuers have proper respiration protection before they enter a
            contaminated area.
       b.   Carry the victim to fresh air immediately. If the victim is breathing, you may not
            need to do any thing else.
       c.   Perform an ABC evaluation. If the victim is not breathing, begin mouth-to-mouth
            resuscitation. If circulation has stopped, commence external cardiac massage.
                           SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC.
                                   1638 East 1st Street
                                  Wichita, Kansas 67214
                                     (316) 263-1264

Please sign this document after you have read the preceding pages, Statement Of Policy and
Safety Procedures dated November, 2004 and return this page to your supervisor. This document
will be signed by every employee of SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC.. If there is
something that is not understood, please ask.

By signing this document, you are stating that you understand and will follow these safety
procedures.

This document will become a permanent record in your employee file.

Upon termination of employment, if the SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. Safety
Manual is NOT returned to SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. a $10 charge will be
deducted from your final payroll check to replace the manual.

You must receive permission from SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. management
before giving information contained within this document to someone other than a
SOUTHWESTERN ELECTRICAL CO., INC. employee.

List PPE received (i.e. hard hat, safety glasses)




SAFETY MANUAL NUMBER _____________________________________

EMPLOYEE NAME PRINTED _____________________________________

SIGNATURE ____________________________________________________

DATE ________________________________


SUPERVISOR SIGNATURE __________________________________________


File a signed form in central files.

								
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