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					                                Choosing a Web Browser


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Use of this presentation is for teaching purposes only and is subject to the fair use doctrine of U.S. copyright laws. Citations are
provided for quoted material. No profits are made from this product. Unauthorized reproduction or alteration of this product is
prohibited.
                         Browsers Are a Battleground Once Again

                         By BRAD STONE Published: May 26, 2008


   SAN FRANCISCO — The browser, that porthole onto the broad
   horizon of the Web, is about to get some fancy new window
   dressing.

   Next month, after three years of development and six months of
   public testing, Mozilla, the insurgent browser developer that rose
   from the ashes of Netscape, will release Firefox 3.0. It will
   feature a few tricks that could change the way people organize
   and find the sites they visit most frequently.


New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
Not to be outdone, Microsoft recently took the wraps off the first public
test version of the latest edition of Internet Explorer, which is used by
about 75 percent of all computer owners, according to Net Applications, a
market share tracking firm. The finished version of Internet Explorer 8
could be released by the end of the year and is expected to have
additional features
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Even Apple, which once politely kept its Safari browser

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within the confines of its own devices, is making a somewhat
controversial push to get it onto the computers of people who use
Windows PCs.

In other words, the browser war — the skirmish that landed
Microsoft in antitrust trouble in the ‟90s — is heating up again.
New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
 “The typical browser for today‟s consumer doesn’t look all that
 different than it did 10 years ago,” said Larry Cheng, a partner at Fidelity
 Ventures, one of the firms that invested in Flock,
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 “That is an unsustainable trend that is the launching point for the second
 browser war, which will not be won by monopolistic muscle but by
 innovation.”


 Browsers have always been viewed as crucial on-ramps to the Web.
 Nevertheless, after vanquishing Netscape, the first commercial browser
 developer, Microsoft waited five years before releasing the sixth version
 of Internet Explorer in 2006. Dean Hachamovitch, general manager of
 Microsoft‟s Internet Explorer group, says the company was focused on
 plugging security holes during that time.
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New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
America Online, which acquired Netscape,
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spun off the nonprofit Mozilla Foundation in 2003. Its Firefox browser
soon inspired an open-source movement backed by computer
enthusiasts. Early versions of Firefox
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introduced features like a built-in pop-up blocker to kill ads, and tabbed
browsing, which lets users toggle between Web windows.

Firefox now has 170 million users around the world and an 18 percent
share of the browser market, according to Net Applications. That is
especially impressive given that most of its users have made the active
choice to download the software, while Internet Explorer is installed on
most PCs at the factory.
New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
 In addition to giving Microsoft a kick in its competitive pants, Firefox
 has also reinforced for the high-tech industry the financial and strategic
 value of the browser. In 2004,
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 struck a deal with Mozilla to include a Google search box tucked into a
 corner of the Firefox browser. According to Mozilla‟s most recent tax
 documents, in 2006 Google paid Mozilla $65 million for the resulting
 traffic to its search listings.

 With tasks like e-mail and word processing now migrating from the
 PC to the Internet, analysts and industry players think the browser will
 soon become even more valuable and strategically important.



New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
 “People in the industry foresee a time in which for many people, the only
 thing they‟ll need on a computer is a browser,” said Mitch Kapor, the
 software pioneer who now sits on the board of the Mozilla Foundation
 and has created a start-up, FoxMarks, that is developing a tool to
 synchronize bookmarks between computers. “The browser is just
 extraordinarily strategic.”

 That notion has helped to rekindle the browser wars and has resulted in
 the latest wave of innovation.

 Firefox 3.0, for example, runs more than twice as fast as the previous
 version while using less memory, Mozilla says.
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New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
     The browser is also smarter and maintains three months of a user‟s
     browsing history to try to predict what site he or she may want to visit.

     Typing the word “football” into the browser, for example, quickly
     generates a list of all the sites visited with “football” in the name or
     description.

     Firefox has named this new tool the “awesome bar” and says it could
     replace the need for people to maintain long and messy lists of
     bookmarks. It will also personalize the browser for an individual user.




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New York Timse, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
 “Sitting at somebody else‟s computer and using their browser is going to
 become a very awkward experience,” said Mitchell Baker, chairwoman of
 the Mozilla Foundation.
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 Internet Explorer 8,
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 from Microsoft, promises its own set of tricks. One new tool, Web slices,
 allows a user to bookmark a dynamic piece of a Web site, like an online
 auction or a sports score, and save it in the margin of the browser,
 where the user can watch as it changes.

 Another new feature, called activities, allows users to highlight text on a
 page, click on it, then instantly send it to another site, like a mapping, e-
 mail or blogging service.
New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
 Asked whether Firefox‟s increasing popularity had motivated these and
 other improvements, Mr. Hachamovitch of Microsoft said only, “We love to
 compete.” But he did say that amid the new competitive pressures, “the
 quality and quantity of my team has gone up significantly.”


 His group will have one other company besides Mozilla to keep its eye on:
 Apple‟s Safari Web browser



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 has a little over 5 percent of the market, according to Net Applications, and
 subsists mostly on the loyalty of devoted Mac and iPhone owners.



New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
But in March, deploying the kind of strategic jujitsu more commonly
associated with Microsoft in the past, Apple
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began using the automatic update software that is packaged with its
iTunes music player to deliver Safari onto the computers of people who
use Windows. (Users had to specifically decline the Safari offer if they
didn‟t want the browser to be downloaded to their computers.)
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The tactic irked even Apple fans in the blogosphere, along with Apple‟s
browser rivals. But it was at least partly successful: Net Applications
reported that Apple’s market share on Windows computers had
tripled since March. In a statement released last month addressing
the comments about the maneuver, Apple said it had made it easier for
customers to distinguish minor updates from new programs delivered
through the update software. Apple‟s boldness underscores the new
importance of the Web browser in a world that is increasingly shifting
online.
      New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
         Apple's Gamble: Push Safari to Windows Users via
                  Software Updates. Did it Work?
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     On March 18th, Apple released the Safari 3.1 web browser for Windows and the
     Mac With the release, Apple also included Safari 3.1 with Apple's Software
     Update service on Windows It was labeled as an update with the option to install
     pre-selected. The update has been pushed to millions of Windows users of
     Apple's other software products, like iTunes. Normally, Apple's Software Update
     service is not used for delivery of new products.
     Clearly, this is a calculated risk by Apple that has annoyed and/or alienated
     some users. However, the question is, did it work? Did Apple gain browser
     market share on Windows based on this move? The answer is yes. Safari 3.0
     on Windows never gained much market share, peaking at .07%. However,
     Safari 3.1 on Windows is rapidly gaining market share, already tripling Safari
     3.0's peak. Note: As of April 18th, Apple's update now lists Safari as 'new'
     software if not already installed.
Source: http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?sample=13&qprid=22&qpdt=1&qpct=5&qptimeframe=M&qpsp=100&qpnp=12
       This month (June „08) , Mozilla has implemented a change in Firefox
       3.0 where the installation now has a checkbox that defaults to making
       Firefox your default browser.
       The option is clearly displayed and labeled, unlike Safari, which
       misleadingly labeled the Safari install as an 'update' (since correctly
       changed to an 'install'). However, this practice is a break from the
       traditional practice browsers employed of defaulting this option to off.
       Prior to this change, Firefox 3.0 was already rapidly gaining usage
       share, so it will be difficult to measure the effect of this change.



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Source: http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?sample=13&qprid=22&qpdt=1&qpct=5&qptimeframe=M&qpsp=100&qpnp=12
Firefox 3.0 Marketing Campaign
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                                                         Internet Explorer

  Internet Explorer is the dominant player in the browser field with
  about 79% market share. A product of Microsoft, it offers a user
  interface that is similar to that offered by Windows Explorer. This
  internet browser has been designed for accessing a wide variety of
  web sites and content. Internet Explorer allows third parties to
  incorporate Browser Helper Objects and rich content into the
  design of their websites. Other valuable features offered by Internet
  Explorer include pop-up blockers and tabbed browsing
  capabilities.
  The main criticisms of this internet browser have focused on
  Internet Explorer's security problems. Microsoft is working hard to
  fix these problems, and they continue to provide security patches to
  Internet Explorer users.


Source: Ask Bob Rankin-- http://askbobrankin.com/best_web_browser.html
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                                                     Mozilla Firefox

 Firefox is an internet browser that works with just about any
 operating platform including: Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows. This
 graphic browser offers a great selection of features. Firefox pioneered
 tabbed browsing, which was recently picked up by Internet Explorer.
 This browser also offers integrated download management, live
 bookmarking, incremental find using the Firefox toolbar, anti-
 phishing protection, and a dynamic search system. Because it's
 open source software, there is a vibrant community of developers
 actively improving the base software, and creating Firefox extensions
 to add new features to the browser.
 Firefox is rapidly gaining market share, mostly at the expense of
 Explorer. As of February 2007, Firefox was used by about 14% of all
 Internet users, an increase of 5% over the previous year.

Source: Ask Bob Rankin-- http://askbobrankin.com/best_web_browser.html
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                                                   Opera
Opera is another cross-platform browser like Firefox. However, this
browser is more of an "internet suite" than a simple browser. It provides
users with the tools and technology to perform a wide variety of internet
related tasks like viewing web pages, searching the Internet, sending and
receiving emails, conducting online chats, and even displaying the latest
Widgets.
Opera was developed to perform well on small systems and low-end
computers. It also has integrated features that make it a great choice for
people with visual and mobility impairments.
Another great feature of Opera is its mobile version, Opera Mini. This
free download allows Opera users to access this internet suite on their
mobile devices. Other features offered by Opera include: a download
manager, tabbed browsing, notes, and a pop-up blocker. The drawbacks of
this particular browser are related to its limited capabilities for add-ons,
extensions, and Widgets.
Source: Ask Bob Rankin-- http://askbobrankin.com/best_web_browser.html
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                                               Safari

Safari is a browser found on Apple Macintosh systems, but has recently
been released for Windows too. It is a great browser that has been
integrated into the Mac OS X operating platform.
It has many of the same features as Internet Explorer and Firefox,
including: QuickTime multimedia technology, a tabbed-browsing interface
system, and internet searching tools.
Safari uses Google as its main search engine, and it also offers users
tools that automatically fill out web-based forms, manage passwords,
check spelling, and block pop-ups. Safari is by far the most popular
browser for Mac OS X systems, but people who use both Windows
and Mac systems now have a choice between Safari and Firefox,
since both offer a common interface and can share bookmarks.


Source: Ask Bob Rankin-- http://askbobrankin.com/best_web_browser.html
                                                              Browser Market Share




Source: http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?qprid=0
Source: http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=2024&tag=nl.e539 (Adrian Kingsley-Hughes)
   Shawn Hardin, chief executive of Flock,

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   which is developing a browser that helps users share photos, videos
   and blog entries more easily, said consumers would ultimately benefit
   from the new browser battle. “We are seeing choice in the browser
   market really emerge as a significant force for the first time in a
   while,” Mr. Hardin said.




New York Times, Brad Stone, 5-26-08
Selecting an Internet Browser

   There are several internet
   browsers that you can select from
   including those that were already
   mentioned. However, while most
   browsers offer similar features, not all browsers are created
   equally.
   The best way to find the browser that will work best for you is to
   first narrow down the field to include only the browsers that will
   work with your operating system.
   Then try out a few of the top browsers to see which one has the
   features and extensibility that you want and need.

 Source: Ask Bob Rankin-- http://askbobrankin.com/best_web_browser.html
           Postscript: There Is Also a Search Engine War




               And An ISP (Internet Sevice Provider) War


                                                              (AT&T)




Source: http://marketshare.hitslink.com/report.aspx?qprid=0

				
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