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					                    PS "Dialects of English"
                         WS 2005/06

                            M. Huber
                      Institut für Anglistik
                     JLU Gießen, Germany




                 Internet resources
                         on
           Dialects and accents of English



Here is a list of links that the class compiled in the last session.
    As yet it is unedited, unsorted and contains doublets,
                   but it may be helpful anyway.
                           http://www.collectbritain.co.uk/collections/dialects/

http://members.tripod.com/~rjschellen/EnglishNums.htm
small list of english numerals from old english to modern english, also including dialects

http://www.georgetown.edu/faculty/ballc/oe/oe-fonts.html
here you can download Old English Fonts, Runes etc. for term papers

http://academics.vmi.edu/english/audio/Audio_Index.html
“These are links to web pages with excerpts from Chaucer's works read by professors.“ This
is a good site for those people, who are interested in the pronounciation of Middle English.

http://www.weblearn.ox.ac.uk/site/
Site from the Oxford University, which offers some resources, but the access as a guest user
is quite restricted.

http://www.linguistlist.org/
Says about itself: “The world's largest online linguistic resource”
Hosted by the Eastern Michigan University and the Wayne State University.

http://www.lagb.org.uk/
Linguistics Association of Great Britain
A lot of liks to linguistic departments etc.

http://www.yorksj.ac.uk/dialect/
About the Yorkshire dialect, run by York St John University College.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/voices/
bbc site recorded conversations around the country…

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/routesofenglish/storysofar/series3.shtml
the routes of english, some recordings and the world of english/history of the language

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/lj/conquestlj/legacy_01.shtml
history of english – the vikings and their impact on english language

http://coral.lili.uni-bielefeld.de/Classes/Winter96/Dialects/dialects/node33.html
maps of history of english dialects

http://www.dalank.de/hardtimes/71Siem.htm
article on english dialects on british isles (and elsewhere)

http://www.lorem-ipsum.info/english-language
general information and very interesting: loanwords (but this site is linked to wikipedia)

http://www.ethnologue.com/14/show_language.asp?code=ENG
information about where it is spoken

http://www2.ignatius.edu/faculty/turner/arabicspanish.htm
language information (loanwords/relationships between french, english, spanish, arabic…)

http://www.vec.ca/english/1/english.cfm
english centre in vancouver, provides further links on history of english
http://www.theverybestofstuff.de/contents/dialectology.html
A thesis by Rainer Schlötterer (1996)

http://www.ku.edu/~idea/
The International Dialectsof English Archive(IDEA): The IDEA, was created in 1997 as a
repository of primary source recordings for actors and other artists in the performing arts.
Recordings of people all around the world talking English.

http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmDialLnx.html:
        A list of links of links (the ones with descripstions seem to be functional).

http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/EngDialLnx.html
        Another list of English dialects links.

http://accent.gmu.edu/index.php
The Speech Accent Archive: The speech accent archive uniformly presents a large set of
speech samples from a variety of language backgrounds. Native and non-native speakers of
English read the same paragraph and are carefully transcribed.

http://runglish1.narod.ru/index.html
        A site about the English language variety spoken by Russians.



For fun:

                         -
http://rinkworks.com/dialect/
The Dialectizer: Convert English text to any of several comicdialects.
www.americandialect.org                      American Dialect      Founded in 1889, the
                                             Society               American Dialect
                                             Editor of American    Society is dedicated to
                                             Speech,               the study of the English
                                                                   language in North
                                                                   America, and of other
                                                                   languages, or dialects
                                                                   of other languages,
                                                                   influencing it or
                                                                   influenced by it. Our
                                                                   members include
                                                                   academics and
                                                                   amateurs, professionals
                                                                   and dilettantes,
                                                                   teachers and writers.
http://polyglot.lss.wisc.edu/dare/dare.html Dictionary of          Information about the
                                            American Regional      DARE
                                            English                Audio material
                                                                   The Linguistic Atlas
                                                                   Project
                                                                   Telsur etc.
www2.arts.gla.ac.uk/IPA/ipa.html            The International      Recordings
                                            Phenetic Association Links
                                                                   IPA fonts
                                                                   X-Rays data for speech
                                                                   Archive
                                                                   maps
http://www.ic.arizona.edu/%7Elsp/index.html Varieties of English info on different
                                                                   american/engl. Dialects
                                                                   (eg. AAVE, Chicano
                                                                   etc.)
                                                                   Phonetics with
                                                                   exercises
http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atlas/      A National Map of      Highly
NationalMap/NationalMap.html                Regional Dialects of recommended!!!
                                            American English       Telsur-Link
                                                                   Description of
                                                                   Telsur/Atlas of
                                                                   Northamerican English
                                                                   University of
                                                                   Pennsylvania
www.lsadc.org                               Linguistic Society of
                                            America
http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/          “Do you speak          nice short essays about
                                            American?”             dialectal subjects, good
(PBS is the only public broadcaster in the                         to get into a subject
US, partly funded by the government, with                          DARE audio samples
educational focus; eg.: Sesamestreet!)
http://www.ku.edu/~idea/                    International Dialects Archive of audio
                                            of English Archive     samples
                                           (IDEA) Department
                                           of Theatre and Film
                                           at the University Of
                                           Kansas, in Lawrence,
                                           KS, USA
http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/   The American         Highly
AmDialhome.html                            Dialect Homepage     recommended!!!
                                                                Short discription of
                                                                main American
                                                                Dialects
                                                                Pretty good
                                                                bibliography on the
                                                                subject
www.bbc.co.uk/voices                       BBC site             Recordingsn UK
                                                                “How Do we Sound?”
Helpful websites to collect information about different dialects
Created by Anja Opper, Jens Prüwer,Anna-Lena Uhl & Theresa Winderlich


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_English

A nice homepage to get a first impression about the topic you are searching for! On this site
you mainly get an overview of general facts about English Dialects. The site is full of links
that lead you to further information but the site does not imply speech sounds.


www.americandialect.org

American speech - monthly newspaper


www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmAialhome.de


American Dialect homepage
Regional varities of English in the United States of America and Canada
The site includes maps with bibliographies. Furthermore a list of books about English dialects
is available and you also get access to a bibliography of dialectology.
It is a good homepage if you are searching for books and links of a topic concearning English
dialects.


www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atlas/NationalMap.html

A National map of the Regional Dialects of American English analysis of mergers and chain
shifts in progress on the basis of the acoustic analysis of the stressed vowels of 238 speakers.
The website deals with the questions:
1. What are the major dialect regions of the United States?
2. What are the defining features of those regions?
A wide range of detailed information and maps are given. The hompage also gives a lot of
information if you are interested in the topic or if you need a certain map (link to the
Linguistic Atlas).


http://members.tripod.com/~rjschellen/EnglishNums.htm.

The homepage concerns only English numerals. There are a lot of examples given but you get
no information or general facts why the numerals changed and you don't know how to
pronounce them because there are no speech sound available.
The website is confusing because it's not well structured and the design is unfavourable. Too
many popups! We would not recommend this site to get information about English Dialects.


http://my.havard.edu/icb/icb.do?course=fas-ling80&tabgroupid=tk.course.ling80_top.
The website is created by a course of Havard University. You can look at different
presentations (with topics concerning dialcts) written by the students. Speech sounds are
available. There is a link given where you can find weblinks concearning American English,
Canadian, etc. dialects. We can recommend this homepage to all persons that are interested
and eager to learn more about dialects.



http://polyglot.Iss.wisc.edu/dare/dare.html

You can listen to audio samples that are recorded very good and you get acces to dare text and
useful links.
{\rtf1\ansi\ansicpg1252\deff0\deflang1031{\fonttbl{\f0\fswiss\fcharset0
Arial;}{\f1\fnil\fcharset2 Symbol;}} \viewkind4\uc1\pard\f0\fs24\par \pard\qc\ul\b\fs32
Helpful websites to collect information about different dialects\par \ulnone\b0\i\fs28 Created
by Anja Opper, Jens Pr\'fcwer,Anna-Lena Uhl & Theresa Winderlich\par \fs24\par
\pard\i0\par \ul\b http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_English\par \ulnone\b0\par A nice
homepage to get a first impression about the topic you are searching for! On this site you
mainly get an overview of general facts about English Dialects. The site is full of links that
lead you to further information but the site does not imply speech sounds. \par \par \par \ul\b
www.americandialect.org\par \par \ulnone\b0 American speech - monthly newspaper\par \par
\par \ul\b www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmAialhome.de\par \ulnone\b0\par \par
American Dialect homepage\par
\pard{\pntext\f1\'B7\tab}{\*\pn\pnlvlblt\pnf1\pnindent0{\pntxtb\'B7}}\fi-720\li720 Regional
varities of English in the United States of America and Canada\par {\pntext\f1\'B7\tab}The
site includes maps with bibliographies. Furthermore a list of books about English dialects is
available and you also get access to a bibliography of dialectology.\par {\pntext\f1\'B7\tab}It
is a good homepage if you are searching for books and links of a topic concearning English
dialects. \par \pard\par \par \ul\b www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atlas/NationalMap.html\par \par
\ulnone\b0 A National map of the Regional Dialects of American English analysis of mergers
and chain shifts in progress on the basis of the acoustic analysis of the stressed vowels of 238
speakers.\par The website deals with the questions:\par 1. What are the major dialect regions
of the United States?\par 2. What are the defining features of those regions?\par A wide range
of detailed information and maps are given. The hompage also gives a lot of information if
you are interested in the topic or if you need a certain map (link to the Linguistic Atlas).\par
\par \par \ul\b http://members.tripod.com/~rjschellen/EnglishNums.htm.\ulnone\b0\par \par
The homepage concerns only English numerals. There are a lot of examples given but you get
no information or general facts why the numerals changed and you don't know how to
pronounce them because there are no speech sound available.\par The website is confusing
because it's not well structured and the design is unfavourable. Too many popups! We would
not recommend this site to get information about English Dialects.\par \par \par \ul\b
http://my.havard.edu/icb/icb.do?course=fas-ling80&tabgroupid=tk.course.ling80_top.\par \par
\ulnone\b0 The website is created by a course of Havard University. You can look at different
presentations (with topics concerning dialcts) written by the students. Speech sounds are
available. There is a link given where you can find weblinks concearning American English,
Canadian, etc. dialects. We can recommend this homepage to all persons that are interested
and eager to learn more about dialects.\par \par \par \par \ul\b
http://polyglot.Iss.wisc.edu/dare/dare.html\ulnone\b0\par \par You can listen to audio samples
that are recorded very good and you get acces to dare text and useful links.\par }
http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/EngDialLnx.html
On this homepage you can choose among different countries and their dialects. Several links
are given, especially about England (e.g. Yorkshire dialect, language in London or Cornish
dialect. The homepage is well structured, what makes a good impression.
http://www.ling.upenn.edu/phono_atlas/NationalMap/NationalMap.html
The first thing we noticed, was that there is much to read. To illustrate what is written in the
text, there are some maps available.
http://www.ku.edu/~idea/
We got a positive impression of this website because it starts with an introduction about the
editors, who they are and what they do. You can listen to dialects of people from different
countries (it`s real fun!) all over the world. If you have problems to understand what they say,
there is also a transcription available.
http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmDialhome.html
    This homepage was quite boring but there are some links to other websites,
    which might
    be more interesting.
http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/accents.html
On this homepage you have access to the British Library sound archive, which is useful and
interesting. It is well structured and very helpful if you want to get an insight about the British
dialects and accents.
http://www.une.edu.au/langnet/descriptions.htm
The homepage shows the varieties of English language all over the world. One can choose a
country one likes from a simply structured homepage. Then one can find further information
about background (history, attitudes and use), vocabulary, grammar and sounds. You can also
listen to examples.

http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmDialhome.html
This web-site presents regional varieties of English in the United States
of America and Canada and tries to bridge the gap between the scholarly and literary worlds
of dialectology.There are many links for further information
(http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmDialLnx.html).

http://www.pbs.org/speak/seatosea/americanvarieties/map/map.html
This page can be used for practical matters. It contains many useful information for future
teacher e.g. quizzes, video, dvd… and it looks interesting for students to gain information
about recent language developments. You can listen to various native speakers, the local radio
etc.  Very good!!!

http://www.universalteacher.org.uk/lang/britishisles.htm
This website provides basic information about linguistic issues like language and social
contexts – sociolinguistics, language acquisition, language change, language varieties for
advanced leraners of English and especially trainee teachers.
 make a list containing a URL and a short description of the site
 no doublets

URL                                     Excerpt                                Treatment       Audio   Evalu

www.collectbritain.co.uk/collections/ Listen to England's changing voice.      Syntax          +       +
dialects/                               Extracts from the Survey of English    Morphology
                                        Dialects and the Millennium            Rules
                                        Memory Bank document how we            Phonology
                                        spoke and lived in the 20th century.
                                        There are nearly 700 recordings
                                        featured here.
http://www.evolpub.com/Americandia Link Collection off English any             Link collection -       Many
lects/EngDialLnx.html                   dialects                                                       don’t
http://members.tripod.com/%7ETHSl bibliography of Melanesian                   Bibliography    -       -
one/MPEB.html                           Pidgin English
http://www.rootsweb.com/~genepool/ Explanation for old American                                -       -
amerispeak.htm                          Idioms and the fitting nowadays
                                        explanation
http://cfprod01.imt.uwm.edu/Dept/FL Dialect Survey for the US                  Morphology      -       +
L/linguistics/dialect/
http://polyglot.lss.wisc.edu/dare/dare. The DARE                               Dictionary      -
html
http://us.english.uga.edu/              The Linguistic Atlas Projects of       Portal         -
                                        America                                Bibliography
http://www.duke.edu/web/hst195.15/ American Communities: An Oral               Speech records +        +
                                        History Approach African               of old people
                                        American Experiences in Durham,
                                        North Carolina.
                                        eight undergraduate students
                                        interviewed elders in Durham's
                                        African American Community.

http://www.yorksj.ac.uk/dialect/        The Yorkshier dialects.                SED subsite?    +       ++
                                        Descriptions, development,
                                        classification, examples
http://accent.gmu.edu/                  A large set of speech samples          English         +       ++
                                        from a variety of language             dialects around
                                        backgrounds. Native and non-           the world
                                        native speakers of English read
                                        the same paragraph and are
                                        carefully transcribed.
http://www.ku.edu/~idea/                International Dialects of English      English         +       ++
                                        Archive  IDEA                         dialects around
                                        Since 1997                             the world
Dialectology

http://www.collectbritain.co.uk/


http://linguisticspage.homestead.com/files/iawe8.doc
Content:
I. Introduction (Variation in English and the Concept of Dialects; Renspeak: History and
Development; Objectives of the Present Study
II. Methodology (Test Hypotheses; Materials; Subjects; Procedure)
III. Results
IV. Discussion
V. Afterword: Thoughts from Africa
V. References (Publications; Unpublished Correspondence and Documents; Appendix)


http://www.ling.ed.ac.uk/lel/research/ihd/
Linguisatics and English Language – Institute for Historical Dialectology
Institute for Historical Dialectology
Content: CSTR; Developmental Linguistics; English Language; IHD; Language in Context; LEC;
Phonetics & Phonology; Sound Comparisons; Syntax & Semantics; facilities + resources;
postgraduate study; A Linguistic Atlas of Early Middle English = The LAEME (by Dr Margaret
Laing); A Linguistic Atlas of Older Scots = The LAOS (by Dr Keith Williamson)


http://www.courses.fas.harvard.edu/~ling80/tool/wwwlinks/
Content: Syllabus; Lecutres; Teching Staff ; Assignments; WWW Links; Audio; Armenian;
Conference 2003; American Dialects; British Dialects; Colonial Dialects; Canadian Dialects
(e.g. Canadian English; Canadian Phonetics; Dialect Topography of Québec City English…);
Engrish; Audio (English Dialects in general; Links to many good audio samples of diverse
varieties of English); Miscellaneous (dialectal survey)


http://www-personal.umich.edu/~duanmu/ling211/dialect.htm#basic
Resources on Dialectology and Accents
Content: 48 links to other websites [e.g. audo archives: International Dialects of English Archive
(IDEA) Audio files of a variety of English dialects and L2 accents; American English speech
samples; Sounds of English); There are also audio and video samples at the North Carolina Life
and Language Project; DARE – The Dictionary of American Regional English – homepage of
the dialectology research project;]


http://www.harrassowitz.de/top_offers/0512so03.html
Atlas of North American English - Phonetics, Phonology and Sound ChangeM; William
Labov;


http://staff-www.uni-marburg.de/~naeser/gloss-ed.htm
Kleine Wortliste Englisch / Deutsch zur Linguistik und Dialektologie (von Wolfgang Näser,
Marburg)

http://dialektologie.know-library.net/
Bekannte Dialektologen des Deutschen in dem so.20. Jh. sind u.a.: Albert Bachmann; Werner
Besch; Walter Haas; Rudolf Hotzenköcherle; Ulrich Knoop; Werner König; Konrad Kunze;
Walther Mitzka; Arno Ruoff; Viktor Schirmunski; Robert Schläpfer; Stefan Sonderegger;
Rudolf Trüb; Peter Wiesinger; Paul Zinsli;
1. http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~kroch/omev2-html/omev2-html.html

Information about verb movement in Old and Middle English. The dialect variation and
language contact.

2. http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/accents.html

The British Library Sound Archive has a large collection about the study of dialects and
accents. On this page you can also find links to different pages about endangered languages
or even the British National Corpus. You can listen to several recoring of different people
living in different areas.

3. http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmDialMap.html

The first page gives an overview about the linguistic geography of the mainland in the United States. If
you press the link "Evolution Home Page" then you'll find further information and helpful linguistic
resources. By pressing the link "The American dialect Homepage" you will get informations about that
and even different link that might be helpful.

4. http://www.csiss.org/classics/content/17

A rather short description of Hans Kurath's Linguistic Atlas project in the United States.

5. http://www.humbul.ac.uk/output/headlist.php?code=FJ.28001&sub=linguistics

Useful links

6. http://www.lang.ltsn.ac.uk/resources/goodpractice.aspx?resourceid=964

An explanation of what dialectology actually is, by showing maps and certain words spoken in a
certain area. Interesting links to pages with related topics.

7. http://us.english.uga.edu/cgi-bin/lapsite.fcgi/

Overview about the Atlas projects.

8. http://www.courses.fas.harvard.edu/~ling80/tool/wwwlinks/

Links to several sites about the American dialect, British dialect, Canadian and African dialect. By
chosing a link you will get informations about the regional dialect supported by maps and texts.


www.wikipedia.com
This is an online lexica. If you search for “English dialects” you can find all kinds of different
dialects, with their historical backround, lexical- phonetic information etc. There is a lot of
written information but we couldn`t find any recordings. An example foe one Homepage we
looked at is: www.wikipedia.org/wiki/british_english

http://www.ku.edu/~idea/
On this page you can find information about different English dialects. These information are
a bit more general than the ones from wikipedia, but they include many recordings which give
a very interesting overview.
http://dir.yahoo.com/Social_Science/Linguistics_and_Human_Languages/Languages/Specific_Langua
ges/English/Dialects_and_Regional_Variants/
By searching with yahoo, you can find interesting pages like this one. You get the posibility
to choose between eight different dialects (American, Australian, British, Canadian, Hawaiian
Pidgin ans New Zealand English and also Singlish ans South African English) By choosing
one of them you get to other pages where it gets more and more into detail.


www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/EngDialLnx.html
By searching for English dialects we got to this page a few times. The links that are added
there sound very interesting, like “English Dialect Links”, “American Slanguages” or
“English Based Creoles”, but unfortunately we couldn`t open one of them.

http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/accents.html
Very informational Homepage with recordings

http://us.english.uga.edu/
Overview about various linguistic atlas projects, such as the LANE.
http://www.americandialect.org/
„Call for Papers: Language Variation and Change in the United States”
Founded in 1889, the American Dialect Society is dedicated to the study of the English
language in North America, and of other languages, or dialects of other languages,
influencing it or influenced by it. Our members include academics and amateurs,
professionals and dilettantes, teachers and writers.


http://www.esl-lab.com/slang/slangrd1.htm
“American Slang”
Funny quiz about American slang.

http://polyglot.lss.wisc.edu/dare/dare.html
“DARE”
The Dictionary of American Regional English (DARE) is a reference tool unlike any other. Its
aim is not to prescribe how Americans should speak, or even to describe the language we use
generally, the "standard" language. Instead, it seeks to document the varieties of English that
are not found everywhere in the United States--those words, pronunciations, and phrases that
vary from one region to another, that we learn at home rather than at school, or that are part of
our oral rather than our written culture.
Try the “Arthur the Rat” audiosample!

http://www.ku.edu/~idea/northamerica/usa/newyork/newyork.htm
Here you will find downloadable mp3 recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region
you selected, plus textfiles giving their biographical details, and scholarly commentary in
some cases.

http://www.indiana.edu/~creole/
“Welcome”
Startsite of Indiana University Creole Institute

http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/EngDialLnx.html
“English Dialect Links”
The Norfolk Dialect

http://www.norfolkdialect.com/

a website with general information about the norfolk dialect and soundfiles



Numerals in different English dialects

http://members.tripod.com/~rjschellen/EnglishNums.htm

The numbers 1 - 10 are presented in many different English dialects



International Dialects of English Archive

http://www.ku.edu/~idea/

A repository of primary source recordings for actors and other artists in the performing arts.
All recordings are in English, are of native speakers, and you will find both English language
dialects and English spoken in the accents of other languages.


The British Library Sound Archive
http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/accents.html

A large collection of recordings suitable for the study of accents and dialects. Most oral
history collections held by the Archive contain recordings of dialect and accent interest, and
searching the catalogue by locality or place-name is one means of accessing such material.



The American Dialect Homepage

http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/AmDialhome.html

Regional Varieties of English in the United States
of America and Canada
1. British English/Definition

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_English
British English (BrE) is a term used to differentiate between the form of the English language
used in the United Kingdom and those used elsewhere. It includes all the varieties of English
used within the UK, including England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales.
2. English Dialect Links
http://www.evolpub.com/Americandialects/EngDialLnx.html
General Interest
    Lowlands-L a discussion group for people who are interested in Lowlands languages and
cultures. (Includes English and Scots)
    English Dialect Links Features many additional links, especially for the British Isles.
    American Slanguages. Brief examples of dialect usage from about 40 American cities,
states, and regions rendered in common English spelling. Also contains examples from 5
other English-speaking countries: Australia, Canada, England, Ireland, and South Africa.
   English Dialect Information Exchange (EDIE-CECTAL).
   English Based Creoles. From the Ethnologue Database.



3. International Dialects of English Archive
Since 1997

http://www.ku.edu/~idea/
About Us
The International Dialects of English Archive, IDEA, was created in 1997 as a repository of
primary source recordings for actors and other artists in the performing arts. Its home is the
Department of Theatre and Film at the University Of Kansas, in Lawrence, KS, USA; while
associate editors form a global network. All recordings are in English, are of native speakers,
and you will find both English language dialects and English spoken in the accents of other
languages. The recordings are downloadable and playable for both PC and Macintosh
computers. The development of this website is supported, in part, by grants from the
University of Kansas General Research Fund and the Kimbell Faculty Enrichment Fund. The
Founder and Director is Professor Paul Meier. The Technical Director and Webmaster for the
archive is Shawn M. Muller.



4. The speech accent archive:

http://accent.gmu.edu/
The speech accent archive uniformly presents a large set of speech samples from a variety of
language backgrounds. Native and non-native speakers of English read the same paragraph
and are carefully transcribed. The archive is used by people who wish to compare and analyze
the accents of different English speakers.

5. The British Library Sound archive:

http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/accents.html
The British Library Sound Archive has a large collection of recordings suitable for the study
of accents and dialects. Most oral history collections held by the Archive contain recordings
of dialect and accent interest, and searching the catalogue by locality or place-name is one
means of accessing such material.
6. http://members.tripod.com/~rjschellen/EnglishNums.htm


           Old
Old                        Old         Middle      Chaucer    +Yola     Modern     *Geordie
           Northum-
English                    Kentish     English     English    Dialect   English    Dialect
           brian



Comparison of dialects in charts



7. http://www.universalteacher.org.uk/lang/britishisles.htm

This guide is written for students who are following GCE Advanced level (AS and A2)
syllabuses in English Language. This resource may also be of general interest to language
students on university degree courses, trainee teachers and anyone with a general interest in
language science.

8. http://www.ruf.rice.edu/~kemmer/Words04/usage/dialects.html
This is a more complete listing of English dialects, although by no means comprehensive.
Research of Linda Tiefenbrunner and Marlies Thiemann


LINGUISTICS- an educational “cyberplayground”

http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Linguistics/Home_Linguistics.html
The Hompage promotes and improves the teaching and learning of languages. It
identifies and solves problems related to language and culture, and serves as a resource
for information about language and culture.
You can look up basic information about creoles, dialects and language and you get a
good overview about the topic of linguistics.
English Language and Linguistics
http://www.putlearningfirst.com/language/research/research.html
you get an overview of tha basics, especially the link “main topics” supports help for a
better knowledge. It can also be seen as a checklist for oneself in studies and revision.
The speed accent archive
http://accent.gmu.edu/
The speech accent archive uniformly presents a large set of speech samples from a variety of
language backgrounds. Native and non-native speakers of English read the same paragraph
and are carefully transcribed. The archive is used by people who wish to compare and analyze
the accents of different English speakers.

Wikipedia- list of dialects of the english language
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dialects_of_the_English_language
Research and explanations of english dialects
Dialects of English

http://www.ship.edu/~cgboeree/dialectsofenglish.html

English is actually an unusual language. Already a blend of early Frisian and Saxon, it
absorbed Danish and Norman French, and later added many Latin and Greek technical terms.
In the US, Canada, Hawaii, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, and elsewhere, it absorbed
terms for indigenous plants, animals, foodstuffs, clothing, housing, and other items from
native and immigrant languages. Plus, the various dialects, from Cockney to Jamaican, and
innumerable sources of slang, from Polari to hip hop, continue to add novel terms and
expressions to the mix. It is no surprise to hear from people learning English what a student
once told me: English just has too many words!


Middle English dialects

http://coral.lili.uni-bielefeld.de/Classes/Winter96/Dialects/dialects/node35.html

Old English Dialects
English Dialects and Sociolects
Chronology of the history



English Intonation in the British Isles

http://www.phon.ox.ac.uk/~esther/ivyweb/#spe
Speech data and intonation transcriptions from nine urban dialects of British English in five
speaking styles

English varieties of the British Isles

http://www.universalteacher.org.uk/lang/britishisles.htm

This resource is in general for language students, trainee teachers and anyone is interest in
language science.
1. Arthur The Rat:

Sound samples are spoken by English speakers from around the world. The spoken texts have
been chosen for their usefulness in accent determination.

http://alt-usage-english.org/audio_archive.shtml

2. English accents:

links to additional materials

http://www.let.uu.nl/~Rene.Kager/personal/TV2/accents.htm

3. Some Informative and Entertaining Linguistics Resources

http://www3.baylor.edu/~Jeannette_Denton/Lingwebsites.htm

4. Norfolk Dialect

Norfolk is not simply a word that describes a county."Norfolk" describes also a language,a
humour and a way of life. Spoken Norfolk has a stout and uniquely resistant quality and only
people born in the county are able properly to penetrate it and repeat it with their own
tongues. Just as their language, so also the people of Norfolk are tough, resistant and
impenetrable. They guard to themselves the secrets of their language and of their humour. Yet
humour there is in the Norfolk people,riotous and abundant. When you read Norfolk tales,
remember that they are tales about a highly observant, subtle and recondite people.Therefore,
always think twice before you laugh at a Norfolk tale - the laugh might be on you!"

http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Acres/5564/dialect.html

5. Dialects and accents of English

http://www.unc.edu/~jlsmith/pht-url.html - (10)

6. Dialects And Accents Of England

Here you will find downloadable mp3 recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region
you selected, plus textfiles giving their biographical details, and scholarly commentary in
some cases.

http://www.ku.edu/~idea/europe/england/england.htm

7. Worldwide Accents of English
First, you can listen to real accentsworldwide either by renting films (obviously), by listening
to satellite channels (even more obvious) or by connecting to the following sites which have
audio language material of various kinds: BBC World Service (mainly RP and UK accents),
BBC Words Words Words (mainly RP and UK accents), CNN (mainly American accents), Reel
Radio (regional American), C-SPAN, ActDen (Canadian).
Or else, if these lines are slow (THEY ARE!) or if you wan to to revise material done in class,
you can click below on the accent you want to hear and you'll get a short example through
your headphones.
http://www.gazzaro.it/accents/files/accents2.html
8. Dialects for Download
Upper Class, Middle Class….Dialects
http://www.angelfire.com/geek/tappet/dialect/dialdown.html
http://www.collectbritain.co.uk/collections/dialects/
English Accents and Dialects
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_English
British English
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dialects_of_the_English_language
List of English language dialects
http://www.ku.edu/~idea/
Archive of International dialects of English
http://members.tripod.com/~rjschellen/EnglishNums.htm
Pronunciation charts of different dialects of English
http://englishlanguage.allinfoabout.com/dialects/spelling.html
English spelling and pronunciation
“English Dialects” – Pages on the Internet
List of dialects of the English language
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dialects_of_English
This is a list of varieties of the English language; each with link to an own page with
definition

Fun page: The Dialectizer
http://www.rinkworks.com/dialect/
Convert English text to any of several comic dialects.

The Dialects of American English
http://pandora.cii.wwu.edu/vajda/ling201/test3materials/AmericanDialects.htm
historic overview

The speech accent archive
http://accent.gmu.edu/
The speech accent archive uniformly presents a large set of speech samples from a variety of
language backgrounds. Native and non-native speakers of English read the same paragraph
and are carefully transcribed. The archive is used by people who wish to compare and analyze
the accents of different English speakers.

Naturalness and Artifice in Modern English Dialectology:

The Case of Renspeak
http://linguisticspage.homestead.com/files/iawe8.doc

-Variation in English and the Concept of Dialects
-Renspeak: History and Development
Dialects And Accents Of England:
http://www.ku.edu/~idea/europe/england/england.htm

Here you will find downloadable mp3 recordings of accent/dialect speakers from the region
you selected, plus textfiles giving their biographical details, and scholarly commentary in
some cases.


English accents: links to additional materials:
http://www.let.uu.nl/~Rene.Kager/personal/TV2/accents.htm
There are a lot of interesting links to websides with recordings of speakers from different
regions/ countries. (e.g. http://www.alt-usage-english.org/audio_archive.shtml)
2001 The Language Samples Project:
http://www.ic.arizona.edu/~lsp/BritishEnglish.html
A webside which deals with different aspects of British English (Background of British
English; Geography of British English; Sociolinguistic issues of British English; Accents
within England).
Regional accents of English speakers:
This article contains information on Regional accents of English speakers.
The regional accents of English speakers show great variation across the areas where
English is spoken as a first language. This article provides an overview of the many
identifiable variations in pronunciation, usually deriving from the phoneme inventory of the
local dialect, of the local variety of Standard English between various populations of native
English speakers
http://www.infoslurp.com/information/Regional_accents_of_English_speakers
1) International Dialects of English Archive Since 1997
       http://www.ku.edu/~idea/
The International Dialects of English Archive, IDEA, was created in 1997 as a repository of
primary source recordings for actors and other artists in the performing arts. Its home is the
Department of Theatre and Film at the University Of Kansas, in Lawrence, KS, USA; while
associate editors form a global network. All recordings are in English, are of native speakers,
and you will find both English language dialects and English spoken in the accents of other
languages. The recordings are downloadable and playable for both PC and Macintosh
computers. The development of this website is supported, in part, by grants from the
University of Kansas General Research Fund and the Kimbell Faculty Enrichment Fund. The
Founder and Director is Professor Paul Meier. The Technical Director and Webmaster for the
archive is Shawn M. Muller.

2)TREDS: The Repository of English Dialect Samples
http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/treds/
These recordings of different varieties of English were made by the students in my Dialects of
English course (Linguistics 80) at Harvard University between 1997 and 2003, with the
exception of a few recordings that I made myself over that same period. Any and all
constructive comments, suggestions, and new audio contributions are welcome; email me at
vaux@uwm.edu.

3)      Accents and Dialects
http://www.bl.uk/collections/sound-archive/accents.html
The British Library Sound Archive has a large collection of recordings suitable for the study
of accents and dialects. Most oral history collections held by the Archive contain recordings
of dialect and accent interest, and searching the catalogue by locality or place-name is one
means of accessing such material.


4)       English Dialects Online; Lang Book Notice List
http://linguistlist.org/issues/15/15-576.html
The British Library's "Collect Britain" project has just put 131
recordings of Northern English dialects on-line at:

=>     http://www.collectbritain.co.uk/collections/dialects/   (English Accents and Dialects)

The recordings are from the Survey of English Dialects and the
Millennium Memory Bank.
Peter Christian, Goldsmiths College, London

5)     English accents: links to additional materials
http://www.let.uu.nl/~Rene.Kager/personal/TV2/accents.htm
A list of links is offered. To every link there can be found a short note of what this link will
lead to.

6)     English Dialects and Regional Variants
http://dir.yahoo.com/Social_Science/Linguistics_and_Human_Languages/Languages/Specific_Langua
ges/English/Dialects_and_Regional_Variants/
The Yahoo! Directory is an online guide to the World Wide Web. It is catalog of sites created
by a staff of editors who visit and evaluate web sites, and then organize them into subject-
based categories and sub-categories.In one of these subcategories a lot of links to many
interesting “English Dialect Sites” are offered.