Comments by nationalss

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									I just sent this post to a bunch of my friends as I agree with
most of what you’re saying here and the way you’ve presented it
is awesome.

I also blog from time to time on this stuff. In fact, here’s an
expert from my most recent blog post…

People can spend hundreds and hundreds of hours on building a radio controlled plane. It
is a hobby that is very pervasive throughout the world, and no matter where you can go
you can find at least a few die-hard enthusiasts who will continue to devote their time to
creating the best radio controlled plane possible. Some people get started on the project
on a whim, without putting proper thought into the amount of effort that it will take to get
finished. If you are thinking about making a radio controlled plane, you should know
exactly what will be required of you. You may decide that it is too much work for too
little payoff – or you may be passionate enough to stick with it and give it a try.

The complete post can be viewed easily on the following page…

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

Keep up the good work,
<YOURNAME>

###

I agree with most of what you’re saying. I just posted
something similar to what you’re talking about on my blog.

Here’s part of what I said…

QSL cards:
The Q code is a standardized collection of three-letter message encodings, all starting
with the letter "Q", initially developed for commercial radiotelegraph communication,
and later adopted by other radio services, especially amateur radio. In today’s audio
signal transmission age, the Q codes are not essential. but still in use and are viewed as a
sort of tradition.

If you want to check out the full context and leave a comment
you can check out the full post here…

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

Talk to you later,
<YOURNAME>

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While we don’t agree on everything in your post, I do tend to
get a refreshing view every time I read one of your posts.

Here’s a related comment from a post that I recently published…

After you have gained this essential basic understanding of the way that radio controlled
cars work, you can start on whatever you want your next project to be. For most people,
their goal is to build a model car from wood or plastic, install the electrical components,
paint it, apply decals, and basically get it looking as good and performing as good as
possible. Others may want to build an incredibly fast remote controlled car to show off to
friends. No matter what you want to do, you will only be able to achieve it if you take it
one step at a time and learn everything there is to know about remote controlled hobbies.

If you’d like to read and comment on that statement, check out
the full blog post and get in touch.

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

Thanks,
<YOURNAME>

###

I recently posted something related to this on my blog over at…

Toy cars aren’t the only radio controlled hobby. Remote controlled boats are also very
popular. It is fairly easy to convert a boat toy to be radio controlled. The biggest
challenge faced by those trying to make a radio controlled boat is the issue of having a
waterproof area for the engine and electrical equipment. Usually this is solved by placing
the motor in the hull of the boat, and having the propeller emerge underwater through
some sort of rubber, watertight seal. It is a good idea to buy this part of the boat pre-
made, since a do-it-yourself, trial and error approach could lead to quite a few ruined
engines before you get it right.

Take a look and please feel free to drop in a comment with your
own two cents as well…

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

Thank you,
<YOUR NAME>

###

While we don’t agree on everything in your post, I do tend to
get a refreshing view every time I read one of your posts.

Here’s a related comment from a post that I recently published…

The most important part is to choose the day and the place carefully. On the ideal day,
there are perfectly clear skies, with little to no wind. Hopefully it is also warm, but if it
isn’t that won’t jeopardize your mission (unless you are shivering so much that you can’t
effectively control the plane). You should go to a place that offers some sort of good
take-off point. Sidewalks and roads are perfect for this. You should also try to look for an
area that is low on houses, trees, and preferably doesn’t have many people around.

If you’d like to read and comment on that statement, check out
the full blog post and get in touch.

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

Thanks,
<YOURNAME>

###

I tend to agree with most of what you said in your post but I
did post something related on my blog a while back.

Here’s just some of what I said in that post…

Of course, the first thing you need is the raw material that will be used to construct the
project. Most radio controlled projects are made out of wood. If your plans don’t call for
a specific type, you will have to choose it yourself, which can be tough. Balsa wood is the
most popular choice, especially for toy airplanes and helicopters. It is extremely light,
while maintaining a good level of solidity. You can build an entire airplane frame out of
it, and it will have a minimal amount of flex. IF you are building a larger model of an
airplane or other vehicle, then balsa may be too soft, in which case you will want to look
for other woods.

Give it a read and if you have any opinions on it of your own,
feel free to give me a shout…

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

Thanks,
<YOUR NAME>

###

I just book marked your blog on Digg and StumbleUpon. I enjoy
reading your commentaries.

I also run a blog that may be of interest that I’d love to share
with you. I recently stated that…

The benefit of online search is that distance is not a factor, and there are virtually no other
restrictions. You may also meet with more experienced hobbyists who can guide you
pretty well in pursuing your hobby. Talking to experienced hobbyists can help you make
a good decision, and can help you learn a lot. There is a lot available online and someone
must know where and how to get to the useful information. You must try to collect
information on the history of the hobby that you are pursuing, and the current issues and
contemporary relevant things with regard to the hobby.

Feel free to poke around my blog and leave a comment. Us
quality bloggers have to stick together!

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

Peace,
<YOURNAME>

###

Check out my commentary on this subject matter (reprinted from
by blog)…

The contests are usually sponsored events, and can last anywhere between a few hours
and 2 days, the world wide contests being two days usually. It can be local in a specific
region, or may involve traveling a long distance. It can be a cumulative contest taking
place over many weekends, or a sprint contest which lasts only a few hours. The rules are
specific for the event and they include which stations (which regions) may participate and
the like.

As you can see, our opinions aren’t exactly the same but for the
most part they serve the same purpose.

Here’s the full post…

<YOUR BLOG URL>

I wish you success with your blog,
<YOUR NAME>

###

While this subject isn’t the hardest to write on, it certainly
is hard to get right when you do. (No pun intended).

Here’s an excerpt from my blog on the same subject…

The requirement to be certified killed the enthusiasm in many amateurs, and the number
of amateurs dwindled. But then after WWI, there was a boom. The first radio clubs were
formed in 1909 and this was the beginning of the radio hobbies which included radio as a
part of the hobby activity.

I’ll make sure to re-visit your blog and post comments from time
to time. I enjoy your commentary and attention to the message.

In the mean time, here’s a link to the full post the above
excerpt came out of…

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

More later,
<YOURNAME>

###

Thanks for the informative commentary.

You might find my latest blog post of interest if you’re really
into the subject.

Here’s a clip of one of my opinions…

For small inquiries that don’t require hands-on assistance, you can use the internet. There
are numerous online communities for radio controlled hobbies, which come in the form
of message boards, mailing lists, or blogs. These can be found with a quick search engine
keyword, and are usually home to numerous extremely intelligent people whose
combined knowledge covers pretty much everything about radio controlled hobbies. If
you ask a question of these communities, you will almost immediately receive multiple
helpful responses. Using advanced technology like digital cameras and microphones, you
can get an even more personal response.

You can read the full post as well as many other related posts
here…

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

See you there!
<YOUR NAME>
###

You certainly deserve a round of applause for your post and more
specifically, your blog in general. Very high quality material.

I run a related blog and recently said this in a new post I
published…

The first decade of the century saw many entrepreneurs and experimenters working with
wireless radio but it was about at the near end of the first decade that definite hobby
interests sparked. Radio signals were originally produced by spark transmitters, which
were noisy and inefficient. Then the alternator-transmitter and then the arc-transmitter
came into being.

Of course, the above is just a portion of a post. You can check
out the full post as well as many others here…

<INSERT BLOG URL HERE>

To your success,
<YOURNAME>

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