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					Tend My Sheep: Providing
Mental Health Care for
Congregations & the Poor

           Charles Suhayda, Ph.D.
  First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood

       Ana Wong-McDonald, Ph.D.
       The Salvation Army – Haven
             John 21: 15-17

   …Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon son
    of John, do you love me more than
    these?”
   “Yes, Lord,” Peter replied, “you know I
    love you.”
   “Then feed my lambs,” Jesus told him.


                                              2
            John 21: 15-17

   Jesus repeated the question: “Simon
    son of John, do you love me?”
   “Yes, Lord,” Peter said, “you know I
    love you.”
   “Then take care of my sheep,” Jesus
    said.


                                           3
             John 21: 15-17
   Once more he asked him, “Simon son of
    John, do you love me?”
   Peter was grieved that Jesus asked the
    question a third time. He said, “Lord,
    you know everything. You know I love
    you.”
   Jesus said, “Then feed my sheep.”

                                             4
        Matthew 25:40

Jesus said: “Whatever you do for the
least of these brothers and sisters of
mine, you do it unto me.”

            (Paraphrased)


                                         5
     A Call to Social Righteousness
Is this not the fast which I choose, to loosen the bonds of
   wickedness, to undo the bands of the yoke, and let the
   oppressed go free, and break every yoke?
Is it not to divide your bread with the hungry, and bring the
   homeless poor into the house; when you see the naked to
   cover him; and not hide yourself from your own flesh?
Then your light will break out like dawn, and your recovery
   will speedily spring forth; and your righteousness will go
   before you; the glory of the Lord will be your rear guard.
And those from among you will rebuild the ancient ruins; you
   will raise up the age-old foundations; and you will be called
   the repairer of the breach, the restorer of the streets in
   which to dwell.               Isaiah 58: 6-8, 12
                                                               6
    Call to seek the common good
    and peace of the community

And seek the welfare (peace) of the city
 where I have sent you into exile, and pray
 to the Lord on its behalf; for in its welfare
 you will have welfare.
                               Jeremiah 29:7



                                                 7
      Call to provide extravagant care
      for the sick and the wounded

Jesus replied and said, “A certain man was going down from
  Jerusalem to Jericho; and he fell among robbers, and they
  stripped him and beat him, and went off leaving him half
  dead…But a certain Samaritan, who was on a journey, came
  upon him; and when he saw him, he felt compassion, and
  came to him, and bandaged up his wounds, pouring oil and
  wine on them; and he put him on his our beast, and brought
  him to an inn, and took care of him. And the next day he
  took out two days salary and gave it to the innkeeper and
  said, „Take care of him; and whatever more you spend,
  when I return, I will repay you‟.” Luke 10: 30-31, 33-35

                                                             8
    Call to seek peace
Seeking: Shalam, Shalom and Peace
 Shalam---to be whole, sound, safe

 Shalom---health, security, tranquility, welfare, harmony

 Eirene---peace and rest. Such a state of peace is the
  object of divine and saving promise and is brought about
  by God‟s mercy, granting deliverance and freedom from all
  the distresses that are experienced as a result of sin.
 John 14:27---Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to
  you; not as the world gives, do I give to you. Let not your
  heart be troubled, nor let it be fearful.


                                                                9
    Specific Actions

Every child of God can help by…
 Raising awareness about mental illness

 Working toward stigma busting

 Lovingly accept people with mental illness




                                               10
      Specific Actions – Level I
Steps that all churches can do:
   Pastoral counseling
   In specific cases, refer/collaborate with a mental
    health professional
   Incorporate mental illness into intercessory prayer
    time during worship service
   Preach on the subject
   Visit congregants with mental illness when they are
    in the hospital
                                                     11
        Specific Actions – Level I
Steps that all churches can do:
   Publicize issues in church bulletin or newsletter
   Advertise the National Day of Prayer for Mental Illness
    which is the first Tuesday in October. (Bulletin insert
    available at www.MentalHealthMinistries.net)‫‏‬
   Healing prayers and services for illnesses (e.g., Sacrament
    of Anointing the Sick) should include mental illness
   Host an educational seminar with a mental health
    professional‫‏‬
   Invite individuals with mental illness to give testimonies of
    successful recoveries
                                                                    12
       Specific Actions – Level II
Steps necessitating a coordinator or team
     Hold NAMI groups in the church (i.e., support groups for
      people with mental disorders and their families)‫‏‬
     Expand existing services (e.g., meals for the homeless) to
      include outreach for people with mental illness
     Have a specific outreach program for people with mental
      disorders (e.g., model by Lambert & Lambert , “Mental
      Illness and Faith Community Outreach”).



                                                               13
       Specific Actions – Level II
Steps necessitating a coordinator or team
     Address the specific needs of people with mental
      illness by having designated ministries (e.g.,
      Shepherd‟s class) designed specifically for them
     Stephen‟s Ministries
     Structured counseling program (Refer to book,
      Lay Counseling, by S.Y.Tan)‫‏‬


                                                     14
      Specific Actions – Level III
Steps for a fuller continuum of social services
   Model by Catholic Social Services of Lincoln, NE
    (Benes, Walsh, McMinn, Dominguez, & Aikins, 2000).

   Indirect services (for prevention) include
    newsletters, mailings, workshops, and specific
    outreach (to schools, hospitals, etc.)‫‏‬
   Direct services (for remedial psychological
    evaluation and treatment) include crisis response,
    support groups, psychological assessment and
    counseling.                                        15
                       Video


      Creating Caring Congregations
             By Mental Health Ministries

    A five-step program for education,
commitment, welcome, support, & advocacy.
      Handout is posted on conference website.


                                                 16
Example of a Level III Ministry




 Hollywood HealthCare Partnership




                                    17
       Ministry Context in Hollywood

   Hollywood is a regional, national and international
    destination point for tourists and those who relocate to Los
    Angeles seeking new opportunities and a fresh start in life.
   Hollywood is in the midst of a 40-yr urban redevelopment
    project, managed by the Community Redevelopment
    Agency (CRA) that is rapidly changing the infrastructure
    and social fabric of the community.
   First phase of redevelopment revived theater and
    entertainment venues, restaurants and nightclubs, and
    media production companies.
                                                               18
       Ministry Context in Hollywood

   Second phase, new hotels and market rate and luxury
    housing units are under construction and in the planning
    phase.
   Many in Hollywood struggle to make ends meet: senior
    citizens living on social security, immigrant families from
    Latin America, homeless individuals, and those who are
    homeless because of health and mental health problems.
   We have adopted a strategy that has increased our
    effectiveness and connectedness to those entities in our
    city who serve these vulnerable populations, address
    relevant social issues, and work for the common good of
    all.
                                                                  19
       Strategy for Local Ministry at
       Hollywood Presbyterian Church

   To empower those we serve, to advocate with and
    for those in need, to network and form
    partnerships with agencies beyond the church, to
    shape public policy as it pertains to the common
    good, and to facilitate opportunities for our
    congregation to participate in community service
    activities in our city.
   To address the needs of the whole person:
    physical, emotional, mental, and spiritual.

                                                   20
A relational understanding of
poverty       Walking with the Poor
         (Bryant Myers,   , Orbis Books, 2000)




                                                 21
     Real Stories

Mental health cases: Support & empowerment:
 Adam---USC student, homeless, bi-polar

 Jimmy---SSI, housed, schizophrenia

 Bob---Canadian, homeless, clinical depression,
  alcoholic
 Michael---Thai prison, extradition to US, homeless,
  schizophrenia
 Tony---homeless, schizophrenia, travel to NYC that
  never materializes
                                                    22
      Protecting the Vulnerable

   Life insurance fraud and murder
   Medical fraud
   Arson attacks
   Civil rights---Jones vs. City of Los Angeles



                                                   23
    Creating a Healing Environment

   Safe, comfortable place
   Hospitality
   Respecting human dignity
   Common civility, personal humility
   Gratitude
   Equality

                                         24
Creating a Healing Environment

   Encouraging healthy relationships
   Mediating conflict
   Opportunities to volunteer/participate
   Listening, caring, loving
   Prayer individually and together
   Pastoral care

                                             25
      Example of a
      Level III Ministry
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
   The Partnership is a collaboration between local
    community organizations to provide free medical,
    mental, spiritual, nutritional, and social services
    to the homeless and disenfranchised in
    Hollywood, CA.




                                                          26
   Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
VISION
 Develop an outreach program to reach
  homeless and disenfranchised in Hollywood
 Addressing physical, mental, and spiritual

  health, as well as case management
 Needed an alliance of health care and social
  services agencies

                                            27
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
Forming alliance with core partners
   Physical Health:
     QueensCare
     Dept. of Health Services
     Verdugo Medical
     L. A. Midnight Mission (nutrition)‫‏‬
   Mental Health:
     Behavioral Health Services
     Hollywood Mental Health

                                           28
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
Forming alliance with core partners
   Social Services/Case Management:
     Hunger Action Los Angeles
     Youth Link of America
     Gettlove
     U. S. Vets
   Spiritual Health:
     Hollywood Presbyterian Church (venue for the
     program)‫‏‬
   Six core organizations present weekly; others present
    once/mo

                                                       29
        Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
   Vision & Preparation: 2003
   Implementation: 2004
   Schedule and Structure:
       Time: Wednesday, 10:30 am - 12:15 pm
       Location: Fellowship Hall at the Church
       Hot Meal: Served from 11:30 am – noon
       Services: Available at partner booths
       Tangible Necessities: Free to attendees
                                                  30
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
Public Announcements:
 Letters & flyers sent to local agencies

 Service providers distribute flyers on
  street to homeless
 Community and professional

  presentations


                                            31
    Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
Resources:
 Service providers contribute staff time & tangible
  goods
 Local agencies (e.g., dental society) give donations

 MOU with PATH enabled program to receive hygiene
  items
 Received 2 grants from Hollywood Rotary Foundation

 Received Christmas gifts (e.g., hats and gloves) from
  donors


                                                      32
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership:
2006 Client Survey
   48 surveys collected over 2
    Wednesdays in October
   Age range: 21 – 78
   Average age: 45
   Gender: 69% Males, 31% Females



                                     33
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership:
2006 Client Survey
   Ethnicity:
       52% Caucasian
       23% African American
       25% Other
   Heard about program through:
       50%   Word of mouth/friend
       21%   Church programs
       14%   Came before/Referral
       15%   Other
                                    34
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership:
2006 Client Survey
   Came from:
      73% Hollywood area (35)‫‏‬
      10% Los Angeles vicinity (5)‫‏‬
      17% Other
   Why come to outreach:
      48% Food/lunch (23)‫‏‬
      28% For services (13)‫‏‬
      24% Other


                                      35
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership:
2006 Client Survey
   Status of current housing:
      60%   Living on the streets (29)‫‏‬
      10%   Living in car (5)‫‏‬
      10%   Living with family/friends (5)‫‏‬
      10%   Has own apartment (5)‫‏‬
      10%   Other



                                              36
    Hollywood HealthCare Partnership:
    2006 Client Survey
                                                                            Needs in order of importance:
                      Rating of Services
    With "7" as Most Importatn and "1" as Least Important
                                                                            •  Food
                                                                               Housing
7
                                                                            •
6

5
                                                                            •  Healthcare
4                                                                           •  Transportation
3                                                                           •  Employment
2                                                                           •  Spiritual Care
1
    F       H        HS         T         E       SC        LA              •  Legal assistance
    Key: F = Food, H = Housing, HS = Health Services, T = Transportation,
         E = Employment, SC = Spiritual Care, LA = Legal Assistance




                                                                                                       37
       Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
                  Summary
   Started with 6 clients on Jan. 7, 2004
   Attendance rose to 50 weekly in 2005
   Started once/mo free give-aways in 2005
   Gettlove provides grocery/hygiene items in Fall 2006
    (a Gettlove bag given to each attendee weekly; the giving
    ceased in Fall 2008 due to budget constraints of Gettlove)‫‏‬
   Today, average 100 clients/Wednesday
   Twice/mo yoga exercises with yoga instructor
   Monthly "10 Minute Talk" on public health topics
   Annual Christmas party with turkey luncheon and gifts

                                                              38
    Hollywood HealthCare Partnership:
    Numbers of Persons Served

Types of Services   2004   2005   2006   2007
Medical Care        430    950    950    1127
Mental Health       200    380    200    200
Employment          200    300    60     500
Soc Serv/Housing    700    1600   1000   1100
Tangible Goods      250    1350   2500   6000
Spiritual Support   400    450    150    125
Health Education    150    150    630    6000
Meals               2400   2400   3000   6250

                                                39
      Hollywood HealthCare Partnership:
      Outcome

   Over 20,000 persons served to date
   Over 5,500 received help in health care
   Over 6,500 received help in social services and
    case management
   Over 13,500 received free tangible items (e.g.,
    groceries, socks, hygiene kits)‫‏‬
   Hollywood HealthCare Partnership is the recipient
    of a 2005 Achievement Award from the National
    Association of Counties
                                                        40
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
  Fellowship Hall at the Church




                                   41
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
Coffee & Refreshments for Guests




                                   42
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
  Guests at Christmas Program




                                   43
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
Midnight Mission Distributed Lunch




                                 44
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
    Annual Christmas Program




                                   45
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
  Staff Distributing Christmas Gifts




                                       46
Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
Dept of Public Health Providing Services




                                       47
            Video

Hollywood HealthCare Partnership
Questions & Discussions
           Charles Suhayda, Ph.D.
  First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood
           cgsuhayda@gmail.com
              (213) 880-3261

       Ana Wong-McDonald, Ph.D.
       The Salvation Army – Haven
ana.wong-mcdonald@usw.salvationarmy.org
       (310) 478-3711, Ext. 43653
Thank you!

				
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