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Monitoring Report July 2006

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									          Sun Prairie Area School District

                 2005-2006
             Monitoring Reports
  Working together to provide the best
education for every student by building a
        community of learners.

                 July 2006
            Our mission: To maximize each student’s learning by:
                      Partnering with parents, community & businesses;
                      Implementing high quality, focused curriculum addressing essential learning;
                      Ensuring best practices in instruction & assessment;
                      Using data to drive instructional decision-making;
                      Recognizing and meeting the unique needs of individuals;
                      Inspiring lifelong learning for all students and staff; and
                      Supporting collaborative learning teams.

                                                                  Table of Contents
Chapter                                                  District Priority Goal(s)
  1              Improve reading achievement
  2              Improve mathematics achievement
  3              Implement service delivery models that promote the goals adopted in the Special Education
                 Strategic Plan.
      4          Ensure adequate classrooms to meet the needs of the growing student population without
                 compromising existing levels of programs and services.
      5          Increase every staff member’s knowledge and skills of cultural competence and differentiated
                 instruction in order to improve student learning in our increasingly diverse community.
  6              Increase students’ sense of connectedness to their schools.
Chapter                                       Topic Area or Request from the School Board
  7              Technology
  8              Alternative Education
                 (Added 3-28-05 by Board directive)
      9          Resources above state and local aid
                 (Required by Board Procedure KH-R)
     10          Substitute Usage
                 (Added by Board directive 2001-2002)
     11          Staff Development
                 (Added 3-28-05 by Board directive)


D:\Docstoc\Working\pdf\56bd9581-f2f9-491d-8852-52ea0c92081a.doc                                          2
                                                         Chapter 1
                                                   Report prepared by: Evelyn Smojver



School Board Priority Goal 1: Improve Reading Achievement

                             DISTRICT-WIDE READING TARGET INDICATORS
                                                                                                03/04                04/05               05/06
Goal 1: Improve Reading Achievement                                                             Result               Result              Result
Elementary School Level
1E1     90% of students in K-2nd meet or exceed the end of grade reading benchmarks        K – NA
                                                                                           1st – 345/403 86%
                                                                                                               K – 253/416 61%
                                                                                                               1st – 375/438 86%
                                                                                                                                   K – 332/462 72%
                                                                                                                                   1st – 390/432 90%
        as measured by running records (K= 4, 1st = 16; 2nd = 24)                          2nd – 327/393 83%   2nd – 317/394 80%   2nd – 376/459 82%
                                                                                            Overall - NA        Overall – 76%       Overall – 81%
1E2     90% or more of Sun Prairie 3rd grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced”
        readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)                90.9%                91.2%               89%
                                                                                               (WRCT)                (WRCT)
        and the mean scale score for reading increases from the previous year.                                                          468.5
        (WRCT prior to 2005-06, no scale score)
1E3     90% or more of Sun Prairie 4th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced”
                                                                                                                                        87%
        readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)                  84%                  85%
                                                                                                                                        487.0
        and the mean scale score for reading increases from the previous year.
1E4     90% or more of Sun Prairie 5th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced”
                                                                                                                                        88%
        readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)                  NA                   NA
                                                                                                                                        493.7
        and the mean scale score for reading increases from the previous year.
1E5     The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who are “proficient” or               NE - 89%
                                                                                                                   NE - 88%            NE – 92%
        “advanced” readers as measured by MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY               E - 63%
                                                                                                                   E - 69%             E – 71%
        economically disadvantaged students and FAY non-economically disadvantaged              -26%                 -19%               -21%
                                                                                              (Gr 2,3,5)
        students. Improvement = reduction.
1E6     The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who are “proficient” or                W – 88%
                                                                                                                    W – 90%            W – 89%
                                                                                               B – 52%
        “advanced” readers as measured by MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY                                     B – 62%            B – 67%
                                                                                                -36%                 -28%               -22%
        Black students and FAY White students. Improvement = reduction.                        (Gr 2,3,5)


      Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                               3
1E7      The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who are “proficient” or            ND – 88%
                                                                                                                  ND – 89%             ND – 90%
                                                                                               D – 44%
         “advanced” readers as measured by MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY                                      D – 57%              D – 65%
                                                                                                  -44%                 -32%                 -25%
         disabled students and FAY non-disabled students. Improvement = reduction.          (Gr 2,3,5)
1E8      78% or more of 2nd grade students meet the fall to spring growth target in
                                                                                                   83%                  81%                  89%
         reading as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
1E9      70% or more of 3rd grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in              76%                  80%                  70%
         reading as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                        (fall to spring)     (fall to spring)    (spring to spring)
1E10     70% or more of 4th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in                                   80%                  70%
                                                                                                     NA
         reading as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                                             (fall to spring)    (spring to spring)
1E11     70% or more of 5th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in              74%                  80%                  70%
         reading as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                        (fall to spring)     (fall to spring)    (spring to spring)


Middle School Level
         90% or more of Sun Prairie 6th grade FAY students are “proficient” or
1M1      “advanced” readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts                                                             83%
                                                                                                     NA                  NA
         Exam (WKCE) and the mean scale score for reading increases from the                                                                505.7
         previous year. (2005-06 Baseline)
1M2      90% or more of Sun Prairie 7th grade FAY students are “proficient” or
         “advanced” readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts                                                             90%
                                                                                                     NA                  NA
         Exam (WKCE) and the mean scale score for reading increases from the                                                                521.3
         previous year. (2005-06 Baseline)
1M3      90% or more of Sun Prairie 8th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced”
                                                                                                                                            90%
         readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)                   85%                  89%
                                                                                                                                            532.3
         and the mean scale score for reading increases from the previous year.
1M4      The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or
                                                                                                NE – 82%             NE – 83%              NE – 91%
         “advanced” readers as measured the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam               E – 57%              E – 54%               E – 70%
         (WKCE) is 10% or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged                      -25%                 -29%                 -21%
         students and FAY non-economically disadvantaged students.                              (MAP 6)              (MAP 6,7)
          Improvement = reduction. (MAP prior to 2005-06)
1M5      The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or                 W – 81%              W – 82%              W – 90%
         “advanced” readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts                  B – 38%              B – 47%              B – 69%
         Exam (WKCE) is 10% or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY                     -43%                 -35%                 -21%
         White students. Improvement = reduction. (MAP prior to 2005-06)                        (MAP 6)              (MAP 6,7)



       Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                                   4
1M6     The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or
                                                                                         ND – 81%           ND – 85%             ND – 95%
        “advanced” readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts           D –37%             D – 22%              D – 37%
        Exam (WKCE) is 10% or less when comparing FAY non-disabled students and            -44%               -63%                -58%
        FAY disabled students. Improvement = reduction. (MAP prior to 2005-06)           (MAP 6)           (MAP 6,7)

1M7     70% or more of 6th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in
        reading as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                      73%                75%                 70%
                                                                                        (fall to spring)   (fall to spring)   (spring to spring)

1M8     70% or more of 7th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in
        reading as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                       NA                76%                 74%
                                                                                                           (fall to spring)   (spring to spring)

1M9     70% or more of 8th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in
        reading as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                       NA                 NA                 71%
                                                                                                                              (spring to spring)


High School Level

        90% or more of Sun Prairie 10th grade FAY students are “proficient” or
        “advanced” readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts                                                    86%
1H1                                                                                         75%                70%
        Exam (WKCE) and the mean scale score for reading increases from the                                                       554.6
        previous year.
1H2     The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced”
        readers as measured the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE) is          NE – 78%           NE – 72 %            NE – 90%
        10% or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged students and           E – 58%            E – 53%              E – 60%
        FAY non-economically disadvantaged students.                                       -20%               -19%                -30%
         Improvement = reduction.
1H3     The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced”
                                                                                          W – 79%           W – 74%              W – 90%
        readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)           B – 35%           B – 30%              B – 40%
        is 10% or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY White students.           -44%               -44%                -50%
        Improvement = reduction. )
1H4     The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced”
                                                                                         ND – 83%           ND – 73%             ND – 94%
        readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)          D – 26%            D – 30%              D – 26%
        is 10% or less when comparing FAY non-disabled students and FAY disabled          -57%               -43%                -68%
        students. Improvement = reduction.

      Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                          5
1H5     90% of 9th grade students score proficient or advanced on the „Literal
        Understanding‟ component of the 2nd semester district reading indicator given in                       52%                      69%                           74%
        “Exploring English‟ classes. (Score of 3 or higher)
1H6     0 students are required to take the reading competency course for failing to pass
        the WKCE or MAP reading assessment.
        This value does not include students’ w/disabilities or English Language                                NA                          NA                           7
        Learners who are allowed accommodations to meet the requirement in
        alternative ways.



      ELEMENTARY SCHOOL-BASED READING TARGET INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                       CHB                ES                  HZ                NS                    RO                  WS
S1.        Elementary Goal 1: Improve Reading
           Achievement
S1E1       90% of students in K-2nd meet or exceed the end of      K – 45/74 61%     K – 63/93 68%      K – 70/76 92%     K – 67/79 85%          K – 54/72 75%     K – 33/78 42%
                                                                   1st – 64/69 93%   1st – 99/102 97%   1st – 27/29 93%   1st – 78/83 94%        1st – 67/79 85%   1st – 55/64 86%
           grade reading benchmarks as measured in running         2nd – 68/85 80%   2nd – 83/86 97%    2nd – 35/43 81%   2nd –73/85 86%         2nd - 73/85 86%   2nd – 50/72 69%
           records (K= 4, 1st = 16; 2nd = 24)                       Overall -78%      Overall- 87%         Overall- 89%      Overall-87%          Overall- 82%          Overall-64%
S1E2       90% or more of the school‟s 3rd -5th grade FAY
           students are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as
                                                                     85%               95%                 87%               85%                   94%                 83%
           measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts
                                                                    1433.9            1476.0              1449.3            1432.7                1479.7              1416.6
           Exam (WKCE) and the combined mean scale score
           for reading increases from the previous year.
S1E3       Based on the percentage of reading proficiency as
           measured on the 5th grade WKCE, a school ranks in
                                                                         6                 2                   5                 8                     3                  10
           the top three in comparison with ten demographically
           similar schools.
S1E4       The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who
           are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as measured by                       NE – 96%                              NE – 88%                                  NE – 85%
                                                                     NE – 92%                              NE – 89%                                NE – 94%
           MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY                      E—51%             E—90%                E-- *           E – 61%                 E– *               E – 74%
           economically disadvantaged students and FAY non-          -41%                -6%                                 -28%                                        -11%
           economically disadvantaged students. Improvement =
           reduction.                                                increase        decrease                NA             increase                 NA              decrease
           ✴ – Group size less than 20 students
      Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                                                            6
S1E5    The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who
                                                                 W – 86%    W – 96%    W – 87%                   W – 93%              W – 83%
        are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as measured by    B – 59%     B– *       B– *
                                                                                                   W – 82%
                                                                                                                  B– *                B – 69%
                                                                                                    B– *
        MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY Black              -27%                                                                 -14%
        students and FAY White students. Improvement =
                                                                             NA         NA          NA            NA
        reduction. ✴ – Group size less than 20 students.        decrease                                                          decrease

S1E6    The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who
        are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as measured by   ND – 88%   ND – 96%    ND – 92%   ND – 84%       ND – 95%         ND – 81%
                                                                D – 63%    D – 95%       D– *      D – 48%         D– *           D – 76%
        MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY disabled           -25%       -1%                    -36%                               -5%
        students and FAY non-disabled students.
         Improvement = reduction.                               decrease   decrease     NA        increase        NA              decrease
        ✴ – Group size less than 20 students.
S1E7    78% or more of 2nd grade students meet the fall to
        spring growth target in reading as measured by the        89%        97%        82%        91%           85%                  84%
        Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
S1E8    70% or more of 3rd grade students meet the spring to
        spring growth target in reading as measured by the        65%        58%        78%        68%           85%                  71%
        Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
S1E9    70% or more of 4th grade students meet the spring to
        spring growth target in reading as measured by the        67%        63%        72%        65%           86%                  66%
        Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
S1E10   70% or more of 5th grade students meet the spring to
        spring growth target in reading as measured by the        76%        76%        64%        61%           70%                  66%
        Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)


  MIDDLE LEVEL SCHOOL-BASED READING TARGET INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                                                         PMMS               PVMS
S1.     Middle School Goal 1: Improve Reading Achievement
S1M1    90% or more of the school‟s 6th – 8th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced”           89%                88%
        readers as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE) and the                  1559.9             1560.8
        combined mean scale score for reading increases from the previous year.                        (base year)     (base year)
S1M2    Based on the percentage of reading proficiency as measured on the 8th grade WKCE, a
                                                                                                             7                6
        school ranks in the top three in comparison with ten demographically similar schools.
  Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                             7
S1M3    The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as   NE – 93%     NE – 90%
        measured by the WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged                E – 67%      E – 74%
        students and FAY non-economically disadvantaged students. Improvement = reduction.                -26%         -24%
S1M4    The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as   W – 90%      W – 91%
        measured by the WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY White               B – 70%      B – 76%
        students. Improvement = reduction.                                                                -20%         -15%
S1M5    The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as   ND – 96%     ND – 94%
        measured by the WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY non-disabled students and FAY             D – 35%      D – 55%
        disabled students. Improvement = reduction.                                                       -61%         -39%
S1M6    70% or more of 6th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in reading as
                                                                                                           69%             71%
        measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
S1M7    70% or more of 7th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in reading as
                                                                                                           76%             72%
        measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
S1M8    70% or more of 8th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in reading as
                                                                                                           68%             74%
        measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)


  HIGH SCHOOL-BASED READING TARGET INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                                                                     SPHS
S1.     High School Goal 1: Improve Reading Achievement
        * = Group size less than 20 students
S1H1    90% or more of Sun Prairie 10th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as                 86%
        measured by the WKCE and the mean scale score for reading increases from the previous year.                  555.1
S1H2    Based on the percentage of reading proficiency as measured on the 10th grade WKCE, a school
                                                                                                                       3
        ranks in the top three in comparison with ten demographically similar schools.
S1H3    The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as measured           NE – 90%
        by the WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged students and FAY                   E – 60%
        non-economically disadvantaged students. Improvement = reduction.                                            -30%
S1H4    The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as measured           W – 91%
        by the WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY White students.                        B – 40%
        Improvement = reduction.                                                                                     -50%
S1H5    The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” readers as measured           ND – 94%
        by the WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY non-disabled students and FAY disabled                        D – 26%
        students. Improvement = reduction.                                                                          -68%

  Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                          8
S1H6      90% of 9th grade students score proficient or advanced on the „Literal Understanding‟ component of
                                                                                                                       74%
          the 2nd semester district reading indicator given in Exploring English.
S1H7      Any difference between Black students and White students who score proficient or advanced on the         W – 245/323 76%
          „Literal Understanding‟ component of the 2nd semester district reading indicator given in Exploring      B – 17/31 55%

          English is < 11%                                                                                            -21%
S1H8      0 students are required to take the reading competency course for failing to pass the WKCE or MAP
          reading assessment.
                                                                                                                         7
          This value does not include students’ w/disabilities or English Language Learners who are allowed
          accommodations to meet the requirement in alternative ways.


                                      Narrative Analysis of Indicators for Goal 1

The School Board and Administration have initiated, implemented and/or supported plans to improve reading achievement in the
Sun Prairie Area School District.
   1. Smaller class sizes – Primary grades; all schools
   2. SAGE Program – C.H. Bird and Westside
   3. Approval of Comprehensive Assessment Plan which includes Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) to provide additional
      diagnostic information
   4. Increase in FTE Reading Resource – 1.0 FTE in all schools
   5. Additional 1.0 FTE Reading Staff – High School; 2006-2007 3.0 FTE
   6. READ 180 Program as intervention for both middle schools
   7. READ 180 Program intervention for Northside, Westside and C. H. Bird
   8. Additional staffing for the Title I support
   9. Implementation of Reading Improvement Plans (K-2, 3-5, 6-8, 9-12, K-8 Special Education & 9-12 Special Education)

District-wide Reading Target Indicators show some evidence of success by grade level or demographic groups.
   1. 90% of 7th grade FAY (full academic year) students are proficient or advanced readers as measured by WKCE.
       90% of 8th grade FAY students are proficient or advanced readers as measured by WKCE.
       While the 90% target was not met for Grade 10 students, the increase from 70% (fall 2004) to 86% (fall 2005) students
       scoring proficient and advanced is significant.

   2. The district has set a goal that 78% of the students in Grade 2 and 70% of the students in grades 3-8 will meet or exceed
      spring growth target on MAP. These growth targets, established by national norms, are set so only 50% of the students will
      meet them. By setting higher expectations, we are expecting our students to grow academically at a higher rate, resulting in
    Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                         9
        students with higher levels of knowledge and skills. This model of higher expectations and targets mimics similar processes
        used in other high performing districts across the nation.
        a) Grade 2 exceeded the growth target of 78% (fall to spring growth).
        b) Grades 3-5 met the growth target of 70% (spring to spring growth).
        c) Grades 6-8 met or exceeded the growth target of 70% (spring to spring growth).

   3. The targeted gap between various demographic groups should be 10% or less. Current gaps, although greater than this
      10% target, have been reduced and show positive trends in Reading Achievement.
      a) When comparing FAY economically disadvantaged students to FAY non-economically disadvantaged students –
           decrease of 8% at middle level.
      b) When comparing FAY Black students to FAY White students – decrease of 6% at elementary and 14% at middle level.
      c) When comparing FAY disabled students to FAY non-disabled students – decrease of 7% at elementary.

   4. Elementary schools meeting the growth target in Reading as measured by MAP:
           C.H. Bird – grades 2, 5
           Eastside – grades 2, 5
           Horizon – grades 2, 3, 4
           Northside – grade 2
           Royal Oaks – grades 2, 3, 4, 5
           Westside – grades 2, 3

        Middle schools meeting the growth target in Reading as measured by MAP:
             Patrick Marsh – grade 7
             Prairie View – grades 6, 7, 8

   5.   When comparing 6th & 7th grade FAY Black students and FAY White students, the difference in overall percentage of
        students who are proficient or advanced readers as measured by MAP has decreased by 18%.

   6. Two of the elementary schools ranked in the top three when compared with ten demographically similar schools. Sun
      Prairie High School ranked third when compared with ten demographically similar schools.

Additional study of the data identifies areas of concern.

   1. 19% of grades K-2 students did not meet the spring reading benchmarks as determined by running records.

    Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                       10
   2. The „gap‟ when comparing the spring growth targets for students in grades 2-5 as measured by MAP is identified at 21%
      when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged students to FAY non-economically disadvantaged students.

   3. When comparing 6th-8th grade FAY disabled students to FAY non-disabled students, the „gap‟ as measured by MAP remains
      high at 58%.

   4. The „gap‟ when comparing 10th grade FAY economically disadvantaged students to FAY non-economically disadvantaged
      students is 30%.

   5. The „gap‟ when comparing 10th grade FAY Black students to FAY White students as measured by the WKCE is 50%.

   6. The „gap‟ when comparing 10th grade FAY disabled students and FAY non-disabled students as measured by the WKCE is
      58%.

   7.   Both middle schools ranked in the lower half when compared with ten demographically similar schools.


                                 Future Directions and Recommendations for Goal 1

Revisions and updates to the Reading Review Cycle and Improvement Plans will be discussed as part of the School Board Work-
Study session on Reading in August. This will be our focus.

Grades K-8
   1. Monitoring of Reading Action Plans (K-2, 3-5, 6-8) focusing on continued improvement and strategies of intervention
   2. Monitoring of Grades K-8 Special Education Action Plan in Reading, including progress monitoring and direct instruction

Grades 9-12
   1. Increased learning opportunities through implementation of Reading courses
   2. Definition and communication of the expectation for ALL teachers to be teachers of reading
   3. Implementation of plan requiring staff development over the next three years to support reading
   4. Monitoring of Grades 9-12 Reading Action Plan
   5. Implementation of Grades 9-12 Special Education Plan in Reading




    Chapter 1 (Reading)                                                                                                     11
                                                         Chapter 2
                                                   Report prepared by: Evelyn Smojver


School Board Priority Goal 2: Improve Mathematics Achievement


                           DISTRICT-WIDE MATHEMATICS TARGET INDICATORS
                                                                                                  03/04        04/05      05/06
Goal 2: Improve Math Achievement                                                                  Result       Result     Result
Elementary School Level
2E1    90% or more of Sun Prairie 3rd grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                                          79%
       mathematics as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)                 NA           NA
                                                                                                                          447.9
       and the mean scale score for math increases from the previous year.
2E2    90% or more of Sun Prairie 4th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                                          79%
       mathematics as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)                80%          77%
                                                                                                                          472.9
       and the mean scale score for math increases from the previous year.
2E3    90% or more of Sun Prairie 5th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                                          81%
       mathematics as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)                 NA           NA
                                                                                                                          492.2
       and the mean scale score for math increases from the previous year.
2E4    The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in    NE – 89%
                                                                                                              NE – 85%   NE – 92%
       math as measured by MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY economically                   E – 63%
                                                                                                              E – 72%     E – 71%
       disadvantaged students and FAY non-economically disadvantaged students.                   -26%          -13%       -21%
                                                                                                (Gr. 2,3,5)
       Improvement = reduction.
2E5    The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in    W – 88%       W – 87%    W – 89%
       math as measured by MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY Black students and             B – 52%       B – 64%    B – 58%
       FAY White students. Improvement = reduction.                                              -36%          -23%       -31%
                                                                                                (Gr. 2,3,5)

2E6     The overall percentage 2nd – 5th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in   ND – 88%
                                                                                                              ND – 87%   ND – 92%
        math as measured by MAP is 10% or less when comparing FAY disabled students             D – 44%
                                                                                                              D – 55%     D – 58%
        and FAY non-disabled students. Improvement = reduction.                                  -44%          -32%       -34%
                                                                                                (Gr. 2,3,5)

       Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                              12
2E7    78% or more of 2nd grade students meet the fall to spring growth target in
                                                                                                   84%                73%                  84%
       mathematics as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
2E8    70% or more of 3rd grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in                75%                81%                  68%
       mathematics as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                      (fall to spring)   (fall to spring)   (spring to spring)
2E9    70% or more of 4th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in                                   74%                  66%
                                                                                                    NA
       mathematics as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                                         (fall to spring)   (spring to spring)
E10    70% or more of 5th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in                68%                76%                  74%
       mathematics as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                      (fall to spring)   (fall to spring)   (spring to spring)

Middle School Level
2M1    90% or more of Sun Prairie 6th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in
       mathematics as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)
                                                                                                                                           81%
       and the mean scale score for math increases from the previous year. (2005-06                 NA                 NA
                                                                                                                                           513.6
       Baseline)

2M2    90% or more of Sun Prairie 7th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in
       mathematics as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)
                                                                                                                                           83%
       and the mean scale score for math increases from the previous year. (2005-06                 NA                 NA
                                                                                                                                           537.1
       Baseline)

2M3    90% or more of Sun Prairie 8th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in
       mathematics as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)
                                                                                                                                           79%
       and the mean scale score for math increases from the previous year. (2005-06                72%                84%
                                                                                                                                           545.9
       Baseline)

2M4    The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                 NE – 82%           NE – 86%             NE – 85%
       math as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE) is 10%              E – 57%             E – 57%              E – 62%
       or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged students and FAY non-               -25%               -29%                  -23%
       economically disadvantaged students. Improvement = reduction.                             (MAP 6)           (MAP 6,7)             (WKCE)

2M5    The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                 W – 81%            W – 86%               W – 85%
       math as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE) is 10%               B – 38%            B – 49%               B – 45%
       or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY White students.                         -43%               -37%                  -40%
        Improvement = reduction.                                                                 (MAP 6)           (MAP 6,7)             (WKCE)


      Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                                                 13
2M6     The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                 ND – 81%           ND – 87%              ND – 88%
        math as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE) is 10%              D – 37%            D – 30%               D – 24%
        or less when comparing FAY non-disabled students and FAY disabled students.               -44%               -57%                 -64%
        Improvement = reduction.                                                                  (MAP 6)           (MAP 6,7)             (WKCE)

2M7     70% or more of 6th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in
        mathematics as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                          68%                70%                  62%
                                                                                                (fall to spring)   (fall to spring)   (spring to spring)

2M8     70% or more of 7th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in
        mathematics as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                           NA                72%                  70%
                                                                                                                   (fall to spring)    (spring to spring)

2M9     70% or more of 8th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in
        mathematics as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)                           NA                 NA                  71%

2M10    50% of 7th grade students meet the criteria to take Algebra in 8th grade.                # Alg. – 63        # Alg. – 91          # Alg. – 117
                                                                                                # 7th Gr. – 401    # 7th Gr. – 403      # 7th Gr. – 428
                                                                                                    16%                23%                  27%
High School Level
2H1     90% or more of Sun Prairie 10th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                                                           84%
        mathematics as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE)                 77%                71%
                                                                                                                                           577.7
        and the mean scale score for math increases from the previous year.
2H2     The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                 NE – 79%           NE – 73%              NE – 88%
        math as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE) is 10%              E – 58%            E – 56%               E – 55%
        or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged students and FAY non-                -21%               -17%                 -30%
        economically disadvantaged students. Improvement = reduction.
2H3     The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                  W – 79%            W – 75%              W – 88%
        math as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE) is 10%               B – 34%            B – 34%              B – 40%
        or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY White students.                          -45%               -41%                 -48%
         Improvement = reduction.
2H4     The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                 ND – 84%           ND – 79%             ND – 91%
        math as measured by the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Exam (WKCE) is 10%              D – 29%             D – 34%             D – 29%
        or less when comparing FAY non-disabled students and FAY disabled students.               -55%               -45%                 -62%
        Improvement = reduction.


       Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                                                14
2H5     0 high school students are required to take the math competency course for failing to
        pass the WKCE or MAP math assessment.
                                                                                                       NA             NA                   5
        This value does not include students’ w/disabilities or English Language Learners who
        are allowed accommodations to meet the requirement in alternative ways.
2H6     90% of graduates have earned credits in Algebra and Geometry (or higher)                      # – 280        # – 265            # – 296
                                                                                                     Grads–386      Grads–354          Grads–375
                                                                                                     72.5%          74.9%               78.9%



            ELEMENTARY SCHOOL-BASED MATH TARGET INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                                 CHB        ES            HZ         NS           RO             WS
  S2.      Elementary Goal 2: Improve Math
           Achievement
  S2E1     90% or more of the school‟s 3rd – 5th grade FAY students are
           “proficient” or “advanced” in mathematics as measured by the        72%         93%          77%        73%           92%            67%
           WKCE and the combined average scale score for math                 1388.9      1464.9       1395.5     1396.8        1450.6         1366.1
           increases from the previous year. (2005-06 Baseline)
  S2E2     Based on the percentage of MATH proficiency as measured on
           the 5th grade WKCE, a school ranks in the top three in                9           1            9          9             7              5
           comparison with ten demographically similar schools.

  S2E3     The overall percentage of the school‟s 2nd – 5th grade students     NE – 91%   NE – 98%     NE – 88%   NE – 89%      NE – 95%       NE – 88%
           who are “proficient” or “advanced” in math as measured by MAP       E – 47%    E – 94%        E– *      E – 78%       E – 76%       E – 71%
           is 10% or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged        -44%        -4%                     -11%          -19%           -17%
           students and FAY non-economically disadvantaged students.
                                                                              increase    decrease       NA       decrease      increase       increase
           Improvement = reduction.
  S2E4     The overall percentage 2nd– 5th grade students who are
           “proficient” or “advanced” in math as measured by MAP is 10%        W – 90%    W – 97%      W – 89%    W – 89%       W – 95%         W – 65%
                                                                               B – 48%     B– *         B– *        B–*          B– *           B – 60%
           or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY White
                                                                               -42%                                                           -5%
           students. Improvement = reduction. ✴ – Group size less than 20     increase      NA           NA         NA            NA        decrease
           students.



      Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                                              15
S2E5     The overall percentage 2nd– 5th grade students who are          ND – 89%   ND – 98%   ND – 92%   ND – 89%    ND – 97%     ND – 85%
                                                                          D – 33%   D – 87%      D– *     D – 71%      D – 62%     D – 35%
         “proficient” or “advanced” in math as measured by MAP is 10%
                                                                          -56%      -11%                   -18%        -35%           -50%
         or less when comparing FAY disabled students and FAY non-
         disabled students. Improvement = reduction.                                             NA
                                                                         increase    same                 decrease    decrease    increase
                             nd
S2E6  78% or more of 2 grade students meet the fall to spring growth
      target in mathematics as measured by the Measures of                83%        98%        75%        85%         78%            79%
      Academic Progress (MAP)
S2E7 70% or more of 3rd grade students meet the spring to spring
      growth target in mathematics as measured by the Measures of         48%        68%        66%        67%         84%            72%
      Academic Progress (MAP)
S2E8 70% or more of 4th grade students meet the spring to spring
      growth target in mathematics as measured by the Measures of         68%        58%        67%        69%         73%            59%
      Academic Progress (MAP)
S2E9 70% or more of 5th grade students meet the spring to spring
      growth target in mathematics as measured by the Measures of         71%        85%        72%        73%         77%            60%
      Academic Progress (MAP)
S2E10 25% or more of 5TH grade FAY students are rated “advanced” in       13%        33%        21%        23%         33%            15%
      mathematics as measured by the Measures of Academic
      Progress (MAP)                                                      8/61      23/70       7/33       11/48       23/80          8/52



       MIDDLE LEVEL SCHOOL-BASED MATH TARGET INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                                                             PMMS                PVMS
   S2.      Middle School Goal 2: Improve Math Achievement
            * = Group size less than 20 students
   S2M1 90% or more of Sun Prairie 6th – 8th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in
                                                                                                              81%                 82%
        mathematics as measured by the WKCE and the combined mean scale score for math
                                                                                                             1597.5              1599.2
        increases from the previous year. (2005-06 Baseline)
   S2M2 Based on the percentage of MATH proficiency as measured on the 8th grade WKCE, a
                                                                                                               10                     8
        school ranks in the top three in comparison with ten demographically similar schools.



   Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                                       16
S2M3 The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in math
                                                                                                    NE – 85%          NE – 85%
     as measured by WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged               E – 61%           E – 61%
     students and FAY non-economically disadvantaged students. Improvement = reduction.              -24%              -24%
     (2005-06 Baseline)
S2M4 The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in math     W – 84%           W – 87%
     as measured by WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY White             B – 46%           B – 43%
     students. Improvement = reduction. (2005-06 Baseline)                                           -38%              -44%
S2M5 The overall percentage 6th – 8th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in math     ND – 89%          ND – 88%
     as measured by WKCE 10% or less when comparing FAY non-disabled students and FAY               D – 22%           D – 29%
     disabled students. Improvement = reduction. (2005-06 Baseline)                                  -67%              -59%
S2M6 70% or more of 6th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in mathematics
                                                                                                      49%               73%
     as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
S2M7 70% or more of 7th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in mathematics
                                                                                                      71%               68%
     as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
S2M8 70% or more of 8th grade students meet the spring to spring growth target in mathematics
                                                                                                      74%               68%
     as measured by the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP)
S2M9 50% of 7th grade students meet the criteria to take Algebra in 8th grade.                    # Alg. – 56       # Alg. – 61
                                                                                                  # 7th Gr. – 213   # 7th Gr. – 215
                                                                                                      26%               28%


             HIGH SCHOOL-BASED MATH TARGET INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                                                                        SPHS
S2.     High School Goal 2: Improve Math Achievement
        * = Group size less than 20 students
S2H1 90% or more of Sun Prairie 10th grade FAY students are “proficient” or “advanced” in mathematics as
                                                                                                                       84%
     measured by the WKCE and the mean scale score for math increases from the previous year. (2005-06
                                                                                                                       544.7
     Baseline)
S2H2 Based on the percentage of MATH proficiency as measured on the 10th grade WKCE, a school ranks in the
                                                                                                                             2
     top three in comparison with ten demographically similar schools.
S2H3 The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in math as measured by            NE – 88%
     WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY economically disadvantaged students and FAY non-                         E – 55%
     economically disadvantaged students. Improvement = reduction. (2005-06 Baseline)                                  -33%


Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                                 17
S2H4 The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in math as measured by                W – 88%
     WKCE is 10% or less when comparing FAY Black students and FAY White students. Improvement =                         B – 40%
     reduction. (2005-06 Baseline)                                                                                        -48%
S2H5 The overall percentage 10th grade students who are “proficient” or “advanced” in math as measured by                ND – 91%
     WKCE 10% or less when comparing FAY non-disabled students and FAY disabled students. Improvement                    D - 30%
     = reduction. (2005-06 Baseline)                                                                                     -61%
S2H6 0 students are required to take the math competency course for failing to pass the WKCE or MAP math
     assessment.
                                                                                                                               5
     This value does not include students’ w/disabilities or English Language Learners who are allowed
     accommodations to meet the requirement in alternative ways.
S2H7 90% of SPHS graduates have earned credits in Algebra and Geometry (or higher level mathematics)                      # – 293
                                                                                                                         Grads–369
                                                                                                                         79.4%



                                       Narrative Analysis of Indicators for Goal 2

District-wide Math Target Indicators show some evidence of success by grade level or subgroup.

   1. Math scores for students scoring proficient or advanced at Grade 10 increased significantly by 11% (73% in 2004; 84% in
      2005).

   2. Sun Prairie High School ranked third when compared to ten demographically similar schools.

   3. The district has set a goal that 78% of the students in Grade 2 and 70% of the students in grades 3-8 will meet or exceed
      spring growth target on MAP. These growth targets, established by national norms, are set so only 50% of the students will
      meet them. By setting higher expectations (70 or 78%), we are expecting our students to grow academically at a higher rate,
      resulting in students with higher levels of knowledge and skills. This model of higher expectations and targets mimics similar
      processes used in other high performing districts across the nation. Students in grades 2, 5, 7 & 8 met these growth targets
      during the 2005-2006 school year.

   4. Two elementary schools, Eastside and Royal Oaks, met the target of 90% or more of the school‟s 3 rd-5th grade FAY students
      are “proficient or advanced” in mathematics as measured by WKCE.

Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                                   18
   5. Eastside Elementary ranked first when compared with ten demographically similar schools on the 5 th grade WKCE in Math.

   6. Elementary schools meeting the growth target in Math as measured by MAP have demonstrated success:
              C.H. Bird – grades 2, 5
              Eastside – grades 2, 5
              Horizon – grade 5
              Northside – grades 2, 5
              Royal Oaks – grades 2, 3, 4, 5
              Westside – grades 2, 3

       Middle schools meeting the growth target in Math as measured by MAP have demonstrated success:
                Patrick Marsh – grades 7, 8
                Prairie View – grade 6
Additional study of the data identifies areas of concern.

   1. The 90% target for students in grades 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 & 8 as measured by the WKCE was not met.

   2. The 70% spring to spring growth target for students in grades 3, 4 & 6 as measured by MAP was not met.

   3. The „gap‟ when comparing subgroups of 2nd-5th grade students as measured by MAP remains greater than 10%.
      a) FAY economically disadvantaged students to FAY non-economically disadvantaged students – 21%.
      b) FAY Black students to FAY White students – 31%.
      c) FAY disabled students to FAY non-disabled students – 34%.

   4. The „gap‟ when comparing subgroups of 6th-8th grade students as measured by MAP remains greater than 10%.
      a) FAY economically disadvantaged students to FAY non-economically disadvantaged students – 23% (decreased from
         26%).
      b) FAY Black students to FAY White students – 40%.
      c) FAY disabled students to FAY non-disabled students – 64%.

   5. The „gap‟, when comparing demographic groups of 10th grade students as measured by WKCE, exceeds the goal of 10% or
      less.
      a) FAY economically disadvantaged students to FAY non-economically disadvantaged students – 33%.
      b) FAY Black students to FAY White students – 48%.
      c) FAY disabled students to FAY non-disabled students – 61%.

Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                              19
                                Future Directions and Recommendations for Goal 2

The goal for the 2006-2007 school year is to implement Math Improvement Plans focused on research-based studies and best
practices. Initiatives are prepared for this fall.

Grades K-5
   1)    Implement the document that aligns proficiency statements/expectations with the Math Trailblazer lessons
   2)    Provide staff development in content best instructional practices for grades 3, 4, 5
   3)    Offer opportunities for grade level teachers to take credit classes in Mathematics Content from UW-Madison through a
         consortium grant
   4)    Monitoring of K-8 Special Education Action Plan in Math, including progress monitoring and direct instruction

Grades 6-8
   1) Direct grade level expectancies according to the National Mathematics Teachers Council and the WKCE Criterion-
      Referenced Framework
   2) Review data from MAP with focus on skill areas
   3) Direct expectations for “pacing” of curriculum
   4) Implement the instruction of Math Vocabulary List to improve understanding
   5) Focus group discussions with teachers on Algebraic concepts and “Algebra for All Students”
   6) Monitoring of K-8 Special Education Action Plan in Math, including progress monitoring and direct instruction

Grades 9-12
   1) Implement Competency Course to meet Graduation Requirement
   2) Create a two-year course structure to ensure ALL students achieve the expectations in Algebra and Geometry
   3) Identify and implement a Mathematics Vocabulary List to improve understanding
   4) Address “reading in content” strategies




Chapter 2 (Mathematics)                                                                                                20
                                                        Chapter 3
                                                    Report prepared by: Lisa Dawes
School Board Priority Goal 3: Implement service delivery models that promote the goals
adopted in the Special Education Strategic Plan.

              <Indicators to measure success or                                03/04           04/05             05/06
<?>                                                                           Results          Result            Result
                         improvement>
           <Descriptors of the program or topic area >
1A     Percentage of parents responding to survey that are “satisfied Respondents=252 Respondents=62        Respondents=53
       or very satisfied” with special education services based on
       Parent Satisfaction Survey.                                         86.1%            60.8%                84%
1B     Percentage of students with disabilities employed or attending
                                                                             87%             87%
       post-secondary education upon graduation.
1C      Complaints to DPI, OCR or District.                                   0                0                   0
1D      Percentage of students with disabilities attending                                16 Students         35 Students
                                                                         Not Available
        neighborhood school.
                                                                                              2%                  7%
1E      Percentage of students with disabilities receiving 50% or
        more of their instruction in general education setting            65.64%           68.36%               77.49%

1F     Responses to the student survey question, “Regardless of any
       differences, students at this school treat others with respect.”         2.9             3.1               2.8
                                                                                                                SWD 2.8
       (Target: 3.5 or higher)
1G     Responses to the student survey question, “Students exclude
       other students because they are different.” (Target: 3.5 or              2.6             2.8               3.0
                                                                                                                SWD 2.9
       higher)
1H     Increasing number of special education staff co-teaching.                28              41                48
1I     Responses to teacher survey question for special educators,
                                                                          Respondents=48   Respondents=36    Respondents 53
       “The Strategic Plan is positively affecting student                     52%            97.3%            SWD 83%
       achievement”

Chapter 3 (Special Education)                                                                                       21
1J     Responses to teacher survey question for regular educators,
                                                                                             Respondents=118        Respondents 146
       “The Strategic Plan is positively affecting student                    N/A
                                                                                                    32.2%            SWD – 38.1%
       achievement”
1K     Responses to teacher survey question for special educators, “I
                                                                      Respondents=36         Respondents=36          Respondents 52
       feel confident that the Strategic Plan is meeting the mission         69%                    97.2%                88.5%
       and vision goals”
1L     Responses to teacher survey question for regular educators, “I
                                                                                             Respondents=94         Respondents 127
       feel confident that the Strategic Plan is meeting the mission          N/A
                                                                                                     50%                 47.2%
       and vision goals”


                                              Narrative Analysis of Indicators

The Sun Prairie Area School District continues to improve upon the quality of services provided for students with disabilities
resulting in long term student success.

Parent involvement and satisfaction are continually monitored by Student Services. Due to low response rates a random phone
survey was conducted in-order to determine whether or not the positive parent satisfaction results we were obtaining actually
reflected the general population. The survey confirmed at that time that parents were mostly satisfied with special education
services in Sun Prairie even though the response rate was still low.

Students with disabilities are participating more with their general education peers in their home schools than in previous years,
however, there appears to be concern whether or not this is resulting in a greater level of acceptance and sense of belonging when
analyzing the results of the student surveys. The new survey disaggregates by disability status and this is an item to be closely
monitored.

Special Education staff are aware of and are fully implementing the Special Education Strategic Plan in all Sun Prairie schools. It
is clear that more time needs to be spent with regular education staff and new special education staff in the implementation and
understanding of the goals of the strategic plan. Revisions to the wording of the survey will also be considered for next year.




Chapter 3 (Special Education)                                                                                               22
                                        Future Directions and Recommendations
   1. Parent Satisfaction:
      a. Conduct mass mailing to all parents of students with disabilities one time each year.

   2. Sense of Belonging:
      a. Monitor student survey disaggregated by disability status.
      b. Share results of student survey with staff for close monitoring of peer relations, harassment, bullying, etc. with regards to
          students with disabilities.

   3. Regular Education Concerns:
      a. Meet with regular education staff in buildings to determine needs of students and monitor implementation of strategic
          plan.
      b. Provide on-going staff development for regular educators to meet the needs of students with disabilities in the
          classroom.
      c. Foster collaboration between special education staff and regular education staff with co-teaching experiences and
          instruction in differentiation.

The indicators included in this report will be absorbed into the school performance report and other monitoring chapters for the
06/07 school year as the special education plan has been fully implemented and is no longer a priority Board goal.




Chapter 3 (Special Education)                                                                                               23
                                                           Chapter 4
                                                        Report prepared by: Phil Frei
School Board Priority Goal 4: Ensure adequate classrooms to meet the needs
of the growing student population without compromising existing levels of
programs and services.
                                                     Indicators                             03/04       04/05     05/06
                                                                                             Results   Results   Results

                                                              rd
       Bird Elementary:         K-5 Student enrollment as of 3 Friday Count                   472       508        449
                                                              rd
       Eastside Elementary:     K-5 Student enrollment as of 3 Friday Count                   463       494        535
                                                              rd
       Northside Elementary:    K-5 Student enrollment as of 3 Friday Count                   500       525        462
                                                              rd
       Royal Oaks Elementary: K-5 Student enrollment as of 3 Friday Count                     515       542        455
                                                              rd
       Westside Elementary:     K-5 Student enrollment as of 3 Friday Count                   422       436        441
                                                              rd
       Horizon Elementary       K-5 Student enrollment as of 3 Friday Count                   N/A       N/A        347

       Percentage of elementary school students versus maximum capacity                      96%       101%        89%
       Percentage of middle school students versus maximum capacity                          98%       103%        84%
       Percentage of high school students versus maximum capacity                            88%        91%        91%

       Date of anticipated need for elementary school #7,                         Fall of                   2008
       Date of anticipated need for elementary school #8,                         Fall of                   2012
       Date of anticipated need for middle school #3,                             Fall of                   2009
       Date of anticipated need for new high school classrooms,                   Fall of                   2008




Chapter 4 (Classrooms)                                                                                              24
                                                   Narrative Analysis of Indicators
See charts with detailed year-by-year history and projections at the elementary, middle level and high school levels. The Applied Population Lab of
                                                                                                     rd
UW-Madison bases these charts on enrollment projections. All enrollment numbers are based on 3 Friday counts. A complete copy of the APL report
is available at the district office.




                                            Future Directions and Recommendations
   1. To continue working as rapidly as possible towards a solution for the high school classroom issue. At this time, this involves further study by the
      School Board.
   2. Establish a building design review committee to finalize design for elementary school #7; to be completed no later than December 1, 2006.




Chapter 4 (Classrooms)                                                                                                                             25
                                                                                         Elementary (K-5) Enrollment
                                                                                                                               History                    Projected
                  4000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              8th Elem School




                                                                                                                                                                                                                       3810
                                                                                                                                                                                                                              needed @ 3,500




                                                                                                                                                                                                                3707
                  3800                                                                                                                                                                                                        pupils.




                                                                                                                                                                                                         3593
                                                                                                                                                                                                  3494
                  3600




                                                                                                                                                                                           3438
                                                                                                                                                                                    3325
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               7th Elem
                  3400




                                                                                                                                                                             3237
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               School




                                                                                                                                                                      3128
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               needed @
                  3200
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               3,000 pupils




                                                                                                                                                               2984
     Enrollment




                                                                                                                                                        2866
                  3000
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Horizon




                                                                                                                                                 2689
                  2800




                                                                                                                                          2559
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Royal Oaks
                  2600




                                                                                                                                   2372
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               CH Bird
                  2400




                                                                                                                            2230
                                                                                                                     2217
                                                                                                              2120
                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Westside
                  2200
                                                                                                       2046
                                                                                  1957
                                                                           1955




                                                                                                1949
                                                                    1944




                                                                                         1942




                                                                                                                                                                                                                               Eastside
                                                             1887
                                                      1886




                  2000
                                               1851
                                       1831
                         1822

                                1804




                                                                                                                                                                                                                              Northside
                  1800
                         88-    89-    90-     91-    92-    93-    94-    95-    96-    97-    98-    99-    00-    01-    02-    03-    04-    05-    06-    07-    08-    09-    10-    11-    12-    13-    14-    15-
                         89     90     91      92     93     94     95     96     97     98     99     00     01     02     03     04     05     06     07     08     09     10     11     12     13     14     15     16




                                              Source: Enrollment Projections by Applied Populations Lab, UW-Madison, Oct. 2005, Page 11, Table 9
                                                                                                    rd
                                                                             All numbers based on 3 Friday Counts




Chapter 4 (Classrooms)                                                                                                                                                                                                                          26
                                                                                               Middle School (6-8)
                                                                                                   Enrollment




                                                                                                                                                                                                                1956
                                                                                                                                                                                                         1941
                                                                                                                     History                       Projected




                                                                                                                                                                                                  1875
                   2000




                                                                                                                                                                                           1820
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          3rd MS
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          needed




                                                                                                                                                                                    1712
                   1800                                                                                                                                                                                                   @ 1,500




                                                                                                                                                                             1612
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          pupils




                                                                                                                                                                      1530
                   1600




                                                                                                                                                               1432
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       PVMS and




                                                                                                                                                        1345
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       PMMS each
     Enrollmen t




                                                                                                                                                 1279
                   1400




                                                                                                                                   1230
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       have




                                                                                                                                          1221
                                                                                                                            1171
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       capacity for




                                                                                                                     1144
                                                                                        1096
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       750 pupils




                                                                                                              1090
                   1200                                                          1073




                                                                                                       1063
                                                                                                1057
                                                                          1013
                                                              987

                                                                    977
                                                  961

                                                        963




                   1000                                                                                                                                                                                                   PVMS
                                            887
                                      820
                                769
                          741




                   800                                                                                                                                                                                                    PMMS


                   600
                          88- 89- 90- 91- 92- 93- 94- 95- 96- 97- 98- 99- 00- 01- 02- 03- 04- 05- 06- 07- 08- 09- 10- 11- 12- 13- 14- 15-
                          89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16



Source: Enrollment Projections by Applied Populations Lab, UW-Madison, Oct. 2005, Page 11, Table 9
                                                                              rd
                                                        All numbers based on 3 Friday Counts




Chapter 4 (Classrooms)                                                                                                                                                                                                                27
                                                                                                    High School (9-12)
                                                                                                        Enrollment

               2800                                                                                                      History                              Projected




                                                                                                                                                                                                             2491
               2600




                                                                                                                                                                                                                    2698
                                                                                                                                                                                                      2401
                                                                                            As of Feb. 1, 2006, the high
                                                                                            school has grown by 35




                                                                                                                                                                                               2256
               2400
                                                                                            students since the 2005 3rd
                                                                                            Friday count                                                                                                                      ?




                                                                                                                                                                                        2076
               2200




                                                                                                                                                                                 2020
                                                                                                                                                                          1901
  Enrollment




                                                                                                                                                                   1781
               2000
                             SPHS Capacity
                             1816 Students
               1800




                                                                                                                         1602
                                                                                                                  1593
                                                                                                           1550




                                                                                                                                                            1767
                                                                                                                                                     1725
                                                                                                    1524




                                                                                                                                              1706
                                                                                             1498
                                                                                     1485




                                                                                                                                       1683
                                                                              1468




               1600




                                                                                                                                1631
                                                                       1421
                                                                1351




                                                                                                                                                                                                                           Current High
                                                         1258




               1400                                                                                                                                                                                                        School
                                                  1188
                      1151



                                    1126

                                           1124
                             1097




               1200


               1000
                      88- 89- 90- 91- 92- 93- 94- 95- 96- 97- 98- 99- 00- 01- 02- 03- 04- 05- 06- 07- 08- 09- 10- 11- 12- 13- 14- 15-
                      89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16



                                            Source: Enrollment Projections by Applied Populations Lab, UW-Madison, Oct. 2005, Page 11, Table 9
                                                                                                  rd
                                                                           All numbers based on 3 Friday Counts




Chapter 4 (Classrooms)                                                                                                                                                                                                                    28
                                                                  Chapter 5
                                                           Report prepared by: Annette Mikula

School Board Priority Goal 5: Increase every staff member’s knowledge and skills of cultural
competence and differentiated instruction in order to improve student learning in our increasingly
diverse community.


                             Indicators to measure improvement                                              03/04                04/05               05/06
                                                                                                             Results            Results             Results
5A      Cultural Competence:
        The number of staff development offerings designed to promote cultural competence (each is              0               5                   6
         a different offering, some may have multiple sessions)
        The hours of staff participation in training designed to promote cultural competence                    0             1282                2,148
        The number of staff who participate in cultural competence activities
        (Complete data on these professional opportunities available in chapter 11)                            n/a             749               865
5B      The number of employees who fluently speak a language in addition to English                            -               -             Unavailable
5C      Differentiated Instruction
        The number of hours of differentiated instruction training being offered in the district.               84             64                  375
        The percentage of instructional staff who have been trained in differentiation
        The number of instructional staff who participate in ongoing support on differentiation              25.17%          29.12%              32.94%
        (Complete data on these professional opportunities available in chapter 11)
                                                                                                               110             53                  511
5D      The average score from staff who agree with the statement on the staff survey that says that I
        provide differentiated instruction based on student needs. (5.0 scale)                                 4.5             4.5                 4.4
5E      The number of employees of color.                                                                      n/a             19                  31
5F      The percentage of employees of color.                                                                  n/a           2.68%               3.73%

                                                      Narrative Analysis of Indicators
During the 2005-2006 school year the district has focused on increasing the number of staff that received training in differentiated instruction and cultural
competence.

5A. Dr. John Odom was the keynote speaker at the opening day assembly on the topic of cultural competence. Dr. John Odom also worked with the
administrative leadership team several times during the school year to increase administrators‟ understanding of cultural competence. Mr. and Mrs. Lee
Yang worked with administrative leadership team this school year to develop a better understanding of the Hmong culture. Donna Mackey provided
training on multicultural classrooms and conducted study circles on race relations. In addition the district provided three sections of Spanish in the
Classroom for staff. The Culture and Learning Advisory of Sun Prairie (CLASP) met throughout the 2005-06 school year to focus on cultural competence
and increasing the awareness of cultural competence in our schools.
Chapter 5 (Cultural Competence)                                                                                                                          29
5B. This data will be collected in September of 2006 and maintained in a database in the Human Resources Department.
                                                                                                                      rd          th     th             th
5C. The ongoing support for differentiation was imbedded with in the district‟s literacy training. All teachers in grades 3 through 5 and 6 through 8
participated in these training programs during the school year.

5E and F. The district has also explored options to increase minority recruitment. The number of minority employees has increased by 63% from the
2004-05 school year to the 2005-06 school year. The district participated in the first Madison Diversity Recruitment Fair this school year.


                                              Future Directions and Recommendations

This goal will be incorporated into Board Goal 6 on Student Connectedness. The Human Resources Department will continue to focus on minority
recruitment and will create a minority recruitment action plan.




Chapter 5 (Cultural Competence)                                                                                                                   30
                                                 NECESSARY APPENDICES
                     5 E. Notes:
                     Differentiation Question:
                                                                                                            2006
                      I provide differentiation instruction based on                        2004*   2005*
                     student needs.

                                                                                             4.7     4.4    4.4
                                                                          CH Bird
                                                                                             4.5     4.6    4.6
                                                                         Eastside
                                                                                             NA      NA     4.8
                                                                          Horizon
                                                                                             4.3     4.4    4.2
                                                                        Northside
                                                                                             4.5     4.4    4.4
                                                                      Royal Oaks
                                                                                             4.7     4.6    4.6
                                                                        Westside
                                                                                                            4.5
                                                District - Elementary                        4.5     4.5
                                                                                             4.4     4.5    4.4
                                                                   Patrick Marsh
                                                                                             4.6     4.6    4.5
                                                                     Prairie View
                                                                                             4.3     4.5    4.1
                                    Sun Prairie High School (including SOAR)
                                                                                                            4.3
                                                 District - Secondary                        4.4     4.5
                                                                                                            4.4
                                                    District - Overall                       4.5     4.5



                          * These values have been adjusted to reflect the new 5.0 scale.




Chapter 5 (Cultural Competence)                                                                                    31
5F&G
Staff Ethnicity
                                   Asian          Black        Hispanic    Am. Indian        White
                                                                                                         Total
                                  %      #    %           #    %       #   %        #    %           #
                  1994-1995       0%     0   0.2%         1   0.6%    3    0%      0    99.2%    520     524

                  1996-1997       0%     0   0.4%         2   0.7%    4    0%      0    98.9%    547     553

                  1998-1999       0%     0   0.2%         1   1.2%    7    0%      0    98.7%    598     606

                  2000-2001       0%     0   0.5%         3   1.1%    7    0%      0    98.4%    606     616

                  2002-2003   0.3%       2   0.1%         1   0.7%    5    0%      0    98.8%    679     687

                  2004-2005   0.3%       2   0.4%         3   2.0%    14   0%      0    97.3%    689     708

                  2005-2006   0.8%       7   0.6%         5   2.2%    18   0.1%    1    96.3%    800     831




Chapter 5 (Cultural Competence)                                                                                  32
                                                                               Chapter 6
                                                                          Report prepared by: Tim Culver

School Board Priority Goal 6:                                Increase students’ sense of connectedness to their schools


WHAT                                                                                       WHY                                                      HOW
A student is connected to his or her school when he or she    Connectedness to school has been shown by research to         The most effective research based strategies to increase
                                                                                                                            students’ connectedness to school include:
1. Has a sense of belonging and being part of a                                                                              Implementing high standards and expectations,
   school                                                      improve academic performance                                    while providing academic support and
                                                                                                                                interventions for all students. (HE)
2. Likes school                                                reduce incidents of fighting, bullying, vandalism and          Applying fair and consistent disciplinary policies
                                                                disruptive behavior                                             that are collectively agreed upon and fairly
3. Perceives that teachers and other staff members                                                                              enforced. (FD)
   are supportive and caring                                   improve attendance and reduce truancy                          Creating trusting relationships among students,
                                                                                                                                teachers, staff, administrators, and families.
4. Has friends within school                                   improve school completion and reduce dropout rates              (TR)
                                                                                                                               Hiring and supporting capable teachers skilled
5. Is engaged in his/her current and future                    reduce incidence of substance and tobacco use                   in content, teaching techniques, and classroom
   academic progress                                                                                                            management to meet each learner‘s needs.
                                                               reduce influence of ‗gang‘ related behaviors and activity       (CT)
6. Believes that discipline is fair and effective                                                                              Fostering high parent/family expectations for
                                                               increase educational motivation and engagement in               school performance and school completion.
7. Participates in active learning, service learning            learning                                                        (PF)
   and/or extracurricular activities                                                                                           Ensuring that every student feels close to at
                                                                                                                                least one supportive adult at school. (SA)




        Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                                                             33
                     Indicators to measure improvement                                   03/04                 04/05                 05/06
6                                                                                       Results                Result                Result
6A    The percent occurrence per enrollment and the number of disciplinary
       incidents for all forms of student-to-student discrimination &                    1.4%                  0.6%                   1.0%
                                                                                          (70)                   (32)                  (56)
       harassment. See appendix for calculation details
6B    The percent occurrence per enrollment and the number of disciplinary
      incidents for all reported incidents of fighting, bullying, and vandalism,        13.2%                 14.5%                  12.2%
                                                                                         (361)                  (420)                 (353)
      grades 6-12. See appendix for calculation details
6C    The percentage and number of students classified as „habitually truant‟.           4.8%                  5.4%                   7.8%
      See appendix for calculation details                                               (254)                  (299)                 (442)
6D    The percentage and number of students suspended out of school more                 2.5%                  1.7%                   1.4%
      than one time. See appendix for calculation details                                (133)                   (95)                  (82)
6E    Responses on the 5th-12th grade student survey questions related to
      „RESPECT‟ averaged together. See appendix for calculation details.
                                                                                          3.3                    3.3                   3.4
      (Note: There is a 5.0 scale for this and the following four
      indicators)
6F    Responses on the 5th-12th grade student survey questions related to
                                                                                          3.3                    3.4                   3.6
      „CARING‟ averaged together. See appendix for calculation details
6G    Response on the 5th-12th grade student survey question “I feel safe at
                                                                                          4.1                    4.1                   4.1
      school”
6H    Response on the 5th-12th grade student survey question “If I had a
                                                                                          4.3                    4.3                   4.3
      problem, there is an adult at this school who I could go to for help.”
6I    Response on the 5th-12th grade student survey question “To make good
                                                                                          4.6                    4.5                   4.5
      grades at my school, I have to work hard””
6J    Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades
      7-8.
      (Note: For this and the following eight indicators, the count is of
                                                                                   All – 509/731   70%   All – 509/ 798   64%   All – 589/813   72%
      students who participated in one or more athletic team or other activity
      recorded in SASI.)

6K    Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades    W – 424/ 610 70%      W – 408/ 632 65%       W – 486/661 74%
      7-8 by students of color                                                      C – 85/121 70%       C – 101/166 61%        C – 103/152 68%
6L    Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades    ND – 460/623 74%      ND – 457/684 67%       ND – 534/720 74%
      7-8 by students with disabilities                                             D – 49/105 47%        D – 52/124 42%         D – 55/93 59%


     Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                                  34
6M      Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades         NE – 416/580 72%       NE – 424/627 68%      NE – 489/654 75%
        7-8 by students who are economically disadvantaged.                                E – 93/151 62%         E – 85/171 50%       E – 100/159 63%
6N      Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades
                                                                                          All – 921/1529 60%     All – 885/1659 53%    All – 1061/1666 64%
        9-12
6O      Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades         W – 830/1351 61%       W – 793/1413 56%      W – 918/1378 67%
        9-12 by students of color                                                          C – 91/178 51%         C – 92/246 37%       C – 143/288 50%
6P      Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades     ND – 855/1305 66%          ND – 842/1421 59%     ND – 985/1415 70%
        9-12 by students with disabilities                                              D – 66/ 224 29%           D – 43/238 18%        D – 76/251 30%
6Q      Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades     NE – 844/1358 62%          NE – 819/1443 57%     NE – 957/1420 67%
        9-12 by students who are economically disadvantaged.                            E – 77/171 45%            E – 66/ 216 31%       E – 104/246 42%


     ELEMENTARY SCHOOL-BASED “CONNECTEDNESS” INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                                    CHB           ES           HZ         NS           RO          WS

S6E1       The percent occurrence per enrollment and the number of
                                                                                    0.0%        0.2%         1.3%       0.4%          0.0%       0.2%
            disciplinary incidents for all forms of student-to-student
                                                                                     (0)         (1)           (5)        (2)          (0)         (1)
            discrimination & harassment.
S6E2       The percentage and number of students classified as „habitually          1.5%        1.7%         1.1%       2.7%          0.6%       3.3%
           truant‟.                                                                  (7)         (9)           (4)       (13)          (3)        (15)
S6E3       The percentage and number of students suspended out of                   0.2%        0.2%         1.3%       0.6%          0.0%       1.8%
           school more than one time.                                                (1)         (1)           (5)        (3)          (0)         (8)
S6E4       Responses on the 5th grade student survey questions related to
                                                                                    3.8          4.0           3.9        3.8         3.6          3.5
           „RESPECT‟ averaged together.
S6E5       Responses on the 5th grade student survey questions related to
                                                                                    4.0          4.1           4.1       4.2          4.0         3.7
           „CARING‟ averaged together.
S6E6       Response on the 5th grade student survey question “I feel safe at
                                                                                    4.4          4.5           4.1       4.3          4.3         4.2
           school”
S6E7       Response on the 5th grade student survey question “If I had a
           problem, there is an adult at this school who I could go to for          4.5          4.6           4.3       4.6          4.4         4.3
           help.”
S6E8       Response on the 5th grade student survey question “To make
                                                                                    4.6          4.7           4.7       4.6          4.7         4.6
           good grades at my school, I have to work hard””




       Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                                     35
        MIDDLE SCHOOL-BASED “CONNECTEDNESS” INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                                                PMMS                 PVMS
         The percent occurrence per enrollment and the number of disciplinary                    5.0%                1.5%
S6M1
          incidents for all forms of student-to-student discrimination & harassment.              (30)                 (9)
         The percent occurrence per enrollment and the number of disciplinary                   17.6%               26.2%
S6M2
         incidents for all reported incidents of fighting, bullying, and vandalism.              (106)               (159)

S6M3     The percentage and number of students classified as „habitually truant‟.                0.8%                2.6%
                                                                                                   (5)                (16)
         The percentage and number of students suspended out of school more than                 2.3%                3.1%
S6M4
         one time.                                                                                (14)                (19)
         Responses on the student survey questions related to „RESPECT‟ averaged
S6M5                                                                                              3.3                 3.1
         together.
         Responses on the student survey questions related to „CARING‟ averaged
S6M6                                                                                              3.3                 3.2
         together.
S6M7     Response on the student survey question “I feel safe at school”                          4.0                 4.0
         Response on the student survey question “If I had a problem, there is an adult
S6M8                                                                                              4.1                 4.1
         at this school who I could go to for help.”
         Response on the student survey question “To make good grades at my
S6M9                                                                                              4.4                 4.4
         school, I have to work hard””
         Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades 7-8.
S6M10    (Note: For this and the following three indicators, the count is of students who   All – 289/412 70%   All – 300/401 75%
         participated in one or more athletic team or other activity recorded in SASI.)
         Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades 7-8 by   W – 239/339 71%     W – 247/322 77%
S6M11                                                                                        C – 50/73 68%       C –53/79 67%
         students of color
         Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades 7-8 by   ND – 257/360 71%    ND – 277/360 77%
S6M12                                                                                        D – 32/52 62%       D – 23/41 56%
         students with disabilities
         Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades 7-8 by   NE – 240/332 72%    NE – 249/322 77%
S6M13                                                                                        E – 49/80 61%       E – 51/79 65%
         students who are economically disadvantaged.




   Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                        36
          HIGH SCHOOL-BASED “CONNECTEDNESS” INDICATORS: 2005-2006
                                                                                                                     SPHS
        The percent occurrence per enrollment and the number of disciplinary incidents for all forms of              0.5%
S6H1
         student-to-student discrimination & harassment.                                                               (8)
        The percent occurrence per enrollment and the number of disciplinary incidents for all reported              4.8%
S6H1
        incidents of fighting, bullying, and vandalism.                                                               (80)

S6H1    The percentage and number of students classified as „habitually truant‟.                                    20.2%
                                                                                                                     (338)
S6H1    The percentage and number of students suspended out of school more than one time.                            1.7%
                                                                                                                      (29)
S6H1    Responses on the student survey questions related to „RESPECT‟ averaged together.                             2.6
S6H1    Responses on the student survey questions related to „CARING‟ averaged together.                              3.0
S6H1    Response on the student survey question “I feel safe at school”                                               3.0
        Response on the student survey question “If I had a problem, there is an adult at this school who I
S6H1                                                                                                                  3.7
        could go to for help.”
        Response on the student survey question “To make good grades at my school, I have to work
S6H1                                                                                                                  3.9
        hard””
        Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades 9-12
S6H1    (Note: For this and the following three indicators, the count is of students who participated in one   All – 1061/1666 64%
        or more athletic team or other activity recorded in SASI.)
        Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades 9-12 by students of color    W – 918/1378 67%
S6H1
                                                                                                                C – 143/288 50%
        Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades 9-12 by students with        ND – 985/1415 70%
S6H1
        disabilities                                                                                            D – 76/251 30%
        Percentage participation in extra- and co-curricular activities in grades 9-12 by students who are     NE – 957/1420 67%
S6H1
        economically disadvantaged.                                                                             E – 104/246 42%



                                         Narrative Analysis of Indicators
1. The percent occurrence per enrollment and the number of disciplinary incidents for all reported incidents of fighting,
   bullying, and vandalism, grades 6-12 decreased to an all time low in terms of number of incidents and percentage.
2. The percentage and number of students suspended out of school more than one time decreased for the second year in a
   row in terms of numbers and percentages.

  Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                     37
    3. Habitual truancy increased significantly overall. This change is based primarily on a very large increase in truancy at the
       highs school. The high school attributes this, in part, to more accurate record keeping. Four elementary schools and one
       middle school declined in the number of habitual truants.
    4. Responses on student surveys did not change significantly. I reduce „survey fatigue, in 2005-2006 the levels for these
       surveys was standardized at grades 3,5,6,8,10,and 12. In previous years, it was grades 5-12.
    5. 80 more students at the middle level and 179 more students at the high school level participated in one or more school
       activities. Percentages also increased. The new contract language and plan to add positions may be helping this.
    6. While there was still a gap in participation by students of color, students with disabilities, and poor students, all three of
       these subcategories increased significantly as well.


                                              Future Directions and Recommendations
The following is the draft of an action plan under consideration as of July 17, 2006. This is a work in progress that will guide future
activities. You will note that some of the strategies cross over into other priority goals of the school district.

  Strategy                       2006-2007                                    2007-2008                                2008-2009                    Oversight by
1    HE         By implementing the K-12 reading action plans, we will work to see that at least 90% of all students (including poor              Tim Culver
                students, students of color and students with disabilities) are proficient or advanced in reading skills and 0% of students       Evelyn Smojver
                have minimal skills as measured by the WKCE.                                                                                      Lisa Dawes
                                                                                                                                                  Principals
2       HE      By implementing the K-12 math action plans, we will work to see that                                                              Tim Culver
                      90% or more of all students (including poor students, students of color and students with disabilities) are                Evelyn Smojver
                          proficient or advanced in math                                                                                          Lisa Dawes
                      50% or more of 7th grade students qualify to take Algebra in 8th grade                                                     Principals
                      90% of high school graduates have completed Algebra or higher
3       HE      Expand the Schools of HOPE tutoring         Expand the Schools of HOPE tutoring        TBD                                        Tim Culver
        SA      program so that every at-risk learner at    program to at least one other school.                                                 Rachael
                Bird and Westside has a trained, caring                                                                                           Johnson
                tutor in reading and/or math.                                                                                                     Chad
                                                                                                                                                  Wiedmeyer
4       CT      Specific professional development in         Specific professional development in         Specific professional                   Evelyn Smojver
        SA      cultural competence and differentiation of   cultural competence and differentiation      development in cultural                 Nancy Nikolay
                instruction will be included in staff        of instruction will be included in staff     competence and differentiation of
                development plans.                           development plans.                           instruction will be included in staff
                                                                                                          development.

      Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                                                38
                Work in Progress                                                                                                  Draft as of July 17, 2006
    Strategy                  2006-2007                                       2007-2008                               2008-2009                      Oversight by
5      SA      3 school staff meetings will focus on and     3 school staff meetings will focus on and   3 school staff meetings will focus on    Paul Keats,
               provide information that promotes the         provide information that promotes the       and provide information that             Nancy Hery,
               cultural competence of school staff           cultural competence of school staff         promotes the cultural competence of      Clark Luessman,
               members. Instructional Programs, ESL, and     members. Instructional Programs, ESL, and   school staff members. Instructional      Lori Schultz,
               CLASP will provide resources and              CLASP will provide resources and            Programs, ESL, and CLASP will            Karen Ward,
               suggestions to principals to support this     suggestions to principals.                  provide resources and suggestions to     Kathi Klaas,
               action.                                                                                   principals.                              Chad
                                                                                                                                                  Wiedmeyer, Tom
                                                                                                                                                  Yelich, Rachael
                                                                                                                                                  Johnson, Evelyn
                                                                                                                                                  Smojver
6     ALL      A 9th grade study group will research and       TBD                                       TBD                                      Evelyn Smojver
               prepare a plan to improve educational                                                                                              Craig Coulthart
               outcomes for 9th grade students with specific                                                                                      Liz Merrick
               consideration of research-based strategies                                                                                         Jennifer Laveck
               to increase school connectedness.
7      SA      Each secondary school BLC will review           1. Implement school-based plans.          TBD                                      James Ackley
       HE      information on connectedness and create a 2. Determine any necessary request for                                                   Craig Coulthart
               plan for increasing volunteers in schools           resources and, if necessary, submit                                            Liz Merrick
               who mentor, tutor, or serve as positive role        unfunded proposal funding requests.                                            Lisa Strosin
               models for students. Each school‘s plan will                                                                                       Jason Widiker
               be reviewed by MT.
8      SA      Each secondary school BLC will review           1. Implement school-based plans.          TBD                                      James Ackley
       TR      information on connectedness and barriers       2. Determine any necessary request for                                             Craig Coulthart
               that exist to student participation in co- and      resources and, if necessary, submit                                            Jim McClowry
               extracurricular activities and create a plan to     unfunded proposal funding requests.
               overcome these barriers.
9     ALL      By February 1, 2007, elementary school          TBD                                       TBD                                      Tom Yelich,
               BLCs will review the information on Student                                                                                        Chad
               Connectedness and make suggestions to                                                                                              Wiedmeyer,
               inform the update of this action plan.                                                                                             Rachael Johnson
                                                                                                                                                  Kathi Klaas, Lori
                                                                                                                                                  Schultz
                                                                                                                                                  Karen Ward



    Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                                                   39
                Work in Progress                                                                                                          Draft as of July 17, 2006
    Strategy                  2006-2007                                           2007-2008                                   2008-2009                      Oversight by
1      PF      1. Translate ―priority‖ publications             TBD                                            TBD                                        James Ackley
0      TR           regarding co- and extracurricular                                                                                                     Craig Coulthart
                    athletics and activities into Spanish                                                                                                 Jim McClowry
                    (and possibly other languages).
               2. Create a more effective user-friendly
                    environment for students and parents,
                    including more public sign-up dates and
                    locations and more opportunities for
                    late registration.
1      CT      Actively recruit racially and ethnically         Actively recruit racially and ethnically       Actively recruit racially and ethnically   Annette Mikula
1      SA      diverse faculty and staff.                       diverse faculty and staff.                     diverse faculty and staff.                 Hiring
                                                                                                                                                          supervisors
1      TR      1. Implement transition to high school plan      Implement a program where upperclassmen        TBD                                        James Ackley
2      HE         for 8th grade students.                       partner/mentor with incoming freshman.                                                    Craig Coulthart
               2. Develop a program where                                                                                                                 Liz Merrick
                  upperclassmen partner/mentor with                                                                                                       Lisa Strosin
                  incoming freshman.                                                                                                                      Jason Widiker
                                                                                                                                                          Jim McClowry
1     ALL      Vigorously explore grant funding for after       Vigorously explore grant funding for after     Vigorously explore grant funding for       Katie Krueger
3              school activities, service learning, student     school activities, service learning, student   after school activities, service
               volunteerism, and/or intramurals. Goal: to       volunteerism, and/or intramurals. Goal: to     learning, student volunteerism, and/or
               obtain at least one grant per year to initiate   obtain one grant per year to initiate a new    intramurals. Goal: to obtain one
               a new activity in one of these areas.            activity in one of these areas.                grant per year to initiate a new
                                                                                                               activity in one of these areas.
1      HE      1. Every high school department has at           1. Every high school department has at         Every high school department has at Paul Keats
4      TR         minimum one course that provides                 minimum two courses that provide            minimum three courses that provide     High School
       PF         service learning.                                service learning.                           service learning                       C.L.C.
               2. Service learning opportunities are            2. Service Learning is a requirement for                                              Evelyn Smojver
                  developed and implemented in summer              graduation in 2008.                                                                Lisa Albrecht
                  school 2007.




    Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                                                           40
                                                       Chapter 6 - Appendix
6A                       Elem. Schools               Middle Schools               Senior Highs                   District
            Year    2004     2005      2006     2004      2005     2006     2004      2005      2006     2004     2005       2006
             N=    (2372) (2637)      (2768)   (1171)    (1223)   (1208)   (1560)    (1666)    (1696)   (5103)   (5526)     (5672)
Sexual
                   0.1%      0.1%     0.1%     2.1%      0.9%     2.1%     0.5%      0.2%      0.2%     0.7%      0.3%      0.6%
harassment
                    (2)       (2)      (3)     (24)      (11)     (25)      (8)       (4)       (4)     (34)      (17)      (32)
SASI code 191
Racial or ethnic
                   0.1%      0.1%     <0.1%    0.9%      0.2%     0.4%     0.2%      0.4%      0.2%     0.3%      0.2%      0.2%
harassment:
                    (3)       (3)      (1)     (10)       (3)      (5)      (3)       (6)       (4)     (16)      (12)      (10)
SASI code 192
Sexual
orientation        <0.1%     0.0%     0.0%     0.7%      0.2%     0.6%     0.1%      0.0%      0.0%     0.2%     <0.1%      0.1%
harassment          (1)       (0)      (0)      (8)       (3)      (7)      (2)       (0)       (0)     (11)      (3)        (7)
SASI code 193
Disability
                   0.0%      0.0%     0.0%     0.1%      0.0%     0.2%     0.0%      0.0%      0.0%     <0.1%     0.0%      <0.1%
harassment:
                    (0)       (0)      (0)      (1)       (0)      (2)      (0)       (0)       (0)      (1)       (0)       (2)
SASI code 194
Religious
                   0.0%      0.0%     0.0%     0.1%      0.0%     0.0%     0.0%      0.0%      0.0%     <0.1%     0.0%      0.0%
harassment.
                    (0)       (0)      (0)      (1)       (0)      (0)      (0)       (0)       (0)      (1)       (0)       (0)
SASI code 195
Other
Discriminatory     0.0%      0.0%     0.2%     0.0%      0.0%     0.0%     0.4%      0.0%      0.0%     0.1%      0.0%      0.1%
harassment:         (0)       (0)      (5)      (0)       (0)      (0)      (7)       (0)       (0)      (7)       (0)       (5)
SASI code 196
TOTAL              0.3%      0.2%     0.3%     3.8%      1.4%     3.2%     1.3%      0.6%      0.5%     1.4%      0.6%      1.0%
                    (6)       (5)      (9)     (44)      (17)     (39)     (20)      (10)       (8)     (70)      (32)      (56)




     Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                       41
6B                                                 Middle Schools                    Senior Highs                        District
                                  Year        2004       2005      2006      2004        2005      2006      2004        2005         2006
                                   N=        (1171)     (1223)    (1208)    (1560)      (1666)    (1696)    (2731)      (2889)       (2904)
Fighting                                     12.8%      12.5%     12.7%      4.4%        3.0%      3.8%      8.0%       10.5%         7.5%
SASI codes 130,170, 250                       (150)      (253)     (153)     (69)        (50)      (64)      (219)       (303)        (217)
Bullying
                                             8.1%        7.8%       7.9%     1.6%        0.8%     1.2%       4.4%       3.8%         4.0%
SASI codes:
                                             (95)        (95)       (96)     (25)        (14)     (20)       (120)      (109)        (116)
181,182,189,320,321,322,323,324,329
Vandalism
                                             0.8%        0.4%       1.3%     0.8%        0.2%     0.2%       0.8%       0.3%         0.7%
SASI codes:
                                              (9)         (5)       (16)     (13)         (3)      (4)       (22)        (8)         (20)
 110,350,351,352,353,359
TOTAL                                        21.7%       20.7%     21.9%     6.9%        4.0%     5.2%       13.2%      14.5%        12.2%
                                             (254)       (253)     (265)     (107)       (67)     (88)       (361)      (420)        (353)

     6C and 6D
                                                                                                                    Enrollment
School                       # Habitual Truants                    # Students suspended > 1
                                                                                                                  (May 30th count)
                         2004         2005        2006           2004       2005           2006            2004           2005        2006
Bird                      11           11           7              7          8              1             475             522         452
Eastside                  12           12           9              2          1              1             506             532         532
Horizon                    -            -           4               -         -              5               -               -         371
Northside                 31           15           13             5          2              3             530             549         478
Royal Oaks                 1           10           3              2          7              0             523             563         485
Westside                  10           15           15             4          2              8             472             471         450
PMMS                      12           11           5              16        20             14             591             629         601
PVMS                      15            9           16             20        19             19             592             594         607
SPHS                      143          187         338             77        35             29             1527           1607        1,666
SOAR                      19           29           31             0          1              2              50              59          30
              TOTAL #     254          299         442            133        95             82             5266           5526        5672
             TOTAL %     4.8%         5.4%        7.8%           2.5%       1.7%           1.4%              -               -




     Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                                42
6E:                                                2004       2005       2006      2004    2005    2006    2004   2005   2006
RESPECT Questions                                 District   District   District   Elem.   Elem.   Elem.   Sec.   Sec.   Sec.
Adults at my school treat students with
                                                    4.1        4.1        4.2       4.3     4.3     4.4    3.9    3.9    4.0
respect. (1)
Students resolve conflicts without fighting or
                                                    2.9        3.0        3.1       3.2     3.3     3.4    2.6    2.6    2.7
threats. (11)
Regardless of any differences, students at this
                                                    2.9        3.0        3.0       3.1     3.3     3.5    2.6    2.6    2.5
school treat other students with respect (3)
Students behave respectfully toward school
                                                    3.3        3.4        3.5       3.7     3.8     3.9    2.9    2.9    3.0
staff. (4)
Students show respect for school property (5)       3.1        3.1        3.3       3.5     3.7     3.7    2.7    2.5    2.8
                                        Average     3.3        3.3        3.4       3.6     3.7     3.8    2.9    2.9    3.0


6F:                                                2004       2005       2006      2004    2005    2006    2004   2005   2006
CARING Questions                                  District   District   District   Elem.   Elem.   Elem.   Sec.   Sec.   Sec.
Students exclude other students because they
                                                    2.8        2.9        3.2       3.0     2.9     3.6     2.6    2.8   2.7
are different. (9)
Older students are kind to younger students
                                                    3.4        3.6        3.6       3.9     4.1     4.0     2.9    3.0   3.1
(10)
When students see another student being
                                                    2.9        3.1        3.7       3.2     3.5     4.2     2.6    2.6   3.2
picked on, they try to stop it. (12)
Students help new students feel accepted. (24)      3.9        4.0        4.0       4.1     4.4     4.3     3.6    3.5   3.6
                                      Average       3.3        3.4        3.6       3.6     3.7     4.0     2.9    3.0   3.2




     Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                                  43
6E: SCHOOL DATA                                                   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006
                                                       2004 CHB
RESPECT Questions                                                 CHB    CHB     ES     ES     ES     HZ     HZ     HZ
Adults at my school treat students with
                                                         4.3      4.4    4.4    4.4    4.6    4.4    N/A    N/A    4.5
respect. (1)
Students resolve conflicts without fighting or
                                                         2.8      3.4    3.5    3.7    3.7    3.6    N/A    N/A    3.6
threats. (8)
Regardless of any differences, students at this
                                                         2.8      3.4    3.6    3.0    3.4    3.8    N/A    N/A    3.4
school treat other students with respect (3)
Students behave respectfully toward school
                                                         3.2      3.8    3.9    3.9    4.0    4.2    N/A    N/A    4.0
staff. (4)
Students show respect for school property (6)            3.2      3.9    3.7    3.5    4.0    3.9    N/A    N/A    4.0
                                        Average          3.3      3.8    3.8    3.7    3.9    4.0    N/A    N/A    3.9


6F: SCHOOL DATA                                        2004 CHB
                                                                  2005   2006   2004   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006
CARING Questions                                                  CHB    CHB     ES     ES     ES     HZ     HZ     HZ
Students exclude other students because they are
                                                         2.7      2.7    3.6     2.8   3.3     3.7   N/A    N/A    3.7
different. (19)
Older students are kind to younger students (7)          3.5      4.2    4.0     3.9   4.4     4.1   N/A    N/A    4.1
When students see another student being picked on,
                                                         3.1      3.6    4.1     3.3   3.6     4.1   N/A    N/A    4.1
they try to stop it. (9)
Students help new students feel accepted. (15)           4.0      4.3    4.4     4.3   4.5     4.4   N/A    N/A    4.3
                                             Average     3.3      3.7    4.0     3.6   4.0     4.1   N/A    N/A    4.1




      Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                           44
6E: SCHOOL DATA                                   2004   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006
RESPECT Questions                                  NS     NS     NS     RO     RO     RO     WS     WS     WS
Adults at my school treat students with
                                                  4.1    4.2    4.3    4.4    4.4    4.3    4.2    4.1    4.3
respect. (1)
Students resolve conflicts without fighting or
                                                  3.3    3.2    3.4    3.6    3.5    3.4    2.7    2.9    3.1
threats. (8)
Regardless of any differences, students at this
                                                  3.3    3.3    3.7    3.7    3.5    3.3    2.7    3.1    3.1
school treat other students with respect (3)
Students behave respectfully toward school
                                                  3.8    3.6    3.9    4.3    4.1    3.7    3.1    3.7    3.7
staff. (4)
Students show respect for school property (6)     4.0    3.9    3.7    3.9    3.9    3.5    3.0    3.0    3.4
                                        Average   3.7    3.6    3.8    4.0    3.9    3.6    3.1    3.4    3.5


6F: SCHOOL DATA                                   2004   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006
CARING Questions                                   NS     NS     NS     RO     RO     RO     WS     WS     WS
Students exclude other students because they
                                                  3.0     2.5    3.8    3.4    3.2    3.7    2.9    2.9    3.1
are different. (19)
Older students are kind to younger students (7)   4.0     4.2    4.0    4.3    4.0    3.9    3.8    3.9    3.6
When students see another student being
                                                  3.4     3.6    4.4    3.2    3.6    4.2    2.9    3.3    4.0
picked on, they try to stop it. (9)
Students help new students feel accepted. (15)    4.1     4.5    4.5    4.5    4.4    4.3    3.7    4.4    4.1
                                      Average     3.6     3.7    4.2    3.9    3.8    4.0    3.3    3.6    3.7




     Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                   45
6E: SCHOOL DATA                               2004      2005    2006   2004   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006
RESPECT Questions                               PMMS   PMMS    PMMS    PVMS   PVMS   PVMS    HS     HS     HS
Adults at my school treat students with
                                                 4.1    4.1     4.2     4.0    4.0    4.0   3.6    3.6    3.7
respect. (1)
Students resolve conflicts without fighting or
                                                 2.6    2.6     3.0     2.8    2.7    2.7   2.5    2.5    2.4
threats. (10)
Regardless of any differences, students at this
                                                 2.8    2.8     2.9     2.7    2.7    2.6   2.2    2.3    2.1
school treat other students with respect (3)
Students behave respectfully toward school
                                                 3.1    3.2     3.3     3.2    2.9    3.1   2.5    2.6    2.5
staff. (4)
Students show respect for school property (6)    2.9    2.5     3.1     2.9    2.7    2.9   2.2    2.4    2.3
                                        Average  3.1    3.0     3.3     3.1    3.0    3.1   2.6    2.7    2.6


6F: SCHOOL DATA                               2004      2005    2006   2004   2005   2006   2004   2005   2006
CARING Questions                                PMMS   PMMS    PMMS    PVMS   PVMS   PVMS    HS     HS     HS
Students exclude other students because they
                                                 2.7    2.9     2.8     2.7    2.8    2.5    2.5    2.6    2.7
are different. (8)
Older students are kind to younger students (9)  2.9    3.2     3.1     3.0    3.0    3.0    2.9    2.8    3.1
When students see another student being
                                                 2.7    2.6     3.3     2.7    2.7    3.5    2.3    2.4    2.7
picked on, they try to stop it. (11)
Students help new students feel accepted. (19)   3.9    3.7     3.8     3.6    3.6    3.8    3.2    3.2    3.3
                                      Average    3.1    3.1     3.3     3.0    3.0    3.2    2.7    2.8    3.0




     Chapter 6 (Connectedness)                                                                                   46
                                                      Chapter 7
                                                 Report prepared by: Alice A. Murphy
Report on the Information and Technology Plan 2006 - 2009
Goa   Indicators/Descriptors                                                                            05-06        06-07     07-08
 l                                                                                                    Results      Results   Results
 1.0 FORWARD-THINKING VISION
     The Sun Prairie Area School District will work to build a shared community-based vision for
     technology that prepares students to learn, work, and live successfully in the digital age.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Vision 2.5                                                      2.22
 1.1 Communication: Provide greater publication and dissemination of the vision statement for
     Information and Technology to stakeholders in the school district and the community.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Vision 2.5                                                      1.69
 1.2 Community Linkages: Create linkages to local and global communities as critical
     stakeholders.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Vision 2.5                                                      2.26
 1.3 Technology Committee Representation: Provide broad representation on the District                      1
     Technology Committee so that all key stakeholders are engaged in the visioning process.         community
                                                                                                      represent-
     Success Indicator: 1 Student, 1 Parent, 1 Community Representative                                    ative
 2.0 EFFECTIVE TEACHING AND LEARNING PRACTICES
     The learning environment will be characterized by powerful research-based strategies that
     effectively use technologies.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Practice 3.0                                                    2.81
 2.1 Authentic Learning: Increase authentic learning opportunities to include project-based
     experiences and problem solving with real-world data sets.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Relevance 3.0                                                   2.73
 2.2 Effective Communication with Parents: Provide the best data sources for presenting student
     information to parents.
     Success Indicator: Parent Focus Groups report only 2 negative statements                                 5
 2.3 Internet Safety Instruction: Increase student, parent, and teacher awareness of safe Internet
     practices.                                                                                      K-5, 6-8
     Success Indicator: All ISAFE K-5, 6-8 and 9th grade lessons are taught, 1 parent meeting at     lessons
     each elementary and middle school


Chapter 7 (Technology)                                                                                                       47
 2.4 Online Learning Activities: Develop and implement online learning opportunities for staff and
     students.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Range of Use 3.5                                             3.1
 3.0 EDUCATOR PROFICIENCY
     Educators will demonstrate proficiency in implementing, assessing, and supporting a variety
     of effective practices for teaching and learning supported by information resources and
     technology.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Proficiency 3.3                                             3.05
 3.1 Technology Staff Development: Gather data to indicate that all educators are able to
     demonstrate basic technology literacy as described in the district Technology Staff
     Development framework
     Success Indicator: 80% of educators demonstrate 100% of Basic Technology Literacy                NA
 3.2 Assessment Literacy: Assist staff in the development of assessment tools that will measure
     products of technology supported learning.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Assessment 3.0                                              2.62
 3.3 Social, Ethical and Legal Implications: Ensure that all educators are prepared to guide
     students as they deal with the social, ethical, and legal issues related to life in a
     technological world.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Ethics 3.3                                                  3.07
 4.0 DIGITAL AGE EQUITY
     Information and technology resources will address the digital divide by ensuring that all
     students are engaging in an educational program aligned to the vision.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Equity 3.5                                                  3.35
 4.1 Assistive Technology: Achieve equity between all students with and without specials needs
     and have a plan in place to address potential inequities.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Special Needs 3.8                                           3.73
 4.2 Equitable Access to Technology Hardware: Maintain a comprehensive technology
     hardware replacement and network accessibility plan that will provide students and staff
     access to high-quality technology, regardless of the school or classroom.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Systemwide 3.3                                              3.03
 4.3 Information Resources and Software Adoption Align with Curriculum: Provide instructional
     support resources in print and digital format that align with the adopted curriculum and
     foster information and technology literacy skills.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Practice Alignment 3.4                                      3.27



Chapter 7 (Technology)                                                                                      48
 5.0 ROBUST ACCESS
     The district will continue to deploy high-tech resources to ensure that students and staff
     have the hardware, software and network access needed to perform multi-media tasks that
     promote high productivity in their work and higher level learning.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Access 3.5                                                3.35
 5.1 Mobile Computing: Install at least one wireless mobile computer lab in each school.
     Success Indicator: 9 schools with mobile computer labs                                          4
 5.2 Wireless Internet Access: Provide wireless access to the Internet in locations that
     demonstrate the need for greater mobility, effective communication, or increased
     productivity.
     Success Indicator: 5 new locations                                                              3
 5.3 Instructional Presentation Resources: Increase the number of instructional presentation
     resources by 50% (LCD projectors, integrated sound systems.)
     Success Indicator: 75 systems                                                                  50
 5.4 Planning for New Facilities: Ensure that the planning for new school facilities includes an
     adequate budget to support state of the art technology resources, to provide necessary
     hardware, software, network access and robust support.
     Success Indicator: TBD                                                                        TBD
 6.0 SYSTEMS AND LEADERSHIP
     The district will continue to support existing policies and develop new formal processes to
     ensure that effective technology systems support a high-performance learning organization.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Systems 3.3                                               2.94
 6.1 Network Security: Develop a network security plan that ensures management solutions to
     protect critical data services.
     Success Indicator: Network Protection Enhanced                                                  N
                            Disaster Recovery Enhanced                                               N
                            Email Messaging Archived and Searchable                                  N
                            Monitoring Critical Data Services Implemented                            N
 6.2 Staffing for Library Media Centers: Provide recommended library media staffing to ensure
     the maximum potential for improving student achievement.
     Success Indicator: Increased LMS Staffing                                                       N
                            Flexible Scheduling @ 2 grade levels                                     N
 6.3 Budget for Total Cost of Ownership: Develop budget practices that continue to prioritize
     funding to address the full cost of technology and the support systems necessary to sustain
     all aspects of it.


Chapter 7 (Technology)                                                                                    49
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Funding 3.0                                                                  2.84
 6.4 Infrastructure, Connectivity, Telecommunications and Technical Support: Support intensive
     technology use by staff and students and provide for the changing needs of schools,
     increased applications and needs beyond the traditional school day and structures.
     Success Indicator: enGauge Survey – Access Connectivity 4.0                                                      3.89


                                                  Narrative Analysis of Indicators
Most of the current indicators for 2005-06 are taken from the results of the enGauge survey, January –February 2006. These
indicators fall within the range for the 4-stage continuum of the enGauge Six Essential Conditions.
     1.0-2.0 Awareness             For the most part, the Sun Prairie Area School District has scores which are in the Exploration stage
     2.0-3.0 Adoption              suggesting that, in general, educators are using data to systematically align curriculum, instruction, and
     3.0-4.0 Exploration           assessment to digital age goals. Technology is continuing to visibly bring value to K-12 education.
     4.0-5.0 Transformation
                                                                                                                         Database
                                                                                                               SPASD
The national database for enGauge shows averages that are higher than SPASD                      Vision        2.22      2.57
in 4 of the 6 indicators.                                                                        Practice      2.81      3.03
                                                                                                 Proficiency   3.04      2.99
                                                                                                 Equity        3.73      3.39
                                                                                                 Access        3.35      3.37
                                                                                                 Systems       2.94      3.19
                                                                                                 AVERAGE       3.02      3.11



                                           Future Directions and Recommendations
The goals and objectives of the Information and Technology Plan 2006-09 are designed to bring about improved scores in each
stage of the Essential Conditions. Improved performance, as measured by the
enGauge survey 2007, would display results as follows:                                         SPASD
                                                                                                 Vision        2.50
                                                                                                 Practice      3.00
                                                                                                 Proficiency   3.30
                                                                                                 Equity        3.50
                                                                                                 Access        3.50
                                                                                                 Systems       3.30
                                                                                                 AVERAGE       3.18




Chapter 7 (Technology)                                                                                                                       50
                                                              Chapter 8
                                                         Report prepared by: Lisa Dawes
School Board directive to monitor alternative education programs.


               Descriptors of the program or topic area                               03/04               04/05           05/06
                                                                                       Results            Result          Result
1A      Number of students served:
                        General Equivalency Diploma Option #2                           N/A               N/A             17
                        Credit Recovery                                                 N/A               N/A             35
                        School Of Alternative Resources                                  50                59             71
                        Dane County Transition School                                     9                12             13
                                                  Seminar 9                      Semester 1: 11     Semester 1: 15   Semester 1: 12
                                                                                 Semester 2: 11     Semester 2: 10   Semester 2: 16


                         STRIVE
                   (Students Take Responsibility in Valuing Education)                PMMS 24       PMMS 23             PMMS 25
                                                                                      PVMS 39       PVMS 25             PVMS 17
1B      Number of FTE:
                      General Equivalency Diploma Option # 2                               N/A             N/A              .5
                      Credit Recovery                                                      N/A             N/A              .2
                      School Of Alternative Resources                                                                2.7 Day
                                                                                          3.0 Day        3.0 Day      .5 Night

                      Dane County Transition School                                        N/A             N/A             N/A
                      Seminar 9                                                             1               1              1.4
                      STRIVE                                                                3               3               3

1C      Funding source:                               Program Cost:
          General Equivalency Diploma Option #2                      $42,000               N/A             N/A           District
          Credit Recovery                                        $25,000                   N/A             N/A           Grant




Chapter 8 (Alternative Education)                                                                                                51
           School Of Alternative Resources                       $174,000 Day          Day: District      Day: District       Day: District
                                                                 $30,000 Night          Night: N/A         Night: N/A         Night: Grant


           Dane County Transition School                            $100,000             District            District            District
           Seminar 9                                                $73,000              District            District            District

           STRIVE                                                   $150,000           40% District        60% District       100% District
                                                                                        60% Grant          40% Grant
1D      GEDO2:                                                                             N/A                N/A                  75%
        Percentage of students enrolled that graduate with their class
1E     Credit Recovery:                                                                    N/A                 N/A                 55%
       Number of students participating that recover one or more credits
1F     SOAR: Percentage of students participating that graduate from the program
       with their cohort group                                                            79.2%               70%                  33%
       Note: This does not reflect graduation rates
1G     HS: Percentage of students that graduate with their entering
       cohort group                                                                       93.7%              88.7%                 82%
       Note: This does not reflect graduation rates
1H      HS: Drop out rates                                                             1.07% (17)          1.78% (29)       Not Available until
                                                                                                           Preliminary           October
        SOAR: Drop out rates                                                                                1.67% (1)       Not Available until
                                                                                        5.46% (3)
                                                                                                           Preliminary           October
1I     HS: Number of students that failed more than one core class (semester 1     Sem. 1-181 (11.5%)   Sem.1-208 (13.2%)   Sem 1-98 (5.8%)
       and 2)                                                                      Sem. 2-192 (12.6%)   Sem. 2-152 (9.5%)   Sem 2-116 (6.9%)
1J     HS: Number of students that received a “D” in more than one core class      Sem. 1- 142 (9.0%)   Sem. 1-126 (8.0%)   Sem 1-157 (9.3%)
       (semester 1 and 2)                                                          Sem . 2-146 (9.6%)   Sem. 2-152 (9.5%)   Sem 2-149 (8.8%)
1K     HS: Percentage of habitual truants                                                                 11.4% (187)         20.2% (336)
                                                                                       9.5% (152)
                                                                                                           Preliminary         Preliminary

       SOAR: Percentage of habitual truants                                                                78.3% (29)          43.7% (31)
                                                                                       67.9% (19)
                                                                                                           Preliminary         Preliminary
1L     HS: Attendance rates                                                               97.2%             94.76%               92.6%
                                                                                                           Preliminary         Preliminary
       SOAR: Attendance rates                                                             68.7%             87.46%               77.0%
1M     HS: Number of dropouts                                                                                   29          Not Available until
                                                                                            17
                                                                                                                                 October


Chapter 8 (Alternative Education)                                                                                                     52
          SOAR: Number of dropouts                                                                                           1             Not Available until
                                                                                                     3
                                                                                                                                                October
1N        HS: Number of students suspended out of school more than once                              77                     35                    29

1O        HS: Number of students suspended for:
          Drugs                                                                                      8                      17                      5

          Weapons                                                                                    6                       7                      2

          Assault                                                                                    51                     36                     38


                                                         Narrative Analysis of Indicators
     1.    The efforts of the High School to address student failure rates through frequent monitoring have indicated a positive change in the percentage of
          students failing courses.

     2.   Attendance rates and truancy rates continue to be an issue for HS age students.

     3. Multiple suspensions have declined for two years in a row, indicating that administration is finding alternatives to suspension to improve student
        success possibly demonstrated by improved failure rates.

     4. Students are not necessarily graduating with their cohort group. This may indicate that students need more from their high school education
        experience to prepare for their adult life. There has been a change in the focus of SOAR to make sure students leave with the skills they need to
        be successful, rather than to graduate on time with classmate. The data indicates this change in philosophy.


                                                  Future Directions and Recommendations
     1.   Continue to monitor failure lists at progress reports and quarterly report card times.

     2.   Expand continuum of educational opportunities to meet the needs of all learners.

     3. Expand student connectedness to school through alternative learning options, staff mentoring, student assistance groups and individualized
        counseling to reduce truancy rates and increase attendance.




Chapter 8 (Alternative Education)                                                                                                                       53
                                                               Chapter 9
                                                            Report prepared by: Phil Frei

                          Report on Policy KH: Public Gifts, Donations, And Grants To The School
    “The Sun Prairie Area School Board appreciates the generosity of booster clubs, parent-teacher organizations, service groups and other
                     community organizations that donate gifts that will enhance and extend the work of the schools…”


                             Report on Policy DD: Grant Proposals And Entitlement Applications
  “Grants and entitlements may provide additional educational opportunities for students, allow the implementation of valuable educational
    innovations and research, allow the trial and evaluation of promising new practices, allow the purchase of specialized materials and
                                 equipment, or provide professional development opportunities for staff…”



                                        Descriptors                                            03/04            04/05               05/06
                                                                                              Results          Results             Results

        Total amount of gifts or donations contributed to the district this fiscal year
                                                                                             $172,205.46      $89,847.69        $220,896.00
        Total amount of entitlements distributed to the district this fiscal year            $494,607.00    $1,431,125.00     $1,545,746.00
        Total amount of competitive grants won by the district and received this
                                                                                            $1,478,632.00    $432,082.00        $469,931.00
        fiscal year

                                                            Gifts and Donations 2005/2006
         Donor                                         Purpose                                                   Accepted in compliance with
                                                                                                  Amount
                                                                                                                Policy KH and Procedure KH-R?
Alliant Energy            Monetary for Royal Oaks use                                            $300.00                     Yes
Aluminum Gutters          Donation for High School Home Construction Project                                                 Yes
                                                                                                  $ 75.00
&Downspouts, Inc
America‘s Best Flowers    1% Loyalty Donation                                                     $ 25.36                    Yes




Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                                                 54
American Family Ins.        In-kind donation for the printing of the SPASD Calendar                           Yes
                                                                                                  $5,188.06
Group
American Family Ins.        Monetary towards an Ashley Field Scoreboard                                       Yes
                                                                                                  $ 250.00
Group
American Family Ins.        Monetary for bus to Ethics Conference in Madison                                  Yes
                                                                                                  $ 175.75
Group
Anonymous                   Monetary donation for high school girls varsity soccer jersey‟s       $1,400.00   Yes
Bank of Sun Prairie         Monetary towards an Ashley Field Scoreboard                           $1,000.00   Yes
Bank of Sun Prairie         Monetary donation-PVMS 8th grader to go on Washington DC trip            $50.00   Yes
Beans „N Cream              Four air pots of coffee for PVMS teacher appreciation breakfast       $ 71.14     Yes
Ben‟s Marketing             Coca Cola rebate for product at the high school                       $ 200.00    Yes
Birrenkott Surveyors, Inc   In-kind services for the Home Construction Class at the High School   $ 235.00    Yes
Blackhawk Co. Inc           Filing cabinet for use in the library at Horizon Elementary           $ 800.00    Yes
Bohling & Sons Inc.         Donation for High School Home Construction Project                    $1,125.00   Yes
Bonnie Lauzon               Monetary donation to the HS Academic Decathlon Team                   $ 100.00    Yes
Bristol Lutheran            Backpacks filed with supplies for each elementary school                          Yes
                                                                                                  $2,000.00
Churches
C. H. Bird PTO              Debror truck (WARE) with shelves-Ms Teasdale-Art Room                 $ 504.00    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Die Cuts for C. H. Bird Elementary School                             $ 985.00    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               4th Grade Fieldtrip to IMAX                                           $ 300.00    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Laminator, laminator cabinet, and laminating film                     $2,296.35   Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Monetary-milk scholarship for snacks and milk-kindergarten            $ 324.00    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Monetary grant for assembly lyceums for the 2005-06 year              $2,500.00   Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Monetary donation for a cake to celebrate the school‟s namesake       $ 266.00    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               8 sets Orff instrumentarium for school music room                     $3,677.00   Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Monetary donation for OT teacher                                      $ 91.47     Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Megaphone for playground                                              $ 109.94    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Dragon Club T-shirts                                                  $ 540.00    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Radios for Bird School Staff                                          $ 226.20    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Staff appreciation at conferences                                     $ 20.89     Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Family Fun Night Out                                                  $ 147.22    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Two playground benches with cement pads                               $1,261.00   Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               School Nurse Supplies                                                 $ 500.00    Yes
C.H. Bird PTO               Books for C.H. Bird Elementary Kindergarten                           $1,400.00   Yes

Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                               55
CH Bird PTO             Oak hardwood bark for landscaping in May of 2004-05                $   848.00   Yes
CH Bird PTO             Balls, Sports skating equipment-physical education classes 04/05   $   195.00   Yes
CH Bird PTO             TV/VCR/DVD combination for music room                              $   349.00   Yes
CH Bird PTO             Color copies for 3rd grade in June of 2004-05                      $    52.00   Yes
CH Bird PTO             Glockenspiel, xylophone, twelve 10” hand drums for music room      $   528.72   Yes
CH Bird PTO             Ellison Sure Cut Die Sets for Teacher‟s Workroom                   $   690.00   Yes
CH Bird PTO             Culture Club T-Shirts for Assemblies                               $   130.00   Yes
CH Bird PTO             Purchase of games for indoor recess for 2nd graders                $    50.00   Yes
CH Bird PTO             Ten Books for first grade classroom                                $    50.44   Yes
Christopher Alberts     Monetary donation for field trips for financial need students      $   350.00   Yes
Cindy Terhune           Reference/supplemental textbooks for science classrooms HS         $   150.00   Yes
Conrad‟s Inc            Monetary donation for school district calendar                     $   500.00   Yes
                                                   th
Cress Funeral Home      Monetary donation-PVMS 8 grader to go on Washington DC trip        $    50.00   Yes
Dane County cops for    Monetary donation-PVMS 8th grader to go on Washington DC                        Yes
                                                                                           $ 350.00
Kids                    trip
Dane County Deputy      Monetary for student membership at the YMCA                                     Yes
                                                                                           $    63.00
Sheriff Assoc.
Darin Kubly             Donated a motorcycle to the High School Shop Class                 $ 400.00     Yes
Diesel Injection        Equipment and transportation for SPHS girls swim team                           Yes
                                                                                           $2,500.00
Services, Inc
Don & Sue Barman        1993 Nissan Maxima (donated car to teach students in auto                       Yes
                                                                                           $ 800.00
                        mechanics at the high school)
Eastside SCO            Certified staff classroom supplies                                 $ 650.00     Yes
Eastside SCO            Homeroom teacher start-up gift expense                             $2,400.00    Yes
Eastside SCO            Help defray cost of 2nd grade fieldtrip                            $ 250.00     Yes
Eastside SCO            Help defray cost of 5th grade fieldtrip                            $ 500.00     Yes
Eastside SCO            Help defray cost of 4th grade fieldtrip                            $ 250.00     Yes
Eastside SCO            Help defray cost of an all school fieldtrip                        $ 535.00     Yes
Eastside SCO            Purchased toner cartridges for printers                            $1,000.87    Yes
Eastside SCO            Purchased program license & equipment for “Peaceful Playground”    $2,000.00    Yes
Eastside SCO            Purchased Ellison die cuts for teacher workroom at Eastside        $ 488.25     Yes
Eastside SCO            Purchased a Think Pad Computer For Eastside                        $1,180.00    Yes
Eastside SCO            Purchased materials for 3rd grade memory journals                  $1,350.00    Yes
Eastside SCO            3rd grade to terrace town                                          $ 850.00     Yes


Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                         56
Eastside SCO              Purchased take home books for 2nd grade                              $ 500.00      Yes
Eastside SCO              Purchased items for 2nd grade memory book project                    $2,016.00     Yes
Eastside SCO              Purchased three xylophones for music room                            $1,060.00     Yes
Eastside SCO              Purchased on-line subscription-Tumble Books & Stereo head phones     $ 575.00      Yes
Eastside SCO              Purchased books for Kindergarten Literacy Program                    $2,500.00     Yes
General Casualty CO.      Monetary for HS fall 2005 traffic safety program                     $ 400.00      Yes
General Casualty Co.      Spring 2006 Traffic Safety Program at the high school                $ 400.00      Yes
George & Kathy Oehrlein   Monetary for music for orchestra students at all schools             $ 100.00      Yes
Geri Stenstrup            Four refurbished bikes for use by students                           $ 500.00      Yes
Hebl, Hebl & Ripp         Academic Decathlon Activity Account SPHS                             $ 100.00      Yes
Horizon SCO               K-2 Writing curriculum materials                                     $ 327.07      Yes
Horizon SCO               Science Supplies                                                     $1,325.48     Yes
Horizon SCO               Kindergarten Visitation Refreshments                                 $ 87.60       Yes
Horizon SCO               5th Grade Safety Patrol                                              $ 289.56      Yes
HS Baseball Boosters      Monetary for a pitching platform                                     $ 800.00      Yes
Janice Thompson           Professional development library books for Royal Oaks                $ 205.85      Yes
Jennifer Zutter           Character education books for Horizon                                $ 200.00      Yes
Jennings & Woldt          Donation for High School Home Construction Project – Labor,                        Yes
                                                                                                   In-Kind
Remodeling, Inc.          Equipment
Jennings & Woldt          Donation for High School Home Construction Project                                 Yes
                                                                                                   In-Kind
Remodeling, Inc.
Jim & Kathy Renz          Monetary donation in memory of father for HS volleyball & softball   $ 470.00      Yes
Jon & Angela Schmidt      Monetary for use by PMMS music staff                                 $ 200.00      Yes
Judy Mueller              Percussion starter kit for PVMS                                      $ 150.00      Yes
Karen Witt                Two coolers and four cooler freezer packs to be used on                            Yes
                                                                                               $    60.00
                          fieldtrips or any other use the school chooses
Knights of Columbus       Provide educational equipment for cognitive disabilities students    $1,486.54     Yes
M/M James Riederer        Monetary donation to Academic Decathlon at the High School           $ 500.00      Yes
McGann Construction       Donation for High School Home Construction Project – Labor,                        Yes
                                                                                                   In-Kind
                          Equipment
McGann Construction       Donation for High School Home Construction Project                      In-Kind    Yes
                                                      th
Michael Richel            Monetary donation-PVMS 8 grader to go on Washington DC trip          $ 70.00       Yes
Northside SCO             Monetary grant for Professional Development Workshops                $6,000.00     Yes
Northside SCO             20 Keyboards/Headsets for the music room                             $5,400.00     Yes


Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                              57
Northside SCO           Assembly Programs                                               $ 500.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Beautification Day-Plants                                       $ 100.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Monthly Birthday Parties                                        $ 100.30    Yes
Northside SCO           Pizza for Kindergarten parent meeting                           $ 142.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Open House                                                      $ 79.77     Yes
Northside SCO           Santa                                                           $ 500.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Staff Appreciation Breakfast                                    $ 350.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Safety patrol end of year field trip                            $1,171.00   Yes
Northside SCO           Book/sign gift to honor Teacher Retirees                        $ 150.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary for Fieldtrip busses for kindergarten                  $ 120.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary for Fieldtrip busses for 1st grade                     $ 275.75    Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary for Fieldtrip busses for 2nd grade                     $ 149.75    Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary for Fieldtrip busses for 3rd grade                     $ 400.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary for Fieldtrip busses for 4th grade                     $ 190.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary for Fieldtrip busses for 5th grade                     $ 429.99    Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary Fieldtrip hardship gifts for kindergarten              $ 30.00     Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary Fieldtrip hardship gifts for 1st grade                 $ 10.75     Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary Fieldtrip hardship gifts for 2nd grade                 $ 46.00     Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary Fieldtrip hardship gifts for 3rd grade                 $ 40.00     Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary Fieldtrip hardship gifts for 4th grade                 $ 51.75     Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary Fieldtrip hardship gifts for 5th grade                 $ 170.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Purchased die cuts for the building                             $ 600.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Purchased a freezer                                             $ 516.92    Yes
Northside SCO           Purchased Comprehension Toolkits for 3-5 grades                 $ 957.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Purchased Lesson One Part II                                    $6,000.00   Yes
Northside SCO           Purchased Playground structure/equipment                        $2,000.00   Yes
Northside SCO           Purchased Nesco Roasters (2)                                    $ 100.00    Yes
Northside SCO           Monetary for teacher reimbursements                             $3,000.00   Yes
NuWool Company, Inc.    Donation for High School Home Construction Project              $ 946.75    Yes
Office Depot            Rebate 5% back to school credits at the High School             $ 143.81    Yes
Office Depot            5% Back to „Schools Program – High School                       $ 23.50     Yes
Office Depot            5% Back to School program – High School                         $ 23.50     Yes
Overture Onstage        50 subsidized & 10 complimentary tickets for 6th graders PVMS               Yes
                                                                                        $ 360.00
                        to attend UW Band Concert


Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                     58
Overture Onstage        38 Subsidized & 7 complimentary tickets for “Stolen Moments”                     Yes
                                                                                             $ 270.00
                        for students at PVMS
Physicians Plus         Monetary for Health & Physical Education program at C.H.Bird         $ 175.00    Yes
PMMS PTSO               15 rolls of book tape to make books last longer                      $ 110.00    Yes
PMMS PTSO               Two sets kids disc. Mag. 1 Shakespeare, 1 English language           $ 175.00    Yes
PMMS PTSO               Motivational Phrases – posters                                       $ 33.00     Yes
PMMS PTSO               Card stock/color copying envelopes                                   $ 250.00    Yes
PMMS PTSO               Matting and framing of student artwork                               $ 425.00    Yes
PMMS PTSO               7 adult/child/infant manikins to practice on for 6th & 8th graders   $ 425.00    Yes
PMMS PTSO               Library decorations                                                  $ 206.25    Yes
PMMS PTSO               Books on tape/radio/CD                                               $ 50.00     Yes
PMMS PTSO               Band Polo Shirts for low income students                             $ 67.50     Yes
PMMS PTSO               Money for taxi‟s for kids to attend after school activities          $ 300.00    Yes
PMMS PTSO               Die cuts for school                                                  $1,323.00   Yes
Prairie Athletic Club   Monetary towards an Ashley Field Scoreboard                          $ 250.00    Yes
Prairie Athletic Club   Monetary donation-PVMS 8th grader for Washington DC trip             $ 50.00     Yes
PVMS 8th Grade          Raised money to offset cost of European Educational Trip by                      Yes
                                                                                             $ 500.00
Parents                 donating baked goods and sodas
PVMS SCO                Goodie Bags for Teachers – Classroom supplies                        $ 153.50    Yes
PVMS SCO                Teacher Wish List – Classroom Supplies/Materials                     $ 452.93    Yes
PVMS SCO                Fun Run Lunches, Refreshments, Food                                  $ 158.46    Yes
PVMS SCO                Testing Day Refreshments, Food                                       $ 47.48     Yes
PVMS SCO                Student Fun Lunch                                                    $ 219.77    Yes
PVMS SCO                6th Grade Orientation                                                $ 31.65     Yes
PVMS SCO                Food/Decorations for Farewell Dance                                  $ 600.00    Yes
PVMS SCO                8th Grade Recognition                                                $ 100.00    Yes
PVMS SCO                Teacher Appreciation Week                                            $ 89.95     Yes
PVMS SCO                Fundraising Events that raised money for lighted sign                $4,563.88   Yes
PVMS SCO                Monetary donation to Student Council                                 $2,227.25   Yes
R & K Construction      Donation for High School Home Construction Project                   $1,150.00   Yes
Roundy‟s                Monetary donation We Care Program – Asian Club High School           $ 74.88     Yes
Roundy‟s                Monetary donation We Care Program – Asian Club High School           $ 70.74     Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Monetary donation for open house                                     $ 278.57    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Monetary donation for Parent Welcome                                 $ 101.65    Yes


Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                          59
Royal Oaks SCO          Monetary donation for Teacher Allowance                            $1,323.26   Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Monetary donation for Teacher Incentive Grants                     $1,699.25   Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Monetary donation for Test Day Snacks                              $ 110.22    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Teacher Allowance                                                  $7,751.75   Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Teacher Incentive Grants                                           $7,078.76   Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Safety Patrol                                                      $ 600.00    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Playground                                                         $ 171.00    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Test Day Snacks                                                    $ 10.87     Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Class Incentives                                                   $ 31.24     Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Sock Hop                                                           $ 197.30    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Kindergarten Program                                               $ 168.40    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Kindergarten Visitation                                            $ 113.70    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          5th Grade Gift                                                     $ 558.57    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          5th Grade Party                                                    $ 83.91     Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          5th Grade Shirts                                                   $ 174.00    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Field Day                                                          $ 221.38    Yes
Royal Oaks SCO          Yearbook                                                           $ 56.50     Yes
                                                  th
Rubin For Kids Inc      Monetary donation-PVMS 8 grader to go on Washington DC trip        $ 200.00    Yes
SCA Packaging North     Monetary donation to Westside for 5th grade trip to Pardeeville                Yes
                                                                                           $   95.00
America
Schools of Hope         Monetary grant for a computer at Bird and Westside                 $2,653.76   Yes
Select Enterprises      Bucky Books for families at C.H. Bird                             $16,800.00   Yes
Select Enterprises      Bucky Books for families at Eastside                              $14,700.00   Yes
Select Enterprises      Bucky Books for families at Royal Oaks                            $12,600.00   Yes
Select Enterprises      Bucky Books for faculty                                            $1,400.00   Yes
Select Enterprises      Bucky Books for families at Westside                              $17,500.00   Yes
Sentry                  Monetary donation to Key Club at the high school                   $ 24.42     Yes
Sentry                  Monetary towards an Ashley Field Scoreboard                        $1,000.00   Yes
                                                  th
Sentry Foods            Monetary donation-PVMS 8 grader to go on Washington DC trip        $ 25.00     Yes
Sign 1-1                In-kind donation for Ashley Field Scoreboard                      $ 250.00     Yes
Soccer Booster Club     Contribution towards boys soccer team warm-ups and duffle bags                 Yes
                                                                                           $1,059.00
SPHS
Soccer Booster Club     Monetary bus expense for Green Bay soccer tournament                           Yes
                                                                                           $ 200.00
SPHS


Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                        60
SP Education              Westside Elementary Math Resource Room                                              Yes
                                                                                                $2,411.47
Foundation
SP Education              High School Vocational Education                                                    Yes
Foundation                                                                                      $1,000.00

SP Education              Patrick Marsh Middle School Disability Awareness                                    Yes
                                                                                                $ 620.00
Foundation
SP Education              Monetary donation for Academic Decathlon at the High School                         Yes
                                                                                                $ 100.00
Foundation
SP Youth Basketball       Equipment for boys and girls basketball – shooting machine                          Yes
                                                                                                $4,350.00
Association
SPE Foundation, Inc       Monetary grant awarded - reading & math material – at-risk students   $1,300.00     Yes
Stanley Schrereck         Monetary donation to Royal Oaks for books and science material        $ 200.00      Yes
Stark Realtors            Furniture for any building                                            $ 500.00      Yes
Steve‟s Drafting          Donation for High School Home Construction Project –                                Yes
                                                                                                    In-Kind
Service                   Blueprints
Steve‟s Drafting          Donation for High School Home Construction Project                                  Yes
                                                                                                    In-Kind
Service
Sue Virchow               Large Screen TV and cart to support science curriculum Royal Oaks     $   500.00    Yes
Sun Prairie Lion‟s Club   Monetary donation to Key Club – High School                           $   150.00    Yes
Sun Prairie Lions Club    Boys Track – Corn Fest Monetary Donation                              $   250.00    Yes
Sun Prairie Lions Club    Monetary track activity account for uniforms & equipment HS           $   250.00    Yes
Sun Prairie Lions Club    Monetary donation for Drama Club at the High School                   $   100.00    Yes
Sun Prairie Lions Club    Monetary donation to the High School Key Club                         $   150.00    Yes
Sun Prairie Optimists     Monetary donation to Interact Club from Optimists Breakfast           $   100.00    Yes
Susan Berg, SCO           Monetary for field trip assistance at Horizon                                       Yes
                                                                                                $ 120.50
Horizon
Susan Oliver              200 Little Golden Books – Various Leaning Tools & Toys Horizon        $ 300.00      Yes
Tammy Castillo            Popcorn, oil, bags, salt to raise money for European Trip PVMS        $ 50.00       Yes
Tammy Castillo            Sold Bucky Books to raise money for European Trip PVMS                $3,500.00     Yes
Target                    1% of purchases “Take Charge of Education” Royal Oaks                 $ 145.39      Yes
Target                    1% of Purchases “Take Charge of Education”                            $ 599.43      Yes
Target                    Monetary donation PVMS 1% Take Charge of Education Program            $ 131.81      Yes
Various SP Area           Donated prizes/food for PV Spaghetti Dinner to raise money                          Yes
                                                                                                $2,108.26
Businesses                for European Educational Art and Cultures Trip to the Amazon

Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                               61
Veridian Foundation       Monetary donation to DECA for Mr. Sun Prairie Contest HS                $ 500.00                      Yes
Verizon                   5% Rebate on Phone Calls – High School                                  $ 120.75                      Yes
Vogel Brothers            School supplies for all nine schools                                                                  Yes
                                                                                                  $3,000.00
Building Company
Washington Mutual         Monetary donation for high school activity account-WaMoola              $ 18.96                       Yes
Weisensel Electric, Inc   Donation for High School Home Construction Project                      $ 518.00                      Yes
Wells Fargo Bank          School supplies for Westside Elementary                                 $ 40.00                       Yes
WI Aviation               Gift certificate 1 hour flight & ground school-aviation class SPHS      $ 90.00                       Yes
Wolter Builders           Monetary donation towards publication of School District Calendar       $1,000.00                     Yes

                                                                    Entitlements
                      Title                              Received 2003-04                  Received 2004-05               Received 2005-06
Special Education Plan – Flow-Through                       $756,358                          $879,427                       $944,149
Special Education Plan – Preschool                          $ 33,836                          $ 34,103                     $ 34,301
Elementary & Secondary Education Act (ESEA)                 $488,337                          $517,595                        $537,419
Carl Perkins                                                $ 30,520                          $ 32,708                        $ 29,877


                                                                         Grants
Title                                                                                                 Amount Received
Arts-in-Schools – Musical Connections-Dane County Cultural Affairs                                        $ 3,000
Commission - LD
Learn and Serve America – Feeding the Mind, Body, and Soul                                                $ 1,000
Learn and Serve America – Keeping It Up!                                                                  $ 1,000
Learn and Serve America – Sewing to Serve                                                                 $ 1,000
Parent and Communication Teams (PACT) Trainer-of-Trainers - LD                                            $ 5,438
Community Child Care initiatives – Department of Workforce                                                $16,336
Development - LD
Integrated Preschool Settings - LD                                                                        $ 5,500
Student Alcohol & Other Drug Abuse Mini-Grant – Dance Troupe -LD                                          $ 575
Best Buy Teach                                                                                            $ 2,500 gift card
We the People “Becoming American” Bookshelf                                                               $ 9,000
ATODA – Wis. Department of Public Instruction -LD                                                         $79,913
Noun and Adverb Mini Grant – Wis. Department of Public Instruction                                        $ 1,200


Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                                                                                   62
Dragon Club                                                       $ 620
Mentoring – Wis. Department of Public Instruction                 $ 9,375
SPARC (School, Parents and Reading Connection) – Dane County      $ 500
Youth Commission
Alternative Education Program 2nd year of grant - LD              $91,390
Altrusa-Play Group/Parent Group Project - LD                      $ 1,200
Arts-In-Schools – Dallas Brass Clinic and Concert – Dane County   $ 2,000
Cultural Affairs commission
Pep Grant 2nd year of pep program                                 $238,384




Chapter 9 (Resources)                                                        63
                                                              Chapter 10
                                                         Report prepared by: Annette Mikula

School Board directive to report on substitute usage. The School Board requests annual data that
summarizes time that employees are engaging in activities outside of their normal day-to-day
assignment.



         Substitute Usage 2003-2004 thru 2005-2006

CERTIFIED STAFF (SPEA)
                                           FTE       426.65    452.15      494.50


                                                  2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006
MEDICAL REASONS
Illness                                               1,238      1378        1544
Medical Appointments                                    680       713         820
Worker's Compensation                                     5        40           7a
Family Medical/Child Rearing Leave                    1,009      1454        2146 b
Disability Medical                                       57       110         444 c
                                     Total Days       2,989     3,695        4961

                 AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE                  7.01       8.17      10.03



a. The district has seen a substantial decrease in the number of days missed as a result of worker's compensation injuries. The district
   partnered with EMC our worker's compensation insurance provider to complete a detailed work analysis designed to identify
   potential problems areas and helped in prevention.
b. As the district grows we are seeing an increase in the number of requests for Family Medical Leave. The main reasons are birth or
   adoption of a child, individual‟s own medical illness, or the illness of an immediate family member.
c. This represent 9 employees who suffered from serious health conditions.




Chapter 10 (Substitute Usage)                                                                                                              64
PERSONAL REASONS
Personal Time                                           318         418         385
Emergency Leave/Funeral                                 131          97         168
Leave with out stated reason                            191         143         146
Parent Teacher Conferences                               25          25          18
Dock Time                                                98          77         116 d
                                     Total Days         763         760         833

                  AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE                 1.79        1.68         1.68

d. Through collective bargaining measures the district has tried to limit the number of dock days that certified teachers are able to take.
   We have successfully capped the number to ten days in any rolling five-year period. As the number of employees in the district
   grows we are seeing an increase in the number of days taken, but the percentage has been fairly consistent.



                                                  2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006
PROFESSIONAL/STAFF DEVELOPMENT
Professional Development                              1,296        1602        1949 e
                         Total Days                   1,296        1602        1949

                  AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE                 3.04        3.54         3.94

e. See Chapter 11 for a detailed breakdown of staff development offerings



PUPIL SERVICES
IEP Meetings                                            240         160         147
Testing                                                              93          82
                                     Total Days         240         253         229 f

                  AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE                 0.56        0.56         0.46

f.   As the number of children referred or receiving services in special education grows the number of meetings and required time for
     testing has increased. Through the use of contracting with external diagnosticians when ever possible to complete initial testing we
     have seen a decrease in the number of days that our own employees have needed to be out for testing.



Chapter 10 (Substitute Usage)                                                                                                                 65
CURRICULUM/INSTRUCTION
Coordinator Time                                       13           5           6
Curriculum Hours                                      108          90          71
Kindergarten Visitation                                22          21          30
Testing                                                52          30          94 g
Running Records                                       106         112          91
                                   Total Days         326         258         292

                   AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE              0.76        0.57        0.59



g. The number of testing days did significantly increase due to the significant increase in Federal mandated testing under NCLB.



COMMITTEES/MEETINGS
SPEA Meetings                                          27          22           0
Meetings                                              103         202         186
District Interview Teams                               64          97          71
                                   Total Days         194         321         257


                   AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE              0.46        0.71        0.52



MISCELLANEOUS
Athletic Events                                        97          65         73
Extra Curricular Activities                            20          26         41
Field Trips                                           347         392        474
Jury Duty                                              16           7         19
Other                                                 116          78        379 h
Snow Day                                                           73         14
District Directed Leave                                            44         67
                                   Total Days         621         685       1067

                   AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE              1.46        1.51        2.16


Chapter 10 (Substitute Usage)                                                                                                      66
h. The majority of these days were used when certified teachers filled in for administrators moved to cover family medical leaves
   (Westside and Eastside). The other reasons include a teacher's participation in an international program, and several teacher's
   leadership participation in state and national organizations (in most instances the sub costs are paid by the organizations).




CLASSIFIED STAFF (Local 60)
                       CLASSIFIED FTE                208.26     224.97       248.91


                                                  2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006
MEDICAL REASONS
Illness                                                 972        834        1058
Medical Appointments                                    322        303         395
Family Medical Leave                                    372        295         379
Worker's Compensation                                    69         73          16
Disability Medical                                        9         41         171
                                     Total Days       1,744       1546        2019

                  AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE                 8.37        6.87        8.11



PERSONAL REASONS
Emergency/Funeral Leave                                  78          76         114
Dock Time                                               186         240         349 I
Vacation Time                                         1,320         881        1020
261 Days                                                                         45
Personal Time                                           377         308         372
                                     Total Days       1,961       1,505       1,900

                  AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE                 9.41        6.69        7.63

i.   When classified employees are absent and still in their probationary period the only option they have is to take dock time. As we see
     increased FTE and an increasing number of probationary employees with in local 60 we will continue to see increases in the number
     of dock days that are processed.




Chapter 10 (Substitute Usage)                                                                                                                67
                                                  2003-2004 2004-2005 2005-2006
MISCELLANEOUS
District meetings                                         7           4          22
Conferences and Workshops                               102          72          87
IEP Meetings                                              4           3           3
Testing (not IEP)                                                               131
Jury Duty                                                13          1           10
Field Trips                                              27         23           25
Miscellaneous                                            41         34          316 j
Snow Day                                                           100            1
                                     Total Days         194        237          595

                  AVERAGE PER EMPLOYEE                 0.93        1.05        2.39

j.   Many of these days were used when a health assistant covered the family medical leave of the district nurse, and a vacant nurse
     position. Other reasons include additional time that was needed for the conversion from the AS400 to Skyward, additional staffing
     used for secretarial and clerical support, and additional staffing used for aides.




                                                     Narrative Analysis of Indicators
Included as footnotes in the data report.


                                              Future Directions and Recommendations
As the district continues to grow and we have more employees we will continue to see upward trends in our time off usage. In analyzing the data it can
be seen that most of the time off is not employer driven or employer directed. The district will continue to work through the bargaining process to
control and or limit the amount of time that employees are schedule in activities outside of their normal work activities. One such goal would be to have
extra days added to the certified contract for professional development activities.




Chapter 10 (Substitute Usage)                                                                                                                       68
      Certified Staff Substitute Usage
                   2005-06


                                12%




                    3%


               3%
                                               Medical
             2%
                                               Personal

                                               Professional/ Staff
                                         52%   Development
                                               Pupil Services
   20%
                                               Curriculum/
                                               Instruction
                                               Committees/
                                               Meetings
                                  8%           Miscellaneous



Chapter 10 (Substitute Usage)                                    69
 Classified Staff Substitute Usage 2005-06

                                                Medical
                                9%
                                                Emergency
                                                Leave
                                                Dock Time
        27%
                                          50%
                                                Staff
                                                Development
                                                Vacation Time
                 2%
                         9%
                                     3%         Personal
                                                Time

Chapter 10 (Substitute Usage)                                   70
                                                        Chapter 11
                                                     Report prepared by: Nancy Nikolay
Report on Professional Development 2005-2006
The Sun Prairie Area School District‟s Staff Development Program is driven by the goals identified in the district‟s strategic plan. Support
is provided for teachers to work together in professional learning communities, examining the questions: What do we want students to
learn? How will we know they have learned it? What will we do if they haven’t learned it? (DuFour and Eaker) A variety of research-
based activities are utilized, including courses, workshops, data retreats, collegial study groups and mentoring.

Courses and workshops are designed to meet teachers‟ needs, connect to prior knowledge, and engage learners in the construction of
knowledge. Facilitators model best practices so that teachers will create similar educational experiences in their own classrooms.
Courses and workshops are ongoing in nature, to provide teachers opportunities to implement programs and strategies.

 This year our K-5 teachers utilized 16 hours during Professional Development Thursdays to examine student data and explore best
 practices in mathematics. The 6-12 teachers utilized the Professional Development Days to identify power standards/essential learning
 for students, create assignments that align with the standards, and analyze student achievement data.

 Our new teacher mentor program provided 2 full release mentors to work with 28 new teachers. The mentors met on a weekly basis
 with the new teachers and conducted monthly classroom observations for the purpose of peer coaching. The district provides ongoing
 training for both the mentors and the new teachers.

 Throughout the year, employees participated in professional development that supports the mission of maximizing student learning.
 (See the attached table for details.)


                                           Initiatives for the 2006-07 school year
K-12 Best Practices in Literacy
3-5 Mathematical Concepts and Best Practice
K-5 Standards Based Grading
6-12 Power Standards/Common Assessments
K-12 Cultural Competence/Student Connectedness
K-12 Inclusion Practices/Differentiation




Chapter 11 (Staff Development)                                                                                                         71
*See page 75 for description of Levels
                          Title                             *Level    Audience       Teachers     Support    Hours per    No. of     Total    Total   Presenter      Substitute     Stipend/Fee Funding
                                                                                     Attending     Staff     Workshop    Sessions   Teacher   Supp.      Fee           Cost                     Source
                                                                                                 Attending                           Hours    Staff
                                                                                                                                              Hours
LITERACY

Breakthrough to Literacy 6.0                                  4            K           28                       14          2        392        0                   $ 8,120 $            15,830   District
Kindergarten Literacy                                         2            K           27                        7          1        189        0       $     900     $ 3,915                   Dist/Title II
K-2 Blue Folder                                               2           K-2          110                       7          6        770        0      $ 5,040 $          7,830                 Dist/Title II
1-2 Literacy                                                  2           1-2          59                       21          6        1239       0      $ 5,400 $ 25,665                         Dist/Title II
3-5 Literacy                                                  2           3-5          83                       28         12        2324       0      $ 18,000 $ 48,140                        Dist/Title II
Reading in the Middle School                                  2           6-8          44                       21          6        924        0     $     9,000 $     19,140                  Dist/Title II
Reading in the Content Area for MS Educators                  2           6-8          25                       14          2        350        0     $     3,000 $       7,250                 Dist/Title II
Read 180                                                      3           5-8           8                       28          4        224        0     $       840 $ 4,640                         Title I
Read 180 for High School                                      3      9-12 Spec.Ed.      5                       14          2         70        0                   $     1,450                 Flow Thru
Reading Strategies K - 2                                      1           K-2                       43           7          1          0       301    $       900                               Flow Thru
Reading Strategies 3 - 12                                     1           3-12                      47           7          1          0       329    $       630                               Flow Thru
Literacy Overview                                             1         Admin.         17                        6          3        102        0     $       900                                 District
Assess. & Instr. In Begin. Rdg. (DIBELS)                      2           K-2          10                       15          8        150        0     $     5,000                                District
Cris Tovani Reading Group                                     2           K-5          10                        9          4         90        0     $       270                                District
Implementing Reading and Writing in Primary Grades            2           K-2          27                        2          1         54        0      $       60                                District
6+1 Writing Traits                                            2           1-6           7                       12          6         84        0     $     2,160                                District
Book Study: The Art of Teaching Reading                       2           K-5           8                        2          3         16        0       $     540                                District
Dir. Instr. Wkshp Ser/Rdg Mastery 1 & 2                       2           K-2           6                       12          3         72        0     $       553                               Flow Thru
Dir. Instr. Wkshp Ser/Corrective Redg - Decoding              2           3-6           2                        6          1         12        0     $       553                               Flow Thru
Dir. Instr. Wkshp Ser/Rdg Mast. Plus (Levels 3 & 4)           2           6-12          6                        6          1         36        0     $       553                               Flow Thru
Early Reading Empowerment (ERE)                               3           K-5          19                       90         30        1710       0     $     1,598               $        25,705 District
Introduction: How to Take a Running Record                    4           K-3           2                       1.5         1          3        0     $       135
                                                    Total                              503          90         329.5       104       8811      630       $ 56,032     $ 126,150   $      41,535

CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION

Introduction to Handwriting Without Tears                     2          K-5           22           2           2           2         44        4     $        200                                 District
High School Power standards                                   2          9-12          136                      7           1        952        0     $      2,400                                 District
Middle School Power standards                                 2          6-8           140                     3.5          1        490        0                                                  District
Differentiation of Instruction & Active Learning              2          K-12           8                      28           4        224        0     $      3,390   $      4,640                  District
Grant Writing for Teachers                                    2          K-12          16                       2           1         32        0     $        180                                 District
Learning and the Brain                                        2          K-12          16                      15           1        240        0     $        750                                 District
The Teenage Brain: A Work in Progress                         2          K-12          21                      15           2        315        0     $      1,129                                 District
Life Skills Booster                                           2          K-12          17                      2.5          1         43        0                    $      1,232                  Title IV
Life Skills Training                                          2          K-12           4                       7           1         28        0                    $        580                  Title IV
Making the Most of our Library Resources                      2          K-12          10                       2           1         20        0     $        180                                 District
Grading Gdlns. For a Standards Based System                   2          K-12          21                      7.5          5        158        0     $        630                                 District
Memory and the Power of Transfer                              2          K-12          18                      15           2        270        0     $      1,129                                 District
Overview of the Keyboarding Curr                              2          3-5            6                       2           2         12        0     $        360                                 District
Support for Using Grade Book (IGPro) Intro to Grd Bk          2          6-12          34                       2           3         68        0     $        540                                 District
Support for Using Grade Book (IGPro) GrdBk&EndQtr             2          6-12          25                       2           2         50        0     $        360                                 District
Support for Using Grade Book (IGPro) GrdBk&PrgRpt             2          6-12          31                       2           3         62        0     $        540                                 District
WebGrader Training                                            2          K-12          62                       6           2        372        0                    $      8,990                  District
                                                                                       16                       2           4         32        0                    $      1,160                  District
                                                   Total                               603          2          123         38        3412       4         $ 11,788       $ 16,602    $         -

Chapter 11 (Staff Development)                                                                                                                                                                       72
                          Title                               *Level    Audience      Teachers     Support    Hours per    No. of     Total    Total   Presenter        Substitute       Stipend/Fee Funding
                                                                                      Attending     Staff     Workshop    Sessions   Teacher   Supp.      Fee             Cost                       Source
                                                                                                  Attending                           Hours    Staff
                                                                                                                                               Hours
ASSESSMENT

MAP                                                             3                        51                      3.5         4        179        0                                $                   Dist/TitleV
                                                                                                                                                                              1,885
Book Study: Classroom Assessment                                2           K-5          6                       8           4        48         0                                                      District
I have RIT scores & Lexiles for my students…now what?           3      K-12 Spec Ed      10                      2           2        20         0                                                      District
Scoring Reading Indicator Assessments                           3                        10                      16          2        160        0                              $                       District
                                                                                                                                                                            2,900
                                                      Total                              77                     29.5        12        407        0         $        -     $ 4,785         $       -

MATH

Professional Development Thursdays: Math Inservices             2        PreK-5         220                      16          8        3520       0                  $                                 Dist/Title II
                                                                                                                                                               18,000
Algebra in the Elementary Classroom                             3          K-5          13                       15          5        195        0     $        1,500                                   Title II
Math Training for Eastside Elementary Teachers                  3          K-5          18                      3.5          2         63        0                                                    ES Grant
CGI Math: Session 1                                             3          K-5          17                       15          5        255        0     $      1,500                                     Title II
CGI Math: Session 2                                             3          K-5           7                       15          5        105        0     $      1,500                                     Title II
Co-TchMath: SpecEd & RegEd…Inclusive Setting                    2          K-5          17                       2           1         34        0     $        360                                   Flow Thru
Math Trailblazers Support - Kindergarten                        2           K            6                       10          5         60        0     $        900                                    District
Math Trailblazers Support - 1st Grade                           2           1            3                       6           3         18        0     $        540                                    District
Math Trailblazers Support - 2nd Grade                           2           2            2                       6           3         12        0     $        540                                    District
                                                      Total                             303                     88.5        37        4262       0         $ 24,840       $          -    $       -

INCLUSION

Spec. Ed. Forms Mgr. Software Training (OASYS)                  2                       112                       3          8        336        0     $        5,000 $       4,132                   Flow Thru
OASYS Follow-up Support for Spec. Ed.                           2                       12                        2          1        24         0                                                    Flow Thru
Essential Facilitation for IEP Team Meetings                    2                       21                       14          2        294        0     $       15,884 $       3,190                   Flow Thru
Func. Behav. Assess. & Behav. Intervention Plans                2                       10                        7          1        70         0                                                    UW Grant
Inclusion Study Group                                           2                        8                        6          6        48         0     $         540                                  Flow Thru
Mtg Needs of Children w/Autism-Adolescence                      2                       25                        6          1        150        0                                                    Flow Thru
Mtg Needs of Children w/Autism-Challenging Behaviors            2                       39                        6          1        234        0                                                    Flow Thru
Mtg Needs of Children w/Autism-Inc. Classroom                   2                       39                        6          1        234        0                                                    Flow Thru
Non-Violent Crisis Intervention                                 2                       26                        7          2        182        0                                                    Flow Thru
Schools of HOPE Training                                        2                        9                       1.5         1        14         0                                                    Flow Thru
                                                                2                       27                        7          1        189        0                                                    Flow Thru
Sensory Integration I                                           2                       11           5            2          1        22        10     $         240                                  Flow Thru
Sensory Integration II                                          2                       11           3            2          1        22         6     $         240                                  Flow Thru
Student Records and Confidentiality                             2                       11                        4          1        44         0                                                       DPI
Understanding and Responding to Students w.                     2                                   177           3          6         0        531    $        2,500 $       3,408                   Flow Thru
Challenging
   Behavior                                                                                                                                                                                           Flow Thru
Using Visuals to Support Students on the Autism Spec.           2                       19           10           2          1         38       20                                                    Flow Thru
PACT - Parents and Communication Team                           2                        2                       1.5         1          3        0                                                    Flow Thru
Writing Standards Based IEP's                                   2                        7                        2          1         14        0                                                    Flow Thru
                                                  Total                                 389         195          82         37        1918      567        $ 24,404       $ 10,730        $       -


Chapter 11 (Staff Development)                                                                                                                                                                            73
                          Title                              *Level   Audience   Teachers     Support    Hours per    No. of     Total    Total   Presenter      Substitute       Stipend/Fee Funding
                                                                                 Attending     Staff     Workshop    Sessions   Teacher   Supp.      Fee           Cost                       Source
                                                                                             Attending                           Hours    Staff
                                                                                                                                          Hours
NEW TEACHER MENTOR PROJECT

New Teacher Orientation                                        1        K-12       77                       14          2        14
Breakthrough to Literacy for New Teachers                      4                    3                       14          2        42         0                                                   District
3-5 Literacy Curriculum Overview for New Teachers              1        3-5        14                       8           1        112        0     $      2,160                                  Title II
K-2 Math&Lit. Curricula Overview for New Teachers              1                   11                       8           1        88         0     $      1,440                                  Title II
3-5 Math Curriculum Overview for New Teachers                  1        3-5        14                       4           1        56         0     $      1,080                                  Title II
New Teacher Ongoing Support                                    4                   28                       12          8        336        0                    $       1,740                  Title II
                                                     Total                         147                      60         15        648        0         $ 4,680        $   1,740     $       -

CONNECTEDNESS

TRIBES: Together a New Way of Learning & Being                 2                   20                       30          4        600       0      $      2,258                                  ATODA
Gangs                                                          2                   42           40          2           1         84       80                                                   ATODA
Middle School Gangs                                            2        6-8        140                     3.5          1        490       0                                                    ATODA
Peaceful Playgrounds                                           2                   23                       6           2        138       0
Student Assist. Program Group Facilitator Training             3                    9                       21          3        189       0      $     2,250                                   ATODA
Student Assist. Program Group Facilitator Training             3                   13                       7           1         91       0      $       750 $          1,015                  ATODA
                                                     Total                         247          40         69.5        12        1592      80         $ 5,258   $        1,015     $       -

CULTURAL COMPETENCE

Opening Day Speaker                                            1        K-12       800                      1           1                         $      3,500                                 Flow Thru
Leadership Training in Cultural Competence                     2       Admin.      25                       14          3        350        0     $      7,500                                 FT/Dist/II
Study Circles: A Study in Race Relations                       2                    8                       14          7        112        0     $        540                                  District
The Multicultural Classroom                                    2                   32                       8          16        256        0     $        720                                  District
Spanish I                                                      3                   26                       18         12        468        0     $      4,440                                  District
Spanish II                                                     3                    9                       18          6        162        0     $      2,549                                  District
                                                     Total                         900          0           73         45        1348       0         $ 19,249       $        -    $       -

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Advanced Boardmaker                                            2        K-12        4                       2           1         8         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Draft Builder                                                  2        K-12       14                       2           1        28         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Dragon Naturally Speaking                                      2        K-12        5                       2           1        10         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Earobics                                                       2        K-12        4                       2           1         8         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Augmentative Communication Overview                            2        K-12        2                       2           1         4         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Beginning Boardmaker                                           2        K-12        7                       2           1        14         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Chat PC                                                        2        K-12        7                       2           1        14         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Geometer's Sketchpad                                           2        K-12       11                       2           1        22         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
                                                                        K-12       11                       2           1        22         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Kurzweil                                                       2        K-12        4                       2           1         8         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Picture Communication Systems                                  2        K-12       27                       2           1        54         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Screen Reader, AlphaSmarts & Dana's                            2        K-12        4                       2           1         8         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Symbols 2000                                                   2        K-12        4                       2           1         8         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
Write Out Loud and CoWriter                                    2        K-12        3                       2           1         6         0     $       180                                  Flow Thru
                                                     Total                         107          0           28         14        214        0         $ 2,520        $        -    $       -



Chapter 11 (Staff Development)                                                                                                                                                                   74
                           Title                               Level        Audience      Teachers       Support     Hours per      No. of           Total    Total   Presenter     Substitute   Stipend/Fee Funding
                                                                                          Attending       Staff      Workshop      Sessions         Teacher   Supp.      Fee          Cost                   Source
                                                                                                        Attending                                    Hours    Staff
                                                                                                                                                              Hours
TECHNOLOGY

Typing Tutor Software                                             2           K-12             3                         2              1             6         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
Advanced Word                                                     3           K-12                          3            4              1             0        12     $     360                                Dist/IID
Integrating Word                                                  3           K-12             16                        8              8            128        0     $     840                                Dist/IID
Chat PC                                                           2           K-12             7           0             2              1            14         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
Classxp                                                           2           K-12             6           0             2              1            12         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
Creating Newsletters for Publisher 2000                           2           K-12             4           2             2              1             8         4     $     180                                Dist/IID
GroupWise                                                         2           K-12                         22            2              2             0        44     $     180                                Dist/IID
Introduction to Powerpoint                                        2           K-12             17          4             2              2            34         8     $     180                                Dist/IID
Increasing Student Learning - Publisher/Digital Camera            2           K-12             5           1             2              1            10         2     $     180                                Dist/IID
Introduction to Publisher                                         2           K-12             6           3             2              1            12         6     $     180                                Dist/IID
Publisher                                                         3           K-12             8                         2              1            16         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
Introduction to the Internet                                      2           K-12             4            2            2              1             8         4     $     180                                Dist/IID
SASI New User                                                     2           K-12             16                        3              1            48         0     $     270                                Dist/IID
SASI Query I                                                      2           K-12             5                         2              1            10         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
SASI Query II                                                     2           K-12             2                         2              1             4         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
SASI Brush-Up/SASI Advanced User                                  3           K-12             4                         2              1             8         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
SASI User Group                                                   3           K-12                         10            6              1             0        60     $     540                                Dist/IID
Introduction to Web Page Design                                   2           K-12            39                         6             15            234        0     $   1,260                                Dist/IID
Web Page Design Follow-up                                         2           K-12            13                         2              2            26         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
KidPix Deluxe Version 4                                           2           K-12             4                         2              1             8         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
Online Resources for 6 - 12 Teachers                              2           6-12            11                         2              1            22         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
Windows Accessability Features                                    2           K-12             6                         2              1            12         0     $     180                                Dist/IID
                                                   Total                                      176          47            61            46            620       140     $ 6,330       $      -     $        -

MEDICAL

CPR Certification                                                 2           K-12             22          12            4              3            88        48     $     1,915                              District
CPR Recertification                                               2           K-12             13          23            3              3            39        69                                              District
Medication Administration                                         2           K-12                         2             1              1             0         2                                              District
Bloodborne Pathogen Exposure Control Plan                         2           K-12             34          39            1              5            34        39                                              District
Red Cross First Aid Training                                      2           K-12             27          10            4              3            108       40     $       900                              District
                                                   TOTAL                                       96          86            13            15            269       198     $   2,815     $      -     $        -

GRAND TOTAL                                                                                   3,548        460           957          375           23,501    1,619   $ 157,915     $ 161,022    $    41,535


Level 1: Developing Awareness - (Elicits thoughtful questioning from teachers concerning new information during beginning phases of change)

Level 2: Building Knowledge - (Deepen understanding of content and instructional practices)

Level 3: Translating Knowledge into Practice - (Translate new knowledge into practice by engaging in planning instruction and improving teaching)

Level 4: Implementing New Approaches and Deepening Understanding - (Learn by using/practicing a new approach with students)

Italicized/Shaded = Required
Bold = Elective


Chapter 11 (Staff Development)                                                                                                                                                                                  75

								
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