SECONDHAND SMOKE AND YOUR FAMILY by mikeholy

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									SECONDHAND SMOKE AND YOUR
         FAMILY

  Jacqueline A Batcha- MPH Student
           Walden University
      Instructor-Dr Jean Johnson
              Spring 2009
SECONDHAND SMOKE AND YOUR
         FAMILY

 WHAT DO YOU KNOW AND
HOW CAN YOU PROTECT YOUR
         FAMILY
                    OBJECTIVES

• To identify the serious effects of exposure to second
  hand smoke

• To create an awareness in families on need for
  protecting themselves and loved ones from exposure
  to secondhand smoke

• To provide some resources for smokers who want to
  quit smoking
              WHAT IS SECOND HAND SMOKE

• Second hand smoke has two components

• 1-Side stream smoke-smoke released from burning
  end of cigarette

     2-Exhaled mainstream smoke-smoke exhaled by
     smokers

Reference: The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General,U.S
              Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved 5/8/2009 from
              http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/factsheets/factsheet6.html
    CONTENTS OF SECOND HAND SMOKE

• Cigarettes contain more than 4,000 chemicals
  compounds

• Secondhand smoke contains many similar chemicals
  that are exhaled by smokers

• At least 250 chemicals in secondhand smoke are toxic
  or can cause cancer

•   Source-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 5/7/2009 from
    http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/sgr_2006/00_pdfs/ToxicPoster26may06.pdf
     TOXIC CHEMICALS IN SECONDHAND
                 SMOKE
•   Some cancer causing chemicals
•   Formaldehyde-used to embalm dead bodies
•   Benzene-found in gasoline
•   Polonium-210-Radio active element
•   Vinyl chloride-used to make pipes


•   Source-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 5/7/2009 from
    http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/sgr_2006/00_pdfs/ToxicPoster26may06.pdf
    TOXIC METALS IN SECONDHAND SMOKE

•    Chromium-used to make steel
•    Arsenic-used in pesticides
•    Lead
•    Cadmium-used in making batteries




•    Source-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 5/7/2009 from
     http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/sgr_2006/00_pdfs/ToxicPoster26may06.pdf
      POISONOUS GASES IN SECONDHAND
                  SMOKE
•   Carbon monoxide-found in car exhaust
•   Hydrogen cyanide –used in chemical weapons
•   Butane –used in lighter fluids
•   Ammonia-used in household cleaners
• Toluene-found in paint thinners.



•   Source-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved 5/7/2009 from
    http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/sgr/sgr_2006/00_pdfs/ToxicPoster26may06.pdf
       NO RISK FREE LEVEL EXPOSURE TO
             SECOND HAND SMOKE

• A non smoker in a pack a day house for 24 hours
  inhales the equivalent of 3 cigarettes

• A non smoke in a car with windows closed for 1 hour
  inhales the equivalent of 3 cigarettes

• A non smoker in an office that allows smoking for 8
  hours inhales the equivalent of 6 cigarettes

•   Source:Hammond,SK. et.al.(1995)Occupational Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke,JAMA,174:956-960
           SCOPE OF SECOND HAND SMOKE

• More than 126 million nonsmoking Americans continue to be
  exposed to secondhand smoke in homes, vehicles, workplaces,
  and public places.
• Most exposure to tobacco smoke occurs in homes and
  workplaces.
• Almost 60% of U.S. children aged 3–11 years—or almost 22
  million children—are exposed to secondhand smoke.
• About 25% of children aged 3–11 years live with at least one
  smoker, compared to only about 7% of nonsmoking adults
•   Reference:U.S. Department of Health and Human Services(2006). The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to
    Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease
    Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Retrieved from
    http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/report
       HEALTH EFFECTS OF SECONDHAND
           SMOKE-HEART DISEASE
• Secondhand smoke is estimated to cause from 22,700
  to 69,600 premature deaths from heart disease each
  year in the United States among nonsmokers.

• Nonsmokers who are exposed to secondhand smoke
  at home or at work increase their risk of developing
  heart disease by 25–30%.

•   Reference: American Heart Association(2006). Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics—2006 Update . Dallas, Texas: American
    Heart Association. Retrieved 5/7/2008 from http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/short/113/6/e85
      SECONDHAND SMOKE AND CANCER

• Secondhand smoke causes lung cancer in adults who
  have never smoked themselves.
• Nonsmokers who are exposed to secondhand smoke
  at home or at work increase their risk of developing
  lung cancer by 20–30%.
• Secondhand smoke causes approximately 3,000 lung
  cancer deaths among U.S. nonsmokers each year.

•    Reference:U.S. Department of Health and Human Services(2006). The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to
    Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services,
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease
    Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health. Retrieved 5/8/2009
•   from http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/report
     WHO IS AFFECTED BY SECONDHAND
                 SMOKE
• Fetus

• Breathing second hand smoke while pregnant
  increase risk of complications such as miscarriages,
  premature birth, still birth and spontaneous abortions.



•   Reference: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Preventing Smoking and Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Before,
    During and After Pregnancy. Retrieved 5/7/2009 from
•   http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/publications/factsheets/Prevention/smoking.htm
    SECONDHAND SMOKE AND NEW BORNS

• Low birth weight
• 430 Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) cases
  annually
• Respiratory dysfunction due to weaker lungs
• Brain dysfunction and mental retardation



•   Reference: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preventing Smoking and Exposure to Secondhand Smoke Before
    During and After Pregnancy. Retrieved 5/8/2009 from
•   http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/publications/factsheets/Prevention/smoking.htm
    SECONDHAND SMOKE AND CHILDREN

• 22 million children aged 3-11 and 18 million youths
  aged 12-19 were exposed to second hand smoke in
  2006

• Infants and young children are more vulnerable to
  second hand smoke because their bodies are still
  developing


•   Reference: The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General,
            U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved 5/8/2009 from
            http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/factsheets/factsheet6.html
            HEALTH EFFECTS ON CHILDREN

• Increased acute respiratory infections –bronchitis,
  pneumonia and ear infections

• Increased episodes of Asthma for children suffering
  with asthma

• Respiratory symptoms such as cough, wheezing

•   Reference: The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General, U.S.
    Department of Health and Human Services .Retrieved 5/8/2009 from
    http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/factsheets/factsheet6.html
      SECONDHAND SMOKE AND ADULTS

• Hear disease, lung cancer and breathing problems.

• Increased episodes of Asthma

• Teens who live with adult smokers are likely to
  become smokers themselves


•   Reference:Pirkle JL, Bernert JT, Caudill SP, Sosnoff CS, Pechacek TF.(2006) Trends in the Exposure of Nonsmokers in the
    U.S. Population to Secondhand Smoke: 1988–2002. Environmental Health Perspectives. 114(6):853–858.
             COST OF SECONDHAND SMOKE
                      EXPOSURE
• Over 5 billion dollars in direct medical cost annually

• Over 5 billion dollars in indirect cost annually

• 700,000 to 1.6 million physician office visit for ear
  infections.

•   Reference: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Trends of secondhand smoke among US non-smokers. Retrieved
    5/8/2009 from
•   http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/secondhand_smoke/secondhandsmoke.htm
                            TAKE ACTION NOW!!!

• The Surgeon General has concluded that the only way
  to fully protect yourself and your loved ones from the
  dangers of secondhand smoke is through 100%
  smoke-free environments.




•   Reference. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General, U.S.
    Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved 5/8/2009 from
    http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/factsheets/factsheet7.html
     ONLY YOU CAN PROTECT YOURSELF
            AND LOVED ONES
• Making your home and car smoke-free.

• Asking people not to smoke around you and your children.

• Making sure that your children’s day care center or school is
  smoke-free.

• Choose restaurants and other businesses that are smoke-free
  and thank businesses for being smoke-free.
• Let owners of businesses that are not smoke-free know that
  secondhand smoke is harmful to your family’s health.

•   Source: The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General, U.S.
    Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved 5/8/2009
    fromhttp://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/factsheets/factsheet7.html
                MORE TIPS ON PROTECTION

• Teach children to stay away from secondhand smoke.


• Avoiding secondhand smoke exposure especially if you
  or your children have respiratory conditions, if you have
  heart disease, or if you are pregnant.


• Talk to your doctor or healthcare provider more about
  the dangers of secondhand smoke.

•   Source: The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon
    General, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services .Retrieved 5/8/2009 from
    http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/factsheets/factsheet7.html
                              SMOKERS BEWARE.

• The best way to protect you family from secondhand
  smoke is QUITTING SMOKING.


• A smoke free home rule can help you quit
  smoking.


•   Reference: The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General, U.S.
    Department of Health and Human Services. Retrieved 5/8/2009 from
    http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/library/secondhandsmoke/factsheets/factsheet3.html
                 QUITTING HELP.

• Join the national trend. Take the Smoke-free Home
  Pledge by calling the toll-free Smoke-free Home
  Pledge Hotline at 1-866-SMOKE-FREE (1-866-766-
  5337) or visiting www.epa.gov/smokefree.


• To access a telephone quitline serving your area, call
  1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800-784-8669) or visit
  www.smokefree.gov.
        THANKS FOR VIEWING THIS
            PRESENTATION

• Please questions and comments are welcomed.

• Forward all questions and comments to
  jacqueline.batcha@waldenu.edu.

								
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