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									    VCE Physics:

 Practical Activities
Common Exam Errors
  Revision Advice
   Exam advice
          Practical Activities
Types / Styles

Criteria for selecting Activities

Reporting

Assessment
 Types / Styles of
Practical Activities
              Types / Styles of
             Practical Activities
Familiarisation       Exploration
exercise
Simulation            Demonstration

Self paced activity   Class exercise

Formal experiment     Investigation

Excursion             Prac Test
               Types / Styles of
              Practical Activities
                                      Examples
Familiarisation exercise
                                  Using a CRO
                              and other devices

Exploration
                    Introductory Light activities
                       Dissection of a DC motor
                Types / Styles of
               Practical Activities
                                    Examples
Simulation (Spreadsheet investigation)
                            Radioactive Decay
                                     Telescope
                                Planetary data
Demonstration (POE)
                       Properties of a, b and g
                            Magnet in Al tube
              Types / Styles of
             Practical Activities
                                       Examples
Self paced activity
               Booklet of Electricity experiments
                 Booklet of Electronics exercises
Class exercise
                             Half life experiment
                  Photoelectric Effect experiment
                 Twirling a tuning fork at the ear
     Types / Styles of Practical Activities

                                     Examples
Formal experiment
                                    Snell’s Law
                                    Net F = ma
                                Circular motion
                    Magnetic field of a solenoid
Investigation
                                     Numerous
   Types / Styles of Practical Activities
                                   Examples
Excursion
                VCE Physics Day at Luna Park
                         Brash’s Soundhouse
                      Australian Synchrotron
                               Scienceworks
                                      VSSEC
                                 CSIROSEC
Prac Test           DC Circuit measurements
                    Location of virtual image
 Criteria for selecting Practical Activities

   Selecting both the activity and the type:
• Learning benefit

• Equipment

• Time

• Comfort level

• Behaviour
                  Reporting
    How should the students present what they
                    have learnt?
•   Oral
•   Poster
•   IT based
•   Written
    * Answers to set questions
    * Log book entry
    * Formal write up
                 Assessment
Alternatives can range from:

•   Completed? Y/N
•   Overall grade, A - E
•   Raw score out of 10
•   Satisfactory completion
•   Criterion referenced
         Units 3 & 4 Assessment
   Unit 3: Extended Practical Investigation

They design and carry out an extended practical
investigation. They collect accurate data,
evaluate the quality of data and measurement
processes, and make conclusions based on the
data.
          Units 3 & 4 Assessment
    Unit 3: Extended Practical Investigation
Students:
• select focused research questions and formulate
  a quantitatively testable hypothesis.
• identify variables of significance to an
  investigation and decide the appropriate
  variables to be controlled.
• adapt or extend given methods, and design their
  own methods, for the control of variables and
  the systematic collection of sufficient relevant
  data ..
• record raw qualitative and quantitative data
          Units 3 & 4 Assessment
      Unit 3: Extended Practical Investigation
Students also:
• present processed data, including correct use of
  units, symbols and formulas, to ensure that
  relationships between variables are evident.
• identify sources of error and estimate uncertainties
  in, and reliability of, data and derived quantities.
• analyse procedures and results, taking into account
  limitations of, and weaknesses and errors in,
  techniques and equipment.
• Identify and explain alternative interpretations of
  data and results.
         Units 3 & 4 Assessment
    Unit 3: Extended Practical Investigation
Teacher’s decisions:
• How much class time?
• From which Area of Study to choose topics?
• How much topic choice to give the students?
• Group size?
• How much home time? Use of log books?
• Format for the write up?
• Marking procedure?
          Units 3 & 4 Assessment
 Unit 3: Extended Practical Investigation (EPI)
              Marking Procedure

VCAA Assessment Booklet

Descriptors for EPI

Descriptors in table format
           Units 3 & 4 Assessment
 Unit 4: Report on selected Practical Activities
Teacher’s decisions:
• Which Area of Study to choose pracs from?
• Which pracs?
• Use of log books?
• How much home time?
• Format for writing report?
• Structure of the report?
• Marking procedure?
      VCE Physics




Resources for Teachers
          Resources

          Formats:
Text

CDROM

Website
            Resources

             Text:
• VCAA booklet (pages 46 – 88)
• Teacher’s Guides
• Old Prac Guides
• Old Problem books
• Old Exam and Trial papers
            Resources

           CDROMs:
• Colin Hopkins
• Teacher Support kits
• Conference Proceedings
             Resources

            Websites:
• VCAA
• www.vicphysics.org
• Textbook sites
• Web 2.0 sites for Students
Common Exam Errors
   Common Errors: Connected Bodies
Examples: Horse pulling a cart, Mass over edge
pulls another along table.
Error: Apply net force on system to each mass.
       Misuse internal forces.

Consider: Questions 3 & 4 from 2010 Exam.
Average: 0.7 out of 2 (35%), Only 10% got 2 marks.




Average: 1.1 out of 2 (55%), 51% got 2 marks. Consequential on Q’n 3.
Common errors: assume a = g or loss of GPE of mass 2 = gain in KE of mass 1
  Common Errors: Connected Bodies
Method:
1. Label all forces acting
2. The whole system and each mass of the
   system accelerates at the same rate
3. Apply Newton’s 2nd Law: Net Force = Mass
   x Accel’n applies to each mass in the system
   and to the whole system as well.
4. Forces between masses in the system are
   examples of Newton’s 3rd Law.
     Common Errors: Circular Motion
Examples: Banked curves, crests in road
Error: Include centripetal force as another force,
misunderstand reaction force.




Consider: Questions 5 & 6 from 2010 Exam.
Average: 0.9 out of 2 (45%), 51% got zero)




Average: 1.5 out of 3, 48% got 3, 48% got zero
     Common Errors: Circular Motion
Examples: Banked curves, crests in road
Error: Include centripetal force as another force,
misunderstand reaction force.

Method: Better to only refer to centripetal
acceleration and then apply Newton’s 2nd Law.

Consider: Questions 5 & 6 from 2010 Exam.
         Common Errors: Collisions
Examples: Elastic, and inelastic collisions (both
sticky and non-sticky)
Error: Assume momentum temporarily goes into
‘storage’; assume all rebound collisions are elastic.




Consider: Questions 15 - 17 from 2010 Exam.
36% got full marks



56% got full marks


 35% got full marks
         Common Errors: Collisions
Examples: Elastic, and inelastic collisions (both
sticky and non-sticky)
Error: Assume momentum temporarily goes into
‘storage’; assume all rebound collisions are elastic.

Method: Include graphs on 2 page summary.

Consider: Questions 15 - 17 from 2010 Exam.
     Common Errors: Electric Circuits
Examples: Diode circuits
Error: Don’t realise diode restricts voltage.




Consider: Question 2 from 2010 Exam.
Average: 0.7 out of 2, 62% got zero,
most assumed Total R = 700 ohm
     Common Errors: Electric Circuits
Examples: Diode circuits
Error: Don’t realise diode restricts voltage.

Method: Do prac showing voltage across a diode is
constant and independent of resistor values, while it
is on.

Consider: Question 2 from 2010 Exam.
      Common Errors: Electromagnetic
               Induction
Examples: Induced EMF with changing Flux
Error: Don’t realise that only a changing magnetic
flux induces an EMF.




Consider: Questions 8, 9 and 11 from 2010 Exam.
Average: 0.8 out of 2, 51% got zero,
some drew sine waves, many missed
the point of different gradients.




 Average: 0.4 out of 1, both
 Faraday and Lenz were accepted.
Average: 1.0 out of 2, 33% get zero, Many said
the induced flux opposed the original flux rather
than the change in flux. Others had right reason,
but wrong direction.
      Common Errors: Electromagnetic
               Induction
Examples: Induced EMF with changing Flux
Error: Don’t realise that only a changing magnetic
flux induces an EMF.

Method: Demonstration as an POE, with students
drawing graph of flux (with direction) and observing
induced EMF.

Consider: Questions 8, 9 and 11 from 2010 Exam.
      Revision Advice for Students
• Prepare a one page summary as soon as you
  finish an Area of Study,
• Use it with extra problems until the weeks
  before the exam,
• Maintain a regular routine of doing exam type
  problems after finishing an Area of Study,
• Two weeks before the exam prepare the first
  draft of the two page summary,
      Revision Advice for Students
In the two weeks before the exam:
• Use the draft with past exam and trail papers,
• For June exam, one exam 90 min paper per
  day under exam conditions at home, for a
  fortnight is doable,
• Evaluate performance after each exam and
  revise draft accordingly,
           Exam Advice for Students
• Use the 15 minute reading productively,
• Attitude: Remember if you are finding the exam
  fairly hard, don’t panic, because the rest of the
  state is probably also finding it hard. The reverse
  also applies.
• Read the Question Carefully: The exam will have
  many instances where you have to read a graph or
  interpret data. In many cases the values will need
  to be converted to SI units, e.g. cm  m, kN 
  N, MPa  Pa.
           Exam Advice for Students
• Highlight data and important information as you
  read the question.
• Show working every time.
• Written response: Answer in point form.
• Don’t look for complexities in the question.
  Assume the simplest explanation.

								
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