Hotel and Restaurant Management Courses in Italy 2010 11 Undergraduate Student Handbook Mateer Building Home of the by uyb13437

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									          2010/11
Undergraduate Student Handbook




                    Mateer Building
      Home of the School of Hospitality Management




        www.hhdev.psu.edu/shm
      Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management
                (HRIM) Student Handbook
                                      Table of Contents
                                                                                                                             Page
Section A — Introduction to the HRIM Program ......................................................................1
   Welcome ....................................................................................................................................2
   HRIM Faculty/Staff Directory ...................................................................................................3
   Faculty Biographies ...................................................................................................................4
   HRIM Staff ..............................................................................................................................11
Section B — Curriculum .............................................................................................................12
   Explanation of the HRIM Program ..........................................................................................13
   Degree Requirements ...............................................................................................................14
   HRIM Course Descriptions......................................................................................................16
   Plan of Study ............................................................................................................................23
   Flow Chart ..............................................................................................................................25
   Areas of Specialization ............................................................................................................26
   International Programs .............................................................................................................27
       Global Hospitality Program ...............................................................................................27
       Chinese University of Hong Kong ....................................................................................27
       Hotel Management School, Maastricht .............................................................................27
       Hospitality Studies in Europe ...........................................................................................28
       Summer in San Juan, Puerto Rico .....................................................................................28
       Culinary Program in Lyon, France ....................................................................................28
       Spring Break in Italy/Spain/Greece ...................................................................................29
       Study Abroad Programs .....................................................................................................29
Section C — Work Experience Requirement and Placement Information ...........................30
   Work Experience Requirement ................................................................................................31
   Hospitality Work Experience Verification Form .....................................................................32
   Internship Information .............................................................................................................33
   Corporate Recruiting and Placement Guidelines .....................................................................35
   Corporate Recruiters ................................................................................................................36
Section D — HRIM Student Services.........................................................................................37
   HRIM Student Organizations ..................................................................................................38
   Scholarship Information...........................................................................................................41
Section E — Advising Information ............................................................................................42
   Advising Information ...............................................................................................................43
   Individuals From Whom to Obtain Additional Information ...................................................44
   SECTION A


Introduction to the
 HRIM Program




         1
              Welcome to the Penn State School of Hospitality Management!
We are delighted that you have decided to join us, and pleased that we will have the opportunity to share our
enthusiasm about the hospitality industry with you.

We are the best place to go if the hospitality industry is where you would like to be, and we thank you for making us
your school of choice: the Penn State School of Hospitality Management has been around since 1937, making it one
of the oldest, and largest, programs in the country, with 800 enrolled undergraduate students. Ranked among the top
five programs in the country since its inception, we have more than 8,000 alumni in all fifty states and in many
countries around the world that are proud to call Penn State and this program their alma mater. All of them are ready
to help you in any way they can.

As you go through our program, you will find that the industry we care so much about is filled with many
opportunities. Based on the technical insights you acquire in our program, the analytical and life skills you learn
from our faculty, your participation in our student organizations, your involvement with our many alumni and
industry contacts, and your own initiative, we can truly say that the sky is the limit! We will ask you to live up to our
academic and professional standards, and in return we will strive to live up to your expectations of us. Take
advantage of everything our program has to offer- this is the time in your life to do so! Join a club, study abroad,
attend an industry function, go on field trips, or work as a volunteer. There are so many opportunities!

We have an outstanding faculty and staff who are eager to help you along the way, and ready to cater to your
personal needs. Specifically, Ms. Rosemarie Hibbler, Coordinator for Career Placement and Advising, (Room 229)
and Mr. Jeff Heim, Internship Coordinator, (Room 230) can help you with internships, part-time jobs and with
finding full-time employment. Mr. David Rachau (Room 212), our Academic Advisor, is happy to talk to you about
your academic options. Dr. Karthik Namasivayam (Room 216) has information about international programs, and
Mr. Brian Black (Room 201A) can help you with industry contacts.

There are many hospitality specific scholarships that you qualify for when you have the right mix of academic
effort, industry experience and personal interest (for information see Paul Howard, Room 217A Mateer). Please see
your assigned academic advisor right away. This is the person who is your "anchor" while you are here. He or she
will know the final answer to your questions, or get the answer for you.

If there is anything we can do for you personally, please feel free to come and see us. Just ask! We would like to
hear from you and talk to you about your plans for the future. Welcome to Penn State, welcome to the School of
Hospitality Management, and welcome to the hospitality industry!

Sincerely,




Hubert B. Van Hoof, Ph.D.                                        Albert “Bart” Bartlett, Ph.D.
Director and Professor                                           Associate Director and Associate Professor




                                                           2
                           SCHOOL OF HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT

                                                          Directory
        Name            Office Phone     Office Address            Email                              Title
Andrew, William        863-0272        219 Mateer         WPA@PSU.EDU        Associate Professor
Bardi, James           610-396-6123    142 Franco Bldg.   JXB21@PSU.EDU      Assistant Professor
                                       Berks                                 (Berks Campus)
Bartlett, Bart         863-7443        201F Mateer        BARTB@PSU.EDU      Associate Director and Associate Professor
Black, Brian           865-6728        201A Mateer        BAB180@PSU.EDU     Director of Hospitality Industry Relations
Boggie, Jeffrey        863-3370        209 Mateer         QZX1@PSU.EDU       Chef, Instructor
Devon Bordi            863-3588        123 Mateer         DMB447@PSU.EDU     Research Technologist, Center for Food Innovation
Bordi, Peter           863-3579        124 Keller         PLBJR@PSU.EDU      Associate Professor
                                                                             Director of the Center for Food Innovation
Condo, Brenda          867-2170        201K Mateer        BLC20@PSU.EDU      Undergraduate Program Specialist
Conklin, Martha        865-7756        213 Mateer         MTC11@PSU.EDU      Associate Professor
Cranage, David         863-0296        218 Mateer         DAC2@PSU.EDU       Associate Professor
Driver, Dawn           863-0840        201D Mateer        DAD15@PSU.EDU      Assistant to the Director
Durham, Steve          867-2903        210 Mateer         STD10@PSU.EDU      Instructor of Gaming & Casino Management
Egan, Beth             863-7539        214 Mateer         BETHEGAN@PSU.EDU   Director, On Line Programs
                                                                             Dietetics and World Campus, Instructor
Heim, Jeff             865-7990        230 Mateer         JVH4@PSU.EDU       Instructor
                                                                             Internship Coordinator
Hibbler, Rosemarie     863-1448        229 Mateer         RQH7@PSU.EDU       Coordinator for Career Placement and Advising
Holler, Lanora         865-8426        201G Mateer        KLH3@PSU.EDU       Graduate Program Specialist
Howard, Paul           867-3822        217A Mateer        PAH101@PSU.EDU     Instructor
Jackson, Ruth Ann      863-5437        225 Mateer         RAL10@PSU.EDU      Director of Hospitality Leadership Institute,
                                                                             Instructor
Kelley, Paul           863-8982        121 Mateer         PJK20@PSU.EDU      Instructor
King, Scott            865-7441        104A Mateer        SDK1@PSU.EDU       General Manager, Café Laura
Korner, James          865-6603        213 Mateer         JRK31@PSU.EDU      Instructor
Mattila, Anna          863-5757        224 Mateer         ASM6@PSU.EDU       Marriott Professor of Lodging Management
                                                                             Professor-in-Charge of Graduate Program
Mount, Daniel          863-2675        227 Mateer         DMOUNT@PSU.EDU     Associate Professor
Musco, Steve           863-8981        211 Mateer         SAM363@PSU.EDU     Instructor
Namasivayam,           863-9774        216 Mateer         KUN1@PSU.EDU       Associate Professor
Karthik                                                                      Professor-in-Charge International Programs
Noone, Breffni         865-7128        215 Mateer         BMN2@PSU.EDU       Assistant Professor, Honors Program Advisor
Nyheim, Peter          865-9012        226 Mateer         PDN1@PSU.EDU       Instructor
O’Donnell, John        863-8025        228 Mateer         JMO13@PSU.EDU      Assistant Professor
O’Neill, John          863-8984        233 Mateer         JWO3@PSU.EDU       Associate Professor
Rachau, David          865-7033        212 Mateer         DQR5@PSU.EDU       Academic Advisor and Instructor
Reese, Jadine          863-2676        217A Mateer        JER7@PSU.EDU       Advisor & Staff Assistant On-Line Programs
Regopoulos, Peter      867-2298        221 Mateer         PCR11@PSU.EDU      Instructor
Ruth, George           863-0566        234 Mateer         GBR10@PSU.EDU      Instructor
Sharma, Amit           865-0126        223 Mateer         AUS22@PSU.EDU      Assistant Professor
Kim Snyder             865-3447        124 Mateer         KAC104@PSU.EDU     Research Technologist, Center for Food Innovation
Tews, Michael          863-7130        222 Mateer         MJT17@PSU.EDU      Assistant Professor
Tortorello, Samantha   863-3588        Sensory Lab        SAT182@PSU.EDU     Senior Research Technologist
                                       123 Mateer
Van Hoof, Bert         863-0009        201E Mateer        HBV1@PSU.EDU       Director and Professor
Verbeeten, Marja       865-6673        232 Mateer         MJV13@PSU.EDU      Assistant Professor
Wildes, Vivienne       863-0248        220 Mateer         VWILDES@PSU.EDU    Assistant Professor
Witherite, Eleanor     865-1853        201 Mateer         ERW130@PSU.EDU     Administrative Support Assistant/Receptionist
Yersin, Peter          863-8993        231 Mateer         PMYERSIN@PSU.EDU   Instructor
Zimmerman, Michael     863-6665        201H Mateer        MRZ3@PSU.EDU       Budget/Finance Assistant




                                                               3
School of Hospitality Management
          Faculty Biographies


  William P. Andrew, Associate Professor. Ph.D. in Finance, The Pennsylvania
  State University. M.S. in Hotel Administration, Cornell University. B.A. in
  American Studies, University of Michigan. Teaches financial management courses.
  Research interests focus on corporate hospitality finance and related management
  science techniques.




  James A. Bardi, Assistant Professor. (Berks campus) Ed.D., Widener
  University. M.Ed., The Pennsylvania State University. B.S., The Pennsylvania
  State University. Certified Hotel Administrator and Hospitality Educator.
  Teaches courses in management in the hospitality industry, quantity food
   production analysis, hospitality administration, and hotel management.




  A.L. (Bart) Bartlett, Associate Professor, Associate Director. Ph.D. in
  Higher Education Administration with a focus in Management and Organization,
  The Pennsylvania State University. M.B.A., The Pennsylvania State University.
  B.S. in Food Service and Housing Administration, The Pennsylvania State
  University. Certified Hotel Administrator. Teaches courses in restaurant
  operations, organizational behavior, and human resource management. Current
  research interest includes youth employment and hospitality job design.


  Brian A. Black, Director of Hospitality and Industry Relations. B.S. in
  Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management, The Pennsylvania State
  University. Hospitality experience includes management positions with Hyatt
  Hotels and Resorts, most recently served as director of sales and marketing.
  Teaches colloquium in hospitality management.




                             4
Jeffrey Boggie, Chef and Instructor. Certified Executive Chef, The American
Culinary Federation. B.S. in Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management,
Indiana University of Pennsylvania. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh PA.
Associate in Science, Hotel Motel Management, Community College of
Allegheny County. Member of the American Culinary Federation.
Teaches Food Production Service and Advanced Food Production and Service
Management




Peter L. Bordi, Associate Professor and Director, Center for Food
Innovation. Ph.D. in Home Economics Education, The Pennsylvania State
University. M.S. in Food Service and Housing Administration, The
Pennsylvania State University. B.S. in Food Service and Housing
Administration, The Pennsylvania State University. A.A.S. of Occupational
Studies, The Culinary Institute of America. Teaches courses in restaurant
management and New Product Development. Current research interest is in new
food product development.



Martha T. Conklin, Associate Professor. Ph.D., New York University. M.S.,
University of Missouri-Columbia. B.S., University of Missouri-Columbia.
Teaches food safety, food service systems management, and other non-
commercial food service courses. Research interests include customer
satisfaction and financial management in school food service programs, program
evaluation, and dietetics education.




David A. Cranage, Associate Professor. Ph.D. in Marketing, The Pennsylvania
State University. M.B.A. in Quantitative Business Analysis, The Pennsylvania
State University. B.S. in Food Service and Housing Administration, The
Pennsylvania State University. A.A.S. of Occupational Studies, The Culinary
Institute of America. Teaches courses in hospitality marketing. Current research
interests are in consumer behavior (motivation and attribution theory) and
buyer/seller relationships.




Steve Durham, Instructor of Gaming and Casino Management, BS in Hotel
Administration, Cornell University, MBA, Colgate Darden Graduate School of
Business Administration. Teaches courses in casino management and develops
training seminars for industry practitioners through the Hospitality Leadership
Institute. Expertise includes Native American gaming, financial controls, and
the history and regulation of American gaming industry.




                           5
Beth M. Egan, Instructor and Director of Online Programs. M.Ed. in
Extension Education (Adult Education emphasis), The Pennsylvania State
University. B.S. in Food Service and Housing Administration, Administrative
Dietetics option, The Pennsylvania State University. B.S. in Home Economics
Education, The Pennsylvania State University. Teaches introductory courses in
the profession of dietetics and school food service in Dietetics through Distance
Education


.
Jeff Heim, Instructor. MHRIM with an emphasis in Accounting, The
Pennsylvania State University. B.A. in History, The Pennsylvania State
University. Teaches courses in Financial Management and Hotel Management;
and is coordinator of the HRIM Internship Programs.




Paul Howard, Instructor. M.B.A, specializing in Strategic Management and
Consulting, The Pennsylvania State University. B.S., in Hotel, Restaurant, and
Institutional Management, Pennsylvania State University. Teaches courses in
restaurant management, club management, and hospitality strategic
management.




Ruth Ann Jackson, Instructor, Director of Hospitality Leadership Initiative.
M.B.A. in Finance, University of Pennsylvania-The Wharton School of
Business. B.S. in Finance, The Pennsylvania State University. Director for The
Center for Professional Development & Applied Research in Hospitality
(CPDARH). Teaches financial management in hospitality operations.




Paul J. Kelley, Instructor. M.B.A. with concentration in Finance, The
Pennsylvania State University. B.S. in Food Service and Housing
Administration, The Pennsylvania State University. Served as senior vice
president and chief financial officer for Friendly’s Ice Cream Corporation. Also
served as executive vice president, finance and bakery operations, Il Fornaio
(America) Corporation. Teaches courses in managerial accounting and finance
accounting in the hospitality industry.




                            6
Jim Korner, Instructor. M.B.A., Webster University, BM Bachelor of Music
Education, Ohio University. Has 32 years of College and University
Administration. Past Director of Campus Dining Services at the University of
Missouri, Columbia. Past Executive Director of University Services at Seattle
Pacific University. Served as President of the National Association of College
and University Food Services. Teaching focus is the on-site section of the food
industry.




Anna S. Mattila, Marriott Professor of Lodging Management and
Professor-in-Charge of Graduate Program. Ph.D. in Hotel Administration,
Cornell University. M.B.A., University of Hartford. B.S. in Hotel
Administration, Cornell University. Teaches hospitality marketing. Research
interests focus on services marketing and consumer behavior issues related to the
hospitality industry.



Daniel J. Mount, Associate Professor. D.B.A. in International Business,
United States International University. M.B.A. in Hotel, Restaurant, and
Institutional Management, Michigan State University. B.S. in Finance, Mankato
State University. Certified Hotel Administrator. Teaches courses in hotel
operations and service management. Research interests include lodging quality,
hotel operations, and international hotel operations.



Steven A. Musco, Instructor. B.S. in Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional
Management, The Pennsylvania State University. Teaches courses in restaurant
management.




Karthik Namasivayam, Associate Professor and Professor-in-Charge of
International Programs. Ph.D., Cornell University. M.M.H., Cornell
University. B.A., Madras University, India. Teaches courses in human resources
and organizational behavior. Research interests include service quality,
innovations, and organizational and human resource strategies for service
industries.




                            7
Breffni Noone, Assistant Professor and Honors Program Advisor. Ph.D.,
emphasis in Operations Management, Cornell University. M.B.S., emphasis in
Business Management, Dublin City University, Ireland. B.Sc., University of
Dublin, Ireland. Teaches hospitality decision making and revenue management.
Research interests include service operational management with an emphasis in
revenue management.




Peter Nyheim, Senior Instructor. MBA in Information Technology, Drexel
University. B.S. from Drexel University. B.A. from Lehigh University. Teaches
hospitality information technology and strategic hospitality management.




John M. O’Donnell, Assistant Professor. J.D., University of Pittsburgh School
of Law. B.A. Political Science, The Pennsylvania State University. His career in
law and management has included both legal and management positions with
Stouffer’s, Nestle, and others, as well as maintaining a private law practice with
Littler Mendelson, P.C., the largest labor and employment law firm in the United
States. As an expert on hospitality related law, he teaches courses in law and
strategic management.




John W. O'Neill, Associate Professor. Ph.D. in Business Administration with
concentration in Strategic Management, University of Rhode Island. M.S. in
Real Estate with a concentration in Valuation and Analysis, New York
University. B.S. in Hotel Administration, Cornell University. Teaches lodging
management, strategic planning, and real estate valuation. Research interests
include lodging management and development, strategic planning, and work-life
issues in the lodging industry.


David M. Rachau, Instructor and Advisor. M.Ed. in Counselor Education,
The Pennsylvania State University. B.S. in Psychology, The Pennsylvania State
University. Pre-major and transfer advisor for the major of Hotel, Restaurant,
and Institutional Management (HRIM). Teaches HRIM first-year seminar.




                            8
Peter Regopoulos, Instructor. M.B.A. with concentration in Finance, Rollins
College. B.S. in Food Service and Housing Administration, The Pennsylvania
State University. Owned and operated Firehouse Subs Restaurants in South
Florida. Also served as regional vice president, district manager, dining
manager, for ARAMARK. Teaches financial accounting in the hospitality
industry.



George Ruth, Instructor. M.S. in Marketing and Communications, Franklin
University, Columbus, Ohio. B.S. in Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional
Management, Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Teaches in Food Production
Management.




Amit Sharma, Assistant Professor. Ph.D. in Hospitality and Tourism
Management, Virginia Tech University. M.S. in Hospitality Management,
Institut de Management Hotelier International (France). B.A. in Economics,
University of Delhi (India). Teaches Hospitality Finance. Research interests
focus on corporate finance and economic development.




Michael J. Tews, Assistant Professor. Ph.D. in Hotel Administration with a
specialization in Human Resource Management and Organizational Behavior
from Cornell University. M.S. in Industrial Relations from the London School of
Economics. B.S. in Hotel Administration from Cornell University. Teaches
courses in human resources management. Research interests include employee
selection, training, and retention.




Hubert Van Hoof, Professor and Director. Ph.D. in Public Administration,
Arizona State University, M.S. in Hospitality Management, University of
Houston. M.A. and B.A. in English Language & Literature, University of
Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Teaches advanced senior seminar and doctorial
seminar. Research interests include current trends in U.S. and international
higher education.




                            9
Marja Verbeeten, Assistant Professor and Director of Women’s Leadership
Initiative (CHHD). Ed.D., Northern Arizona University (with emphasis in
Education and Educational Leadership). M.H.M., University of Houston. M.A.
and B.A. in Comparative Literature and Dutch Language and Literature,
University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Teaches hospitality managerial
accounting. Research interests include leadership issues in the hospitality
industry and women’s leadership initiatives.


Vivienne Wildes, Assistant Professor. Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State
University. M.H.R.I.M., The Pennsylvania State University. B.A., The
Pennsylvania State University. Teaches hospitality human resource
management. Research interests include service workers, turnover in hospitality,
and research methods used in psychology and business.



Peter M. Yersin, Instructor. M.B.A., The Pennsylvania State University. B.S.
in Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management, The Pennsylvania State
University. Teaches restaurant management, wine appreciation, beverage
management, and casino management.




                           10
          School of Hospitality Management
                    Staff Members

                                                                     Jadine Reese
              Brenda Condo                                           Advisor & Staff
  Photo
              Undergraduate                                          Assistant for On-Line
 Currently
              Program Specialist                                     Programs (Dietetics
Unavailable
                                                                     and World Campus)


              Dawn Driver                                            Eleanor Witherite
              Assistant to the Director                              Administrative Support
                                                                     Assistant/Receptionist




              Rosemarie Hibbler
              Coordinator for Career                                 Michael Zimmerman
              Placement and Advising                                 Budget/Finance
                                                                     Assistant




              Lanora Holler
              Graduate Program
              Specialist

                                                Devon Bordi
                                            Research Technologist,
                                               Center for Food
                                                 Innovation


                                                Kim Snyder
                                            Research Technologist,
                                               Center for Food
                                                 Innovation



                                            Samantha Tortorello
                                              Senior Research
                                                Coordinator




                                       11
SECTION B
HRIM Curriculum




                  12
                                   HRIM PROGRAM

Vision
We, the Penn State School of Hospitality Management, will be without equal in educating leaders for the
dynamic and global hospitality industry.




Mission
The School of Hospitality Management provides outstanding leadership for a global and dynamic hospitality
industry. Its programs, research, and service to the profession are at the forefront of hospitality management
education, and its faculty, staff, and students bring a new level of proficiency to the hospitality industry. The
School inspires all students to pursue excellence in scholarship, exhibit a strong work ethic, and become
responsible and ethical hospitality leaders.




Intentions
This major provides preparation for management, leadership and executive positions in hotels, restaurants,
institutions, and other hospitality organizations. The program is designed to give its students a broad general
education and a strong problem-solving and analytical orientation balanced with the requisite technical skills,
which are essential for career progression to upper-management positions in the hospitality professions. The
program also helps to prepare students for graduate study.

The Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree program consists of two options: 1) Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional
Management (HRIM) and 2) Management Dietetics (DIETC). A minimum of 120 credits is required for the
B.S. degree with either option.




Foreign Language
Study in a foreign language is encouraged but not required. A proficiency in a foreign language at any level is a
valuable asset in an increasingly internationalized hospitality field. We offer a “Spanish for Hospitality” course
especially designed for our students, and you may want to look into it! Students may use up to four credits of
foreign language in the HRIM electives area of the curriculum. Beyond this, additional credits are considered
useful electives.




                                                         13
Degree Requirements
      Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management (HRIM) Major
           Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management (HRIM) Option
                          Minimum of 120 credits required
              (Always consult with your advisor when planning schedules)

Requirements for the HRIM Major:
Prescribed Courses in the HRIM Major (56 credits)

Course Number and Name                                                Credits
STAT 200 (GQ) - Elementary Statistics                                   4.0
CMPSC 203 (GQ) – Introduction to Spreadsheets and Databases             4.0
ECON 002 (GS) - Introductory Microeconomic Analysis and Policy          3.0
MKTG 221 – Contemporary American Marketing                              3.0
HRIM 201 - Introduction to Management in the Hospitality Industry       3.0
HRIM 202 - Colloquium in Hospitality Management                         1.0
HRIM 271 - Introduction to Hospitality Technology                       2.0
HRIM 329 - Introduction to Food production and Service                  3.0
HRIM 330 - Food Production and Service Management                       2.0
HRIM 335 - Hospitality Financial Accounting                             3.0
HRIM 336 - Hospitality Managerial Accounting                            3.0
HRIM 350 - Hospitality Decision Making and Information Systems          3.0
HRIM 365 (IL) - Organizational Behavior in the Hospitality Industry     3.0
HRIM 380 - Hotel Management                                             3.0
HRIM 430 - Advanced Food Production and Service Management              3.0
HRIM 435 - Financial Management in Hospitality Operations               3.0
HRIM 442 - Hospitality Marketing                                        3.0
HRIM 466 (US) - Human Resource Management - Hospitality Industry        3.0
HRIM 490W - Strategic Hospitality Management                            3.0
HRIM 492 - Advanced Professional Seminar in HRIM                        1.0
                                                                       56.0

Prescribed Courses in the HRIM Option (22.5 credits)                  Credits
NUTR 100 (GHA) - Contemporary Nutrition Concerns                        1.5
NUTR 119 - Elementary Foods                                             3.0
HRIM 355 – Legal Aspects of the Hospitality Industry                    3.0
HRIM 480 – Advanced Hotel Management                                    3.0
HRIM Elective                                                           3.0
HRIM Elective                                                           3.0
HRIM Elective                                                           3.0
HRIM Elective                                                           3.0
(HRIM Electives can include up to 4-credits of Foreign Language)       22.5



Electives (6 credits)                                                 Credits
       Any degree-counting credits                                      6.0


                                           14
General Education requirements
(45.0 credits, of which 10.5 credits can be double-counted from the Major/Option)

Writing/Speaking Skills (9 credits) (GWS)
      ENGL 015 or ENGL 015A or ENGL 030 – Rhetoric and Composition
      ENGL 202 (ENGL 202D recommended) – Business Writing
      CAS 100 (CAS 100A or 100B or 100C) – Effective Speech

Quantification (6 credits) (GQ)
      (STAT 200 from the Major)
      (CMPSC 203 from the Major)

Natural Sciences (9 credits) (GN)
      Any nine credits within the “GN” category

Arts (6 credits) (GA)
       Any six credits within the “GA” category

Humanities (6 credits) (GH)
     Any six credits within the “GH” category

Social and Behavioral Sciences (6 credits) (GS)
       (ECON 002 from the Major), plus
       Any three credits within the “GS” category

Health and Physical Activity (3 credits) (GHA)
      (NUTR 100 from the Option)
      Any 1.5 credits from the “GHA” category

Additional Requirements pertaining to General Education

First-Year Seminar (1 cr.) (FYS) ............................ Any University–First Year Seminar
International Cultures (3 cr.) (IL) ..........................(HRIM 365 from the Major)
United States Cultures (3 cr.) (US) .........................(HRIM 466 from the Major)
Writing Across the Curriculum (3 cr.) (WAC) ...... (HRIM 490W from the Major)




                    Overall Credit Breakdown for HRIM/HRIM

                                 Major Courses           56.0 cr.
                                 Option Courses          22.5 cr
                                 General Education       34.5 cr.
                                 Additional Gen. Ed.     01.0 cr.
                                 Electives               06.0 cr.
                                 TOTAL                 120.0 cr.



                                                15
           Course Descriptions for Required Courses
                                         HRIM Courses:
HRIM 201 -- Introduction to Management in the Hospitality Industry (3)

This introductory course provides an introduction to the hospitality industry, to management practices within
the industry, and to the hospitality major (HRIM). Students learn about the functions of management; the major
components of the hospitality, travel, and tourism industries; trade associations and publications; growth areas
and trends; and the need for creative leadership. Concurrent course: HRIM 202.

HRIM 202 -- Colloquium in Hospitality Management (1 per semester/max. of 4)

This course affords students the opportunity to hear and meet distinguished industry leaders and assists students
with determining their career directions, identifying career opportunities, and learning about the requirements
for success in the hospitality industry.

HRIM 271 -- Introduction to Computers in the Hospitality Industry (2)

Introduction to computers including standard computer applications, basic statistical applications, and
hospitality industry usage and application. Prerequisite or concurrent courses: HRIM 201 and CMPSC 203.

HRIM 329 -- Introduction to Food Production and Service (3)

This course provides information on the basic principles of effective food production and service management.
The primary focus is the integration of food service sanitation principles with menu planning, development and
maintenance of quality standards throughout the food service manufacturing cycle, food cost, and service. The
course provides basic food service management information addressed in the national registration examination
for dietitians.

HRIM 330 -- Food Production and Service Management (2)

This course explores the application of foodservice production and service management, stressing the
integration of management modules with training in employee positions for the quantity production of quality
food. The course draws from the students' theoretical background in accounting, management, nutrition, food
production and sanitation, and integrates these areas into the daily operation of a campus foodservice facility as
a living laboratory. Students, working as a management team, coordinate and manage all aspects of the food
service laboratory. Students also experience a number of employee work positions in the laboratory.
Prerequisite courses: NUTR 119 or 120 and HRIM 329.

HRIM 335 -- Hospitality Financial Accounting (3)

This course provides a basic knowledge of financial accounting principles and techniques. The course
emphasizes what accounting information is, why it is important, and how it is used in the hospitality industry.
The emphasis in this course is on the use of financial information from the user's perspective. Prerequisite or
concurrent: HRIM 201, 202. Prerequisite course: MATH 021 or equivalent by placement exam.




HRIM 336 -- Hospitality Managerial Accounting (3)

This course provides the core knowledge needed to: 1) understand the kinds of data generated by the financial
systems of hospitality operations, 2) prepare budgets, 3) perform variance analysis, and 4) provide control over
the financial aspects of the hospitality business. Prerequisite course: HRIM 335 or ACCTG 211.


                                                       16
HRIM 350 -- Hospitality Decision Making and Information Systems (3)

This course provides an opportunity to learn the qualitative (sociological and psychological) factors affecting
the decision process and provides the knowledge needed to apply management science models and computer-
based information systems to the functional aspects of management in the hospitality industry. The course
focuses on the application of modeling theory to planning and decision-making and project management.
Prerequisite courses: CMPSC 203, STAT 200, and HRIM 201.

HRIM 355 -- Legal Aspects of the Hospitality Industry (3)

This course acquaints students with the application of law to hotels, restaurants, and other institutional settings.
Topics include: 1) Types of law, judicial structure and trial procedures, 2) Legal research, 3) Legal duties of
innkeepers and guests, 4) Negligence and other torts, 5) Contract law, 6) Civil rights and public
accommodations, especially protections from discrimination, 7) Guests' property, 8) Regulation and licensing,
9) Employment law, especially protections from discrimination, 10) Casinos and the law, and 11) Food and
alcohol service liability. Prerequisite or concurrent course: HRIM 201

HRIM 365 -- Organizational Behavior in the Hospitality Industry (3) (IL)

This course acquaints students with organizational issues in the hospitality industry. Main topics include: 1)
What constitutes an organization: its components and different ways of understanding organizations, 2) What
factors influence the behavior of individuals, teams, and groups within organizations, 3) How the behavior of
individuals, teams, and groups affects organizational effectiveness and performance, and 4) Making the
connections between organizational behavior and hospitality organization effectiveness. Prerequisite or
concurrent course: HRIM 201.

HRIM 380 -- Hotel Management (3)

This course focuses on the responsibilities of hotel department heads. Students develop decision-making skills
that are applicable specifically to hotel operations, and generally to all hospitality industry operations. Topics
include: 1) Fundamental lodging classifications, 2) Recent trends in lodging supply segmentation, 3) Major
companies and brands in the hotel industry, 4) The relationship between the hotel front office and other
departments in the rooms division, 5) The relationship between the hotel rooms division and other divisions, 6)
Fundamental operating statistics related to hotels, and 7) Hotel night audits. Prerequisite course: HRIM 201.

HRIM 430 -- Advanced Food Production and Service Management (3)

This course gives students the opportunity to gain experience with the wide range of skills and techniques
needed by a successful hospitality manager. The skills and techniques emphasized include duties involved in the
planning, execution and evaluation of full-service, theme oriented ala carte dining. Students are expected to
form a marketable theme and then develop, produce and evaluate an authentic dining experience. Prerequisite
course: HRIM 330.

HRIM 435 -- Financial Management in Hospitality Operations (3)

This course gives students the opportunity to gain knowledge of the fundamental concepts, tools, and
applications that represent the core of financial management as applied to decision-making and value creation in
the hospitality industry. Topics include: 1) Introduction to financial decision-making in the hospitality industry,
2) Agency theory and the decision-making process, 3) Value creation and the goal of hospitality financial
management, 4) The functioning of financial markets that are relevant to hospitality firms, 5) Principles and
methods of value creation in the hospitality industry, 6) Applications of financial statement analysis to
hospitality finance, 7) Principles and applications of risk analysis to the value creation process, 8) Principles and
applications of the time value of money to the value creation process, 9) Capital expenditure analysis in the
hospitality industry, and 10) Principles and applications of financing hospitality projects and firms. Prerequisite
courses: ECON 002 or 014, HRIM 336. Prerequisite or concurrent course: HRIM 350.




                                                        17
HRIM 442 -- Hospitality Marketing (3)

This course gives an overview of marketing as applied to the hospitality industry, including but not limited to:
unique attributes of service marketing; consumer orientation; understanding consumers and consumer behavior;
market segmentation principles; target marketing; product planning; promotion planning; market research; and
competitor analysis. Prerequisite courses: MKTG 221 or 301, HRIM 350.

HRIM 466 -- Human Resource Management in the Hospitality Industry (3) (US)

This course discusses human resource (HR) issues in the hospitality industry. The course pays special attention
to the changing nature of organizations, the challenges that human resource managers face as a result, and the
consequences of HR managers' actions to the organization. Topics include: 1) Importance of human resources in
the hospitality industry, 2) Processes managers use in recruiting, selecting and training human resources in their
organizations, 3) Legal and social issues that impact human resource management in the hospitality industry,
and 4) Roles and responsibilities of a hospitality industry human resources professional. Prerequisite course:
HRIM 365.

HRIM 480 -- Advanced Hotel Management (3)

This course focuses on the responsibilities of executive committee members and the general manager of a hotel.
The topics are varied and include discussions of current events in the hotel industry. Students participate in a
hotel management simulation exercise to help develop strategic decision-making skills. Topics include: 1)
Introduction to types of owners in a hotel transaction, 2) Leading hotel companies and their brands, 3)
Management companies and franchise agreements, 4) Technology's impact on the hotel business, 5) Hotel
operations in an international environment, 6) Linkage between hotel operating decisions and the service quality
experience, 7) Management style and problem solving abilities in a team environment, 8) General management
perspective on how various operating aspects of a hotel are related to one another, and 9) Individual yield
management components' affect on the yield management decision. Prerequisite courses: HRIM 336 and 380.

HRIM 490W -- Strategic Hospitality Management (3)

This course involves students with the strategic management process through a three-faced series of exercises.
Students begin the process by exploring historical and future environmental trends, explore the marketing
opportunities for a hospitality firm, and develop a new product or service idea for a specific hospitality
organization. Topics include: 1) Identification of trends and shifts in the environment external to the firm, 2)
Development of a method for researching hospitality firms and recommending new product development, 3)
Exploration of industry and firm strengths and weaknesses, 4) Development of several strategies for a firm for
a pre-determined date into the future, and 5) Presentation of business analyses and recommendations for
specific firms. Prerequisite courses: HRIM 365, 435, and 442.

HRIM 492 -- Advanced Professional Seminar in Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Management (1)

This course helps students begin their transition from being students to being hospitality managers. Topics
include: 1) Career planning and lifelong learning, 2) Deciding on employers to pursue, 3) The selection process-
getting offers from employers, 4) Evaluating and choosing between offers, 5) Negotiating salary, location,
benefits, relocation expenses, 6) Personal budgeting and financial planning, 7) Balancing work and personal
life, 8) Time and stress management, 9) Networking and professional associations, and 10) Roles and
responsibilities of alumni. Prerequisite: Completion or near-completion of 1000 hours of hospitality work
experience. Prerequisite or concurrent courses: HRIM 430, 466, and 490.




                                                       18
       Supporting and Foundation Courses in the HRIM Major:
CMPSC 203 – (GQ) Introduction to Spreadsheets and Databases (4) Design, use, and programming of
spreadsheets and data bases with applications from a range of disciplines.

ECON 002 – Introductory Microeconomic Analysis and Policy (3) Methods of economic analysis and their
use; price determination; theory of the firm; distribution.

MATH 021 – College Algebra I (3) Quadratic equations; equations in quadratic form; word problems;
graphing; algebraic fractions; negative and rational exponents; radicals. (This course is waived if a satisfactory
score is achieved on the MATH department’s placement exam.)

MKTG 221 – Contemporary American Marketing (3) Social and economic aspects, movement of goods and
services from producers to consumers; analysis of marketing functions, systems, and institutions.

NUTR 100 – Contemporary Nutrition Concerns (1.5) Interpretation of nutrition principles in relation to
contemporary problems in selecting a diet to promote a healthy lifestyle.

NUTR 119 – Elementary Foods (3) Basic principles and fundamental processes underlying food preparation.

STAT 200 – Elementary Statistics (4) Descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, probability, binomial and
normal distributions, statistical inference, linear regression, and correlation.




                                    HRIM Elective Courses:
HRIM 228 – Hospitality Food Safety (1) Application of HACCP, U.S. Food Code, biosecurity and other
federal regulations to hospitality foodservice operations. Students attain certification in foodservice sanitation.

HRIM 304 -- Institutional Food Service Management (3) Institutional food service management systems in
the hospitality field. Prerequisite course: HRIM 201.

HRIM 310 -- Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Purchasing and Cost Control (3) Purchasing and cost
control principles for hotel, restaurant, and institutional operations. Prerequisite courses: HRIM 201, 202, 335,
380, and NUTR 119.

HRIM 311 -- Wine Appreciation (2) A study of identification of varieties of wine, methods and techniques of
viniculture, development of wine lists and wine marketing. Prerequisite: At least 21 years of age.

HRIM 318 -- Club Management and Operations (2) Topics include: 1) The club management industry and
career opportunities; 2) Types of clubs that exist in the industry, including structure, organization, and
philosophy; 3) The various departments of a successful club including but not limited to: food and beverage,
accounting and cost control, human resources, marketing and promotion, catering and banquets, golf operations,
tennis operations, aquatics, and fitness facilities; and 4) Management skills required of a club manager:
leadership, board relations, general management, service excellence, communications.

HRIM 319 -- Hospitality Facilities Management (3) This course provides students with information related to
hospitality facility design and maintenance. Main topics include principles of facility engineering and
maintenance, costs associated with the life cycle of a hospitality facility, role of the manager in the planning and
maintenance process, function of the building in service and marketing, impact of building design on guest
service and operation, evaluation of building and grounds for compliance with the Americans with Disabilities


                                                        19
Act of 1990, role of management in development, planning, and remodeling of food service operations, flow of
resources (as exhibited in blueprints). Prerequisite course: HRIM 201.

HRIM 397A -- Spanish for Hospitality II (3) Intermediate applications of the Spanish language, grammar
vocabulary, and concepts specific to the hospitality industry. Emphasis on verbal communication.

HRIM 411 -- Beverage Management and Wine Selection (3) This course acquaints students with the
successful management of all beverage products associated with the hospitality industry. Topics include: 1)
Production; 2) Purchasing; 3) Brand recognition; 4) Marketing and promotion; 5) Financial control; and 6)
Responsible alcohol service. Prerequisite: NUTR 100, NUTR 119, and HRIM 201 (At least 21 years-of-age).

HRIM 413 -- New Product Development (3) Students work in the Mateer research kitchen on supervised
projects.

HRIM 415 -- International Cuisine (3) This course exposes students to managerial and cultural issues of
cuisine and how these issues influence the development of commercial food and beverage operations. Topics
include: 1) Understanding how cuisine has developed over time; 2) Variety of foods grown in distant regions; 3)
Evolvement of trade that brought exotic foods from distant locales; 4) Geography's role in defining the types of
foods and quantities of crops that can be produced around the globe; and 5) Critical components of the major
world cuisines. Prerequisite courses: NUTR 100, NUTR 119, and HRIM 201.

HRIM 438 --Cases in Financial Analysis (3) Financial analysis and decision making is examined through a
series of hospitality-oriented cases. Prerequisite: HRIM 435.

HRIM 443 -- Sales Planning and Advertising for Hospitality Operations (3) Elements of sales management,
advertising, promotion and public relations as applied to hospitality organizations. Prerequisite: HRIM 442 or 3
credits in marketing.

HRIM 455 -- Convention Management (3) Management principles of hotel convention sales and service.
Prerequisite: HRIM 380, HRIM 442

HRIM 456 (HRIM 386, effective Spring 2011) -- Casino Operations Management (3) This course provides
historical and current perspectives on the gaming industry, emphasizing management principles of casino
operations, including coordination with traditional hospitality services. Topics include: 1) Introduction to the
casino industry-its size, structure, and historical origins; 2) Management issues in a casino hotel as compared
with other types of hotels; 3) Roles of hotel managers and food and beverage managers at multiple levels in
casino hotels; 4) Model for analyzing casino hotel issues in a rapidly changing industry; 5) Roles of government
and regulatory agencies in protecting consumers, the public, communities, and competitors; 6) Differences
between social responsible and addictive gambling; and 7) Reliable sources of information about the gaming
industry.

HRIM 467 -- Management of Hotel and Restaurant Employee Relations (3) Survey and analysis of
managerial strategies for employee relations in hospitality operations. Topics include: 1) Introduction to
employee relations in hotels and restaurants; 2) Economic influences on the hotel and restaurant labor market;
3) Labor law as applied to the hospitality industry; 4) Management strategies in collective bargaining; 5)
Administration of labor contracts; and 6) Management and supervisory strategies in labor disputes. Prerequisite
course: HRIM 466.

HRIM 471 -- Evaluation of Hospitality Technology (3) This course provides students with an under-standing
of the variety of information technologies used in the hospitality industry. Topics include: 1) The concept of
information systems; 2) Components of hospitality information systems at the corporate and operational levels;
3) Analysis and evaluation of hospitality information systems; 4) Process of selecting information systems; and
5) Implementation and maintenance of information systems. Prerequisite courses: HRIM 470. This course is
part of the ISHRM Minor.

HRIM 482 -- Hospitality Real Estate (3) The course focuses on commercial real estate concepts related to the
hospitality industry. Prerequisite: HRIM 336, HRIM 380


                                                      20
HRIM 495A -- Hospitality Services Internship (3) Supervised on-site observation and participation in each of
four major areas of local participating hospitality firms with a weekly seminar session. Prerequisite: Prior
approval by course instructor.

HRIM 495B -- Executive Internship – Penn State Hospitality Services (3) Students work at the Nittany Lion
Inn or the Penn Stater Conference Center Hotel as part of a special assignment. Prerequisite: Prior approval of
the proposed assignment by the instructor, and successful completion of HRIM 495A.

HRIM 495D -- HRIM Teaching Assistant (1-6) Students assist the instructor of either HRIM 330 or HRIM
430. Prerequisite: Prior approval of the proposed assignment by the instructor.

HRIM 495E -- External Off-campus Internship (1-6) Students complete a previously arranged internship off-
campus. Prerequisite: Prior approval of proposed assignment by the instructor.

HRIM 495F -- Housing and Food Services Internship (3) Supervised on-site observation and participation in
diverse areas of Penn State Housing and Food Services with a weekly seminar session. Prerequisite: Prior
approval by course instructor.

HRIM 495G -- Supervisory Internship (6) Six-month program with Penn State Hospitality Services over
summer and fall semesters, where students spend summer in a line employee capacity while participating in
PSHS management training programs. Fall semester is spent as a supervisor in the department where the intern
spent the summer. Weekly submission of journal entries and two analytical papers required in the fall
semester. Prerequisite: Prior approval by course instructor.

HRIM 496 -- Independent Studies (1-18) Special study planned and completed with an instructor’s prior
approval and assistance.

HRIM 497 -- Special Topics (1-9) Courses designed and offered as a study in a specially chosen topic.

HRIM 497A (Fall) -- Meeting and Events I (3) Students will learn concepts and applications to Event and
Meeting planning.

HRIM 497A (Spring) -- Advanced Meeting Planning (3) Students will learn advanced concepts and
applications to Event and Meeting Planning.

HRIM 497B -- Special Topics in Hotel Management (3) Students, through research and on-line activities, will
discuss special or current interest in the hotel industry.

HRIM 497C -- Revenue Management (3) Revenue or yield management uses historical patterns to set prices
that maximize revenue and profit.

HRIM 497D (Fall) (HRIM 486, effective Spring 2011) -- Casino Marketing (3) Students will learn marketing
techniques for casinos which take into account the external environment, individual consumer choices and
ethical considerations.

HRIM 497D (Spring) (HRIM 387 effective Spring 2011) -- Casino Controls (3) Casino controls are studied
along with the issuance of comps and credits.

HRIM 497E -- Business Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility (3) Examines the role of ethics and
corporate social responsibility in hospitality including the concepts of management.

HRIM 497F -- Entrepreneurship in the Hospitality Industry (3) This course will explore the characteristics
of the successful entrepreneur and the process of starting a new business venture.

HRIM 497G -- French Cuisine/Culture (3) Formal courses given infrequently to explore, in depth, a
comparatively narrow subject which may be topical or of special interest.


                                                     21
HRIM 497G (Fall) (HRIM 487, effective Spring 2011) -- Casino Operations and Societal Impact of Gaming
(3) Students will learn the organization structure, the organization culture, and the ethical responsibility toward
disordered gambling and other social impacts.

HRIM 497G (Spring) (HRIM 388, effective Spring 2011) -- Gaming Operations Management (3) Casino
games’ rules and protection are explored.

HRIM 497H -- Research Design (2) Students learn how to perform research projects. Typically taken by
HRIM students of the Schreyer Honors College.

HRIM 498A -- International Hospitality Management (3) Focuses on tourism related infrastructure in ancient
and modern Greco-Roman times. Includes required trip to Greece or Italy during spring break.

HRIM 498C -- Spanish for Hospitality International (1-4) This course is designed to cover major Caribbean
cuisines in Caribbean setting.




                                                       22
       Recommended Academic Plan for Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional
              Management (HRIM starting at University Park)

                        Semester 1                              Credits                            Semester 2                               Credits
HRIM 201 Intro. to Management in Hospitality                        3        HRIM 271 Intro. to Computers in Hospitality Mgmt                 2
HRIM 202 Colloquium in Hospitality Management                       1        HRIM 365 or HRIM 380 Organizational Behavior/                    3
                                                                             Hotel Management
ENGL 015 or 030 (GWS) Composition/Honors Comp.                      3        ECON 002 (GS) Microeconomics                                     3
Humanities (GH)                                                     3        NUTR 100 (GHA) Contemp. Nutritional Concerns                     1.5
Natural Sciences (GN)                                               3        Natural Sciences (GN)                                            3
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS)                                 3        MATH 021 College Algebra I (if needed based on                   3
                                                                             FTCAP placement exam) OR Humanities (GH)
First-Year Seminar (PSU 014 or any FYS)                             1
                                               Total Credits:      17                                                    Total Credits:      15.5
                        Semester 3                              Credits                            Semester 4                               Credits
HRIM 335 Hospitality Financial Accounting                           3        HRIM 336 Hospitality Managerial Accounting                       3
HRIM 365 or 380 Organizational Behavior/Hotel                       3        HRIM 355 Legal Aspects of Hospitality Industry                   3
Management
CMPSC 203 or STAT 200 (GQ) Introduction to                          4        CMPSC 203 or STAT 200 (GQ) Introduction to                       4
Spreadsheets and Databases                                                   Spreadsheets and Databases
MKTG 221 or 221W Contemp. Am. Marketing                             3        Humanities (GH) or Elective                                      3
Natural Sciences (GN)                                               3        CAS 100 (GWS) Effective Speech                                   3
                                               Total Credits:      16                                                    Total Credits:       16
                        Semester 5                              Credits                            Semester 6                               Credits
HRIM Elective                                                       3        HRIM Elective                                                    3
HRIM 329 Intro. to Food Production & Service                        3        HRIM 330 Food Production and Service Mgmt.                       2
HRIM 350 Decision Making and Info. Systems                          3        HRIM 466 Human Resource Management                               3
NUTR 119 Elementary Foods                                           3        Health and Physical Activity (GHA)                               1.5
Arts (GA)                                                           3        Arts (GA)                                                        3
                                                                             Elective                                                         3
                                               Total Credits:      15                                                    Total Credits:      15.5
                        Semester 7                              Credits                            Semester 8                               Credits
HRIM 435 Financial Management                                       3        HRIM 430 Advanced Food Production/Service                        3
                                                                             Mgmt.
HRIM 442 Hospitality Marketing                                      3        HRIM 480 Advanced Hotel Management                               3
HRIM Elective                                                       3        HRIM 490W Strategic Hospitality Management                       3
ENGL 202D (GWS) Effective Writing: Business                         3        HRIM 492 Advanced Professional Seminar in HRIM                   1
                                                                             HRIM Elective                                                    3
                                               Total Credits:      12                                                    Total Credits:       13


   Bold type indicates courses requiring a quality grade of C or better.
   Italics indicate courses that satisfy both major and General Education requirements.
   Bold Italics indicate courses requiring a quality grade of C or better and that satisfy both major and General Education requirements.
   GWS, GHA, GQ, GN, GA, GH, and GS are codes used to identify General Education requirements.
   US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States/International Cultures requirements.
   W is the code used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.


                                                                        23
       Recommended Academic Plan for Hotel, Restaurant, and Institutional Management (HRIM
                           starting at non-University Park locations)
                        Semester 1                               Credits                           Semester 2                              Credits
ENGL 015 or 030 (GWS) Composition/Honors Comp.                       3        CMPSC 203 or STAT 200 (GQ) Introduction to                        4
                                                                              Spreadsheets and Databases
Humanities (GH)                                                      3        Natural Sciences (GN)                                             3
Natural Sciences (GN)                                                3        ECON 002 (GS) Microeconomics                                      3
First-Year Seminar                                                   1        Humanities (GH)                                                   3
Social and Behavioral Sciences (GS)                                  3        Arts (GA)                                                         3
MATH 021 College Algebra I (if needed based on                       3
FTCAP placement exam)
                                                Total Credits:      16                                                Total Credits:            16
                        Semester 3                               Credits                           Semester 4                              Credits
CMPSC 203 or STAT 200 (GQ) Introduction to                           4        HRIM 335 (or ACCTG 211) Hospitality                               3-4
Spreadsheets and Databases                                                    Financial Accounting/Financial and Managerial
                                                                              Accounting
MKTG 221 or 221W or 301 Contemp. Am.                                 3        ENGL 202D (GWS) Effective Writing: Business                       3
Marketing/Principles of Marketing
CAS 100 (GWS) Effective Speech                                       3        Arts (GA)                                                         3
Natural Sciences (GN)                                                3        NUTR 100 (or NUTR 251) (GHA) Contemp.                         1.5-3.0
                                                                              Nutritional Concerns/Principles of Nutrition
Elective                                                             3        Elective                                                          3
                                                Total Credits:      16                                                Total Credits:       13.5-16
                        Semester 5                               Credits                           Semester 6                              Credits
HRIM 201 Intro. to Management in Hospitality                         2        HRIM 330 Food Production and Service Mgmt.                        2
HRIM 202 Colloquium in Hospitality Management                        1        HRIM 350 Decision Making and Info. Systems                        3
HRIM 271 Intro. to Computers in Hospitality Mgmt.                    2        HRIM 365 Organizational Behavior                                  3
HRIM 329 Intro to Food Production & Service                          3        HRIM 380 Hotel Management                                         3
HRIM 336 Hospitality Managerial Accounting                           3        HRIM Elective                                                     3
NUTR 119 Elementary Foods                                            3        Health and Physical Activity (GHA) (unless                   0.00-1.5
                                                                              NUTR 251 taken)
                                                Total Credits:      14                                                Total Credits:       14-15.5
                        Semester 7                               Credits                           Semester 8                              Credits
HRIM 355 Legal Aspects of Hospitality Industry                       3        HRIM 430 Adv. Food Production/Service Mgmt.                       3
HRIM 435 Financial Management                                        3        HRIM 466 Human Resource Mgmt. in Hosp.                            3
HRIM 442 Hospitality Marketing                                       3        HRIM 490W Strategic Hospitality Management                        3
HRIM 480 Advanced Hotel Management                                   3        HRIM 492 Advanced Professional Seminar                            1
HRIM Elective                                                        3        HRIM Elective                                                     3
                                                                              HRIM Elective                                                     3
                                                Total Credits:      15                                                Total Credits:            16
       Bold type indicates courses requiring a quality grade of C or better.
       Italics indicate courses that satisfy both major and General Education requirements.
       Bold Italics indicate courses requiring a quality grade of C or better and that satisfy both major and General Education requirements.
       GWS, GHA, GQ, GN, GA, GH, and GS are codes used to identify General Education requirements.
       US, IL, and US;IL are codes used to designate courses that satisfy University United States/International Cultures requirements.
       W is the code used to designate courses that satisfy University Writing Across the Curriculum requirement.



                                                                         24
Flow Chart for Sequenced HRIM Major & Option Courses

                                        Prerequisite for all higher level HRIM courses,
                                        except HRIM 335, HRIM 355 and HRIM 365
                                              which may be taken concurrently


                                          HRIM 380                          HRIM 480
                                          HRIM 336
        HRIM 201



        HRIM 365                  HRIM 466



                                                  ECON 002

      MATH 021
 Or a math equivalency       HRIM 335          HRIM 336       HRIM 435             HRIM
          met                                                                      490W
   (by testing score)

      STAT 200
     CMPSC 203                              HRIM 350




     MKTG 221 or                                               HRIM 442
    MKTG 221W or
      MKTG 301

    NUTR 119

                                           HRIM 330             HRIM 430
    HRIM 228


    HRIM 329


     Management Dietetics Option also requires this six-semester sequence:


 CHEM 110         CHEM 202      BMB 211         NUTR 445        NUTR 446         NUTR 452




                                          25
Areas of Specialization
We strongly encourage students to use their 12 credits of major electives to develop a specialization or area
of emphasis. Doing so not only makes you more eligible for employment by the time you graduate, it also
gives you the opportunity to take the courses you would like, and focus on the subjects closest to your heart
and interests. Such specializations might include Food and Beverage Management, Hotel Operations,
Finance/Accounting, Sales and Marketing, Human Resource Management, Event Management, Spanish for
Hospitality or Gaming and Casino Management.


For example, a Finance/Accounting specialization might include elective courses in Revenue Management,
Hospitality Real Estate Valuation, Advanced Finance and a course at the Business college. Similarly, a
specialization in Food and Beverage Management might include the elective courses in Gastronomy, Wine
Appreciation, Bar and Beverage Management, and International Cuisines. Spanish for Hospitality has a
course in Spring, followed by a summer semester in a Spanish speaking country, and can be topped off by
an internship abroad.


An HRIM degree with a Gaming and Casino Management emphasis prepares the student to enter the casino
industry with a solid foundation of basic knowledge and skills. The emphasis teaches the fundamentals of
casino management regarding controls and game protection, marketing tools unique to the industry,
operational know-how, comps and credit, and more.


We encourage our students to consult with their advisors to discuss their personal and professional interests
and talk to them about their career interests. Jointly, they will identify a set of appropriate elective courses
that combines the best of all worlds: personal interest, academic challenge, and enhanced career
opportunities.




                                                       26
                             International Programs
Whether you work in the U.S. or abroad upon graduation, our industry requires you to be
comfortable working with guests and employees from many different cultures and countries. The
School of Hospitality Management continually strives to create unique international opportunities
that will enhance your expertise and knowledge of living and working in multiple cultures, an
important career skill to acquire in a shrinking and connected world.


THREE-SEMESTER GLOBAL PROGRAM
The School of Hospitality Management, has entered into agreements with
the Chinese University of Hong Kong and the Hotel Management School,
Maastricht, The Netherlands, to offer PSU students the opportunity to
live and study in two completely different cultures and academic
environments for two consecutive semesters.


This is a unique program in which a group of PSU students will join
similar-sized cohorts from Hong Kong and the Netherlands and start their
studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong in the Fall of each year.
At CUHK, students will learn about, hospitality management issues and
culture. In the following Spring semester, all students move to Maastricht
and will study issues related to the European hospitality industry.
Finally, all students, including those from Hong Kong and Maastricht,
will come to Penn State in the following Fall semester to complete the
program with an in-depth look at the U.S. hospitality industry. This special program provides students with
a firm grasp of global issues facing the hospitality industry and a unique opportunity to work closely with
peers from two other continents. Students pay PSU tuition throughout and all courses are taught in English.


SEMESTER-LONG PROGRAMS
CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
A semester-long exchange program at the Chinese University of Hong
Kong (CUHK), you pay PSU tuition and study at CUHK for one semester
or a year. Course instruction is in English and both Hospitality
Management and General Education courses are available fall and spring
semesters. Students usually carry about 15 credits each semester.


HOTEL MANAGEMENT SCHOOL, MAASTRICHT, NL
A semester-long exchange program at the Hotel Management School in
Maastricht, you pay PSU tuition and study at Maastricht for one semester
or a year. Course instruction is in English and both Hospitality
Management and General Education courses are available offered fall and
spring semesters. Students usually carry about 15 credits each semester.




                                                     27
UNIVERSIDAD SAN IGNACIO DE LOYOLA, LIMA, PERU
A semester-long exchange program at the USIL Lima. Students will
learn about the Latin America hospitality industry and also have an
opportunity to learn Spanish. This program is ideal for those who wish
to expand their language abilities in an immersion learning experience.
All hospitality courses are taught in English; students pay PSU tuition.




SUMMER PROGRAMS
HOSPITALITY STUDIES IN EUROPE
A five-week summer program in Europe, combining three credits each of
International Cuisine and International Hospitality Management with
extensive opportunities to travel and gain first-hand          international
hospitality experience. Students live in an international environment and
learn about the hospitality field in a uniquely European fashion. Classes
meet from three to four days a week. On the extended weekends, students
may travel independently almost anywhere in Europe.            Approximate
dates: Late June – late July.




SUMMER IN SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
Two courses, each 3 credits, are offered: Spanish for Hospitality and
International Hospitality Management. Prerequisites apply for the
Spanish for Hospitality courses (discretion of instructor). You will learn
Spanish and be able to use it as you travel around the beautiful island of
Puerto Rico. Learn about the culture and cuisine of the Islands.
Approximate dates: Mid May – mid June.




CULINARY PROGRAM IN LYON, FRANCE
A three credit, two-week summer culinary program at the world famous
Institute Paul Bocuse. You will have the opportunity to learn about
French cuisine, culture and wines in a very hands-on setting while also
enjoying some time off to explore the region. Practical classes are held
in the kitchens of Institute Paul Bocuse and are taught by the chefs of the
Institute. Approximate dates: Mid May – mid June
.




                                                      28
SPRING SEMESTER COURSE-ONE WEEK ABROAD




HOSPITALITY AND CULTURE OF ITALY & GREECE

A three-credit course “Hospitality & Culture in the Ancient and Modern
Greco-Roman World” focuses on hospitality and tourism related culture,
customs, and infrastructure (lodging, food & beverage facilities). The
course meets on campus throughout spring semester, with a required trip
to either Greece or Italy embedded during spring break. The Greece
program includes Athens, Delphi and other cities. The Italy program
includes Rome, Florence and Venice.




                STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS

Deadlines for Study Abroad applications for the next year are as follows:

         Fall Semester & Academic Year
         Deadline – Jan. 20th
         Decision – Mar. 15th
         Scholarship Notification – Mar. 22nd

         Spring Semester
         Deadline – Apr. 1st
         Decision – June 15th
         Scholarship Notification – June 22nd

         Summer Session(s)
         Deadline – Feb. 1st
         Decision – Mar. 5th
         Scholarship Notification – Mar. 12th


Additional information on these, and other Study Abroad opportunities, can be found on the PSU
International Programs website at http://www.international.psu.edu/ea/.


For further information on studying abroad, please contact Dr. Karthik Namasivayam, Professor-In-Charge
of International Development (kun1@psu.edu).




                                                    29
       SECTION C


Work Experience Requirement
 And Placement Information




             30
                      Work Experience Requirement

STUDENT INFORMATION
In addition to your academic requirements, the school requires that students document 1,000 hours of
employment in the hospitality industry before graduation.        The requirement may be met with any
combination of school-year or summer employment. International Students must see the International
Student Office before working.

Type of work

Remember that the purpose of this requirement is to enhance your ability to obtain a position in your
desired field. Your work should be consistent with your career goals. These hours will be listed on your
resume to demonstrate to a potential employer that you are “right for the job” you are seeking.

Verification

To receive credit for the hours you complete, you must have your employer verify the position you held
and the number of hours worked. Your employer must complete the verification form provided here on
page 32. In addition, a copy of your paystubs must be provided, containing your name, the name of the
company and the number of hours worked. It’s best to use the last stub in each year you worked. Your
academic advisor must confirm that the position will meet your major requirements.



Following is a list of job categories currently regarded as acceptable hospitality experiences:


•   quick service, mid-scale, casual-dining, and fine-dining restaurants

•   school, hospital, nursing home, campground, military or equivalent mass or institutional feeding
    establishments

•   theme-park and arena foodservice when not limited to vending

•   hotel operations, including front desk, housekeeping, convention/conference sales, room service,
    banquet service and bar service

•   country club operations, when related to food and beverage

•   bakery operations, when not limited to strictly production or over-the-counter sales

•   casino operations, when related to food, beverage, lodging or purchasing activities

•   food sales (purveyor) when not limited to order-taking and delivery. Evidence of inventory
    management, product knowledge, brand selection, and control issues must be present

•   grocery or convenience store (food courts and delicatessens) made-to-order food production and sales,
    when combined with either in-house dining, catering or carry-out service

•   catering production and service



                                                    31
                                    The Pennsylvania State University
                                    School of Hospitality Management
                                           Founded in 1937

                 HOSPITALITY WORK EXPERIENCE
                               VERIFICATION FORM
The School of Hospitality Management requires all of its students to work at least 1000 hours in the
hospitality industry prior to graduation. We appreciate your co-operation in completing this form.


Employee Name: ___________________________ Student I.D. No: ________________
Dates of employment: _____________________________________________________
Number of hours worked: __________________________________________________
Position(s) held: __________________________________________________________
Basic job duties: ________________________                                   Affix a Business Card
                                                                       with the name of the supervisor
______________________________________                          who is signing the form so that we may contact
                                                                           them if we have questions
______________________________________                                               AND
                                                               Paystub – Last stub for each year worked so that
______________________________________                         we can calculate your hours based on the year-to-
                                                               date gross pay divided by your hourly rate of pay
______________________________________                          Must include name of establishment on the
                                                                                   paystub.
______________________________________
************************************************************************
Supervisor’s Name: _______________________________________________________
Supervisor’s Position: _____________________________________________________
Company Name: _________________________________________________________
Address: ________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
                  City                          State                       Zip Code
Telephone number: ___________________________
Email address: _______________________________
Signature: _____________________________________                        Date: ___________________
THANK YOU AGAIN FOR YOUR ASSISTANCE. If returning by FAX (814) 863-4257, please send
to the attention of David Rachau. If returning by mail, please mail to David Rachau, Penn State
University, 212 Mateer Building, University Park, PA 16802.




                                                    32
                                               Internship Information
                An “internship” is a structured program designed by the School and the employer to provide the student
                with a variety of learning experiences in the hospitality business. Although a formal internship is not
                required as part of the 1000-hour work experience requirement, qualified students who participate in such a
                program find it very beneficial in exploring job options and establishing contacts. Corporations which
                invest time and training in student interns are often interested in hiring those students after graduation.
                Also, companies see a formal, structured, university-approved internship as a much more preferable
                attribute than time spent in a “summer job”. With faculty advisor approval, an internship may count
                towards the 1000-hour work experience requirement. Mr. Jeff Heim has responsibility for the School’s
                internship policies, and is the internship coordinator. He is responsible for ensuring that credit-earning
                interns are receiving a valuable experience. Students may select from several types of internships:


                1. On-campus internships:
                        a. HRIM 495A, Penn State Hospitality Services Line-Level Internship, for course credit (3 credit
                        hours) is considered part of a full-time academic load for one complete fifteen week (on average)
                        academic semester. Interns will spend the semester working in a line-level position in one of the
                        two hotels on campus (front desk, housekeeping, maintenance, restaurants, banquets, etc.), while
                        meeting weekly with their supervisors to discuss the week’s issues and educational opportunities.
                        Through HRIM 495A, a student registers for an internship class in which they will be working at
                        the Nittany Lion Inn or The Penn Stater Hotel and Conference Center for about 15 hours per week,
                        along with a one-hour per week class.

Mr. Jeff Heim           b.   HRIM 495B, Penn State Hospitality Services Executive Internship, for course credit (3 credit
                             hours), is also considered part of a full-time academic load during a typical fall or spring
                             semester. Similar to HRIM 495A, except that it involves extensive one-on-one work with a
                             PSHS department head for the semester, developing and implementing a project for the
                             improvement of the department. The time requirement is the same as HRIM 495A, however
                             there is no weekly class requirement, and students must have already successfully completed
                             HRIM 495A.

                        c.   HRIM 495F, Housing & Food Services Internship, for course credit (3 credit hours), is also
                             considered part of a full-time academic load during a typical fall or spring semester. This
                             internship is perfect for students interested in non-commercial or institutional food and
                             housing service management. Currently, the program offers a rotational experience through
                             the different aspects of the Penn State dining commons, including front- and back-of-the-
                             house positions, labor control, purchasing, etc., in addition to a semester project. Work
                             includes approximately 15 hours per week, plus a one-hour per week seminar class.

                        d.   HRIM 495G, Supervisory Internship, for course credit (6 credit hours registered in the fall
                             semester), is designed to fulfill up to one half of a student’s academic load in the fall
                             semester. This is a six-month program, where students spend the summer semester as a line
                             employee with PSHS, while attending all of the PSHS management training programs. Fall
                             semester is spent as a supervisor in the department for which the intern worked over the
                             summer. During the summer and fall, interns will work a minimum of 32 hours per week.




                                                                    33
2. Off-campus internships:
      a.   HRIM 495E, Off Campus Internship: The HRIM Off-Campus Internship for course credit (3
           credit hours) is a full-time academic load for one complete twelve week summer, fall, or
           spring academic semester. Generally, the internship experience involves forty to fifty (40 to
           50) hours of hands-on experience per work week. Any student registered for this course is
           automatically considered, by the University, a full-time student and is required to only pay for
           the three (3) credit hours taken for this internship program. The full-time student status, even
           though the student is taking less than 12 (twelve) credit hours, is by special arrangement with
           the University’s Registrars Office. As such, any student registered for this course will be able
           to maintain their full time student status for the purposes of medical insurance, student loan
           repayment, and any other considerations given students with a full time student status
           designation. The sites for these internships can be domestic or international. Prior approval
           by the internship coordinator is required.
                      i. Regular written journal entries, papers, and progress reports are required
                     ii. The internship coordinator will visit many of the internship sites during the
                          course of the internship to evaluate the intern’s progress and cooperation of the
                          host company

      b.   Non-credit internships: Students can participate in internships without registering for credit,
           but this relationship is strictly between student and employer. The School of Hospitality
           Management and Penn State cannot offer any support to the student in such situations if it is
           not a positive learning experience, nor will the School of Hospitality Management have any
           control over the experience or structure for the student (or lack thereof) by the host company.

      c.   Work Leave: Students may take a leave of absence from Penn State to spend a semester at an
           industry work experience. The students arrange for the program with the participating
           hospitality organization. These experiences will count toward the 1000 hour work
           requirement but have no academic credit. For information on taking a leave of absence,
           please contact the University registrar, www.registrar.psu.edu.




                                                  34
                   Corporate Recruiting and Placement Guidelines

                       The School of Hospitality Management maintains strong relationships with the hospitality
                       industry. Faculty members have extensive experience in the industry, and many of them are
                       active in local, state, and national industry associations. The School also maintains close ties to
                       its alumni, many of whom are top executives in the field. The required work experience gives
                       undergraduates valuable exposure to the field and access to potential employers. This summary
                       provides you with guidelines for using the School’s Career Placement office in Room 229 of the
                       Mateer Building.
Ms. Rosemarie          Ms. Rosemarie Hibbler (rqh7@psu.edu) has the main responsibility for executing the School’s
   Hibbler
            poli       policies in this area, and is the administrator of the Career Placement Center. She is responsible
                       for conducting recruiting and placement affairs on a daily basis.


            The Placement Office provides services to students in all stages of their academic careers - from first-year
            students to seniors. We encourage you to explore all of the services and resources available to you. Please
            stop in and familiarize yourself with all that the career center offers.

            During the fall and spring semesters, companies interview on campus to fill permanent, summer, or
            management internship positions. Rosemarie Hibbler is also available to meet with you to discuss career
            development strategies and assist with resume preparation, networking opportunities, and finding the right
            summer or permanent job.

                                              Job Search Resources

            "Company Days" are designated throughout the semester to give you an opportunity to meet informally
            with company representatives to discuss job opportunities and learn more about the company. Notice of
            company days will be by email as well as the electronic message board located in the Mateer Building
            Lobby.

            Company Information Sessions are held by company representatives who visit campus to interview
            students. The company presentation provides the student an opportunity to learn more about the company
            and to find out as many details as possible before the interview. It is also a great way to break the ice with
            the recruiter and feel more comfortable when interviewing.

            On-campus Recruiting brings companies from various industry/agency segments to campus to interview
            students for both permanent and summer positions. The recruitment calendar is available on Angel.

            In addition to the resources and services available to students through the School of Hospitality
            Management Placement Office, Career Services located in the Bank of America Career Services Building
            (865-2377) is there to offer assistance and many other types of resources if you so choose. Visit their Web
            site at: www.sa.psu.edu/career/.



                                                                   35
                                   Corporate Recruiters
   Below is a partial listing of companies who visited the University Park campus in past semesters. This list
   is provided to represent the variety of companies recruiting our graduates.

AC Nightlife                                            Marriott Corporation
ARAMARK                                                 McDonalds
Archon Hospitality                                      Metz
Omni Bedford Springs                                    Micros Systems, Inc.
The Biltmore                                            Nemacolin Woodlands Spa & Resort
The Borgata & WaterClub                                 Olive Garden
Bubba Gump Shrimp Co.                                   Pappas Restaurants
Charles Town Casino                                     Penn State Hospitality Services
Cheesecake Factory                                      Potbelly Sandwich Works
Clyde’s Restaurants                                     Red Lobster
Compass                                                 Red Robin
Eat’n Park                                              Red Roof Inns
Ecolab                                                  Restaurant Associates
Four Seasons Hotels                                     Ritz-Carlton Hotels
Gaylord Resort                                          Sands Bethlehem
Giant Eagle                                             Sodexo
Great American Restaurants                              Starwood Hotels & Resorts
Growth Properties Hospitality Mgmt.                     Sunburst Hospitality
HEI Hotels                                              TGIF (Bistro)
Hershey Entertainment & Resorts                         Uno Chicago Grill
Hoss’s Steak and Seahouse                               Vista Host Hotel Management
Houston’s Restaurants                                   Waldorf=Astoria Hotel
Hyatt Hotels                                            Walt Disney World
J. Alexander’s Restaurants                              Wegman’s
Kimpton Hotel Group                                     White Lodging
Longhorn Steakhouse




                                                       36
 SECTION D


    HRIM
Student Services




                   37
                             HRIM Student Organizations

Penn State Hotel and Restaurant Society
PSHRS is the umbrella student organization in the School of Hospitality Management. All students upon their entry
into the program become members and may continue as a member of the alumni chapter of this group upon
graduation. The purpose of the organization is to unite and build closer fellowship among the students, alumni, and
faculty of the school with the objectives of strengthening all the professions of the program and building the
reputation of the school. Student members can be active in any of the committees of the club: education, alumni
relations, social, fundraising, and community service. This organization provides trips to the International Hotel-
Motel and Restaurant Show in New York and National Restaurant Show in Chicago. This chapter’s affiliation with
the national alumni group gives students contacts with outstanding professionals in the field. For more information,
please contact the faculty advisors, Mr. Peter Regopoulos (pcr11@psu.edu), 221 Mateer Building, 814-867-
2298, or Mr. Jeff Heim (jvh4@psu.edu), 230 Mateer Building, 814-865-7990.



Casino Management Club

This organization is student run and driven to provide opportunities to experience the casino industry as a part of
management. Participation in industry trade shows, field trips to major gaming markets, production of casino nights,
speakers series, and professional networking opportunities are among the activities planned by the Casino
Management Club. For more information, please contact Adam Schaum, President, ats200@psu.edu, or Steve
Durham, faculty advisor (std10@psu.edu).



Club Managers Association of America
Student members of the Club Managers Association of America are interested in the leading private clubs in
America. The organization’s purpose is to promote networking with club managers and to encourage the education
and advancement of CMAA student members. The CMAA sponsors trips to clubs in the central Pennsylvania
chapter to explore and collect information about this aspect of the hospitality industry. For more information, please
contact the faculty advisor, Mr. Paul Howard (paulhoward@psu.edu), 217A Mateer Building, 814-574-9850.



Eta Sigma Delta – By invitation only
This HRIM honor society attempts to develop the professionalism of the individual student in HRIM and to advance
the segment of the industry related to travel, tourism, food and beverage management, and hospitality management.
The society fosters the growth of knowledge in the HRIM field and promotes contact between members of the
industry and the student body. Eligibility is based on individual student achievement. For more information, please
contact the faculty advisor, Dr. John O’Neill (jwo3@psu.edu), 233 Mateer Building, 814-863-8984.




                                                         38
Hotel Sales and Marketing Association
The Hotel Sales and Marketing Association was developed for those HRIM students interested in marketing sales.
One of the great learning experiences that HSMA offers to its members is the “sales blitz.” In a sales blitz, students
can actively participate in telemarketing as well as on-site calls. Meetings include guest speakers and discussion of
current issues of the field. For more information, please contact the faculty advisor, Dr. David Cranage
(dac2@psu.edu), 218 Mateer Building, 814-863-0296.



National Society for Minorities in Hospitality
This student organization fosters professional networking and diversity among its members at Penn State and the
founding chapter at Cornell University. For more information, please contact, Ms. Rosemarie Hibbler
(rqh7@psu.edu), 229 Mateer Building, 814-863-1448.



Professional Convention Management Association (PCMA)

The principle purpose of the student chapter of PCMA is to familiarize its members with the basic aspects of the
meetings and conventions field through educational and networking opportunities supported or developed by the
Professional Convention Management Association and its members.

Hospitality Finance and Technology Professionals

    The Hospitality Finance and Technology Professionals equips the future graduate and manager with the requisite
finance and technology insights as well as professional development. Students are provided with cutting edge
information and use of today’s technology and financial tools. No student dues are required. For more information,
please contact, Mr. Peter Nyheim (pdn1@psu.edu), 226 Mateer Building, 865-9012 or Mr. Jeff Heim
(jvh4@psu.edu), 230 Mateer Building, 865-7990.

The Penn State Catering Society

Student members of The Penn State Catering Society are interested in learning to plan and carry out successful
catered events. The student’s growth will include development in the following areas.

·       Constructing an effective management team
·       One on one customer meetings
·       Food product purchasing
·       Effective timelines
·       Proper event staffing
·       Actual service of specific catered events

For more information, please contact the faculty advisor, Mr. Jeff Boggie (qzx1@psu.edu) 209 Mateer Building,
814-863-3370.

                                                         39
School of Hospitality Management International Club (SHMIC)

The aim of the International Club is to foster and promote a greater international cultural understanding within the
School of Hospitality Management. Students involved in this group will have the opportunity to open themselves
and others to the many benefits of sharing and appreciating the nuances of different cultures and prepare themselves
for working in a global industry. Students in this club will support the Study Abroad and International Programs of
the SHM by planning and conducting culinary, dance, and other suitable activities and events. The Club will
actively contact and network with corporate officers with International Development of various hospitality
organizations. Additionally, this club is interested in establishing an international service component in the coming
semesters. For more information, please contact the faculty advisor, Dr. Karthik Namasivayam
(kun1@psu.edu), 216 Mateer Building, 814-863-9774.


Spa Professionals Association

Student members of the Spa Professionals Association are interested in issues specifically related to spa
management in a hotel or club context. The organization’s purpose is to promote networking with spa directors and
to encourage the education and advancement of future spa managers. Club topics include financial management for
spas, industry-specific human resources practices, spa ownership, and spa treatment modalities. For more
information, please contact the graduate advisor, Lydia Hanks, (luh138@psu.edu) 201 Mateer Bldg.

Women's Leadership Initiative – Application/Invitation required

Female students from all departments in the College of Health and Human Development can participate in a 12-
month interdisciplinary, extracurricular program, in their junior year. The goal of the WLI is to create opportunities
for women students to observe, interact with and learn from outstanding established leaders, and to facilitate the
process of developing philosophies and individualized plans for becoming tomorrow's leaders.

The program includes:

         weekend workshops
         monthly seminars to observe and learn from outstanding leaders
         observations of and discussions about leadership in action
         selected readings for discussion, observation, and experimentation
         Annual PA Governor’s Conference for Women
         mentoring with alumnae leaders
         Service learning project

For more information, please contact, Dr. Abby Diehl (agc105@psu.edu), 201 Henderson Building, 863-2207.




                                                      40
Scholarships and Awards Available to Students in the
                     School of Hospitality Management
Scholarships and awards are available annually to qualified students in the School of Hospitality   Management.
Scholarships qualifications include: academic merit, need, promise, and leadership in the field of hospitality
management. Students enrolled in the College of Health and Human Development, and School of Hospitality
Management will be considered for scholarships and awards.

To be eligible for internal scholarships, you must: 1) complete the scholarships application on the HHD website
and 2) complete the FAFSA application as early as possible. The FAFSA form is available at
http://www.fafsa.ed.gov. Some scholarships may require additional information such as resumes, letters of
reference, or essays.

Other scholarships and awards are available at Penn State. Students should contact the Office of Student Aid in
314 Shields Building (814-865-6301). Information about national and international competitions, scholarships and
awards can be found at the University Fellowships Office, 212 Boucke Building (814-863-8199) or on the web at
http://www.ufo.psu.edu.




                                                      41
SECTION E

 Advising
Information




    42
                                   Advising Information
The College of Health and Human Development recognizes the crucial role of advising for undergraduate students
and views advising as an important aspect of the professional responsibilities of faculty. The HHD student support
center system provides maximum academic support for the students enrolled in the College, as well as for
prospective students. On behalf of the Dean’s Office, and the HRIM department, Mr. David Rachau provides
consultations and “Dean’s signature” for pre-major HRIM students and HRIM students regarding:


    •   Distance Education

    •   Faculty Senate Petitions

    •   Reinstatement to Degree Status

    •   Re-enrollment to HRIM Status

    •   Leave of Absence

    •   Withdrawal from the University

    •   Deferred Grades

    •   Academic Renewal

    •   HRIM Schedule Planning

    •   Transfer Course Evaluation




Mr. Rachau is available by appointment in 212 Mateer Building to assist with the procedures listed above. Please
call 814-865-2156 to schedule an appointment. Mr. Rachau advises all pre-major students with the intentions of
declaring the HRIM major.

Each student, once in the HRIM major, is assigned a faculty advisor who will assist the student in his/her academic
plan of study and with registration for classes. Faculty advisors have a wealth of information to provide about the
hospitality industry and can offer guidance on career paths. Faculty advisors also maintain very strong ties to
professionals in the hospitality industry and often are able to assist students in finding summer employment,
internships, and positions upon graduation. Your faculty advisor is generally the first person you should see in the
event you have a question or need advice. You can contact your advisor via phone, e-mail, or visit their office
during posted office hours. Your advisor’s name and email address appear on the first page of your HRIM degree
audit.

We strongly recommend that you get to know your faculty advisor. Your advisor is your contact person and it is
his/her goal to help you in any way possible.




                                                        43
               Additional Information is Available from:
Mr. David Rachau, Academic Advisor
School of Hospitality Management Advising Center, 212 Mateer Building
814-865-7033    dqr5@psu.edu


Dr. Albert Bartlett, Associate Director and Undergraduate Professor-in-Charge
School of Hospitality Management, 201F Mateer Building
814-863-7443    bartb@psu.edu


Ms. Brenda Condo, Undergraduate Program Specialist
School of Hospitality Management, 201K Mateer Building
814-867-2170    blc20@psu.edu


Ms. Rosemarie Hibbler, Coordinator for Career Placement and Advising
School of Hospitality Management, 229 Mateer Building
814-863-1448    rqh7@psu.edu


Mr. Jeff Heim, Internship Coordinator
School of Hospitality Management, 230 Mateer Building
814-865-7990    jvh4@psu.edu


Dr. Karthik Namasivayam, International Programs Professor-in-Charge
School of Hospitality Management, 216 Mateer Building
814-863-9774    kun1@psu.edu



Dr. Breffni Noone Honors Advisor

School of Hospitality Management, 215 Mateer Building

814-865-7128    bmn2@psu.edu


Dr. Hubert Van Hoof, Director
School of Hospitality Management, 201E Mateer Building,
814-863-0009    hbv1@psu.edu



                                                     44
                                               201 Mateer Building
                                                  (814) 865-1853
                                     Dr. Hubert B. Van Hoof, Director




                               This publication is available in alternative media on request.


The Pennsylvania State University is committed to affirmative action, equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workforce.

								
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