beautiful - PowerPoint by zhangyun

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									Using Non-Print Texts
and Argument to Teach
Difficult Text
    Sara Spachman  English Teacher
    Curie Metro High School  Chicago, IL
“It was the eve of Progress-Stage Six, and
the daily message had prescribed Stage Five
Ecstasy Formula. Everyone, from 000 to
999, in Community Home 8051, for
Premating Males in Progress-Stage Five,
was experiencing the formula‟s balanced
emotional heightening. Everyone, that is,
except G17-AZ(q):444,801,735, category
male, known familiarly as 735.”


                      -- from “Beautiful, Beautiful, Beautiful”
   Helping the Reader Succeed
Pre-Reading
 – Front-load key concepts and terminology*
                                  *(similar to PreP activity)

 – Tap into visualization before reading through
   pictures; this can give students who will
   struggle “seeing” something difficult or foreign
   a jump start
   • Key Point: Remember your audience! Incorporate
     pictures that reflect your students‟ knowledge-base
     and interests. Pick words/phrases with which they
     are already comfortable.
       Photo-Word Montage
 Which pictures/words don’t “belong”?

                 perfection




               utopia         beautiful




 made for
each other
Which pictures/words don’t seem to
             “belong?”
         Anyone pick:
• Even though some seem to go together better
  than others, all the words and photos in the
  montage are related to the story we‟ll be
  reading.
• Take another look at the montage. This time,
  make a prediction about what the story will be
  about.
Make a prediction about the story:

               perfection




             utopia         beautiful




 made for
each other
          Students’ Predictions

• A prediction from Robert, a student who always
  wants to “get it,” but often has to try and try and
  try again: “I think the story is about a world full
  of perfection. The people will probably be
  obsessed with their looks, plastic surgery and
  botox, face lifts, and adult problems like my
  favorite TV show Nip Tuck.”
          Students’ Predictions

• A prediction from Krista, a shy student who
  often “gets it” but has difficulty expressing
  herself: “This story is going to be about a utopia
  that is perfect and everyone is beautiful. There
  happen to be a few who are not as beautiful
  and who are miss fits in the utopia, they don‟t
  belong there.”
          Students’ Predictions

• A prediction from William, an ELL student who
  has trouble motivating himself to do anything
  that doesn‟t involve a computer: “It‟s going to be
  making people „perfect‟ and keep everyone
  happy. It‟s going to have no conflicts and make
  some people look like other people.”
    Helping the Reader Succeed
• During Reading
  –Don‟t forget pre-reading work!
    • Whenever possible, re-visit pre-reading materials to
      maintain, increase, or change students‟ comprehension.

  –Add steps to the reading process that
   promote “conflict” and use of the text.
    • Honor all interpretations that are supportable and prompt
      students to be the “checks” on others‟ interpretations and
      (mis)readings.
Which picture/word fits this paragraph?
 “It was the eve of Progress-Stage Six, and the daily
 message had prescribed Stage Five Ecstasy
 Formula. Everyone, from 000 to 999, in
 Community Home 8051, for Premating Males in
 Progress-Stage Five, was experiencing the
 formula‟s balanced emotional heightening.
 Everyone, that is, except G17-AZ(q):444,801,735,
 category male, known familiarly as 735. 735 stood
 in a small, mirrored, harshly lighted meditation
 chamber, cut off from the goodness of the
 Community Mind. Under the plastiskin contours of
 his perfect features he felt a flush of shame on his
 own imperfect face; he couldn‟t master the
 formula.”
                            -- from “Beautiful, Beautiful, Beautiful”
Which picture/word fits this paragraph?

                 perfection




               utopia         beautiful




 made for
each other
   Helping the Reader Succeed


• More During Reading
 – Tap into the power of peer collaboration.
   Utilize pairs or small groups.
   • Take about 2 minutes to read the next
     paragraph. Pick a picture or word from the
     montage that “fits” that paragraph and discuss
     your choice with a partner.
   Helping the Reader Succeed

• Even More During Reading
 – Create opportunities for students to approach
   a text in multiple ways. This can involve:
   • Taking a classmate‟s interpretation they don‟t
     agree with and finding evidence to support it.
   • Taking on the POV of a character in the story and
     trying to understand things from his/her
     perspective.
Half-Way Point: A Quick POV Activity

•   Half-way through the story (to the   ) I
    asked my students to get into the mindset of
    the main character, category male 735.
    – Based on what you understand about 735 at this
      point, choose a picture from the montage that
      captures how he‟s thinking and/or feeling.
What my students had to say:

               Laurel picked this
               picture because
               “Even though he
               looks good, he isn‟t
               feeling good. The
               ugliness he felt [at the
               beginning of the
               story] hasn‟t gone
               away. It‟s worse
               now.”
What my students had to say:

               Robert picked
               Antonio Banderas
               because “both 735
               and Antonio seem to
               be having deep, dark
               thoughts. And
               Antonio looks as
               though he‟s searching
               for something, just
               like 735.”
        Reinforcing “Predicting”

• Also at this point in the story, I asked my
  students to make a new prediction, this time
  about what will happen to category male 735.
  – From Jessica: “I believe that 735 will try and make
    everything be unperfect so that he does not feel like
    an outcast and can be able to [feel] let in.”
  – From Robert: “By the end of the story I think that
    735 will finally solve the mystery with [female] 735,
    and he will forget about the perfect world.”
   Helping the Reader Succeed
Post-Reading
 – Follow through! Give students a chance to
   reflect using steps and materials used in
   previous parts of the process. Possibilities:
   •   Students can craft statements including the phrase
       “Beautiful, beautiful, beautiful” that express male and
       female 735s‟ sentiments about those words. Then
       students can argue about whether the 735s‟ thinking
       was “right.”
   •   Students can create a new montage of their own that
       better reflects the end of the story.
       Students’ Post-Reading

From Robert: “The couple 735 believes that
non-perfection is beautiful, beautiful, beautiful.
The way I see was that since the two weren‟t
perfect, they still had each other and that meant
the world to them. Even though their home was
washed away and they were hungry, just
because you aren‟t perfect [doesn‟t mean] you
can‟t still be happy. And to 735 and 735 the
last thing in their minds was „perfection.‟ But it
was still good.”
       Students’ Post-Reading
From Alexandria (who swore on her life that she
just “didn‟t get this story”): “I agree that
imperfection is beautiful, beautiful, beautiful. I
agree with this because if everyone looked the
same and was perfect, they really wouldn‟t stick
out as being beautiful. I think that beautiful is
when there is something about you that sticks
out, is noticeable, or is unique. So if people
have imprefections like 735, they are beautiful
because they are striking and not like the next
person.”
       Students’ Post-Reading

From William: “I said that the 735 characters
thought that everything was beautiful. By that I
mean that they both thought each and every
thing about themselves and others was unique
and wonderful in their own way.”
        Students’ Post-Reading
From Benjamin: “My statement was that the couple
735 believes that imperfections make people beautiful.
I slightly agree with this statement because
imperfections make people unique in their own way.
[However,] the ugliest person in the world will not go
out with someone who is only slightly better looking
than him… People want to end up with someone
beautiful, someone that looks hot. I also guess that it
comes down to what your likes are. Some person‟s
imperfect person might be another‟s most beautiful
person. So imperfection is beautiful but you have to
find the kind of imperfect for you.”
• “Beautiful, Beautiful, Beautiful” by Stuart
  Friedman can be found in:
  – Worlds of Tomorrow, ed. August Derleth, Pellegrini
    Cudahy 1953.
  – Fifty Short Science Fiction Tales, ed. Isaac Asimov
    & Groff Conklin, Collier Books 1963.
  – Worlds of Tomorrow, ed. August Derleth, Four
    Square Books 1963.
Our PowerPoint presentations can be accessed
on-line through the following website:

        http://www.spachman.net




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