Llc Agreement Spanish by qms15118

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									CSUSM Spanish 201, Spring 2008, Prof. Besosa
Prerequisite: 2 years of high school Spanish or 102 college-level equivalent

Sections:
SPAN              INTERMEDIATE
            22316                        3      1130-1245      MW     MARK 213
201(10)           SPANISH I
SPAN              INTERMEDIATE
            22510                        3      1300-1415      MW     MARK 211
201(08)           SPANISH I
SPAN              INTERMEDIATE
            22234                        3      1430-1545      MW     MARK 304
201(04)           SPANISH I
SPAN              INTERMEDIATE
            22504                        3      1300-1415       TR    MARK 211
201(12)           SPANISH I


Instructor: Mayra Besosa – mbesosa@csusm.edu
Office hours: MW 4:00-5:00 & TTh 12:00-1:00, MH 242

Important Web Pages:
http://courses.csusm.edu/span201mb - class page
http://www.colby.edu/~bknelson/exercises/index.html - Colby grammar
exercises
http://www.csusm.edu/ocsl/ - Office of Community Service Learning
http://lynx.csusm.edu/llc/ - Language Learning Center, UNIV 240/260
(information on typing accent marks, etc., and on free tutoring)

I Class Goals

The National Standards for Foreign Language Education recommend what
students “should know and be able to do” when learning a foreign language.
Recognizing that language and communication are central to the human
experience, the standards point to the need to educate “students who are
linguistically and culturally equipped to communicate in a pluralistic American
society and abroad.” This class aims to help you develop as a student of
language and culture in the five different skills identified by the Standards:

    Communication – You should be able to…
     …engage in conversations, provide and obtain information,
     express feelings and emotions, and exchange opinions;
     …understand and interpret written and spoken language on a
     variety of topics;
     …present information, concepts, and ideas to an audience of listeners
           or readers on a variety of topics.

       Cultures – You should be able to…
        …demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the
        practices and perspectives of the cultures studied;
        …demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between the
        products and perspectives of the cultures studied.

       Connections – You should be able to…
        …reinforce and further (your) knowledge of other disciplines through
        the foreign language;
        …acquire information and recognize the distinctive viewpoints that
        are only available through the foreign language and its cultures.

       Comparisons – You should be able to…
        …demonstrate understanding of the nature of language through
        comparisons of the language studied and (your) own;
        …demonstrate understanding of the concept of culture through
        comparisons of the cultures studied and (your) own.

       Communities – You should be able to…
        …use the language both within and beyond the school setting;
        …show evidence of life-long learning for personal enjoyment and
        enrichment.1

As a teacher, I seek to provide opportunities inside and outside the classroom
that will help you accomplish these goals. Most importantly, your experience of
the class should result in learning that is significant to you, that makes a
difference to your own life. The standards are not prescriptive and, thus,
recognize that individuals learn differently, according to factors such as their
own interests, abilities, understanding, and personal experiences. My expectation
is not that all students learn the same things, but, rather, that each student is able
to demonstrate what he/she has learned. If language and communication are
about human experience, then – even with the natural challenges of learning
(and teaching, for me) -, this class should be overall enriching and enjoyable for
us all.

II Structure

      Two award-winning films provide us with multiple themes
      which contextualize the grammar, vocabulary and cultures

1
    http://www.actfl.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3392
   to be studied in this class:

   María, llena eres de gracia (Colombia/USA, 2004, drama, Marston)

   Diarios de motocicleta (Argentina, Chile, Peru, 2004, biography/drama,
   Salles)

   WARNING: The films will be watched in an “episodic” fashion
   throughout the term, not straight through in one sitting as at the movies or
   at home! 

The course is divided into 2 UNITS, each focusing on particular grammatical
concepts. The vocabulary for each unit will include vocabulary from Plazas.

Unit 1, María, llena eres de gracia
   review of present tense
   review of formal commands
   common uses of por and para

Unit 2, Diarios de motocicleta
   present subjunctive mood
   future tense
   conditional mood

A review of the present tense and formal commands will lay the foundation for
and make for an easy transition to the study of the present subjunctive. The
review is necessary since – after focusing on the past tense during Spanish 102 or
the equivalent, or after a break from Spanish -, many students forget the present
and command forms. The subjunctive is used to express subjectivity (volition,
expectation, emotion, opinion), rather than to make statements of fact.

Expect the class to be highly interactive, with daily pair and/or group activities,
including role-playing around simulated real-life situations.

Check the Class Schedule/Agenda de Clase for your section regularly on the
class website, http://courses.csusm.edu/span201mb , since it will provide and
update all information regarding class work, including point-worth and due
date. Expect changes to the schedule.
III Books

Cinema for Spanish Conversation, 2nd edition, Focus Publishing/R. Pullins Co.
Quick Fix Spanish Grammar, Teach Yourself
Plazas, 2nd edition, Heinle & Heinle Publishers (support material)
Spanish Verb Tenses, Passport Books (optional)

IV Course Work At-A-Glance and Weights in Points

The course activities are ways for you to demonstrate your proficiency in the
areas identified by the National Standards for Foreign Language Education. They
include a department-mandated comprehensive final exam.




See explanations following the outline below. I recommend printing out this
outline, checking off the class activities as you complete them, and recording
your points.

Cinema for Spanish Conversation
   María llena eres de gracia – exercises pp. 61-65, except Investigación………… 10
   Diarios de motocicleta – exercises pp. 87-95, except Investigación…………….. 20
3-Film “Lab” or 10-hour Service Learning………………………………………. 30
End-of-Semester Class/Service Learning Reflection………………………… 5
Colby.edu Grammar Exercises
   Present tense…………………………………………………………………….. 10
   Ud.–commands………………………………………………………………… 5
   Present subjunctive…………………………………………………………….. 10
Quick Fix Spanish Grammar Units (2 pts. ea.)………………………………….. 40
   Numbers – Unit 10
   Numbers above 200 – Unit 11
     PRESENT TENSE
     Regular verbs – Unit 38
     Funny first persons – Unit 39
     Spelling changes – Unit 40
     Ser and estar – Unit 41
     Ser and estar with adjectives – Unit 42
     Radical changing verbs – Unit 44
     Reflexive verbs – Unit 45
     More on reflexive verbs – Unit 46
     Gustar – Unit 48
     Saber and conocer – Unit 80

     Direct object pronouns – Unit 28
     Indirect object pronouns – Unit 29

     Para – Unit 84
     Por – Unit 85

     PRESENT SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD & UD.-COMMANDS
     Units 64, 65, 66, 67, 71

     The Future Tense – Units 56, 57
     The Conditional Tense – Unit 58

2 Quizzes…………………………………………………………………………….. 20
Midterm……………………………………………………………………………… 25
Final Exam…………………………………………………………………………… 50
Composition
   Rough draft………………………………………………………………...…….. 5
   Final draft………………………………………………………………………… 10
2 Brief Letters……………………………………………………………………….. 10
2 Group Orals………………………………………………………………………. 20
2 Mini Group Projects…………………………………………………………….. 10
Miscellaneous Homework………………………………………………………… 10
In-Class Participation……………………………………………………………… 10

TOTAL POINTS………………………………………………………………….. 300
Extra Credit…………………………………………………………………………. (20)

V Point-Based Final Grade Scale

A                                              280 – 300+
A-                                             270 – 279
B+                                              262 - 269
B                                               250 - 261
B-                                              240 - 249
C+                                              231 - 239
C                                               210 - 230 (passing)
D+                                              201 - 209
D                                               192 - 200
D-                                              180 - 191
F                                                 0 - 179
I

Reasons for an Incomplete (I) must be justified. Students are given a deadline to
complete the requirement/s or the “I” reverts to the recorded grade. (General
Catalog, p. 74) This option is available only to students with a C average at the
time the “I” is issued or with special circumstances discussed with me. Students
must sign an Authorized Incomplete Agreement, in which I indicate the work
that needs to be completed in order to receive a grade in the class.

VI Films for Class and for 3-Film “Lab” Option

The following films contained in Cinema for Spanish Conversation are on reserve
at the Media Library, 2nd floor Kellogg:

El Norte (R)
Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios (R)
Como agua para chocolate (R)
Danzón (PG-13)
La ciudad y los perros (unrated)
La historia oficial (R)
Fresa y chocolate (R)
Belle époque (R)
¡Ay, Carmela! (PG-13)
Todo sobre mi madre (R)
Todos somos estrellas (PG-13)                              El Norte

I have copies of the following films in my office at MH 242:

Belle époque (R)
Todo sobre mi madre (R)
Nueva Yol (PG-13)
Guantanamera (unrated)
El Norte (R)
Caballos salvajes (unrated)
Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios (R)
La historia oficial (R)
Fresa y chocolate (R)
Mar adentro (R)

R-rated films contain scenes with “strong” language, violence and/or graphic sex.
See page xii of Cinema for general information.

Cinema for Spanish Conversation questions for the 2 class films should be turned
in on loose-leaf paper or as a copy of the book pages. I do not recommend tearing
off the pages. Even when exercises are completed as a group, students must write
and turn in individual copies.

Students choosing the 3-film “lab” option should watch their first film with their
oral presentation groups, since the first oral will be a film review (or a Service
Learning report). The other two films may be watched individually. For each film,
complete the following activities in Cinema for Spanish Conversation:

      Preparación
      Antes de ver la película
      Exploración
      Análisis y contraste cultural

VII 10-Hour Service Learning Option

The Service Learning option offers an opportunity to use the language beyond
the school setting.

Students who choose to participate in the CSUSM Service Learning program will
complete 10 hrs. of community-based volunteer work at a site of their choice,
where Spanish is used at least 70% of the time. You may volunteer additional
hours for extra credit at 1 credit per hour.

At the Office of Community Service Learning webpage,
http://www.csusm.edu/ocsl/, read “A Guide to CSL” and “Information for
Students.” For sites already approved by the OCSL, see “Agency Database” and
“School Districts.” This option will be explained in class.

VIII End-of-Semester Class/Service Learning Reflection

Fill out the End-of-Semester Reflection handout available on the class webpage,
http://courses.csusm.edu/span201mb. Attach a typed reflection in English on
what you have learned in class or through Service Learning, using the questions
given as a guide.

Additional questions for a Service Learning reflection can be found at:
http://www.csusm.edu/ocsl/The%20Guide/MATERIAL%20FOR%20NEW%20
HANDBOOK.pdf

IX Colby.edu and Quick Fix Grammar Exercises

http://www.colby.edu/~bknelson/exercises/index.html
The exercises, point-worth, and due dates will appear on the Class Schedule.
Print out the Colby exercises, hand-write your answers, and turn them in, or do
them on loose-leaf paper.

Turn in the Quick Fix exercises on loose-leaf paper.

X Quizzes, Midterm and Comprehensive Final Exam

Quizzes and exams will be organized in sections of 10 points. Full-statement and
essay-type items will be assessed according to the composition assessment
rubric. Other items will be graded quantitatively. Specific quiz, midterm and
final exam content and will be announced in class and posted on the Class
Schedule/Agenda de Clase.

XI Composition

The composition must consist of 275-300 words, typed in double space. Instructions
and topic options (which will relate to the class films) will be announced in class.
Students will first submit a rough draft for a maximum of 5 points given on the basis
of how well it meets the following criteria: (1) fulfills the requirements and (2) errors
are infrequent. Any composition that does not fulfill the requirements will have to
be rewritten in order to obtain credit.

Composition Assessment Rubric

9 – 10: The written work…
           - demonstrates a sophisticated understanding/command of the language
             and of the topic addressed
           - expresses ideas in a highly effective and exceptionally clear manner
           - is easy to follow
           - meets the requirements of the assignment
7 - 8: The written work…
           - demonstrates a good understanding/command of the language
             and of the topic addressed
           - expresses ideas in a generally effective and clear manner
           - is easy to follow
           - meets the requirements of the assignment

5 – 6: The written work…
          - demonstrates adequate understanding/command of the language
            and of the topic addressed
          - expresses ideas in a somewhat effective and clear manner
          - is somewhat difficult to follow
          - meets the requirements of the assignment

3 – 4: The written work…
          - demonstrates a limited understanding/command of the language
            and of the topic addressed
          - expresses ideas in an ineffective and unclear manner
          - is difficult to follow
          - meets the requirements of the assignment

0 - 2: The written work…
           - is not done, is incomplete and/or does not meet the requirements of the
             assignment

XII Two Brief Letters

These are to be typed in double space. If indicated by the professor, corrections will
have to be made in order to obtain credit. The letters will be addressed to characters
in the class films.

XIII Group Oral Presentations

(You have the option of presenting individual orals.)

The orals will consist of the following:

   Oral 1: review of a film viewed outside of class
   OR report on Service Learning volunteer work

   Oral 2: movie awards - nominations for best film, best actor, best actress, etc.,
   including the 3 class films
I will establish minimum requirements. The orals will be evaluated by the
groups, except regarding criterion #5, which I will rate. The scores will be
averaged. The class may decide to modify the criteria below. Each criterion is
scored from 0 to 2 points.

1. CLARITY
   We understood the presentation.
    0-1-2
2. VOCABULARY
    The vocabulary was varied, appropriate and specific to the topic.
    0-1-2
3. INTEREST LEVEL
    The presentation was interesting, focused, and not repetitive.
    0-1-2
4. FORM/STYLE
    The group used visual aides in a way that enhanced, rather than
    obstructed, the communication of ideas.
    0-1-2
5. REQUIREMENTS
    The presentation met the requirements established by the professor.
    0-1-2


XIV Two Mini Group Projects

These will likely consist of two posters/brief presentations,
a promotion for a film and an itinerary for a trip through
one of the South American countries explored through the
class films. The groups will work on these mini projects during class.

XV Miscellaneous Homework

Homework will be posted daily on the on-line class schedule. Assignments
indicating “correcciones,” need to be corrected prior to being recorded.
Homework will not be accepted after 1 day of class late (un día de gracia).

XVI In-Class Participation

This part of the grade is discretionary. Regularly, groups will report on paper
their in-class participation.
XVII Extra Credit (10 pts. max.)

Any out-of-class activity in which you participate that involves Spanish or
Hispanic culture, may be considered for extra credit. For example, you may
watch additional films in Spanish. The instructor will plan and suggest other
activities during the semester.

You may also complete additional grammar exercises in the optional workbook
Spanish Verb Tenses, in Quick Fix Spanish Grammar, or in Plazas for ½ - 2 extra
credit points per individual exercise. The relevant sections in these books are
listed below.

Present indicative
  SVT – Part I, Units 2, 4, 6, 8 / Plazas - Chapters 1 - 5
Formal commands
  SVT – Part III, Unit 1: III-1-2, III-1-5, III-1-6, III-1-7, III-1-8, III-1-11, III-1-12 /
Plazas - Chapter 9
Present subjunctive
  SVT – Part III, Unit 2 / Plazas – Chapters 11 - 12
Future
  SVT – Part II, Unit 3 / Plazas - Chapter 14
Conditional
  SVT– Part II, Unit 4 / Plazas - Chapter 14

You are welcome to work on other tenses, such as preterit and imperfect. You
can find exercises in both Spanish Verb Tenses, Quick Fix Spanish Grammar and
Plazas:

Preterit
   SVT – Part II, Unit 1 / Plazas – Chapters 6 & 7 / Quick Fix Units 51-53
Imperfect
   SVT – Part II, Unit 2 / Plazas - Chapters 7 & 8 / Quick Fix Units 54-55

Provide some proof of having done the extra credit activities. You may use the
Extra Credit Record sheet provided on the class webpage and turn this in at the
end of the semester.

XVIII Make-up Work

I reserve the right to allow make-up work. Please email or talk to me regarding
the special circumstances that justify an extension.
XIX Academic Honesty

Students are expected to adhere to standards of academic honesty and integrity,
as outlined in the Student Academic Honesty Policy. All written and oral
presentation assignments must be original work. All ideas/material borrowed
from other sources must have appropriate references to original sources. Any
quoted material should give credit to the source and be punctuated with
quotation marks. Students are responsible for honest completion of their work
including exams. The instructor reserves the right to discipline any student for
academic dishonesty, in accordance with the general rules and regulations of the
university. Disciplinary action may include the lowering of grades and/or the
assignment of a failing grade for an exam, an assignment, or the class as a whole.
Students have the right to challenge a grade and to file a complaint with the
Dean of Students.

XX Students with Disabilities

Students with disabilities who require reasonable accommodation must be
approved for services by providing appropriate and recent documentation to the
Office of Disabled Student Services (DSS). Students authorized by DSS to receive
such accommodations should meet with me during my office hours in order to
ensure confidentiality.

XXI The Language Learning Center

http://lynx.csusm.edu/llc/ - Language Learning Center, UNIV 240/260
The LLC offers free tutoring and language software.
For information on tutoring hours and to make appointments, contact the LLC.




                             ¡Bienvenido(a)!
          PLEASE COMPLETE THIS FORM AND TURN IT IN TO ME.


___ I have read the syllabus and understand the class requirements.

___ I have read the syllabus and have the following question(s)/suggestion(s)/
comment(s):



___ I make the commitment to be “on task” and communicate in Spanish in class
to the best of my ability, especially during pair/group activities designed for
conversation.

___ I make the commitment to not copy the answers when I do the Colby
    and Quick Fix exercises, but to only do so when correcting my work.

___ Because I did not take Spanish 102 at CSUM, I am attaching proof of having
met the prerequisite at another institution. (If this is problematic, please talk to
me.)


Name: _______________________________

Signature: ____________________________

Class:   11:30 MW     1:00 MW     2:30 MW     1:00 TTh
                          Film as a Pedagogical (Teaching) Tool


  Film is an effective tool for critical pedagogy, because it engages students as
  active and critical learners. Also, film represents what in the language
  acquisition hypothesis would be considered “meaningful input” because,
  through film, students experience language in real communication, thereby
  developing linguistic ability in the “natural” way; that is, subconsciously.

         Language is best taught when it is being used to transmit messages, not
         when it is explicitly taught for conscious meaning.*

  This is why language programs promote learning through immersion, for
  example through study abroad, and why texts include video as an ancillary
  (or like Destinos and French in Action are totally video-based).

  In her article “Teaching Culture and Improving Language Skills through a
  Cinematic Lens,” Prof. Julie Stephens points out the harmonious
  relationship between critical pedagogy and language acquisition theory:

         Film, with its ability to pack a two-hour period with plot, emotion, drama,
         events, images, and ideas, draws attention uniquely to ethical boundaries,
         conceptual frameworks, national memory and identity and, significantly,
         to the use of language and idioms.**




------------------------------------------

 * Krashen, Stephen D. & Terrell, Tracy D. The Natural Approach. Pergamon Press/Alemany
Press, 1983, p. 55.
** Stephens, Julie L. “Teaching Culture and Improving Language Skills through a Cinematic
Lens.” Association of Departments of Foreign Languages Bulletin, 33 no. 1, fall 2001, pp. 22-25.

								
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