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PSY Psychology of Adolescence and Adulthood

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					             PSY 3540 Psychology of Adolescence and Adulthood
                      Spring 2008, Department of Psychology, CUHK

                              Prof. Catherine McBride-Chang

         Lectures:        F6-7 (Fridays, 1:30p.m. – 3:15p.m.)              ELB 403
         Tutorials:     T3-4 (Tuesdays, 10:30p.m. – 12:15p.m.)             CKB UG05


1. Course Description: What is this course about?

   This course is intended to provide a broad overview of adolescent and adult development.
   Psychological aspects of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development will be considered
   in relation to development from adolescence into old age. Cultural aspects of lifespan
   development will also be integrated into the lifespan development perspective.

2. Learning Approach: How will this course help you to learn about the psychology
   of adolescence and adulthood?

   Learning objectives include recognizing, recalling, and comprehending key terms and theories
   in developmental psychology, applying theories and concepts to “real world” scenarios,
   analyzing and synthesizing competing ideas within the field, and evaluating how current ideas
   about adolescent and adult development relate to your own life and future. You will also be
   asked to integrate some of this knowledge in a research project you design.

3. Prerequisites: What prior knowledge/coursework do you need before taking this
   course?

   Prior successful completion of PSY1000 / UGC258S / GEE258S is a requirement for this class.

4. Contact Information of Teaching Members

   Lecturers
   Prof. Catherine McBride-Chang
   Office         : SB Rm. 359
   Telephone      : 2609-6576
   Email          : cmcbride@psy.cuhk.edu.hk
   Office hours : By appointment

   Teaching Assistants
   Mr. Tony Cheng                                   Ms. Shelley X. L. Tong
   Office       : SB Rm. 351                        Office        : SB Rm. 326A
   Telephone    : 2609-6521                         Telephone     : 3163-4379
   Email        : tthcheng@psy.cuhk.edu.hk          Email         : xltong@psy.cuhk.edu.hk
   Office hours : Monday, 1:00 p.m.-3: 00 p.m.      Office hours : Tuesday, 2:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
                  or by appointment                                 or by appointment




                                                                                           Page 1
5. Course Content
     Topic                                   Contents / fundamental concepts
     Theories of Development                 Bronfenbrenner, Erikson, epigenetic programs, ages,
                                             roles
     Physical maturation & sexuality         Causes and consequences of physical maturation;
                                             dating and sexuality in adolescence
     Peer relationships                      Friends vs. peers, victims and bullies
     Adolescents & the Family                Parenting style, family configurations, siblings, abuse
                                             in the family
     Risk-taking behavior and deviancy       Definitions of deviance, risk-taking theories,
     in adolescence                          depression, drug use, suicide ideation, aggression
     Cognitive abilities in adolescence      Moral development, Piaget’s formal operations,
     and adulthood                           beyond formal operational thinking
     Marriage and partnerships               Married and single life, divorce, gay/lesbian couples
     Parenting                               Reasons to become parents, arguments for
                                             childlessness, changes with children
     Work                                    Super’s lifespan theory of work, building a career
     Health and personality throughout       Stress, gender differences and similarities across the
     the life span; sex differences and      lifespan, personality
     similarities in psychosocial
     relationships
     Cognitive abilities in aging            Fluid and crystallized intelligence, memory, attention
     Psychosocial relationships in old age   Theories of psychosocial adjustment with age
     Dying, death, grieving                  Cultural approaches to death, widowhood, making
                                             sense of death

6. Expected Learning Goals
   a. Students will demonstrate familiarity with the major concepts, theoretical perspectives,
       empirical findings and historical trends in the psychology of adolescence and adulthood.
   b. Students will understand and apply the psychological principles of the psychology of
       adolescence and adulthood to personal, social, and organizational issues.
   c. Students will recognize the complexity of sociocultural diversity.
   d. Students will hone their research skills.

7. Expected Learning Outcomes
   Upon completion of this course, students will be expected to:
   a. acquire a broad overview of adolescent and adult development (matches LG1);
   b. understand the psychological aspects of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development in
       relation to development from adolescence into old age (matches LG1 & LG2);
   c. investigate the cultural aspects of lifespan development from the lifespan development
       perspective (matches LG3);
   d. present their own research within the context of lifespan developmental theories (matches
         LG4).


                                                                                                  Page 2
8. Learning Activities

                                 Lecture                            Tutorial
    Time per week                2 hours                            2 hours
                                 Fridays, 1:30 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.     Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
    Venue                        ELB Rm. 403                        CKB UG05
    No. of sessions in total     13                                 6
    Attendance                   Mandatory                          Mandatory
    Teaching Member(s)           Lecturer                           Teaching Assistant
    Matching with learning           • LG1                             • LG1
    goals (LG)                       • LG2                             • LG2
                                     • LG3                             • LG3
                                     • LG4                             • LG4
    Matching with learning           • LO1                             • LO1
    outcomes (LO)                    • LO2                             • LO2
                                     • LO3                             • LO3
                                     • LO4                             • LO4


9. Assessment Scheme

   Both formative and summative assessment methods will be used to evaluate students’ learning
   throughout the entire course.

    1) ATTENDANCE: Students are required to complete the readings and tutorial assignments
       prior to each class and to attend and participate in lectures and tutorials. We want you to
       attend all lectures and tutorials assigned so as to get a better grasp of the material and how
       it relates to the assigned readings. Typically, lectures and tutorials will be on topics related
       to, but different from, those covered in the text. (matches LG1, LG2, LG3, LG4)

    2) EXAMINATIONS: A mid-term and final examination will be administered in this class.
       The final examination will cover only those topics and readings from the second half of the
       course (AFTER the midterm). The purpose of the exams is to tap your knowledge of the
       subject matter in different forms, including recognition (MC questions), basic knowledge
       (SA questions), and in-depth analysis (essay question). You may remember more from this
       course the more different ways you are required to learn the material. (matches LG1 &
       LG3)

    3) RESEARCH PROJECT: Each group (no more than 5 students per group) is required to
       complete a data-based project on an aspect of adolescent-adulthood development. Please
       note that if the project is completed by a group, everyone in the group will receive the
       same grade for the project. Individual projects are also acceptable. If you choose a
       group project, your contribution to the group project will also be graded by other members
       of your group. The purpose of this research project is to get you to think about age-related
       differences in a meaningful way. Doing original research will help you to relate what you
       read in your (North American) textbook to Hong Kong life and to learn more about how to
       conduct research studies in psychology. (matches with LG1, LG2, LG3, & LG4)




                                                                                                Page 3
Research Project

         The purpose of this research project is to examine development among adolescents and/or
   adults in a construct of your choosing. Thus, your research project must involve direct
   experience with adolescents and/or adults. It is very important that you assure any participants
   whom you work with for this research, whether individually, in groups, or in a class setting,
   that their identities will remain strictly confidential. You are not to disclose the names or
   identities of these individuals to anyone; only your research team will know the identities of
   these research participants. Participants may be friends, neighbors, parents, grandparents,
   siblings, classmates, or strangers. In addition, consent forms from each participant must be
   turned in with your project paper (this will be reviewed in tutorial).
         The final report on the project must be type-written, double spaced, in English. Reports
   should be not more than 15 pages long, excluding references. You have the freedom to choose
   whatever topic you wish for this project. However, you must discuss the topic with Professor
   McBride and your tutors before embarking on the project. Topics are due in class on 1st Feb.
   All students must have approved their topics either with the TA or Professor McBride prior to
   this day.
        The focus of every project must be on adolescent/adult development. Therefore, you
   should compare at least two age groups on a construct or important issue. Topics you might
   study include views of love, the experience of depression, feelings of self-esteem, attitudes
   toward sexuality, beliefs about gender roles/gender equity, political thinking, moral
   development, attitudes toward marriage, child-rearing attitudes, concepts of friendship, views
   of the aging process, or conceptions of intergenerational families. Papers should be written in
   APA style, complete with introduction, method (participants, procedures, and materials),
   results, and discussion sections. You should be given a detailed description of style and content
   requirements for the paper in your tutorial session.
        Group projects will be presented during tutorial. These projects must be presented in
   English and will be a summary of the readings and research findings on your topic. One week
   before your presentation day, you should turn in a readable summary and one suggested
   reading to the other groups, in class. Another group will be responsible for collecting questions,
   responses, and comments raised by the other groups and leading group discussions following
   the presentation. Please sign up for your presentation day during the first tutorial.
        Projects can be based on either quantitative or qualitative analyses or both. For example,
   you might compare attitudes from adolescents and grandparents about the advantages and
   disadvantages of intergenerational families living together. You could do this either by using a
   questionnaire which already exists in the literature (and translating it to Cantonese if necessary)
   or by making up your own questionnaire. You should then perform a statistical analysis of the
   data and come up with your own conclusions about the results.
         Another project may involve intensive interviewing (qualitative research) of individuals. You might
   interview different people about a particular issue or phase of their development (e.g., Adelson's conception of
   political thinking). Again, your participants should differ in age to facilitate subsequent developmental
   comparisons. Prior to your interview, establish at least 3 questions you think capture the essence of your chosen
   topic. (For example, for political thinking, you might ask 1) What is the purpose of laws? 2) How can society help
   to prevent crime? 3) How would an ideal society be governed? (or others that get at the idea of politics and/or
   society) NOTE: This is just an example – feel free to carry out your own project and come up with your own
   questions.) Ask these questions of each participant and follow up with additional queries as needed. You should
   take notes while conducting the interviews.




                                                                                                              Page 4
Grades will be determined as follows:
   Attendance/Participation                 8%
   Midterm Exam                             30%
   Final Exam                               30%
   Group Presentation                       12% (3% by peers; 9% by TAs)
   Research Paper                           15%
   Peer Evaluation (by group members)       5%

   YOU MUST COMPLETE ALL WORK BY THE DATE IT IS DUE. FAILURE TO TAKE THE
   EXAMINATIONS, PRESENT YOUR PROJECTS, OR TURN IN YOUR FINAL PAPERS BY
   THE DESIGNATED DUE DATES WILL RESULT IN A “0” FOR THAT WORK.
   Research papers (hard copies) are due at 5:00 p.m. For any scheduling conflicts, please see me
   AT LEAST ONE WEEK prior to the due-date to arrange an alternate time to turn in your
   project.

Important due dates:
    • On 1/2, research topics are due in class.
    • On 1/4 or 8/4 or 15/4, research presentations will be made during tutorial. All students from
      each assigned group must attend and participate in discussions of these presentations on
      their presentation day.
    • On 21/4, all research papers are due to Professor McBride by 5:00 p.m.




                                                                                             Page 5
10. Learning Resources / Required Readings:
   A Textbook:
      Boyd, D. & Bee, H. (2006). Lifespan development (4th Ed.). Boston: Allan and Bacon.


   B Other required readings (Reserved outside Rm. 362, Sino. Bldg.):
      Arnett, J. (1995). The young and the reckless: Adolescent reckless behavior. Current
           Directions in Psychological Science, 4, 67-71.
      Arnett, J. (2001). Family Relationships (pp. 184-221). In Adolescence and Emerging
           Adulthood. Tokyo: Prentice-Hall.
      Garrod, A., Smulyan, L., Powers, S. I., & Kilkenny, R. (1999). Seeking the best of both
           worlds/Differential acculturation: Negotiating two different worlds (pp. 265-286). In
           Adolescent Portraits. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
      Karney, B. R., & Bradbury, T. N. (2005). Contextual influences on marriage: Implications
           for policy and intervention. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 14, 171-174.
      Kurdek, L. A. (2005). What do we know about gay and lesbian couples? Current Directions
           in Psychological Science, 14, 251-254.
      Salthouse, T. A. (2004). What and when of cognitive aging. Current Directions in
            Psychological Science, 13, 140-144.
      Smith, T. W. (2006). Personality as risk and resilience in physical health. Current
           Directions in Psychological Science, 15, 227-231.
      Steinberg, L. (2007). Risk taking in adolescence. Current Directions in Psychological
            Science, 16, 55-59.

   C Class Web Page

      http://cuforum.cuhk.edu.hk


11. Course Updates

    All announcements and course updates will be posted on cuforum. Please learn how to use
    cuforum informally from TAs or during the first tutorial sessions.

   Feedback for Evaluation
    Students are welcome to give comments and feedback at any time during the class or to stop
    by to talk to the instructor or teaching assistants. You can also send us emails or post your
    comments or questions on cuforum.

    Around Week 7 of the course, we will ask you to give us comments and feedback through an
    open-ended questionnaire. Some questions will be like “things that you like and do not like
    about this course”, “suggestions on enhancing the course”, etc.




                                                                                              Page 6
12. Course Schedule

Lecture schedule

  Date      Reading(s)                                  Topic(s)
  *8/1      1                                           Introduction/Orientation; Theories of
                                                        Development
  11/1      11                                          Focus: Physical maturation & sexuality
  18/1      12                                          Focus: Peer relationships
  25/1      12; Garrod et al., 1999; Arnett, 2001       Focus: Adolescents & the Family
  1/2       12; Arnett, 1995; Steinberg, 2007           Focus: Risk-taking behavior and deviancy
                                                        in adolescence
                                                        (Project topics due in class)
  8/2       Lunar New Year Holiday
  15/2      11; 13                                      Focus: Cognitive abilities in adolescence
                                                        and adulthood
  *19/2     Karney & Bradbury, 2005; Kurdek, 2005 Focus: Marriage and partnerships
  22/2      14; 16                                      Focus: Parenting
  NOTE -- EXAM 1 COVERS MATERIALS THROUGH 19/2 ONLY
  29/2      No class—Substitution with lecture in tutorial for 19/2
  7/3       14; 16                                      Focus: Work
  14/3      5; 16; Smith, 2006                          Focus: Health and personality throughout
                                                        the lifespan; sex differences and similarities
                                                        in psychosocial relationships
  21/3      Easter Holiday
  28/3      16; 18                                      Focus: Psychosocial relationship in old age
  4/4       Ching Ming Holiday
  11/4      17; Cutrona et al., 2006; Salthouse, 2004 Focus: Cognitive abilities in aging
  18/4      19                                          Focus: Dying, death, grieving
  NOTE -- EXAM II INCLUDES ALL MATERIALS FROM 7/3 - 18/4 ONLY
  * Lectures will be held in tutorial time and classroom.




                                                                                                Page 7
Tutorial schedule

   Date      Purpose
   5/1       NO TUTORIAL
   15/1      NO TUTORIAL
   22/1      Introduction, Group Formations, Presentation Sign-ups, Ethics and Consent Forms;
              APA Style; Self-esteem & Goals Mini- Project Introduction
   29/1      NO TUTORIAL
   5/2       Self-esteem & Goals Mini-Project Discussions
   12/2      Lunar New Year Holiday—NO TUTORIAL
   *19/2     LECTURE 7
   26/2      EXAM 1 administered
   4/3       NO TUTORIAL
   11/3      NO TUTORIAL
   18/3      Gender & Longevity
   25/3      NO TUTORIAL
   1/4       Presentations and Discussions
   8/4       Presentations and Discussions
   15/4      Presentations and Discussions



13. Academic Honesty and Plagiarism

Attention is drawn to University policy and regulations on honesty in academic work, and to the
disciplinary guidelines and procedures applicable to breaches of such policy and regulations.
Details may be found at http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/policy/academichonesty/ . Students are required to
submit a statement acknowledging that they are aware of these policies, regulations, guidelines and
procedures and pledging to be honest in their academic work.

Any assignment (i.e., project, essay, or paper) that shows evidence of plagiarism will be marked
down severely. In simple terms, plagiarism is copying passages and/or ideas from other sources
without referencing those sources. Moreover, when you report someone else’s ideas/findings you
must put it in your own words and not merely copy full sentences or parts of sentences from the
source article. It is your responsibility as a scholar-in-training to cite the ideas and work of others
correctly. Please visit the following additional websites for discussions of how to recognize and
avoid plagiarism.

http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html
http://www.hamilton.edu/academic/Resource/WC/AvoidingPlagiarism.html



                                                                                                  Page 8
               PSY 3540 Psychology of Adolescence and Adulthood
                         Spring 2008, Department of Psychology, CUHK

                                 Prof. Catherine McBride-Chang


*Please read the following, fill in the form and hand in to TAs.

Attention is drawn to University policy and regulations on honesty in academic work, and to the
disciplinary guidelines and procedures applicable to breaches of such policy and regulations.
Details may be found at http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/policy/academichonesty/ . Students are required to
submit a statement acknowledging that they are aware of these policies, regulations, guidelines and
procedures and pledging to be honest in their academic work.

Any assignment (i.e., project, essay, or paper) that shows evidence of plagiarism will be marked
down severely. In simple terms, plagiarism is copying passages and/or ideas from other sources
without referencing those sources. Moreover, when you report someone else’s ideas/findings you
must put it in your own words and not merely copy full sentences or parts of sentences from the
source article. It is your responsibility as a scholar-in-training to cite the ideas and work of others
correctly. Please visit the following additional websites for discussions of how to recognize and
avoid plagiarism.

http://www.indiana.edu/~wts/wts/plagiarism.html
http://www.hamilton.edu/academic/Resource/WC/AvoidingPlagiarism.html




I declare that the assignment here submitted is original except for source material explicitly
acknowledged. I also acknowledge that I am aware of University policy and regulations on honesty
in academic work, and of the disciplinary guidelines and procedures applicable to breaches of such
policy and regulations, as contained in the website

http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/policy/academichonesty/



Signature                                     Date



Name                                          Student ID


PSY3540                                       Psychology of Adolescence and Adulthood
Course code                                         Course title




                                                                                                  Page 9

				
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