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Psychology Psychology of Adolescence September In

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Psychology Psychology of Adolescence September In Powered By Docstoc
					                                  Psychology 336 (A01)
                                Psychology of Adolescence
September 2010

In this course, we enter the world of the adolescent. To do so, we examine the
fundamental changes which characterize the life period known as adolescence. These
include the biological changes of puberty and its associated effects on mood, sleep, and
“hormonally driven” behavior. We discuss the new cognitive skills which emerge during
adolescence; and the ways that new modes of thought become fodder for new kinds of
behavior, eg. adolescent self consciousness, idealism and/or rebellion towards established
social norms. An enormous social transition occurs during adolescence. Expectations and
pressures from family, peers and social institutions intensify and the effect of these
contexts is formative to an adolescent’s emerging sense of identity which, according to
some writers, is the fundamental developmental task of adolescence. What makes a
successful adolescence? This question is often answered by considering the successful
completion of normative tasks, such as the acquisition of autonomy, identity, morality,
intimacy, and responsible sexuality. You should be able to answer the question of what
makes a successful adolescence after taking the course.

The format of the course is lecture and discussion and students are expected to complete
assigned reading in advance of each lecture so as to be prepared for participation in class
discussion. The lectures are intended to enrich the material in the text and to add special
topics not covered in the text. You will find that the text does not “cover” the lectures,
and the lectures do not “cover” the text; rather the text is a foundation for lectures. Note
that the online notes provide an outline only of the lecture and you will need to add the
content of the lecture for proper notes. This means that information I write on the
blackboard and other lecture content, i.e. class discussion, is essential to have in your
notes. Tests in the course typically have a greater focus on the lectures but you should
prepare for them from both textbook and lecture. Below you will find some details about
time, place, text, course evaluation, grade calculation and a timetable with test dates.

Time and Place: MWR 2:30 – 3:20 Cor. A120

Instructor: Dr. Laurain Mills

Office: Cor. A213

email: laurainm@uvic.ca

Phone: 250 472 - 4491

Office hours: M W 1:30 – 2:30 or by appointment.

Teaching assistant: Lindsay McCunn ( ljmccunn@uvic.ca)

Text: Arnett, J. 2010 Adolescence and Emerging Adulthood (4th edition), Pearson
Education.



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Online component : This course is a moodle course and you will need netlink id and
password to access the material posted online. This material includes the powerpoint
presentations, review sheets, and sample test questions. The content varies with each
topic. The entry page is at: http://moodle@uvic.ca . Ideally, print outlines before class to
be “enriched” during lecture.

Evaluation Your grade will be based on four in-class tests (77%), a participation mark
of 3% and a project worth 20%. The test schedule is shown on the course timetable and
marking criteria for the project follows.

Tests: (77%) Each test will be composed of multiple choice and short answer questions,
including definition, sentence completion, short paragraph and identification of diagrams
as question types. Tests cover the assigned reading, discussions, videos and lecture
material. Class discussion will be represented in each exam. Typically, the multiple
choice and short answer questions on an exam will be based on the textbook reading and
the paragraph questions will be based on class discussion. The test days are shown on the
outline.

Participation (3%) This is an optional incentive mark and is awarded for class
attendance, attentiveness and not using electronic devices in the classroom for any other
purpose than that which is course-related. Absences should be minimal and an
arrangement for getting the notes if a class is missed need to be made with another
student; attentiveness to lecture and other student’s comments, is important for an
academic atmosphere in the classroom. Other students are disturbed by excessive
talking. Regarding electronic devices, a laptop can be used for notes provided it is only
used for notes. Cell phones and texting are not allowed in the classroom. You need to go
outside the classroom if you are receiving or sending a text message. The first time I see
someone texting, or think there is texting or a student reports texting to me, the full
participation mark of 3% is lost. If the behavior continues, you will be asked to leave the
class and may reenter it only when you have spoken with me. Note that I will delete
the participation mark if I suspect you are using the electronics improperly, I
will not necessarily speak to you.

Project (20%) One class of each week is devoted to small group discussion and four of
the discussions should be submitted online to be marked and returned online. Each is
worth 5%. Each member of the group should have a turn writing the discussion but its
content should reflect a group effort, it is essential for each member of the group to
review the written submission before it is posted to moodle. Unless I am informed of a
difficulty in the group, you will have the same mark as the other members of your group.
As well, a number of discussion topics and thought provoking questions will be posted
online, some of which will become the topic of a class discussion. You can and should
respond to as many of the online questions as you like, because the comments you make
and read will enrich your knowledge of adolescents beyond what we can discuss in class
and will help you achieve better on tests. The more you think about the material and
become flexible with it, the better your test performance. As well, your comments are
interesting for other class members who wish to read and respond.



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Group formation will occur during the second week of class and the marking criteria for a
class discussion will be handed out the second week of class, as well as being posted
online.

                               IMPORTANT NOTICE:

This course requires an ongoing commitment to attendance, tests and discussion days.
Please be attentive to the dates. Missed submissions, without an accompanying medical
note, note of family affliction, or note from a UVIC coach regarding an athletic event
will be penalized 5% a day, or 5% over a weekend. Similarly, exams that are missed
(not due to the above mentioned reasons) will be penalized 10%. Therefore, missed
participation due to vacation travel is penalized. A make-up test will be provided when
tests are missed for the acceptable reasons.


Grades:
A+ 94.500 – 100 %             A 89.500 – 94.499 %            A- 84.500 – 89.499 %
B+ 79.500 – 84.499 %          B 74.500 – 79.499 %            B- 69.500 – 74.499 %
C+ 64.500 – 69.499 %          C 59.500 – 64.499 %            D 49.500 – 59.499 %
F   < 49.500 %

** Final grades are determined from the percentages shown above indicating the numbers
are rounded to the third decimal point, as shown. No further rounding will be applied to
the grades. This grade conversion scheme is mandatory in the Psychology Department at
UVIC as of September 2005

Students are responsible for checking their registration status before the end of the add
period which is September 24 for the winter session. Names will not be added to the
class list after that date.

The prerequisites for this course are Psyc 100A and 100B, Psych 201 and third year
standing. Students who remain in courses for which they do not have the prerequisites do
so at their own risk. Students who complete courses without prerequisites ARE NOT
exempt from having to complete the prerequisite course(s) at some later date if such
courses are required for the degree program.

**The University of Victoria is committed to promoting, providing and protecting a
positive and supportive and safe learning and working environment for all its members.




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Psychology 336 (A01) Lecture Schedule Fall 2010

         September 8- Introductory Class

                 September 9, 13
      Perspectives on the Study of Adolescence
                     Chapter 1

            September 15, 16, 20, 22
              Puberty and Its Effects
                   Chapter 2

            September 23, 27, 29, 30
      The Cognitive Revolution of Adolescence
                     Chapter 3

                  Monday October 4
                   Test One 21%

                 October 6, 7, 13
       Multicultural Changes in Adolescence
                   Chapters 4, 5

   October 11 - THANKSGIVING DAY [ no class]

                October 14, 18, 20,
               Formation of Identity
                    Chapter 6

                October 21, 25, 27
                 Family Relations
                    Chapter 7

              Thursday, October 28
               Test Two     21%

                November 1, 3, 4
              Adolescent Friendships
                    Chapter 8

             November 8, 15, 17, 18
              Adolescent Sexuality
                   Chapter 9

  November 10 - 12 - READING BREAK [no class]

              Monday, November 22
                Test Three 21%
                                                  4
      November 24, 25,
   Schooling in Adolescence
          Chapter 10

 November 29, December 1
Risky Behaviors in Adolescence
        Readings TBA

   Thursday, December 2
     Test Four   14%




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                                  UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
                                  Department of Psychology

                            Important Course Policy Information
                                            Winter 2010

Prerequisites

Students who remain in courses for which they do not have the prerequisites do so at their own
risk. Students who complete courses without prerequisites ARE NOT exempt from having to
complete the prerequisite course(s) if such courses are required for the degree program.

Program Requirements

For more information see pages 215-217 of the UVic Calendar 2010-11.

Registration Status

Students are responsible for verifying their registration status. Registration status may be
verified using WebReg or by invoking the list (L) function on the TelReg system. Course adds
and drops will not be processed after the deadlines set out in the current UVic Calendar.

Commitment to Inclusivity and Diversity

The University of Victoria is committed to promoting, providing and protecting a positive and
supportive and safe learning and working environment for all its members.

In the Event of Illness, Accident or Family Affliction (See UVic Calendar, 2010-11, p. 35)

•   What to do if you miss an exam other than one scheduled during the formal examination period

Do not apply at Records Services for a “Request for Academic Concession”. Instead submit
documentation of the illness, accident or family affliction directly to your course instructor (or
designated teaching assistant).

•   What to do if you miss an exam scheduled during the formal exam period

Apply at Records Services for a “Request for Academic Concession”, normally within 10 working days
of the end of the formal examination period. Records Services will forward the form to the
instructor. If the concession is granted the instructor will determine how to deal with the situation
(for example, a deferred exam). Where a concession is not applied for or where such application is
denied, an N grade will be entered on the student’s academic record.

•   What to do if you require additional time to complete course requirements

Apply at Records Services for a “Request for Academic Concession”, normally within 10 working days
of the end of the formal examination period. Records Services will forward the form to the
instructor. If the concession is granted the instructor will determine how to deal with the situation.
Where a concession is not applied for or where such application is denied, an N grade will be
entered on the student’s academic record.
Policy on Academic Integrity including Plagiarism and Cheating
The Department of Psychology fully endorses and intends to enforce rigorously the Senate Policy on
Academic integrity (http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2010/FACS/UnIn/UARe/PoAcI.html , p. 33-34, UVic
Calendar 2010-11). It is of utmost importance that students who do their work honestly be protected
from those who do not. Because this policy is in place to ensure that students carry out and benefit
from the learning activities assigned in each course, it is expected that students will cooperate in its
implementation.

The offences defined by the policy can be summarized briefly as follows:
  1. Plagiarism. You must make sure that the work you submit is your work and not someone
      else’s. There are proper procedures for citing the works of others. The student is responsible
      for being aware of and using these procedures.

   2. Multiple Submission. Only under exceptional circumstances may a work submitted to fulfill an
      academic requirement be used to satisfy another similar requirement. The student is responsible
      for clarifying this with the instructor(s) involved.

   3. Falsifying Materials Subject to Academic Evaluation. This includes falsification of data,
      use of commercially prepared essays, using information from the Internet without proper
      citation, citing sources from which material is not actually obtained, etc.

   4. Cheating on Assignments, Tests, and Examinations. You may not copy the work of others
      in or out of class; you may not give your work to others for the purpose of copying; you may not
      use unauthorized material or equipment during examinations or tests; and you may not
      impersonate or allow yourself to be impersonated by another at an examination. The
      Department of Psychology has a policy of not making old examinations available for study
      purposes. Therefore, use of old exams without the express written permission of the instructor
      constitutes cheating by the user, and abetting of cheating by the person who provided the exam.

   5. Being an Accessory to Offences. This means that helping another student to cheat (for
      instance, by showing or communicating to them answers to an assignment, or by allowing them
      to view answers on an exam) is an academic offence.

Instructors are expected to make every effort to prevent cheating and plagiarism. This may include the
assignment of seating for examinations, asking students to move during examinations, requests to see
student identification cards, and other measures as appropriate. Instructors also have available to them
a variety of tools and procedures to check for Internet and electronic media-based cheating. In
instances of suspected or actual plagiarism or cheating, instructors, following prescribed procedures, are
authorized to take steps consistent with the degree of the offence. These measures will range from a
zero on the test or assignment or a failing grade for the course, probation within a program to
temporary or even permanent suspension from the University.

Rights of Appeal are described in the Policy on Academic Integrity in the University calendar (on p. 33-
34 in 2010-11).

The definitive source for information on Academic Integrity is the University Calendar (p. 33-34 in
   2010-11) (http://web.uvic.ca/calendar2010/FACS/UnIn/UARe/PoAcI.html)
Other useful resources on Plagiarism and Cheating include:
   1. The Learning Skills program: http://www.coun.uvic.ca/learning/index.html
   2. The Ombudsperson’s office: http://www.uvss.uvic.ca/ombudsperson/pubsguides/plagiarism.pdf
   3. The English Department: http://web.uvic.ca/wguide/Pages/CitPlagiarism.html

                                                                                    Dept Syllabus info Winter 2010.rtf

				
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