Safety Manual PWP splash by mikeholy

VIEWS: 15 PAGES: 155

									                                              TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                                                                             PAGE

I.     ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAM .....................................................................                             1
       A. Safety Orientation ..............................................................................................          1
       B. Employee Education and Training .....................................................................                      1
       C. Inspections ............................................................................................................   3
       D. Accident Investigation .......................................................................................             4
       E. Recordkeeping.......................................................................................................       6

II.    WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAM ............................................................. 7

III.   RETURN TO WORK PROGRAM ................................................................................. 8
       A. Introduction .......................................................................................................... 8
       B. Roles and Responsibilities .................................................................................. 8
       C. Medical Claim ........................................................................................................ 9
       D. Time Loss Claim ................................................................................................... 10

IV.    INFECTIOUS DISEASE EXPOSURE CONTROL PROGRAM ............................ 11
       A. Introduction .......................................................................................................... 11
       B. Intent and Application.......................................................................................... 11
       C. Exposure Determination .................................................................................... 12
       D. Methods of Implementation ............................................................................. 13
           1. General .......................................................................................................... 13
           2. Engineering and Work Practice Controls .............................................. 13
           3. Personal Protective Equipment ................................................................ 15
           4. Housekeeping ............................................................................................... 17
       E. Hepatitis B Vaccination Post-Exposure Evaluation and Follup-Up ......... 20
           1. General ......................................................................................................... 20
           2. Hepatitis B Vaccination ............................................................................. 21
           3. Post-exposure Evaluation and Follow-Up............................................... 21
           4. Information Provided to the Healthcare Professional ..................... 22
           5. Healthcare Professional's Written Opinion ........................................ 23
           6. Medical Recordkeeping ............................................................................. 23
       F. Communication of Hazards to Employees..................................................... 23
       G. Information and Training ................................................................................. 25
       H. Recordkeeping..................................................................................................... 26

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             1.     Medical Records .........................................................................................          26
             2.     Training Records ........................................................................................          27
             3.     Availability ...................................................................................................   27
             4.     Transfer of Records .................................................................................              28

V.    HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM ............................................................ 29
      A. General Requirements ....................................................................................... 29
         1. Written Hazard Communication Program ............................................ 29
         2. Hazardous Materials Inventory ............................................................. 29
         3. Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) ................................................... 30
         4. Labeling ........................................................................................................ 30
      B. Training................................................................................................................. 30
         1. General Training ......................................................................................... 30
         2. Specific Training ........................................................................................ 30
      C. Contractors .......................................................................................................... 31

VI.   HAZARD COMMUNICATION TRAINER'S GUIDE ..........................................                                                  32
      A. Introduction ........................................................................................................         32
         1. HazCom Standard ......................................................................................                     32
         2. What the Hazard Communication Standard Requires ......................                                                     32
         3. Purpose of Training ...................................................................................                    33
      B. Chemical Hazards ...............................................................................................              33
         1. Objectives ...................................................................................................             33
         2. Routes of Entry ..........................................................................................                 33
         3. Types of Hazards ......................................................................................                    34
         4. Chemical Hazards ......................................................................................                    37
         5. Target Organ Effects ..............................................................................                        45
      C. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) .........................................................                                  46
         1. Objectives ...................................................................................................             46
         2. What is an MSDS? ....................................................................................                      46
         3. MSDS Data Sections ................................................................................                        47
      D. Product Labeling .................................................................................................            56
         1. Objectives ...................................................................................................             56
         2. Proper Labeling ...........................................................................................                56
         3. HMIS Labeling System ............................................................................                          57
         4. Inadequate Labels .....................................................................................                    59
      E. HazCom Program ................................................................................................               59


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VII.      HAZARD COMMUNICATION SPECIFIC TRAINER'S GUIDE ...................... 63
          A. How to Use This Trainers Guide .................................................................... 63
          B. Part 1 - HazCom Program ................................................................................. 63
          C. Part 2 - MSDS Review ...................................................................................... 66
             EXAMPLE MSDS SUMMARY SHEET ........................................................... 70
             MSDS SUMMARY SHEET ............................................................................... 72
             GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED ON THE MSDS.......................................... 74
             GLOSSARY OF MEDICAL TERMS USED ON MSDS ............................... 84
             DEFINITION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION
                             SYSTEM (HMIS) RATINGS ............................................ 88
             PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT ..................................................... 89
             CHRONIC EFFECTS .......................................................................................... 90
             HAZARDOUS MATERIAL INVENTORY UPDATE SHEET ...................... 91
             STATION HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL INVENTORIES............................ 92
                 FILLING OUT THE HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL INVENTORY
                      UPDATE SHEET ................................................................................ 92
             CERTIFICATION OF GENERAL TRAINING ............................................. 93
             CERTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC TRAINING ............................................ 94
             REFERENCES ...................................................................................................... 96

VIII. SAFETY AND HEALTH COMMITTEE ..................................................................                               97
      A. Committee or Crew Meetings ..........................................................................                     97
      B. Meeting Activities .............................................................................................          97
IX. GLOSSARY ...................................................................................................................   99

X.        APPENDICES ............................................................................................................... 102




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                        Department of Fish and Wildlife

                              SAFETY MANUAL


I.   ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAM

     It is the responsibility of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife
     (WDF&W) to provide a safe and healthy work environment for all employees.
     This program is intended to ensure that safe workplace practices are in place,
     and that each employee is aware of his or her responsibility to promote safety.

     A. Safety Orientation

        Supervisors will complete the Supervisors Checklist for Employee Safety
        Orientation (Form WDF&W 756, see Appendix A) with new employees prior
        to assignment. The orientation will describe the safety program, how the
        employee is affected, and what the employee can contribute to the overall
        safety goals. Part of the introduction to agency policies and rules will
        include a discussion on job safety. At the time of this discussion, the
        supervisor shall instruct the employee on the safe operation of any
        equipment the employee will be using, as well as a demonstration of personal
        protective equipment that will be used by the employee. One copy of the
        checklist will be sent to the Employee Services office to be retained in the
        employee's file, and one copy will be retained in a file by the supervisor.

     B. Employee Education and Training

        Safety education and job training are two separate, though related, tasks.
        Safety education should modify the worker's attitude toward safe work
        habits and should help him/her understand why personal safety is important.
         Job training teaches the worker how to perform tasks in the most
        efficient and safest way possible.

        1.   Safety education objectives:

             To increase the flow of information that pertains to accident prevention
             both up and down the chain of command.




SAFETY MANUAL                            1                            January 1995
         To develop competent, safety-conscious workers. On-going safety
         education will increase safety awareness and decrease the causes and
         incidence of accidents. This should promote acceptance of safety rules
         and help make accident prevention an integral part of all activities.

      2. Job training

         Each supervisor will provide on-the-job training for each subordinate to
         familiarize them with safety requirements. In addition, they will
         provide specific training for certain jobs and kinds of equipment used.

         Certain jobs require specific training. State safety codes require
         employers to instruct employees in certain areas. For example,
         instruction must be provided in the following:

         a.   Machine tool operations
         b.   Use of toxic materials
         c.   Hazards inherent in an employee's job
         d.   The meaning of accident prevention signs and tags
         e.   Forklift operation
         f.   Employee emergency plans
         g.   Fire protection
         h.   Fire extinguisher
         i.   Carcinogens
         j.   Welding and cutting
         k.   Use of respirators (See Appendix C)
         l.   Use of personal protective equipment

      3. Both training and certification are required by State safety codes in
         the following areas:

         a. First aid
         b. Traffic control flagging
         c. Explosive-actuated hand tools

         For more information about training, contact the WDF&W Employee
         Services Office, or the Safety Office.

      4. Safety Bulletin Boards


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Accident Prevention Program                                              Chapter I


            Bulletin boards are useful to increase employee awareness of safety and
            health, and to communicate the Agency's safety message. It is required
            that each WDF&W office and facility maintain a safety bulletin board.
            The following considerations should be made for bulletin board
            effectiveness:

            a. A specific safety bulletin board or a portion of an existing bulletin
               board should be designated and that spot reserved exclusively for
               safety material.

            b. Bulletin boards should be placed in a spot where there is greatest
               employee exposure.

            c. Posting should be attractively arranged.

            d. Posters and other information that becomes dated or worn should
               be changed periodically.

            e. The site or facility manager should ensure that the bulletin board is
               maintained as recommended above.

            f. The following items are required to be posted:
               (1) Notice to Employees
               (2) Job Safety and Health Protection
               (3) Your Rights as a Worker
               (4) Family Leave, Family Care
               (5) Citation and Notice (as appropriate)
               (6) OSHA Form 200

               Posters and signs are available from the Department of Labor and
               Industries (L & I) by calling (206) 956-5441 or (206) 956-5800, or
               they may be ordered through the safety office.

     C. Inspections

        In order to identify and eliminate workplace hazards, accident prevention
        activities need to be reinforced by a systematic means of minimizing
        physical hazards within the work place. The best way to eliminate exposure

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Accident Prevention Program                                                Chapter I


        to hazards is through a plan of inspection.

        The following guidelines will be used:

        1.   Work areas are to be inspected periodically by the safety office to
             determine what hazardous conditions and/or practices exist. Self-
             inspections should also be conducted at least monthly by facility
             managers. The Safety Inspection Checklist (Form WDF&W 757, see
             Appendix A) should be used for these inspections. Other sources which
             can be consulted or utilized in conducting inspections are:

             a. General Safety and Health Standards (WAC 296-24);
             b. Employee suggestions;
             c. Previous accident experience of the Agency

        2. Findings of inspections are to be reviewed and discussed at the next
           scheduled safety meeting.      Unresolved problems resulting from
           inspections are to be forwarded to the safety office for action or
           recommendation.

        3. Follow-up to recommendations are to be accomplished by one of the
           following options:

             a. Carrying out the implementation of the recommendation;
             b. Explaining why no action can be taken;
             c. Proposing an alternative.

        4. The Department of Labor and Industries (L&I) may also conduct safety
           inspections. An L&I Inspector may conduct an inspection at any facility
           on an unannounced basis or may do so at the Agency's request on a
           consultative basis.

             If an L&I Inspector conducts an unannounced inspection at any agency
             facility, he or she is to be treated with courtesy and allowed access. He
             or she has the legal right and the responsibility to conduct these
             inspections. Their inspection may include questions about the safety
             program (as described in this manual), crew safety meetings, and a walk
             through the physical plant. The facility manager should notify the

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Accident Prevention Program                                                  Chapter I


             safety office when an inspection has occurred. Also, the facility
             manager should give the inspector the safety office name and mailing
             address for any citations.

             If safety violations are found, a "Citation and Notice" will be issued.
             Citations should always be received in the safety office, however, if one
             is received at a facility, it should be immediately forwarded to the
             safety office. The Citation and Notice will list the violation and related
             WAC and give a date by which the violation must be abated. Violations
             may be either "general" or "serious." A serious violation is one in which
             there is a clear injury hazard. Self-inspections should eliminate
             hazards.

             On occasion, an L&I Consultant may be requested to review an office or
             facility. In this case, the consultant will make an evaluation and
             recommendations. The consultation will be confidential and no citation
             will be issued. This service is provided at no cost, but if a serious or
             repeat violation is found, it must be corrected or it may become the
             basis for a citation. These consultations will be requested through the
             safety office, and recommendations received by site managers are to be
             forwarded to the safety office.

     D. Accident Investigation

        1.   All accidents, no matter how minor, are to be reported promptly to the
             immediate supervisor for investigation and evaluation. Since every
             accident is the result of a sequence of contributing causes, it is possible
             to avoid similar accidents by identifying and eliminating those causes.
             During the supervisor's evaluation, the possible consequence of leaving
             the situation uncorrected must be determined, and based on that
             determination, the appropriate action must be taken.

        2. Documentation Procedures

             a. Minor Injuries (those requiring doctor/outpatient care)




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Accident Prevention Program                                             Chapter I


               (1) After any emergency action following an accident, an
                   investigation of the accident is to be conducted by the
                   immediate supervisor.

               (2) The supervisor should review the accident with the victim and
                   any witnesses to determine the contributing causes. The
                   findings of the investigation will be documented on the
                   Supervisor's Report of an Accident form (WDF&W 758, see
                   Appendix A). The completed form will be distributed as follows:

                   (a) Copy to safety office;
                   (b) Copy to remain in the site file.

            b. Major Injuries (those requiring hospitalization or resulting in a
               fatality)

               (1) The regional manager or assistant director and the safety office
                   are to be notified immediately by the immediate supervisor in
                   the event of a major injury. An investigation will be conducted
                   as soon as possible by an investigation team convened by the
                   Director. The investigation team will include the director's
                   designee, a representative of the safety office, and the
                   supervisor of the injured person(s).



               (2) In the case of a fatality or injuries requiring multiple
                   hospitalization, state law requires the supervisor to report the
                   accident to the nearest office of the Department of Labor and
                   Industries within 24 hours. The report shall relate the
                   circumstances, the number of fatalities, and the extent of any
                   injuries. Any equipment involved in an immediate fatality is not
                   to be moved until a representative of the Department of Labor
                   and Industries investigates the accident and authorizes its
                   removal. However, if it is necessary to move the equipment to
                   prevent further accidents or to remove the victim, it may be
                   moved as required.

            c. Near Misses

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Accident Prevention Program                                                  Chapter I




                  (1) A near miss accident is defined as an unplanned event where
                      damages result to equipment or property, but with no personal
                      injury, or where damage did not occur, but the likelihood of
                      personal injury to the employee was great.

                  (2) To the greatest extent possible, all near miss accidents will be
                      reported on a Supervisor's Report of an Accident form
                      (WDF&W 758), and (if warranted) investigated by an
                      investigation team convened by the Director. The investigation
                      team will consist of the director's designee, a representative of
                      the safety office, and the supervisor of the employee involved.
                      If the conditions which contributed to the near miss or close call
                      are not eliminated, they will continue to contribute to additional
                      occurrences which could eventually lead to serious personal
                      injury.

     E. Recordkeeping

        In accordance with applicable requirements of the WISHA standards, an
        OSHA 200 log will be maintained at each facility for accident reporting.
        The following records are maintained:

        1.   Recordable cases include:

             a.   Every occupational death
             b.   Every occupational illness
             c.   Every occupational injury that involves unconsciousness
             d.   Accidents resulting in the inability to perform all phases of the
                  regular job, inability to work full-time on a regular job, temporary
                  assignments to another job, or medical treatment other than first
                  aid.

             Each recordable injury and illness will be entered on the log as early as
             practicable, but no later than six working days after receiving the
             information that a recordable case has occurred.

             During the month of February, the completed summary portion of the

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Accident Prevention Program                                               Chapter I


            OSHA Form 200 for the previous year will be posted on the safety
            bulletin board.

        2. Files of all reports generated when an employee is injured on the job will
           be kept for a period of five years following the year to which they
           relate.




SAFETY MANUAL                           8                            January 1995
                         Department of Fish and Wildlife

                               SAFETY MANUAL


II.   WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAM

      A. Reducing time lost from work related injuries improves productivity and
         lowers the Agency's industrial insurance costs. These are goals of the
         safety program. Even with the best of safety programs, however,
         unavoidable accidents can occur. Claims management includes how the
         situation is handled after the accident has happened. Good claims
         management can reduce the cost and assist in the rehabilitation of the
         injured employee. (See Return to Work Program, Chapter III.)

      B. As part of claims management, it will be the supervisor's responsibility to:

         1.   Ensure that the injured employee receives prompt, effective medical
              treatment;

         2. Require that all accidents are reported immediately;

         3. Perform an accident investigation, and forward the Supervisor's Report
            of an Accident form (WDF&W 758) to the safety office.

         4. Consult with the employee about returning to work as soon as
            practicable; (See Return-to-Work, Chapter III.)

         5. When injuries require professional medical treatment, a Labor and
            Industries Accident Report form must be completed. These forms are
            available from the health care provider. Doctors are required by law to
            lend all necessary assistance in completing this form.

              a. When filling out the Labor & Industries form, employees are to be
                 instructed to list the employer's business name and address as
                 follows:

                     Department of Fish and Wildlife
                     600 Capitol Way North


SAFETY MANUAL                            9                            January 1995
                Olympia, WA 98501-1091

         b. Work location addresses are not to be used. The L & I claim form is
            to be sent to the Department's Safety Office to be completed by
            the Safety Officer.




SAFETY MANUAL                       10                          January 1995
                       Department of Fish and Wildlife

                              SAFETY MANUAL


III. RETURN TO WORK PROGRAM

    A. Introduction

       Reducing time lost from work due to injuries improves productivity and
       lowers the Agency's industrial insurance costs. One of the goals of the
       safety program is to return injured workers to work as soon as is
       practicable, even if the injured worker is unable to perform his or her
       regular job.

    B. Roles and Responsibilities

       1.   Immediate supervisor:

            Provide a safe work environment for employees

            Maintain a positive, supportive relationship with the injured worker
            throughout the return-to-work process.

            Follow through with the injured employee. If he or she is off work,
            maintain contact by phone or personal visits. Let the employee know
            you value his or her contribution, and that you are eager for him or her
            to return to work.

            Keep in touch with the attending physician. Promote early return to
            work for injured employees by exploring and implementing transitional
            return to work opportunities. If light work is available, coordinate with
            the safety office and with the Employee Services office. Let the
            doctor know in writing the amount of exertion involved and ask if the
            employee could be released for some sort of limited employment.

            a. If you are unhappy with the medical treatment your employee is
               receiving, coordinate with the safety office. The department has
               the right to request a second opinion when an employee is off work


SAFETY MANUAL                           11                            January 1995
            due to a work-related injury. The determination about whether or
            not a second opinion will be sought will be made by the safety office
            in consultation with the supervisor and the Employee Services
            office.

         Keep the safety office and the personnel office updated on the
         progress of returning injured workers.

         Provide orientation on the agency return to work program to new
         employees.




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Return to Work Program                                                Chapter III


        2. The Safety Officer is the Return to Work (RTW) Coordinator.

           The RTW coordinator:

           Participates in the RTW program system planning and operations.

           Coordinates with appropriate management staff to facilitate required
           training.

           Promotes and creates a positive attitude throughout the agency for the
           return to work program.

           Promotes and encourages facilitation of the RTW program within the
           agency. Coordinates return to work efforts with the Employee Services
           office.

           Fosters a good working relationship with appropriate labor groups
           represented in the agency.

           Develops and maintains a systematic tracking mechanism to be used for
           information and statewide evaluation of the effectiveness of the RTW
           plan.

        3. Employees:

           Report all work related incidents to the supervisor immediately--no later
           than the same day of the occurrence.

           Actively participate and cooperate with the agency's requirements for
           the return to work program.

           Provide medical documentation to the employer when requested.

           Maintain contact with the employer according to the prescribed
           schedule as discussed by the supervisor and employee.

     C. Medical Claim


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Return to Work Program                                                  Chapter III


        An employee accident or illness which results in medical treatment only, and

        results in no employee time loss is a medical claim. Costs are paid out of
        Labor and Industries Medical Aid Fund.

        1.   The immediate supervisor or program manager:

             a. Ensures that the employee gets prompt medical attention.

             b. Conducts an incident/accident investigation and indicates findings on
                the Supervisor's Report of an Accident (form WDF&W 758).
             c. Follows up with actions to prevent similar incidents or accidents.

     D. Time Loss Claim

        A work-related accident or illness which is expected to result in time loss,
        disability, or death, and awards financial compensation for these is a time
        loss claim.

        1.   The immediate supervisor or program manager:

             a. Assists employee in contacting the Safety Office or the Payroll
                Office to discuss leave options if time loss is involved.

             b. Contacts the safety office to report a time loss situation.

             c. Sets up regular schedule of contacts with the employee to discuss
                and provide return-to-work opportunities. Keeps the safety office
                advised, and keeps in touch with the employee's attending physician,
                if appropriate.

        2. The safety office will offer consultation and advice to the supervisor,
           and will coordinate with the Employee Services office for return-to-
           work accommodations and opportunities. The safety office will also
           communicate with the employee and the employee's attending physician,
           if appropriate.




SAFETY MANUAL                            14                           January 1995
Return to Work Program         Chapter III




SAFETY MANUAL            15   January 1995
                        Department of Fish and Wildlife

                               SAFETY MANUAL


IV.   INFECTIOUS DISEASE EXPOSURE CONTROL PROGRAM

      A. Introduction

         The Washington State Industrial Safety and Health Act (WISHA)
         guarantees every worker in this state the right to a safe work environment.
          To fulfill this obligation, the department has instituted an infectious
         disease exposure control plan.

         A copy of this exposure control plan (as part of the Safety Manual) shall be
         maintained at each office and installation, and shall be accessible to
         employees and volunteers. This plan shall be reviewed and updated at least
         annually, and whenever necessary to reflect new or modified tasks and
         procedures which affect occupational exposure and to reflect new or
         revised employee positions with occupational exposure.

         The exposure control plan will be made available to L & I Inspectors upon
         request for examination and inspection.

         This plan discusses current knowledge about the transmission of the HIV
         and hepatitis B viruses (HBV). It also provides the basic information
         needed to prevent the transmission of bloodborne diseases. Implementation
         of this exposure control plan is designed to eliminate or minimize employee
         exposure.

      B. Intent and Application

         The Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDF&W) Exposure Control Plan is
         intended to follow WISHA General Safety Standard 296-62, Washington
         Regional Directives (WRD), and any other applicable laws or rules in order to
         eliminate or minimize the occupational exposure of employees and volunteers
         to exposure to and possible subsequent infection with bloodborne diseases.
         The agency will apply all safety regulations as outlined in the standard and
         the WRD to the workplace practices of employees and volunteers.


SAFETY MANUAL                            16                           January 1995
      This Exposure Control Plan applies to all employees and volunteers of the
      Department of Fish and Wildlife who, in the course of their assigned duties,
      have "reasonably anticipated potential for exposure to [human] blood and/or
      other potentially infectious materials."




SAFETY MANUAL                        17                            January 1995
Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                             Chapter IV


     C. Exposure Determination

        OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Act) requires employers to perform
        an exposure determination concerning which employees and volunteers may
        incur occupational exposure to human blood or other potentially infectious
        materials. The exposure determination is made without regard to the use
        of personal protective equipment. First, all job classifications in which all
        employees may be expected to incur occupational exposure, regardless of
        frequency, are listed. Also, a listing in which SOME employees may be
        expected to incur occupational exposure is required. Since not all employees
        in these categories would be expected to incur occupational exposure, tasks
        or procedures that would cause these employees to have occupational
        exposure are also required to be listed in order to clearly understand which
        employees in these categories are considered to have occupational exposure.
         The job classifications and associated tasks are as follows:

        Job classifications in which employees may be expected to incur
        occupational exposure are:

            All law enforcement job classes
                 Investigators
                 Fisheries Patrol Officers
                 Wildlife Agents
                 Fisheries Airplane pilots
                 Fisheries Patrol Sergeants
                 Wildlife Sergeants
                 Fisheries Patrol Lieutenants
                 Wildlife Captains
                 Wildlife Area Managers

            Access Area Maintenance job classes
               General Repairer

        Job classifications in which SOME employees and volunteers may be
        expected to incur occupational exposure are:

            Wildlife Area Assistant Managers
            Habitat Development Managers

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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                             Chapter IV


             Habitat Development Specialists
             Habitat Assistants
             Hatchery Managers
             Assistant Hatchery Managers
             Fish Culturists
             Fish Biologists
             Habitat Biologists
             Wildlife Biologists

        The tasks and procedures that the above job classes may perform in which
        occupational exposure may occur are:
           Performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation
           Treatment of wounds
           Contact with combative persons
           Contact with contaminated evidence or property
           Contact with contaminated waste, including sharps

        Supervisors are responsible for identifying the employees who perform
        duties in which occupational exposure may occur. Coordinate with the
        safety office.

     D. Methods of Implementation

        1.   General

             Universal precautions will be observed to prevent contact with human
             blood or other potentially infectious materials. Under circumstances in
             which differentiation between body fluid types is difficult or
             impossible, all body fluids shall be considered potentially infectious
             materials.

        2. Engineering and Work Practice Controls

             Engineering and work practice controls will be used to eliminate or
             minimize employee/volunteer exposure to human blood.         Where
             occupational exposure remains after institution of these controls,
             personal protective equipment shall also be used.


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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                              Chapter IV


            Engineering controls will be examined and maintained or replaced on a
            regular schedule to ensure their effectiveness.

            The employer will provide handwashing facilities which are readily
            accessible to employees/volunteers.

            When provision of handwashing facilities is not feasible, the employer
            will provide either an appropriate antiseptic hand cleanser in conjunction
            with clean cloth/paper towels or antiseptic towelettes.

            When antiseptic hand cleansers or towelettes are used, hands will be
            washed with soap and running water as soon as feasible.

            WDF&W requires that employees and volunteers wash their hands
            immediately or as soon as feasible after removal of gloves or other
            personal protective equipment.




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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                             Chapter IV


            Contaminated needles and other contaminated sharps will not be bent or
            recapped. Shearing or breaking of contaminated needles is prohibited.

            Eating, drinking, smoking, applying cosmetics or lip balm, and handling
            contact lenses are prohibited in work areas where there is a reasonable
            likelihood of occupational exposure to blood.

            Food and drink will not be kept in refrigerators, freezers, shelves,
            cabinets or on countertops or benchtops where blood or other
            potentially infectious materials are present.

            All procedures involving blood or other potentially infectious materials
            will be performed in such a manner as to minimize splashing, spraying,
            spattering, and generation of droplets of these substances.

            Specimens of human blood or other potentially infectious materials will
            be placed in a container which prevents leakage during collection,
            handling, processing, storage, transport, or shipping.

            a. The container for storage, transport, or shipping will be labeled or
               color-coded and closed prior to being stored, transported, or
               shipped. The label will clearly state the content of the container,
               and the contained will also have the bio-hazard label.

            b. If outside contamination of the primary container occurs, the
               primary container will be placed within a second container which
               prevents leakage during handling, processing, storage, transport, or
               shipping and is labeled or color-coded.

            c. If the specimen could puncture the primary container, the primary
               container will be placed within a secondary container which is
               puncture-resistant in addition to the above characteristics.

            Equipment which may become contaminated with human blood or other
            potentially infectious materials will be examined prior to servicing or
            shipping and will be decontaminated as necessary, unless
            decontamination of such equipment or portions of such equipment is not
            feasible.

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            a. A readily observable label in accordance with the exposure control
               plan will be attached to the equipment stating which portions remain
               contaminated.

            b. The employer will ensure that this information is conveyed to all
               affected employees/volunteers, the servicing representative, and/or
               the manufacturer, as appropriate, prior to handling, servicing, or
               shipping so that appropriate precautions will be taken.

        3. Personal Protective Equipment

            a. Provision: When there is occupational exposure to human blood, the
               employer will provide, at no cost to the employee/volunteer,
               appropriate personal protective equipment such as, but not limited
               to, gloves, face shields or masks and eye protection, and
               mouthpieces, resuscitation bags, pocket masks, or other ventilation
               devices.    Personal protective equipment will be considered
               "appropriate" only if it does not permit blood or other potentially
               infectious materials to pass through to or reach the employee's
               work clothes, street clothes, undergarments, skin, eyes, mouth, or
               other mucous membranes under normal conditions of use and for the
               duration of time which the protective equipment will be used.

            b. Use: The supervisor will ensure that the employee/volunteer uses
               appropriate personal protective equipment unless the supervisor can
               show that the employee/volunteer temporarily and briefly declined
               to use personal protective equipment when, under rare and
               extraordinary circumstances, it was the employee's/volunteer's
               professional judgment that in the specific instance its use would
               have prevented the delivery of health care or public safety services,
               or would have posed an increased hazard to the safety of the
               worker or co-worker. When the employee/volunteer makes this
               judgement, the circumstances will be documented in writing and
               forwarded through channels to the regional manager or assistant
               director.    These circumstances will be investigated by an
               investigation team convened by the Director. The purpose of the
               investigation is to determine whether changes can be instituted to

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               prevent such occurrences in the future.

            c. Accessibility: The supervisor will ensure that appropriate personal
               protective equipment in the appropriate sizes is readily accessible at
               the worksite or is issued to employees/volunteers.

            d. Cleaning, Laundering, and Disposal: The Department will clean,
               launder, and dispose of personal protective equipment required by
               this exposure control plan at no cost to the employee/volunteer.
               Captains in each region will coordinate the disposal process.

               (1) If a garment(s) is penetrated by human blood or other
                   potentially infectious materials, the garment(s) shall be removed
                   immediately or as soon as feasible.

               (2) All personal protective equipment shall be removed prior to
                   leaving the work area.




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               (3) When personal protective equipment is removed, it shall be
                   placed in an appropriately designated area or container for
                   storage, washing, decontamination or disposal.

            e. Repair and Replacement: The Department will repair or replace
               personal protective equipment as needed to maintain its
               effectiveness at no cost to the employee/volunteer.

            f. Gloves: Gloves will be worn when it can be reasonably anticipated
               that the employee may have hand contact with blood, other
               potentially infectious materials, mucous membranes, and non-intact
               skin; and when handling or touching contaminated items or surfaces.

               (1) Disposable (single use) gloves such as surgical or examination
                   gloves, will be replaced as soon as practical when contaminated
                   or as soon as feasible if they are torn, punctured, or when their
                   ability to function as a barrier is compromised.

               (2) Disposable (single use) gloves shall not be washed or
                   decontaminated for re-use.

               (3) Utility gloves may be decontaminated for re-use if the integrity
                   of the glove is not compromised. However, they must be
                   discarded if they are cracked, peeling, torn, punctured, or
                   exhibit other signs of deterioration or when their ability to
                   function as a barrier is compromised.

            g. Masks, Eye Protection, and Face Shields: Masks in combination
               with eye protection devices, such as goggles or glasses with solid
               side shields, or chin-length face shields, shall be worn whenever
               splashes, spray, spatter, or droplets of blood or other potentially
               infectious materials may be generated and eye, nose, or mouth
               contamination can be reasonably anticipated.

            h. Gowns, Aprons, and Other Protective Body Clothing: Appropriate
               protective clothing such as, but not limited to, gowns, aprons, lab
               coats, or similar outer garments will be worn in reasonably
               anticipated occupational exposure situations.       The type and

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                 characteristics will depend upon the task and degree of exposure
                 anticipated.

            i.   Surgical caps or hoods and/or shoe covers or boots will be worn in
                 instances when gross contamination can reasonably be anticipated.




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        4. Housekeeping

            a. General: The supervisor will ensure that the worksite is maintained
               in a clean and sanitary condition. If there is a reasonably
               anticipated potential for contamination from human blood and/or
               other potentially infectious materials, the supervisor will determine
               and implement an appropriate written schedule for cleaning and the
               method of decontamination based upon the location within the
               facility, type of surface to be cleaned, type of soil present, and
               tasks or procedures being performed in the area. This written
               schedule will be posted at the worksite and will be followed by all
               employees/volunteers.

            b. Cleaning/Decontamination: All equipment and environmental and
               working surfaces will be cleaned and decontaminated after contact
               with blood or other potentially infectious materials.

               (1) Contaminated work surfaces will be decontaminated with an
                   appropriate disinfectant after completion of procedures;
                   immediately or as soon as feasible when surfaces are overtly
                   contaminated or after any spill of blood or other potentially
                   infectious materials; and at the end of the work shift if the
                   surface may have become contaminated since the last cleaning.




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               (2) Protective coverings, such as plastic wrap, aluminum foil, or
                   imperviously-backed absorbent paper used to cover equipment
                   and environmental surfaces will be removed and replaced as soon
                   as feasible when they become overtly contaminated or at the
                   end of the workshift if they may have become contaminated
                   during the shift.

               (3) All bins, pails, cans, and similar receptacles intended for reuse
                   which have a reasonable likelihood for becoming contaminated
                   with blood or other potentially infectious materials will be
                   inspected and decontaminated on a regularly scheduled basis and
                   cleaned and decontaminated immediately or as soon as feasible
                   upon visible contamination.

               (4) Broken glass which may be contaminated will not be picked up
                   directly with the hands. It will be cleaned up using mechanical
                   means, such as a brush and dust pan, tongs, or forceps.

            c. Regulated Waste

               Contaminated Sharps discarding and containment.

               (1) Contaminated sharps will be discarded immediately or as soon as
                   feasible in containers that are;

                  (a)   Closable
                  (b)   Puncture resistant
                  (c)   Leakproof on sides and bottom, and
                  (d)   Labeled or color-coded

               (2) During use, containers for contaminated sharps shall be:

                  (a) Easily accessible to employees/volunteers and located as
                      close as is feasible to the immediate area where sharps are
                      used or can be reasonably anticipated to be found.

                  (b) Maintained upright throughout use; and


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                  (c) Replaced routinely and not be allowed to overfill.

               (3) When moving containers of contaminated sharps from the area
                   of use, the containers will be:

                  (a) Closed immediately prior to removal or replacement to
                      prevent spillage or protrusion of contents during handling,
                      storage, transport, or shipping;

                  (b) Placed in a secondary container if leakage is possible. The
                      second container will be:

                      i) Closable
                      ii) Constructed to contain all contents and prevent leakage
                           during handling, storage, transport, or shipping, and
                      iii) Labeled or color-coded.

               (4) Reusable containers will not be opened, emptied, or cleaned
                   manually or in any other manner which would expose
                   employees/volunteers to the risk of percutaneous injury.

               (5) Sharps which may be contaminated will not be picked up directly
                   with the hands. They will be picked up using mechanical means,
                   such as tongs or forceps.

               Other Regulated Waste containment

               (1) Regulated waste will be placed in containers which are:

                  (a) Closable
                  (b) Constructed to contain all contents and prevent leakage of
                      fluids during handling, storage, transport or shipping
                  (c) Labeled or color-coded
                  (d) Closed prior to removal to prevent spillage or protrusion of
                      contents during handling, storage, transport, or shipping.

               (2) If outside contamination of the regulated waste container
                   occurs, it will be placed in a second container. The second

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                  container will be:

                  (a) Closable
                  (b) Constructed to contain all contents and prevent leakage of
                      fluids during handling, storage, transport or shipping,
                  (c) Labeled or color-coded
                  (d) Closed prior to removal to prevent spillage or protrusion of
                      contents during handling, storage, transport, or shipping.

               Disposal of all regulated waste will be in accordance with applicable
               regulations of the county and the State of Washington.

            d. Laundry

               (1) Contaminated laundry will be handled as little as possible with a
                   minimum of agitation.




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                    (a) Contaminated laundry will be bagged or containerized at the
                        location where it was used and will not be sorted or rinsed in
                        the location of use.

                    (b) Contaminated laundry will be placed and transported in bags
                        or containers labeled or color-coded. When a facility utilizes
                        Universal Precautions in the handling of all soiled laundry,
                        alternative labeling or color-coding is sufficient if it permits
                        all employees/volunteers to recognize the containers as
                        requiring compliance with Universal Precautions.

                    (c) Whenever contaminated laundry is wet and presents a
                        reasonable likelihood of soak-through of or leakage from the
                        bag or container, the laundry will be placed and transported
                        in bags or containers which prevent soak-through and/or
                        leakage of fluids to the exterior.

                (2) The supervisor will ensure that employees/volunteers who have
                    contact with contaminated laundry wear protective gloves and
                    other appropriate personal protective equipment.

                (3) When contaminated laundry is shipped off-site to a second
                    facility which does not utilize Universal Precautions in the
                    handling of all laundry (e.g. commercial dry cleaners), the region
                    generating the contaminated laundry must place such laundry in
                    bags or containers which are labeled or color-coded. (See
                    Laundry d.(1)b. above.)

     E. Hepatitis B Vaccination Post-Exposure Evaluation and Follup-Up

        1.   General

             The Department of Fish and Wildlife will make available the hepatitis B
             vaccine and vaccination series to all employees/volunteers who have
             occupational exposure. WDF&W will make available post-exposure
             evaluation and follow-up to all employees or volunteers who have had an
             exposure incident.


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            The Department will ensure that all medical evaluations and procedures
            including the hepatitis B vaccine and vaccination series and post-
            exposure evaluation and follow-up, including prophylaxis, are:

            a. Made available at no cost to the employee/volunteer
            b. Made available to the employee/volunteer at a reasonable time and
               place
            c. Performed by or under the supervision of a licensed physician or by
               or under the supervision of another licensed healthcare
               professional, and
            d. Provided according to the recommendations of the U. S. Public
               Health Service current at the time these evaluations and procedures
               take place.

            The employer will ensure that all laboratory tests are conducted by an
            accredited laboratory at no cost to the employee/volunteer.

        2. Hepatitis B Vaccination

            Hepatitis B vaccination will be made available (after the employee or
            volunteer has received the training required in the exposure control
            plan, and within ten working days of initial assignment) to all employees
            and volunteers who have occupational exposure to human blood unless
            the employee or volunteer has previously received the complete
            hepatitis B vaccination series, antibody testing has revealed that the
            employee is immune, or the vaccine is contraindicated for medical
            reasons.

            WDF&W will not make participation in a prescreening program a
            prerequisite for receiving hepatitis B vaccination.

            If the employee/volunteer initially declines hepatitis B vaccination, but
            at a later date while still covered under the standard decides to accept
            the vaccination, WDF&W will make available hepatitis B vaccination at
            that time.

            Captains will assure that employees/volunteers who decline to accept
            hepatitis B vaccination offered by WDF&W sign a Hepatitis B

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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                             Chapter IV


            Vaccination Consent/Waiver Form (WDF&W 759, see Appendix A).
            Captains are responsible to coordinate hepatitis B vaccinations in their
            region for all employees who are covered by this standard.

            If a routine booster dose(s) of hepatitis B vaccine is recommended by
            the U. S. Public Health Service at a future date, such booster dose(s)
            will be made available.

        3. Post-exposure Evaluation and Follow-Up

            Following a report of an exposure incident, WDF&W will make
            immediately available to the exposed employee/volunteer a confidential
            medical evaluation and follow-up, including at least the following
            elements:

            a. Documentation of the route(s) of exposure, and the circumstances
               under which the exposure incident occurred.

            b. Confidential identification and confidential documentation of the
               source individual, in accordance with WAC 246-100 (See Appendix
               F.)

               (1) The source individual's blood shall be tested in accordance with
                   WAC 246-100 in order to determine HBV and HIV infectivity.




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               (2) Results of the source individual's testing shall be made available
                   to the exposed employee or volunteer, and the employee or
                   volunteer shall be informed of applicable confidentiality laws and
                   regulations (WAC 246-100) concerning disclosure of the identity
                   and infectious status of the source individual.

            c. Collection and testing of blood for HBV and HIV serological status.

               (1) The exposed employee's or volunteer's blood will be collected as
                   soon as feasible and tested after consent is obtained in
                   accordance with WAC 246-100.

               (2) If the employee/volunteer consents to baseline blood collection,
                   but does not give consent at that time for HIV serologic testing,
                   the sample will be preserved for at least 90 days. If, within 90
                   days of the exposure incident, the employee elects to have the
                   baseline sample tested, such testing will be done as soon as
                   feasible.

            d. Post-exposure prophylaxis, when medically             indicated,   as
               recommended by the U. S. Public Health Service.

            e. Counseling.

            f. Evaluation of reported illnesses.

        4. Information Provided to the Healthcare Professional

            The safety office will ensure that the healthcare professional
            responsible for the employee's or volunteer's hepatitis B vaccination is
            provided a copy of the exposure control plan, the standard (see
            Appendix F) and WRD. Captains have the WRD available in regional
            offices.

            WDF&W will ensure that the healthcare professional evaluating an
            employee or volunteer after an exposure incident is provided the
            following information: (See post-exposure packet provided to all
            employees. Coordinate with the safety office.)

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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                             Chapter IV




            a. A copy of the standard and WRD
            b. A description of the exposed employee's or volunteer's duties as
               they relate to the exposure incident
            c. Documentation of the route(s) of exposure and circumstances under
               which exposure occurred
            d. Results of the source individual's blood testing, if available; and in
               accordance with WAC 246-100.
            e. All medical records relevant to the appropriate treatment of the
               employee or volunteer including vaccination status which are the
               Department of Fish and Wildlife's responsibility to maintain.

        5. Healthcare Professional's Written Opinion

            The safety office will obtain and provide the employee or volunteer with
            a copy of the evaluating healthcare professional's written opinion within
            15 days of the completion of the evaluation.

            a. The healthcare professional's written opinion for Hepatitis B
               vaccination will be limited to whether Hepatitis B vaccination is
               indicated for an employee, and if the employee or volunteer has
               received such vaccination.

            b. The healthcare professional's written opinion for post-exposure
               evaluation and follow-up will be limited to the following information:

               (1) That the employee or volunteer has been informed of the results
                   of the evaluation; and
               (2) That the employee or volunteer has been told about any medical
                   conditions resulting from exposure to human blood or other
                   potentially infectious materials which require further evaluation
                   or treatment.

            c. All other findings or diagnoses will remain confidential and will not
               be included in the written report.

        6. Medical Recordkeeping


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             Medical records required by the exposure control plan shall be
             maintained by WDF&W, and must be kept confidentially for the duration
             of employment plus thirty years. The safety office is responsible to
             maintain these records.

     F. Communication of Hazards to Employees

        1.   Labels and Signs

             Warning labels will be affixed to containers of regulated waste,
             refrigerators and freezers containing blood or other potentially
             infectious material; and other containers used to store, transport or
             ship human blood or other potentially infectious materials.

             Labels required by this section will include the following legend:




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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                              Chapter IV




                       BIOHAZARD

            Labels will be fluorescent orange or orange-red or predominantly so,
            with lettering or symbols in a contrasting color.

            Labels will either be an integral part of the container or will be affixed
            as close as feasible to the container by string, wire, adhesive, or other
            method that prevents their loss or unintentional removal.

            Red bags or red containers may be substituted for labels.

            Individual containers of blood or other potentially infectious materials
            that are placed in a labeled container during storage, transport,
            shipment or disposal are exempted from the labeling requirement.

            Labels required for contaminated equipment will be in accordance with
            this paragraph and shall also state which portions of the equipment

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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                            Chapter IV


             remain contaminated.

             Regulated waste that has been decontaminated need not be labeled or
             color-coded.

             Signs: Apply requirements stated for labels.



     G. Information and Training

        1.   Supervisors will ensure that all employees or volunteers with
             occupational exposure to human blood participate in a training program
             which must be provided at no cost to the employee and during working
             hours.

        2. Training will be provided as follows:

             a. At the time of initial assignment to tasks where occupational
                exposure may take place;
             b. Within 90 days after the effective date of the standard; and
             c. At least annually thereafter.

        3. For employees or volunteers who have received training on bloodborne
           pathogens in the year preceding the effective date of the standard,
           only training with respect to the provisions of the standard which were
           not included need be provided.

        4. Annual training for all employees or volunteers will be provided within
           one year of their previous training.

        5. Supervisors will provide additional training when changes such as
           modification of tasks or procedures or institution of new tasks or
           procedures affect the employee's or volunteer's occupational exposure
           to human blood. The additional training may be limited to addressing the
           new exposures created.

        6. Material appropriate in content and vocabulary to educational level,
           literacy, and the language of employees or volunteers will be used.

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        7. The training program will contain at a minimum the following elements:

            a. An accessible copy of the regulatory text of the standard and an
               explanation of its contents.

            b. A general explanation of the epidemiology and symptoms of
               bloodborne diseases;

            c. An explanation of the modes of transmission of bloodborne
               pathogens;

            d. An explanation of the employer's exposure control plan and the
               means by which the employee or volunteer can obtain a copy of the
               written plan.

            e. An explanation of the appropriate methods for recognizing tasks and
               other activities that may involve exposure to human blood and other
               potentially infectious materials;

            f. An explanation of the use and limitations of methods that will
               prevent or reduce exposure to human blood including appropriate
               engineering controls, work practices, and personal protective
               equipment;

            g. Information on the types, proper use, location, removal, handling,
               decontamination and disposal of personal protective equipment.

            h. An explanation of the basis for selection of personal protective
               equipment;

            i.   Information on the hepatitis B vaccine, including information on its
                 efficacy, safety, method of administration, the benefits of being
                 vaccinated, and that the vaccine and vaccination will be offered free
                 of charge;

            j.   Information on the appropriate actions to take and persons to
                 contact in an emergency involving human blood or other potentially

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                  infectious materials.

             k. An explanation of the procedure to follow if an exposure incident
                occurs, including the method of reporting the incident and the
                medical follow-up that will be made available;

             l.   Information on the post-exposure evaluation and follow-up that
                  WDFW is required to provide for the employee or volunteer
                  following an exposure incident.

             m. An explanation of the signs and labels and/or color coding required.

             n. An opportunity for interactive questions and answers with the
                person conducting the training session.

        8. The person conducting the training will be knowledgeable in the subject
           matter covered by the elements contained in the training program as it
           relates to the workplace that the training will address.

     H. Recordkeeping

        1.   Medical Records

             a. The employer will establish and maintain an accurate record for each
                employee or volunteer with occupational exposure to human blood.




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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                               Chapter IV


            b. The record will include:

               (1) The name and social security number of the employee or
                   volunteer.
               (2) A copy of the employee's or volunteer's hepatitis B vaccination
                   status including the dates of all the hepatitis B vaccinations and
                   any medical records relative to the employee's or volunteer's
                   ability to receive vaccination.
               (3) A copy of all results of examinations, medical testing, and follow-
                   up procedures.
               (4) The employer's copy of the healthcare professional's written
                   opinion.
               (5) A copy of the information provided to the healthcare
                   professional.

            c. Confidentiality

               The employer will ensure that employee or volunteer medical records
               required by this plan are:

               (1) Kept confidential; and
               (2) Are not disclosed or reported without the employee's or
                   volunteer's express written consent to any person within or
                   outside the workplace except as required by this plan, or as may
                   be required by law.

            d. The employer will maintain the records required by this plan for at
               least the duration of employment plus 30 years in accordance with
               OSHA/WISHA standards.

        2. Training Records

            a. Training records will include the following information:

               (1) The dates of the training sessions;
               (2) The contents or a summary of the training sessions;
               (3) The names and qualifications of persons conducting the training;
                   and

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               (4) The names and job titles of all persons attending the training
                   sessions.

            b. Training records will be maintained for three years from the date on
               which the training occurred.

        3. Availability

            a. The safety office will ensure that all records required to be
               maintained by this plan will be made available upon request to the
               WISHA (L & I) inspector, and as noted below:




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Infectious Disease Exposure Control Program                           Chapter IV


               (1) Employee or volunteer training records required will be made
                   available upon request to the WISHA inspector.

               (2) Employee or volunteer medical records required by this
                   paragraph shall be provided upon request for examination and
                   copying to the subject employee or volunteer, to anyone having
                   written consent of the subject employee or volunteer, or to the
                   WISHA inspector.

        4. Transfer of Records

            a. WDFW will comply with the requirements involving transfer of
               records.




SAFETY MANUAL                         42                           January 1995
                         Department of Fish and Wildlife

                              SAFETY MANUAL



V.   HAZARD COMMUNICATION PROGRAM

     The Department of Fish & Wildlife will supply safety and health hazard
     information to employees for all hazardous materials they may come in contact
     with as part of their employment.

     The Hazard Communication Program is written in accordance with WAC 296-62-
     054.

     A. General Requirements

        Each facility in the Department of Fish & Wildlife that uses or stores
        hazardous materials will have available to all employees the following
        information: 1) Written Hazard Communication Program; 2) an inventory of
        all hazardous materials used or stored at that facility; 3) Material Safety
        Data Sheet (MSDS) for each hazardous substance for that facility.

        1.   Written Hazard Communication Program

             This section of the Hazard Communication Program Manual is the
             written plan describing how the Department of Fish & Wildlife will meet
             the hazard communication requirements.

        2. Hazardous Materials Inventory

             a. Inventory List

                Each facility must have an up-to-date list of all hazardous materials
                used or stored at that location. Generally this list is printed from
                the hazard communication database (but any list will work) and
                placed in the same three ring binder with the MSDS's.

             b. Inventory Updates


SAFETY MANUAL                           43                            January 1995
           On a quarterly basis the Safety Office will send out a notice to each
           facility, with an inventory report for that location, and request that
           they conduct an inventory of hazardous materials. All changes to
           the inventory are reported to the Safety Office and recorded on a
           computerized database. Quarterly updates are generally requested
           on January 1, April 1, July 1, and October 1.




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        3. Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS)

             The MSDS's are the primary written means of conveying safety
             information to employees. They are the source of information for
             determining the hazards of a particular product and what personal
             protection employees should use.

             Each facility owned or operated by the Department of Fish & Wildlife
             must have an MSDS for each hazardous product used at that facility.
             (There are some exceptions to this requirement. See WAC 296-62-
             0543 (6)(h)(i).) In addition to this the Safety Office maintains a central
             MSDS library in Olympia.

             If a facility does not have an MSDS for a particular product, one should
             be requested from the Safety Office in Olympia.

             MSDS's should be placed in a three ring binder and be available to all
             employees.

        4. Labeling

             All hazardous material containers will be labeled with the identity of the
             hazardous materials(s) and appropriate hazard warnings.

     B. Training

        All employees who are required to work with or around hazardous materials
        will receive training on the following: 1) potential hazards for substances
        being used, including protection measures; 2) location and availability of the
        written Hazard Communication Program, including the list of hazardous
        materials for the facility, and MSDS's; 3) the hazard communication
        program and how to use it.

        There are two phases to the Department's training program. Both use a
        manual that facility managers are responsible to use to train their
        employees. Employees must be trained before using any hazardous material.

        1.   General Training

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Hazardous Communication Program                                       Chapter V




           Will teach how to read and interpret MSDS's, chemical hazard
           identification and protection procedures.

        2. Specific Training

           Will be a detailed review of MSDS's of products used at that facility.




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           Note: While both phases of training are required before an employee
           works with a hazardous material, there may be little time available for
           training before he/she starts working. An employee will be restricted
           to the use of a single product, if specific training on that product is
           done first. General Training should be done within 30 days from the
           date hired.

     C. Contractors

        Contractors working at a Fish & Wildlife-owned facility will be informed of
        potential hazardous material exposures and protection measures that are
        required.




SAFETY MANUAL                          47                           January 1995
                         Department of Fish and Wildlife

                               SAFETY MANUAL


VI.   HAZARD COMMUNICATION TRAINER'S GUIDE

      General training is required for all employees who work with hazardous
      substances as part of their normal duties. It is the facility manager's
      responsibility to provide this training for each of his/her employees.

      Each employee must receive "general" and "specific" training before being
      allowed to work with or in the area of hazardous substances. If circumstances
      arise where an employee is required to use a hazardous substance as part of
      this or her normal work duties, and has not yet received the general training, he
      or she may be allowed to use a specific product by completing Part 1 and Part 2
      of the Specific Training Trainer's Guide.

      A. Introduction

         1.   HazCom Standard

              The Hazard Communication Standard or Worker Right-to-Know requires
              that employees be informed of hazardous chemicals in the workplace.
              The law was established in order to ensure safe working conditions for
              employees. It came about as a result of increased hazards and injuries
              to workers while on the job.

         2. What the Hazard Communication Standard Requires

              The law Specifies that:

              a. There must be a written plan describing how the Department of Fish
                 & Wildlife will meet hazard communication requirements. This
                 written program will be made available to all employees.

              b. All employees must have access to Material Safety Data Sheets
                 (MSDS's) and a list of hazardous substances used at his or her work
                 location.


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         c. Containers of hazardous materials must be adequately labeled to
            alert employees to potential hazards.

         d. Finally, employees must be trained in the hazards of chemicals in
            their work place.




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        3. Purpose of Training

             Training will consist of four sections, Chemical Hazards, MSDS's,
             Labeling, and the Department of Fish & Wildlife's HazCom system The
             purpose is to familiarize you with the following:

             -   Chemical Hazards in the work place, how chemicals can enter the
                 body and what kind of hazards they can present.

             -   MSDS's and how to put to use the information they contain.

             -   Product labeling and how they are used as indicators of the hazards
                 of a product.



             -   The Fish & Wildlife HazCom System and how to use it to get needed
                 information.

     B. Chemical Hazards



        1.   Objectives

             This section of the training will help you to understand:

             -   How hazardous substances can enter the body.

             -   The different types of hazards substances that can be present (will
                 it burn your skin, will it present a fire hazard, will it cause cancer).

             -   How to recognize when an overexposure to a hazardous substance
                 occurs.

             -   What adverse health effects hazardous substances can have and
                 how to protect yourself from them.

        2. Routes of Entry


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           There are three routes by which hazardous chemicals can enter the
           body. Most chemicals can enter the body by more than one route.

           a. Inhalation

               If hazardous materials are inhaled, they can irritate, scar, or even
               paralyze the lungs. Some particles, like asbestos, if inhaled, may
               never leave your lungs and can cause cancer at a later date.

               Hazardous chemicals can be absorbed by the lungs and produce
               adverse effects in other parts of the body.

               Inhalation is a concern when substances are in the form of gases,
               vapors, mists, dusts or fumes.

           b. Absorption

               When a hazardous chemical comes into contact with the skin or eyes
               it may cause burns, irritation, rashes, or it may be absorbed through
               the skin to produce toxic effects elsewhere in the body. Be aware
               that some materials can enter the body without necessarily burning
               or irritating the skin.

               Liquids are the most common source of this type of exposure, but
               mists and vapors can cause problems as well.

               MSDS's sometimes use the words "contact" and "absorption"
               interchangeably.

           c. Ingestion

               Ingestion is the least common route of exposure. It usually occurs
               when people eat, drink or smoke without washing their hands.

               Good personal hygiene is the best guard against accidental ingestion
               of hazardous chemicals.

        3. Types of Hazards

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           a. Toxic

           b. Caustic/Corrosive

           c. Carcinogen/Mutagen/Teratogen

           d. Flammable/Combustible

           e. Explosive/Reactive

           f. Irritant

           g. Sensitizer



           Understanding the types of hazards potentially encountered in the
           workplace will help reduce the possibility of exposure. Be aware a
           chemical can present more than one hazard at a time.

           a. Toxic
              A material is considered toxic if it can cause injury or illness.
              Almost anything can be toxic, if the exposure is in a sufficiently
              large amount.

               Levels of toxicity range from substances that are highly toxic (like
               some pesticides) to those that are considered toxic when not used
               safely like strong detergents.

               Substances can have acute, delayed, or chronic affects.

               If a substance is acutely toxic, affects from a single exposure occur
               rapidly and can range from mild irritation to serious illness soon
               after exposure.

               Delayed toxicity means that an acute exposure may not show signs
               for hours or even days.

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               Chronic affects can cause health problems after repeated small
               exposures, but affects may not show up for years. Chronic health
               affects could be liver or kidney problems etc.

               Toxic substances may enter the body through any of the three
               exposure routes (inhalation, contact/ absorption, or ingestion).

           b. Caustic/Corrosive

               Causes visible injury, like a burn, to living tissue. Acids and bases
               are caustic and corrosive.

           c. Carcinogen/Mutagen/Teratogen (tear'-ah-toe-gen)

               Chemicals that can cause changes in the cells of your body.
               Chemicals can be classified in these groups even if only suspected to
               cause these changes.

               Cancer = carcinogen, mutagen = genetic damage, teratogen = birth
               defects.

           d. Flammable/Combustible

               Some chemicals present a potential physical hazard to employees
               from fire.

               Flammable liquids produce fumes or vapors that can burn at
               temperatures of 100 F or lower.

               Combustible materials usually require higher temperatures and a
               sustained heat source.

           e. Explosive/Reactive

               -   Explosive chemicals burn very rapidly. The burning spreads at a
                   violent or explosive rate. The heat and the pressure produced by
                   the burning creates a shock wave. A can of un-vented solvent

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                   sitting in the sun on a hot day is potentially explosive.

               -   Reactive chemicals give off heat and gasses when they contact
                   an incompatible substance. This can occur when acids and
                   caustics come in contact, and some materials are reactive to
                   water or air.

               Many of these reactions are violent and can splatter the chemical.

               They can produce and ignite explosive gases. Some are oxidizing
               agents which means they give off enough oxygen and heat to start
               and sustain their own fire.

               Reactions can be avoided by separating the materials in storage and
               during handling.

               One common example is the mixing of ammonia and bleach, which
               produces deadly toxic chlorine gas. DON'T MIX CHEMICALS!
               except by manufacturer or supervisor instruction.

               Products such as bleach (sodium hypochlorite) can become unstable
               at elevated temperatures. Some manufacturers recommend avoiding
               temperatures over 90 F.

           f. Irritant

               An irritant is a chemical that inflames or irritates tissues on
               contact, including the lungs. The effect is usually not permanent.

               Examples of some irritants are: ammonia, formaldehyde and gasoline,
               but there are many products that will produce some irritation.




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           g. Sensitizer

               A sensitizer is a substance that on first exposure causes little or no
               reaction, but which on repeated exposure may cause an allergic
               reaction in some individuals.

               The reaction to the exposure is not necessarily limited to the
               contact site. Skin sensitization (skin rash) is the most common form
               of sensitization, although sensitization of the breathing passages is
               also known to occur.

               Some common sensitizers are : Toluene (which affects the
               respiratory tract), and Epoxy resins (skin).

        4. Chemical Hazards

           a. Acid and Bases

           b. Asphyxiants

           b. Dusts

           d. Metals and Welding Fumes

           e. Pesticides

           f. Plastics

           g. Solvents

           h. Combustion By-Products

           The following discussed eight general categories of chemicals. Each
           group has hazard that can cause different affects. Understanding the
           hazards of each group can help employees protect themselves.




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                      ACIDS & BASES



           HEALTH HAZARD:            CORROSIVE

           TARGET ORGANS:                EYES
                                         LUNGS
                                         SKIN

           PHYSICAL:                     OXIDIZER
                                         WATER REACTIVE

           ROUTES OF ENTRY:          CONTACT
                                       INGESTION
                                       INHALATION

           RECOMMENDATIONS:              NO SMOKING
                                         PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
                                         VENTILATION

           a. Acids and Bases

               Definition: Acids and bases can be a liquid, gas or solid. If strong
               enough, they can burn skin and dissolve or corrode metal. Acids and
               bases when mixed together will neutralize each other.

               Examples: Strong acids include Picric acid. Weak acids include, boric
               acid, and vinegar. Many cleaning compounds are bases. Examples of
               strong bases are sodium hydroxide which can be found in caustic and
               lye, also potassium hydroxide which is found in caustic potash. Weak
               bases include sodium carbonate or soda ash and calcium hydroxide
               commonly called slaked lime.

               Health Hazards: Strong acids and bases can cause severe burns.

               Target organs: Eyes, Skin, and lungs.

               Physical hazards: Some acids are oxidizers and can cause fires and

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               ignite organic materials like paper or sawdust.

               Acids may react vigorously with water and give off heat, or dissolve
               metal. If they come into contact with certain organic solvents they
               can cause explosions.

               Usual Routes of Entry:       Contact or absorption, inhalation and
               ingestion.

               Recommended Protective Measures: No smoking. Acid proof
               clothing, gloves and goggles should be chosen when splash and
               contact are possible.

               Acid should always be added to water (rather than water to acid) so
               that the reaction heat generated will be rapidly diluted.

               Store acids and bases separately from each other. Also store both
               of these away from any organic materials, solvents and other
               combustible materials.

               Ventilation or respiratory protection may be required in certain
               situations. Read the MSDS!

                          ASPHYXIANTS

               HEALTH HAZARD:            SUFFOCATION

               TARGET ORGANS:            LUNGS

               ROUTES OF ENTRY: INHALATION

               RECOMMENDATIONS: AIR TESTING
                                PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
                                VENTILATION

           b. Asphyxiants

               Definition: Chemicals that reduce the level of oxygen in the air or

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               reduce the bodies ability to carry oxygen. They do this by displacing
               air in a breathing space. Chemicals like carbon monoxide (car
               exhaust) reduce the bloods ability to carry oxygen.

               Asphyxiation is especially a concern when working in a confined
               space.

               Examples: Carbon monoxide (engine exhaust) (reduces the bloods
               ability to carry oxygen), helium, nitrogen, methane and other gases.

               Health Hazards: Suffocation from lack of oxygen.

               Usual Routes of Entry: Inhalation.

               Recommended Protective Measures:          Adequate ventilation is
               absolutely necessary. Air supplying respirators must be used when
               oxygen level is inadequate.

               Signs and Symptoms of Exposure: "Air Hunger", bluish skin,
               impaired coordination and judgement, panic, unconsciousness and
               death.
                             DUSTS

               HEALTH HAZARD:            IRRITANT

               TARGET ORGANS:            EYES
                                         LUNGS
                                         SKIN

               PHYSICAL:                 PYROPHORIC

               ROUTES OF ENTRY: CONTACT
                                  INHALATION

               RECOMMENDATIONS: NO SMOKING
                                PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
                                VENTILATION


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           c. Dusts

               Definition: Small particles of solids.

               Examples: Coal dust, cotton fibers, fiberglass insulation, asbestos
               fibers, silica, wood dust or other materials released from grinding or
               sanding work.

               Health Hazards: Dusts are irritants.

               Target organs: Irritation of eyes, skin and lungs, clogging or
               scarring of the lungs which leads to difficult breathing.

               Physical Hazards:      Some wood dusts may ignite easily or
               spontaneously creating serious fire hazards. Some dusts may cause
               an allergic reaction. Asbestos is known to cause cancer.

               Usual Routes of Entry: Contact, inhalation.

               Recommended Protective Measures: No smoking. Vent-less goggles
               should be used. Ventilation or respirator is recommended. Special
               equipment and certification is required to work with asbestos.




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                      METALS & WELDING FUMES

               HEALTH HAZARD:             SENSITIZER
                                          TOXIC/HIGHLY TOXIC

               TARGET ORGANS:             LIVER
                                          LUNGS
                                          KIDNEYS
                                          NERVOUS SYSTEM/BRAIN
                                          REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM

               ROUTES OF ENTRY:           CONTACT
                                          INGESTION
                                          INHALATION

               RECOMMENDATIONS: AIR TESTING
                                PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
                                VENTILATION

           d. Metals and Welding Fumes

               Definition: Highly conductive solid material normally having a high
               tensile strength.

               Examples: Metals are often found in coloring pigments of paints as
               well as welding materials. Welding fumes contain metal particles
               suspended in the air that are released during welding. Welding
               fumes also contain fluxes, coatings and vapors from de-greasers.
               Welding fumes from galvanized or painted metals are toxic, and
               fumes from alloy steel or high strength steel are highly toxic.

               Many paints contain metals, especially traffic line and marine paints.
                If there is metal in a paint, it will usually be identified in the
               product name (like Zinc Chromate Primer).

               Metals are also found in storage batteries and leaded gasoline.

               Health Hazards: Metals and welding fumes are toxic, highly toxic

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               and sensitizers.

               Target organs: The brain or nervous system, liver, kidney, heart and
               lungs,

               Usual Routes of Entry: All (inhalation, absorption and ingestion).

               Recommended Protective Measures: Wear gloves and splash goggles
               if contact with skin or eyes may occur. Respiratory protection is
               recommended and required in certain situations. Read the MSDS!

               Symptoms of Exposure: Central nervous system depression
               (dizziness, loss of coordination, poor judgement, drowsiness) which
               can lead to coma or death. "Metal Flume Fever" (flu-like disease
               lasting about 24 hours without known further complications).

                          PESTICIDES

               HEALTH HAZARD:            CARCINOGEN
                                         IRRITANT
                                         TOXIC/HIGHLY TOXIC

               TARGET ORGANS:            EYES
                                         SKIN
                                         LUNGS
                                         LIVER
                                         KIDNEYS
                                         NERVOUS SYSTEM/BRAIN
                                         REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM

               ROUTES OF ENTRY:          CONTACT
                                         INGESTION
                                         INHALATION

               RECOMMENDATIONS: NO SMOKING
                                PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
                                VENTILATION


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           e. Pesticides

               Definition: Chemicals used to kill insects (insecticides), rodents
               (rodenticides), fungi (fungicides) and plants (herbicides).

               Examples: Insecticides- Diazinon, Malathion, Sevin, Raid, Entacide,
               Orthene. Herbicides- Roundup, Weedone, Cleancrop, Casoron,
               Garlon, Tordon, Banvel, Princep, Diquat. Fungicide- Benlate, Cyprex,
               Copper Sulfate, Atco. Rodenticides- D-con mouse or rat killer,
               Force's Mole or Gopher killer, Ramik Green Bait Packs.

               Health Hazards: Pesticides can be toxic, highly toxic, an irritant
               and a carcinogen.

               Target organs: Brain or nervous system, lung, eye or skin irritation,
               kidney, liver or heart, reproductive toxicity (toxic to unborn baby or
               damage reproductive capabilities), and cancer.

               Usual Routes of Entry: All (Inhalation, Contact, Absorption, and
               Ingestion).

               Recommended Protective Measures: Personal protective equipment
               is very important when using pesticides. Impervious clothing, splash
               goggles, and gloves are required and after use should be discarded
               or laundered. Respiratory protection is recommended and required
               in certain situations. Read the MSDS!

                           PLASTICS

               HEALTH HAZARD:             CARCINOGEN
                                          IRRITANT
                                          SENSITIZER
                                          TOXIC/HIGHLY TOXIC

               TARGET ORGANS:             EYES
                                          LUNGS
                                          SKIN
                                          LIVER

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                                         NERVOUS SYSTEM/BRAIN

               PHYSICAL:                 EXPLOSIVE
                                         FLAMMABLE
                                         UNSTABLE

               ROUTES OF ENTRY: CONTACT
                                  INGESTION
                                  INHALATION

               RECOMMENDATIONS: AIR TESTING
                                NO SMOKING
                                PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
                                VENTILATION

           f. Plastics

               Definition: Plastics are complex organic compounds that are capable
               of being molded into various shapes. They are formed by the linking
               of chemical building blocks called "Monomers".

               Examples: PVC pipe, dacron, nylon, poly-urethane, latex, silicone,
               isoprene, neoprene. Many adhesives, epoxies, and glues for PVC pipe
               are considered in this group.

               Health hazards: Plastics are carcinogenic, strong irritants and
               sensitizers, toxic and highly toxic.

               Target organs: Some can damage the brain, nervous system, liver,
               lungs, eyes and skin or cause cancer.
               Physical hazards: - Plastics are explosive and flammable, and
               combustion releases toxic and corrosive gases. They can also be
               unstable.

               Usual Routes of Entry: All (Inhalation, Contact, Absorption and
               Ingestion).

               Recommended Protective Measures: Personal protective equipment

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               is very important while using and making plastics or fighting fires.
               Splash goggles, gloves, ventilation or respirators may be required.
               See the MSDS for choice of gloves and respirators. Ignition
               sources should be banned from the area.

                          SOLVENTS



               HEALTH HAZARD:            IRRITANT
                                         TOXIC

               TARGET ORGANS:            EYES
                                         LUNGS
                                         SKIN
                                         LIVER
                                         KIDNEYS
                                         NERVOUS SYSTEM/BRAIN
                                         HEART

               PHYSICAL:                 FLAMMABLE
                                         PYROPHORIC

               ROUTES OF ENTRY:          CONTACT
                                         INGESTION
                                         INHALATION

           RECOMMENDATIONS:              NO SMOKING
                                         PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT
                                         VENTILATION

           g. Solvents

               Definitions: Solvents are chemicals in which other chemicals
               selectively dissolve.

               Examples: Gasoline, Benzene, Toluene, Paint Thinner, Lacquer
               Thinner, Mineral Spirits, Turpentine, Acetone, Xylene, Isopropyl
               Alcohol, Formaldehyde.

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               Health Hazards: Solvents are toxic and irritants.

               Target organs: - Can damage brain or nervous system, and cause
               central nervous system depression. Some solvents (especially the
               chlorinated ones) cause kidney and/or liver damage, sensitization,
               heart rhythm abnormalities and are associated with cancer.
               Chlorinated solvents also react with high temperature sources (like
               cigarettes) to form new toxic chemicals.

               Physical hazards: Solvents can be flammable or combustible, and can
               under go spontaneous combustion (pyrophoric).

               Usual Routes of Entry: All (Inhalation, Contact, Absorption and
               Ingestion).

               Recommended Protective Measures: Smoking and other ignition
               sources should be banned from the area. When skin or eye contact
               is possible, appropriate gloves and goggles should be used. Choice of
               glove material is especially important and depends on the specific
               solvent since "pass-through" often occurs.            Ventilation or
               respiratory protection is recommended.

               Discard solvent-soaked rags in proper containers to prevent
               spontaneous combustion. Read the MSDS for specific information
               on safety equipment.

           h. Combustion By Products

               There are some chemicals "manufactured" in the workplace that are
               not accompanied by MSDS's. Anytime you run fuel powered engines
               you are creating combustion gases - carbon monoxide, nitrogen
               oxides and some ozone are common.

               These gases are lung and eye irritants and damage the blood's
               ability to carry oxygen to the tissues.

               Also, burning wood and other refuse can create toxic gases such as

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                carbon monoxide or dioxins. Many materials undergo chemical change
                during combustion and may become harmful.

        5. Target Organ Effects

             Certain chemicals may present a hazard to specific body organs. These
             chemicals concentrate on a particular organ and can cause injury. Body
             organs which may be affected include: the lungs, liver, kidneys, heart,
             and eyes.

             Often the original site of contact may be quite distant from the
             affected organ. For example, absorbing a liquid through the skin of your
             hands a little each day over a long period of time may result in
             decreased ability for the liver to function properly.

             It is important to recognize the connections between signs and
             symptoms of exposure to a chemical, and the actual effects of
             exposure.

     C. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

        1.   Objectives

             This part of the manual will help you to understand the basic information
             presented on an MSDS.

             You will be able to use an MSDS to find the health hazards and
             protection measures for a product.

        2. What is an MSDS?

             The MSDS or Material Safety Data Sheet is the primary written means
             of conveying safety information to employees.

             Manufacturers are required to develop an MSDS for every hazardous
             material they produce.

             MSDS's are usually two to three pages in length and must contain

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           technical data about a product.

           MSDS's are the source of information for determining the hazards of a
           particular product and what personal protection you should use.

           Use the MSDS to get more detailed information, rather than relying on
           the label alone.

           The MSDS is divided into sections. There are no set formats for
           MSDS's. One manufacturer may have the information displayed one
           way, and another manufacturer will have the information displayed
           another way, but the same required information should all be there.




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        3. MSDS Data Sections




                                    SECTION 1

     Material Identification: (Section 1) This section includes the manufacturer's
     name, address, phone number, the chemical name, trade name of the product,
     synonyms, or other names the product is known by, chemical family and chemical
     formula.

     Notice that some places there is N.A. or Not Applicable, this shows that some
     information is not available or is unknown but no space can be left blank. If you
     have an MSDS with blank spaces notify your supervisor or the Department's
     Safety Office.




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                                 SECTION TWO

     Hazardous Ingredients: (Section 2) This section lists by percent all ingredients
     with 1 percent or more of the product's total weight. It also gives the
     Threshold Limit Value (TLV). The TLV is defined as the concentration of the
     product in the air to which nearly all persons can be exposed day after day,
     eight hours a day, 40 hours a week, over a working lifetime without adverse
     health effects.

     The unit of measure is usually parts per million (ppm). If a chemical has a TLV
     of 5 ppm ,that means 5 parts of the chemical per million parts of air.

     You may not know the actual TLV in a work situation, but this information can be
     an indicator of how toxic a product is. For example: If a substance has a TLV of
     1 ppm it will be much more toxic than a value of 1000 ppm, so personal
     protection equipment should be a primary concern.



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     Notice that on this sample MSDS, which is for sodium hypochlorite, or
     household bleach, under TLV it says unknown. This points out that not all
     hazardous chemicals will have a TLV.




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                                    SECTION 3

     Physical Data: (Section 3) This section includes all the physical properties of
     the material such as appearance and odor.

     Familiarity with the physical properties of a chemical helps employees to
     understand how it will behave.

     For example, if a flammable material has a vapor density greater than one, that
     means it is heavier than air and will settle in low areas where it could become a
     potential explosion hazard.

     A gas that settles in low areas will displace oxygen creating a hazard if you are
     working in a low area.




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                                   SECTION 4

     Fire and Explosion Data: (Section 4) This section includes the fire and
     explosion information about the material.

     The flash point indicates the temperature at which the product can easily catch
     on fire. The lower the flash point, the more flammable the material is.

     Fire fighting techniques and correct fire equipment are also included.

     Some materials create toxic gases in fire situations, this information is
     provided under "unusual fire and explosion hazards".




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                                   SECTION 5

     Health Hazard Data: (Section 5) This section contains information on the
     effects that a substance has to your health. It most often is separated into
     the acute and chronic health effects.

        Acute indicates an effect that takes place soon after exposure. It is a
        strong, and usually brief condition that develops rapidly.

        Examples include dizziness, nausea, skin rashes, sore throat, tearing of the
        eyes, unconsciousness, and even death.

        Chronic it indicates a slow developing, often long lasting health effect. It
        may take months or even years to develop after exposure.

        Examples include irreversible damage to certain organs like your kidney or
        liver and may cause cancer.

     Also included in this section are the primary routes of entry, maximum exposure

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     limits, signs and symptoms of exposure, and toxic properties including
     carcinogenic (cancer causing) determinations, and most importantly the first aid
     procedures.




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                                   SECTION 6



     Reactivity Data: (section 6) This section refers to the stability of a substance
     and its ability to change when exposed to other materials and the environment.

     Also included are conditions or other substances that must be avoided. This
     information is especially important when determining how to safely handle and
     store the product.

     For example, chlorine (calcium hypochlorite) reacts to heat and must be stored
     in a cool area (not over 90 - 100 F.), Hydrochloric acid reacts with
     Formaldehyde and must be stored separately.

     Some products may undergo hazardous polymerization (where molecules combine
     to form other larger molecules) or they may undergo hazardous decomposition
     (the by products of a chemical when heated or burned).




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                                 SECTION 7

     Spill or Leak Procedures: (Section 7) This section contains information on
     environmental hazards, containment, cleanup procedures, and waste disposal
     methods related to spill and leaks.




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                                  SECTION 8

     Special Protection Information: (Section 8) This section includes information
     about personal protection equipment, ventilation systems, medical surveillance
     and other precautions.




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                                   SECTION 9

     Special Precautions: (Section 9) This section includes information on the proper
     handling and storage of materials, special labeling and packaging instructions,
     and emergency phone number.

     Remember, an MSDS must contain all of this information, but not necessarily in
     the order or format illustrated. The same basic information is required.

     Some MSDS's contain technical and/or medical terminology that may be
     difficult to understand. Use the Glossary of Terms. You may want to put it in
     the binder that contains your MSDS's.

     If for some reason you don't yet have an MSDS for a product and you must use
     the product, then all the precautions outlined by the manufacturer must be
     followed with out exception!




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     D. Product Labeling

        1.   Objectives

             The "product labeling" section will explain how labels are used as
             indicators to identify hazardous substances.

             -   You will know what information must be on a label.

             -   You will know what to do if the container of a hazardous substance is
                 not properly labeled.

        2. Proper Labeling

             a. All containers of hazardous materials must be clearly labeled with
                the following information:

                 (1) The identity of the hazardous material; (product name and
                     contents)

                 (2) The manufacturer's name and address;

                 (3) Appropriate hazard warnings;

                 (4) Personal protection measures.




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           Here is a sample manufacturer label that contains the required
           information.

           b. Hazardous substances will usually be identified by the words
              Caution, Warning or Danger on the products label. These words
              indicate the degree of hazard for a particular substance:

               CAUTION: means Low Hazard
               WARNING: means Moderate Hazard
               DANGER: means High Hazard

               It should be noted that these words are indicators of hazard levels,
               and that no information on product labels is intended to replace a
               MSDS. BE SURE TO READ MSDS's FOR COMPLETE
               INFORMATION!

           c. Use only products that are properly labeled. Using a product that is
              not properly labeled is a violation of the law. If you have a container
              that is missing a label the label must be replaced.

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        3. HMIS Labeling System

           The Department of Fish & Wildlife uses the Hazardous Materials
           Identification System (HMIS) for marking containers.

           This system uses colors, numbers, and letters for a quick identification
           of the product and potential hazards.

           The BLUE section of the label contains the acute health hazard rating.
           The RED section gives the flammability hazard rating. The YELLOW
           section indicates the reactivity hazard rating, and a personal protection
           index is listed in the WHITE section.

           The Health, Flammability, and Reactivity sections are rated on a scale of
           0 -4.
               "0" means a MINIMAL HAZARD
               "1" means a SLIGHT HAZARD
               "2" means a MODERATE HAZARD

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                "3" means a SERIOUS HAZARD
                "4" means a SEVERE HAZARD

             The hazard ratings for a particular product are attached to the MSDS
             from the Safety Office. When referring to this sheet, a "yes" under
             the title "chronic" means the product can cause long term health
             effects. "Unknown" indicates that chronic health effects information is
             unavailable or has not been tested. "No" indicates that no long term
             health effects are expected.

             A # symbol next to the numerical rating indicates that limited
             information is available on which to base a rating. Although the
             information that is available indicates a particular hazard rating,
             further precautions may be advisable, especially for pregnant women.

        4. Inadequate Labels

             When material is transferred from a labeled container to an unlabeled
             one, you are required to label the new container if;

             a. More than one person will be using the product from the new
                container.

             b. The product will be used beyond one work shift.

             If a label needs to be replaced, use an HMIS label. The HMIS rating for
             a particular product can be found on the last page of the MSDS.

             The HMIS rating is done in the Safety Office by qualified people.
             Don't rate a product yourself.

             If the HMIS rating has not been received form the Safety Office, call
             the Safety Office for guidance.

     E. HazCom Program

        1.   Inventories and MSDS Files


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           a. Inventory Updates

           Each station has a hazardous chemical inventory list that the
           department's computer data base generates. This list should be kept in
           the three ring binder that contains your MSDS's.




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           When a new hazardous substance is received, it should be added to the
           inventory right away. Do this by using the "Hazardous Chemical
           Inventory Update Sheet".

           These forms should be filled out as completely as possible using the
           proper name for the product. Examples: "Hyamine 1622" not just
           "Hyamine", "#2 Diesel fuel" not just "Diesel", "Sevin 50-W Carbaryl
           Insecticide" not just "Sevin Insecticide".

           It is also important to provide the manufacturer name and complete
           address. After completing the form, attach one copy to your "Station
           Hazardous Chemical Inventory", and send the other copy to the Safety
           Office.


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           On a quarterly basis you will be asked to do a complete inventory update.
            To do this use the station inventory sheet, as a check list. If you no
           longer have an item on the list, remove it from your inventory using the
           Hazardous Material Inventory Update Sheet (Form 823).

           If you have a hazardous substance that is not listed on your inventory
           sheet, add it to your inventory at this time using the Hazardous
           Material Inventory Update Sheet, Form #823.

           b. MSDS Files

               MSDS's should be filed in a three ring binder alphabetically.

               When a product is taken off the station inventory, the MSDS for
               that product should be taken out of the binder.

               When the information for a particular product has been improved or
               updated, the Safety Office will send you a replacement MSDS for
               that product. The old MSDS should be thrown out and replaced with
               the new one. The product is now considered "new" and Specific
               Training for that product should be conducted for all employees who
               will be exposed to the new product.

               If you receive an MSDS with a product order, check the date of the
               MSDS. If the revision date or the effective date is newer than the
               MSDS you have at your facility, discard the old one and put the new
               one in your MSDS binder. Also send a copy of the new MSDS to the
               Safety Office.

           c. Specific Training

               Station Managers will be responsible to conduct Specific Training.
               This training consists of a review of the MSDS for hazardous
               substances used at an individual station. This should be conducted
               using the "Specific Training Manual". This Manual is incorporated
               into the Department of Fish & Wildlife Safety Program Manual. Call
               the Safety Office for an additional copy. The training is required
               for all hazardous substances used at your location.

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               The training can be done during your monthly safety meetings or at
               any other appropriate time. It would be a good idea to prioritize
               which MSDS's to review first. Consider those products that are
               used in large amounts, items used frequently or for long periods of
               time, and extremely hazardous substances.          The Hazardous
               Materials Identification System (HMIS) rating can help you
               determine which products are the most hazardous. The product
               MSDS review should continue until all hazardous substances in use at
               the station have been reviewed.




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                      Department of Fish and Wildlife

                            SAFETY MANUAL


VII. HAZARD COMMUNICATION SPECIFIC TRAINER'S GUIDE

    A. How to Use This Trainers Guide

       Specific training for all employees at a facility is required for each
       hazardous substance used. It is the facility manager's responsibility to
       provide specific training for each hazardous substances.

       Each employee must receive General and Specific Training before being
       allowed to work with or in the area of hazardous substances. If
       circumstances dictate an employee be required to use a hazardous
       substance as part of his or her normal work duties and has not yet received
       General Training, he or she may be allowed to use that one product by
       completing Part 1 and Part 2 of this manual.

       Employees who have already received General Training are only required to
       receive training for Part 2 of this manual. Please note that individual
       employees must receive Part 2 of this training manual for every hazardous
       substance used at the facility.

       Each time a new hazardous substance is used at the facility all employees at
       the facility must receive Part 2 of this training manual.

       Training conducted by the station manager must be documented. All
       documentation is to be sent to the Safety Office in Olympia and a copy
       should be kept in the employee file at his/her work station.

       Summary: If the employee has received General Training, review Part 2 of
                this manual with the employee.

                  If the employee has not received General Training, review Part 1
                  and 2 of this manual with the employee.

    B. Part 1 - HazCom Program


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      This program is in compliance with the Hazard Communication Standard or
      Workers Right-to-Know. This law was established to insure safe working
      conditions for all employees.

      The law specifies that:

      1.   There must be a written plan describing how the Department of Fish &
           Wildlife will meet the hazard communication requirements. The written
           program will be made available to all employees.

      2. All employees must have access to Material Safety Data Sheets
         (MSDSs) and inventories of hazardous substances used at his or her
         location.

      3. Containers of hazardous materials must be adequately labeled to alert
         employees to potential hazards.

      4. Finally, employees must be trained in the hazards of chemicals in their
         work place and the protective measures necessary when using them.

      It is important to know about the hazards associated with chemicals and
      how to be protected. There are two phases to the Department's training
      program.

      1.   General Training; teaches how to read and interpret MSDS's, and
           chemical hazard identification and protection procedures.

      2. Specific Training; is a detailed review of MSDS's of products that are
         hazardous. The training is required for all employees using hazardous
         products.

      Important information for employees.

      1.   Employees can use and work around hazardous substances only if they
           have had safety training. The minimum training required is a review of
           Part 1 and Part 2 of this manual. The review can be done with the station
           manager.




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        2. Employees can only use products that are properly and clearly labeled.

            All containers of hazardous materials must be clearly labeled with the
            following information:

            -   Product name (the identity of the hazardous material).

            -   Manufacturer's name and address.

            -   Appropriate hazard warnings.

            -   Personal protection measures.

        3. Hazardous substances will usually be identified by the words "Caution",
           "Warning" or "Danger" on the product label.




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             Here is a sample manufacturer label that contains the required
             information.



        4. If in doubt about a product don't use it! Ask the station manager or
           read the MSDS.

        5. Each location has a copy of the written Hazard Communication Program,
           an inventory of hazardous substances and MSDS's for those substances.
           These can be found at                                 .
                              (Determine Location)

        6. Safety equipment (gloves, goggles, respirators etc.) is required
           whenever it is recommended on the label or MSDS.



        7. Remember, chemicals can be dangerous if not handled properly. Always
           use the safety equipment prescribed for the product. This program is
           for your safety, and it's your right to know the hazards you face in your
           work environment.

        The MSDS contains all the information you need to safely use a product.
        MSDS's also include valuable information about first aid, spill cleanup and
        disposal. The MSDS's for this facility are located:
                                          .
                      (Give location)

        Know where they are kept and use them.

        Summary/Discussion.

        1.   What are the four requirements of the Hazard Communication Standard
             or the Worker-Right-To-Know law?

             (Written Plan, MSDS's, Labels, Employee training.)

        2. How can you determine if a substance is hazardous?


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            (the words Caution, Warning, or Danger written on the containers label.)

        3. What is the first thing to do before using an unfamiliar product?

            (Read the product's MSDS, label, or ask supervisor.)

     C. Part 2 - MSDS Review

        Review MSDS's for hazardous products employees will be using. Follow the
        out line provided below.
        Another alternative is fill out a summary sheet of each product's hazards.
        Then simply have the employee read the summary sheet. You only need to be
        available to answer questions rather than being present to conduct the
        training. A blank summary sheet is included in this training manual along
        with an example of a completed one.




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        1.   Hazardous Product Review

             Review each of the categories listed in this section. The information is
             available from the MSDS. The format below is to help get started in
             the training.

             Our first product is                              .
                                    (Give name)

             Made by                                       .
                           (Give manufacturer's name)

             We use this product to

                                                      .
                          (Give product use description)

             Now discuss with employee(s) each of the following categories.



        2. Health Hazard Data

             Make sure each employee understands the hazards, including the chronic
             information. Define any terms not understood by using the "Glossary of
             terms". Consider the following questions:

             a. What are the routes of entry?

             b. How would you know if you are having an exposure to skin?

             c. How would you know if you are having an exposure to eyes?

             d. How would you know if you are having an exposure through
                inhalation?

             e. How would you know if you are having an exposure through ingestion?

             f. Is there a chronic hazard?

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        3. Fire and Explosion Hazard Data

            This section includes fire and explosion hazards of the product. Be sure
            to give the flash point. (The flash point indicates the ease of ignition).
            Include fire fighting techniques and necessary equipment. You can add
            common sense comments like "Don't smoke near this product." Particular
            situations at your facility may be noted. Consider the following
            questions:

            a. Will the product burn?

            b. What is the flash point?

            c. Does fire produce toxic gases? If yes, what gases?

            d. How do you extinguish fire?

            e. Where is the local fire department's phone number?

        4. Reactivity Data

            Review the reactivity data. Be sure to include product stability and any
            condition or material to avoid. Consider the following questions:

            a. Is the product generally stable?

            b. Is the product stable at high temperatures?

            c. Does it react with water? If yes, does it react violently?

            d. What materials are incompatible?

            e. What conditions should be avoided?

        5. Required Protection Equipment

            This section tells how to prevent chemical exposure. Review this section

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            carefully. Consider the following questions:

            a. Is respiratory protection required? If yes, what kind?

            b. Is ventilation required?

            c. Is skin protection required? If yes, what kind?

            d. Is eye protection required? If yes, what kind?

        6. Emergency and First Aid Information

            Most of the information about First Aid uses common sense, but some
            information is particular to that product. Employees should review the
            MSDS (if possible) before administering first aid. Emergency phone
            numbers and location of first aid equipment, (such as safety showers
            and eyewash stations, or bandage kits) should be highlighted here.
            Consider the following questions:

            a. What are the first aid measures for contact with skin?

            b. What are the first aid measures for contact with eyes?

            c. What are the first aid measures for inhalation of the product?
            d. What are the first aid measures for ingestion of the product?

        7. Special Precaution/Storage Information

            This section gives storage, handling and use instructions that are
            important for employee safety. You may want to refer back to the
            reactivity section for more information on necessary storage conditions.

        8. Spill and Leak Procedures

            This section contains instructions to follow in the event a product leaks
            or spills. Review this section with emphasis on worker safety. Give
            location of cleanup materials. If the spill is an extremely dangerous
            chemical spill, and the proper equipment is not available, employees,

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            should get out of the area and go for help (tell supervisor).




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                       EXAMPLE MSDS SUMMARY SHEET



Product Name: Sodium Hypochlorite 12%

Synonyms: Liquid chlorine, liquid bleach

Description/Appearance (Liquid or Solid?) Liquid

1.    Health Hazards

      a. What are the routes of entry? Inhalation, skin, eye,
         ingestion

      b. How would you know if you are having an exposure to skin?
         Irritation or burns, red skin, swelling



      c. How would you know if you are having an exposure to the eyes?
         Irritation or burns, impaired vision



      d. How would you know if you are having an exposure through inhalation?
         Irritation to nose, mouth, throat and lungs. Shortness of breath, wheezing,
         choking, chest pain.

      e. Is there a chronic hazard? Yes. Lungs, skin, eyes.



2.    Fire Hazard

      a. Will product burn? No

      b. What is the flash point? N/A

      c. How do you extinguish fire? Appropriate for surrounding fire.




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3.   Reactivity Hazard

     a. Is the product generally stable? Yes

     b. Does it react with water? No

     c. What materials are incompatible? Iron, copper, acids, ammonium compounds,
        organics, other oxidizers.
     d. What conditions should be avoided? Avoid direct sunlight, ultra violet light,
        high heat.

4.   First Aid

     a. Contact with Skin: Flush with water for 15 minutes. Wash clothing before
        re-use. Call physician.

     b. Contact with Eyes: Flush with water for 15 minutes. Call physician.



     c. Inhalation: Remove to fresh air. Call physician.




     d. Ingestion: Drink large quantities of water, do not induce vomiting. Call
        physician.



5.   Personal Protection

     a. Respiratory protection required? What kind?
        Not                           normally                               needed.



     b. Ventilation        required?         What          kind?     Recommended.



     c. Skin protection required? What kind? Yes gloves, apron-neoprene.


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     d. Eye protection required? What Kind? Yes Chemical splash goggles.



6.   Storage

     How do you properly store the material? Cool dry well ventilated area, avoid
     sunlight. Avoid temperatures above 60-70 degrees F. Avoid acids, ammonium
     compounds, organics, other oxidizers.




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                               MSDS SUMMARY SHEET

Product Name:

Synonyms:

Description/Appearance (Liquid or Solid?)

1.   Health Hazards

     a. What             are        the         routes         of        entry?



     b. How would you know if you are having an exposure to skin?

     c. How would you know if you are having an exposure to the eyes?




     d. How would you know if you are having an exposure through inhalation?




     e. Is               there              a        chronic            hazard?



2.   Fire Hazard

     a. Will product burn?

     b. What is the flash point?

     c. How               do              you        extinguish            fire?



3.   Reactivity Hazard

     a. Is the product generally stable?

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     b. Does it react with water?

     c. What                  materials                   are             incompatible?



     d. What               conditions            should           be             avoided?



4.   First Aid

     a. Contact                                  with                               Skin:



     b. Contact                                  with                               Eyes:



     c. Inhalation:



     d. Ingestion:



5.   Personal Protection

     a. Respiratory           protection          required?            What         kind?




     b. Ventilation                 required?                   What                kind?




     c. Skin          protection             required?             What             kind?




     d. Eye           protection             required?             What             Kind?

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6.   Storage

     How       do      you       properly       store   the     material?




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                   GLOSSARY OF TERMS USED ON THE MSDS



Absolute:            A chemical substance that is not mixed; pure. An example is
                     Absolute Alcohol -- which is ethyl alcohol containing not more
                     than one percent by weight of water.

ACGIH:               American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists,
                     Inc.; an organization of professional personnel in
                     governmental agencies or educational institutions engaged in
                     occupational safety and health programs. ACGIH develops
                     and publishes recommended occupational exposure limits (see
                     TLV) for hundreds of chemical substances and physical
                     agents. (6500 Glenway Avenue, Bldg. D-7, Cincinnati, OH
                     45211 (513) 661-7881.

Acute:               A short term period of action measured in seconds, minutes,
                     hours or days.

Acute Effects of     The adverse effects that normally are evident immediately
                     or shortly
Overexposure:        after an exposure to a hazardous material without implying a
                     degree of severity.

Acute Toxicity:      The significant, severe effects resulting from a single dose
                     of, or exposure to, a substance. Ordinarily used to denote
                     effects in experimental animals.

Asphyxiant:          A vapor or gas that can cause unconsciousness or death by
                         suffocation (lack of oxygen). Most simple asphyxiants
                         are harmful to the body only when they become so
                         concentrated that they reduce oxygen in the air
                         (normally about 21%) to dangerous levels (18% or lower).
                         Asphyxiation is one of the principal potential hazards of
                         working in confined spaces.

Auto-ignition        The minimum temperature to which a substance must be
                     heated

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Temperature:       without application of a flame or spark in order to cause that
                   substance to ignite.

Carcinogen:        A substance determined to be cancer producing or potentially
                       cancer producing by the International Agency for
                       Research on Cancer (IARC), the National Toxicology
                       Program (NTP) or the Occupational Safety and Health
                       Administration (OSHA).




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Chronic:            A long term period of action measured in weeks, months or
                    years. Persistent, prolonged or repeated conditions.

Chronic Effects     The adverse effects that develop slowly over a long period of
                    time
of Overexposure:    or upon repeated prolonged exposure to a hazardous material
                    without implying a degree of severity.

Combustible:        According to the United Stated Department of
                    Transportation (DOT) and National Fire Protection
                    Association (NFPA), combustible liquids are those having a
                    flash point at or above 100 degrees F or liquids that will burn.
                     They do not ignite as easily as flammable liquids. However,
                    combustible liquids can be ignited under certain
                    circumstances, and must be handled with caution.
                    Substances, such as wood, paper, etc., are termed "Ordinary
                    Combustibles."

Corrosive:          A chemical that causes visible destruction of, or irreversible
                    alterations in, living tissue by chemical action at the site of
                    contact. A liquid that has a severe corrosion rate on steel.

Decomposition:      Breakdown of a material or substance (by heat, chemical
                    reaction, electrolyses, decay, or other processes) into parts
                    or elements or simpler compounds.

DOT:                The United States Department of Transportation; the
                    federal agency that regulates the labeling and transportation
                    of hazardous materials.

EPA:                The Environmental Protection Agency; the federal agency
                    responsible for administration of laws to control and/or
                    reduce pollution of air, water, and land systems.

Evaporation Rate:   The rate at which a particular material will vaporize
                    (evaporate) when compared to the rate of vaporization of a
                    known material. The known material is usually normal butyl
                    acetate (NBUAC or n-BuAc), with a vaporization rate

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                   designated as 1.0. Vaporization rates of other solvents or
                   materials are classified as the following:

                       FAST evaporation rate greater than 3.0 Example:
                       Acetone 6

                       MEDIUM evaporation rate between .8 to 3.0
                       Example: 190-proof (95%) Ethyl Alcohol 1.4

                       SLOW evaporation rate less than .8 Example: Water
                       .3




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Flammable Limits:   The minimum and maximum concentrations of a flammable gas
                    or vapor between which ignition can occur. Concentrations
                    below the lower flammable limit (LFL) are too lean to burn,
                    while concentrations above the upper flammable limit (UFL)
                    are too rich. All concentrations between LFL and UFL are in
                    the flammable range, and special precautions are needed to
                    prevent ignition or explosion.

Flammable Liquid:   A liquid that has a flash point below 100 degrees F.

Flash Point:        The temperature at which a liquid will give off enough
                       flammable vapor to ignite. There are several flash point
                       test methods and flash points may vary for the same
                       material depending on the method used, so the test
                       method is indicated when the flash point is given.

General Exhaust:    A system for exhausting air containing contaminants from a
                    general work area. Also see "Local Exhaust".

Hazardous Chemical A substance that is one or more of the following: an
                       extremely
Substance:         toxic material, a highly toxic material, a toxic material, a
                       corrosive material, an irritant, a strong sensitizer, a
                       dangerously reactive material, an extremely flammable
                       material, a combustible liquid, a pyrophoric material, a
                       strong oxidizer, a pressure generating material, or a
                       compressed gas. More simply put, any substance that has
                       the capability of producing adverse effects on the health
                       and safety of humans.

Highly Toxic:       A chemical falling within any of the following categories:

                    1.   A chemical that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of 50
                         milligrams or less per kilogram of body weight when
                         administered orally to albino rats weighing between 200
                         and 300 grams each.

                    2.   A chemical that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of 200

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                       milligrams or less per kilogram of body weight when
                       administered by continuous contact for 24 hours (or less
                       if death occurs within 24 hours) with the bare skin of
                       albino rabbits weighing between 2 and 3 kilograms each.




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                     3.   A chemical that has a median lethal concentration (LC50)
                          in air of 200 parts per million by volume or less of gas or
                          vapor, or 2 milligrams per liter or less of mist, fume or
                          dust, when administered by continuous inhalation for one
                          hour (or less if death occurs within one hour) to albino
                          rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.

Human Health Data: Reliable data obtained from scientific studies, including
                       epidemiological or clinical studies, or from human
                       experience which clearly indicate that a chemical
                       substance or mixture is, or is not, carcinogenic, highly
                       toxic, corrosive, an irritant or a sensitizer.

Incompatible:        Materials which could cause dangerous reactions from direct
                     contact with one another are described as incompatible.

Inflammation:        A series of reactions produced in the tissues by an irritant,
                     injury, or infection characterized by redness and swelling
                     caused by an influx of blood and fluids.

Inhibitor:           A chemical which is added to another substance to prevent an
                     unwanted chemical change from occurring.

Ingestion:           The taking in of a substance through the mouth.

Inhalation:          The breathing in of a substance in the form of a gas, vapor,
                     fume, mist, or dust.

Irritant:            A chemical that causes a reversible inflammatory effect on
                     living tissue by chemical action at the site of contact.

Isomers:             Chemical compounds that have the same molecular weight and
                     atomic composition but differ in molecular structure.

LC50:                Lethal Concentration 50, the concentration in air of gas,
                     vapor, mist, fume or dust for a given period of time that is
                     most likely to kill one half of a group of test animals using a
                     specified test procedure. Inhalation is the route of exposure

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                   and the value LC50 is usually expressed as parts per million or
                   milligrams per cubic meter (ppm or mg/m3).




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LD50:               Lethal Dose 50, the dosage of a substance or mixture that is
                        most likely to kill one half of a group of test animals
                        using a specified test procedure. The dose is expressed
                        as the amount per unit of body weight, the most common
                        expression being milligrams of material per kilogram of
                        body weight (mg/kg of body weight). Usually refers to
                        oral or skin exposure.

LEL, or LFL:        Lower explosive limit or lower flammable limit of a vapor or
                    gas; the lowest concentration (lowest percentage of the
                    substances in air) that will produce a flash of fire when an
                    ignition source (heat, arc, or flame) is present. A
                    concentration lower than the LEL, the mixture is too lean to
                    burn. Also see "UEL".

Local Exhaust:      A system for capturing and exhausting contaminants from
                    the air at the point where the contaminants are produced
                    (welding, grinding, sanding, other processes or operations).
                    Also see "General Exhaust".

Mechanical Exhaust: A powered device, such as a motor driven fan or air/stream
                        venture tube, for exhausting contaminants from a
                        workplace, vessel, or enclosure.

Melting Point:      The temperature at which a solid substance changes to a
                    liquid state. For mixtures, the melting range may be given.

Mutagen:            Chemical or physical effects which can alter genetic material
                    in an organism and result in physical or functional changes in
                    all subsequent generations.

NFPA:               National Fire Protection Association; an international
                    voluntary membership organization to promote/improve fire
                    protection and prevention and establish safeguards against
                    loss of life and property by fire. Best known on the
                    industrial scene for the National Fire Codes, 16 volumes of
                    codes, standards, recommended practices, and manuals
                    developed (and periodically updated) by NFPA technical

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                   committees. Among these is NFPA 70 4m the code for
                   showing hazards of materials using the familiar diamond
                   shaped label or placard with appropriate numbers or symbols.




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NIOSH:              National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health for
                    the Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health and
                    Human Services (DHHS); a Federal agency which, among
                    other activities, tests and certifies respiratory protective
                    devices and air sampling detector tubes, recommends
                    occupational exposure limits for various substances and
                    assists the Occupational Safety and Health Administration
                    (OSHA) and Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA)
                    in occupational safety and health investigations and research.

OSHA:               The Occupational Safety and Health Administration; a
                    federal agency under the Department of Labor that publishes
                    and enforces safety and health regulations for most
                    businesses and industries in the United States.

Oxidizer:           A chemical, other than a blasting agent or explosive, that
                    initiates or promotes combustion in other materials, thereby
                    causing fire either of itself or through the release of oxygen
                    or other gases.

PEL:                Permissible Exposure Limit; an exposure limit established by
                    OSHA. May be a time weighted average (TWA) limit or a
                    maximum concentration exposure limit.

Percent Volatile:   Percent volatile by volume; the percentage of a liquid or solid
                    (by volume) that will evaporate at an ambient temperature of
                    70 F (unless some other temperature is stated).

Polymerization:     A chemical reaction in which one or more small molecules
                    combine to form larger molecules. A Hazardous
                    Polymerization is a reaction that takes place at a rate that
                    releases large amounts of energy.

Pyrophoric:         The tendency of a substance to undergo chemical reaction
                       with the release of energy. Undesirable effects such as
                       pressure build up, temperature increase, or formation of
                       noxious, toxic, or corrosive by-products may occur
                       because of the reactivity of a substance to heating,

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                         burning, direct contact with other materials, or other
                         conditions in use or in storage.

Pyrophoric Material: A chemical substance or mixture that will ignite
                         spontaneously in dry or moist air at or below 130 F.




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Reactive Material:   A chemical substance or mixture that will vigorously
                     polymerize, decompose, condense, or become self-reactive
                     under conditions of shock, pressure or temperature. It
                     includes any chemical substance or mixture that falls within
                     any of the following categories:

                     1.   "Explosive Material." A chemical substance or mixture
                          that causes sudden, almost instantaneous, release of
                          pressure, gas and heat when subjected to sudden shock,
                          pressure or high temperature.

                     2.   "Organic Peroxide" An organic compound that contains
                          the bivalent -O-O- structure which may be considered a
                          structural derivative of hydrogen peroxide, in which one
                          or both of the hydrogen atoms has been replaced by an
                          organic radical.

                     3.   "Pressure Generating Material" A chemical substance or
                          mixture which may spontaneously polymerize, with an
                          increase in pressure, unless protected by the addition of
                          an inhibitor, or by refrigeration or other thermal control;
                          may decompose to release gas in its container; or which
                          comprises the contents of a self pressurized container.

                     4.   "Water Reactive Material" A chemical substance or
                          mixture that reacts with water to release heat or gas
                          which is flammable, highly toxic, or toxic.

Sensitizer:          A chemical substance or mixture which, on first exposure,
                     causes little or no reaction in people or test animals, but
                     which, on repeated exposure, may cause a marked response
                     not necessarily limited to the contact site. Skin sensitization
                     is the most common form of sensitization in the industrial
                     setting, although respiratory sensitization to a few chemicals
                     is also known to occur.

Solubility In Water: An expression of the percentage of a material (by weight)
                         that will dissolve in water at ambient temperature.

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                       Solubility information can be useful in determining spill
                       cleanup methods and fire extinguishing agents and
                       methods for a material. Terms used to express solubility
                       are:

                   Negligible =    Less   than .1 %
                   Slight          =       .1 to 1.0 %
                   Moderate        =       1 to 10 %
                   Appreciable     =       More than 10 %
                   Complete        =       Soluble in all proportions




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Specific Gravity:   An expression of the density (or heaviness)
                    of a material. Ratio of the mass of a body to the mass of an
                    equal volume of water at 40 degrees Celsius or other
                    specified temperature. If a volume of a material weighs 8
                    pounds, and an equal volume of water weighs 10 pounds, the
                    material is said to have a specific gravity of 0.8 (8 divided by
                    10 = .8). Insoluble materials with specific gravity of less than
                    1.0 will float in or on water. Insoluble materials with specific
                    gravity greater than 1.0 will sink in water. Most (but not all)
                    flammable liquids have specific gravity less than 1.0 and, if
                    not soluble will float on water -an important consideration for
                    fire suppression and spill cleanup.

Stability:          An expression of the ability of a material to remain
                    unchanged. For MSDS purposes, a material is stable if it
                    remains in the same form under expected and reasonable
                    conditions of storage or use. Conditions such as
                    temperatures above 150 degrees Fahrenheit or shock from
                    being dropped that may cause instability (dangerous change)
                    are stated on the MSDS's.

STEL:               Short Term Exposure Limit; ACGIH (American Conference of
                    Governmental Industrial Hygienists) terminology. See TLV-
                    STEL.

Strong Oxidizer:    A chemical substance or mixture that initiates or promotes
                    combustion in other materials, thereby causing fire either of
                    itself or through the release of oxygen or other gases.

Synonym:            Another name or names by which a material is known. Methyl
                    alcohol, for example, is also known as methanol and wood
                    alcohol.

Target Organ Effects: Chemically caused effects upon organs and systems such
                      as the liver, kidneys, nervous system, lungs, skin, and
                      eyes from exposure to a material.

Teratogen:          An agent or substance that causes physical defects in the

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                   developing embryo.

TLV:               Threshold Limit Value; A term used by ACGIH (American
                   Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists) to
                   express the airborne concentration of a material to which
                   nearly all persons can be exposed day after day without
                   adverse effects. ACGIH expresses TLV's in three ways:

                        TLV-TWA: The allowable Time Weighted Average
                        concentration for a normal 8 hour workday or 40
                        hour week.

                        TLV-STEL: The Short Term Exposure Limit or
                        maximum concentration for a continuous exposure
                        period (maximum of four such periods per day, with
                        at least 60 minutes between exposure periods, and
                        provided that the daily TLV-TWA is not exceeded).

                        TLV-C: The Ceiling Exposure Limit - the
                        concentration that should not be exceeded even
                        instantaneously.

Toxic:                  A chemical falling within any of the following toxic
                        categories:

                   1.   A chemical that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of more
                        than 50 milligrams per kilogram but not more than 500
                        milligrams per kilogram of body weight when
                        administered orally to albino rats weighing between 200
                        and 300 grams each.

                   2.   A chemical that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of more
                        than 200 milligrams per kilogram but not more than 1000
                        milligrams per kilogram of body weight when
                        administered by continuous contact for 24 hours (or less
                        if death occurs within 24 hours) with the bare skin of
                        albino rabbits weighing between 2 and 3 kilograms each.


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                   3.   A chemical that has a median lethal concentration (LC50)
                        in air of more than 200 parts per million but not more
                        than 2000 parts per million by volume of gas or vapor, or
                        more than two milligrams per liter but not more than 20
                        milligrams per liter of mist, fume or dust, when
                        administered by continuous inhalation for one hour (or
                        less if death occurs within one hour) to albino rats
                        weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.

Toxicity:          The sum of adverse effects resulting from exposure to a
                   material, generally by the mouth, skin, or respiratory tract.

TSCA:              Toxic Substances Control Act; federal environmental
                   legislation, administered by Environmental Protection Agency,
                   for regulating the manufacture, handling, and use of
                   materials classified as "toxic substances."

TWA:               Time Weighted Average exposure; the airborne
                   concentration of a material to which a person is exposed,
                   averaged over the total exposure time -- generally the total
                   workday (8 to 12 hours). Also see "TLV".

Unstable:          A chemical tending toward decomposition or other unwanted
                   chemical change during normal handling or storage.

UEL, UFL:          Upper Explosive Limit, Upper Flammable Limit; The highest
                   concentration (expressed in percent of vapor or gas in the air
                   by volume) of a substance that will burn or explode when an
                   ignition source is present. Theoretically, above this limit, the
                   mixture is said to be too rich to support combustion.

Vapor Density:     The weight of a vapor or gas compared to the weight of an
                   equal volume of air; an expression of the density of the
                   vapor or gas. Materials lighter than air have vapor densities
                   less than 1.0. Materials heavier than air have vapor densities
                   greater than 1.0. All vapors and gases will mix with air, but
                   the lighter materials will tend to rise and dissipate (unless
                   confined). Heavier vapors and gases are likely to concentrate

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                   in low places (along or under floors; in dumps, sewers, and
                   manholes; in trenches and ditches) where they may create
                   fire, explosion, or health hazards.

Vapor Pressure:    The pressure exerted by a saturated vapor
                   above its own liquid in a closed container. When quality
                   control tests are performed on products, the test
                   temperature is usually 100 degrees Fahrenheit and the vapor
                   pressure is expressed as pounds per square inch. But vapor
                   pressures reported on MSDS's are in millimeters of mercury
                   (mm Hg) at 68 degrees Fahrenheit, unless stated otherwise.
                   Three facts are important to remember:

                   1.   Vapor pressure of a substance at 100o F will always be
                        higher than the vapor pressure of the substance at 68o
                        F.

                   2.   Vapor pressures reported on MSDS's in mm Hg are
                        usually very low pressures: 760 mm Hg is equivalent to
                        14.7 pounds per square inch.

                   3.   The lower the boiling point of a substance, the higher its
                        vapor pressure.

Water Reactive:    A chemical that reacts with water to release a gas that is
                   either flammable or presents a health hazard.




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                GLOSSARY OF MEDICAL TERMS USED ON MSDS



Alopecia:           Loss of hair.

Analgesia:          Loss of sensitivity to pain.

Anesthesia:         Loss of sensation or feeling.

Anhydrous:          Free of water.

Anorexia:           Loss of appetite.

Anosmia:            Loss of the sense of smell.

Anoxia:             A lack of oxygen from inspired air (literally without oxygen).
                    See Hypoxia.

Argyria:            Local or generalized impregnation (grey-blue color) of the
                    body tissues with silver.

Asphyxia:           Lack of oxygen and thus interference with the oxygenation
                    of the blood. Can lead to unconsciousness.

Asthma:             A disease characterized by recurrent attacks of wheezing,
                    shortness of breath, and perhaps coughing due to spasmodic
                    contraction of the bronchioles.

Asymptomatic:       Neither causing nor exhibiting symptoms.

Ataxia:             A loss of muscular coordination.

Atrophy:            A wasting or diminution in the size of tissues, organs, or the
                    entire body.

Bradycardia:            A slow heartbeat. Pulse rate below 60.

Bronchitis:         Inflammation of the bronchial tubes in the lungs.

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Carcinogen:        A substance determined to be cancer producing or potentially
                       cancer producing by the International Agency for
                       Research on Cancer (IARC), National Toxicology Program
                       (NTP), and the Occupational Safety and Health
                       Administration (OSHA).

Conjunctivitis:    Inflammation of the conjunctiva, the delicate membrane that
                   lines the eyelids and covers the eyeballs.

Cornea:            Transparent structure of the external layer of the eyeball.

Cutaneous:         Pertaining to the skin.

Cyanosis           A dark purplish coloration of the skin and the mucous
                   membrane due to deficient oxygenation of the blood.

Cytotoxin:         A poison that affects a specific organ.

Dermal:            Used on or applied to the skin.

Dermatitis:        Inflammation of the skin.

Diaphoresis:       Perspiration.

Dyspnea:           A sense of difficulty in breathing; shortness of breath.

Edema:             An abnormal accumulation of clear, watery fluid in the
                   tissues.

Embolism:          Obstruction of a blood vessel by a transported clot, a mass
                   of bacteria, or other foreign material.

Emphysema:         A swelling or inflation due to presence of air in the
                       connective tissues of the lungs.

Epistaxis:         Nosebleed, hemorrhage from the nose.


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Fibrosis:          Formation of fibrous tissue, as in a reparative or reactive
                   process, in excess of amounts normally present.

Gangrene:          Death of tissue combined with putrefaction.

Gastroenteritis:   Inflammation of the stomach and intestines.

Gingivitis:        Inflammation of the gums.

Hematuria:         The presence of blood in the urine.

Hemotoxin:         A poison that affects the circulatory system.

Hepatic:           Pertaining to the liver.

Hygroscopic:           Readily absorbs moisture from the air.

Hypoxia:           Insufficient oxygen especially applied to body cells.

Inflammation:      A series of reactions produced in the tissues by an irritant,
                   injury, or infection characterized by redness and swelling
                   caused by an influx of blood and fluids.

Ingestion:         The taking in of a substance through the mouth.

Jaundice:          Yellowish discoloration of tissues (skin), whites of eyes
                   (sclerae), and bodily fluids with bile pigment (bilirubin) caused
                   by any of several pathological conditions that interrupt liver
                   function.

Lacrimation:       Secretion and discharge of tears.

Lavage:            A washing of a hollow organ such as the stomach.

Lesion:            Abnormal change, injury, or damage to an organ.

Leukemia:          A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs.


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Malaise:           A feeling of general discomfort, distress, or uneasiness; an
                   out-of-sorts feeling.

Mutagen:           A substance or agent capable of altering the genetic material
                   in a living cell.

Narcosis:          Stupor or unconsciousness produced by some narcotic drugs.

Nausea:            Tendency to vomit, feeling of sickness at the stomach.

Necrosis:          Local death of tissue.

Neoplasm:          A new or abnormal growth of tissue in which the growth is
                   uncontrollable and progressive.

Neurotoxin:        Toxic substance which affects the nervous system.

Nystagmus:         Spastic, involuntary motion of the eyeballs in a horizontal,
                   rotary, or vertical direction.

Olfactory:         Relating to the sense of smell.

Oliguria:          Scanty or low volume of urine.

Palpitation:       Irregular, rapid heartbeat.

Phlegm:            Thick mucous from the respiratory passages.

Pneumoconiosis:    Respiratory tract and lung condition caused by inhalation and
                   retention of respirable material.

Prostration:       Physical exhaustion and incapacitation.

Pulmonary Edema:   Fluid in the lungs.

Sclerae:           The tough, white, fibrous covering of the eyeball.
Spasm:             An involuntary, convulsive muscular contraction.


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Stupor:            Partial or nearly complete unconsciousness.

Subcutaneous:      Beneath the skin.

Systemic:          Affecting the entire body.

Tachycardia:           Excessively rapid heartbeat. Pulse rate above 100.

Teratogen:         An agent or substance that causes physical defects in the
                   developing embryo.

Tinnitus:          A ringing or singing sound in the ears.

Urticaria:         Nettle-rash; hives; elevated, itching, white patches.

Vertigo:           A feeling of revolving in space; dizziness, giddiness.




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        DEFINITION OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION
                     SYSTEM (HMIS) RATINGS



                    I. FLAMMABILITY HAZARD RATING



0 MINIMAL HAZARD:       Materials that are normally stable and will not burn
                        unless heated.

1 SLIGHT HAZARD:        Materials that must be preheated before ignition will
                        occur. Flammable liquids in this category will have flash
                        points (the lowest temperature at which ignition will
                        occur) at or above 200 F (NFPA Class IIIB).

2 MODERATE HAZARD:      Material that must be moderately heated before
                        ignition will occur, including flammable liquids with flash
                        points at or above 100 F and below 200 F (NFPA Class
                        II & Class IIIA).

3 SERIOUS HAZARD:       Materials capable of ignition under almost all normal
                        temperature condition, including flammable liquids with
                        flash points below 73 F and boiling points above 100 F as
                        well as liquids with flash points between 73 F and 100 F
                        (NFPA Class IB and IC).

4 SEVERE HAZARD:        Flammable gases or very volatile flammable liquids with
                        flash points below 73 F and boiling points Below 100 F
                        (NFPA Class IA).



                       II. HEALTH HAZARD RATING

0 MINIMAL HAZARD:       No significant risk to health.

1 SLIGHT HAZARD:        Irritation or minor reversible injury possible.

2 MODERATE HAZARD:      Temporary or minor injury may occur.

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3 SERIOUS HAZARD:       Major injury likely unless prompt action is taken and
                        medical treatment is given.

4 SEVERE HAZARD:        Life threatening, major or permanent damage may
                        result from single or repeated exposures.




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                     III. REACTIVITY HAZARD RATING

0 MINIMAL HAZARD:        Materials that are normally stable, even under fire
                         conditions, and will not react with water.

1 SLIGHT HAZARD:         Materials that are normally stable but can become
                         unstable at high temperatures and pressures. These
                         materials may react with water, but they will not
                         release energy violently.

2 MODERATE HAZARD:       Materials that, in themselves, are normally unstable and
                         will readily undergo violent chemical change, but will not
                         detonate. These materials may also react violently with
                         water.

3 SERIOUS HAZARD:        Materials that are capable of detonation or explosive
                         reaction, but require a strong initiating source or must
                         be heated under confinement before initiation of
                         materials that react explosively with water.

4 SEVERE HAZARD:         Materials that are readily capable of detonation or
                         explosive decomposition at normal temperatures and
                         pressures.



                    PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

A Safety Glasses.
B Safety Glasses, Gloves.
C Safety Glasses, Gloves, Synthetic Apron.
D Face Shield, Gloves, Synthetic Apron.
E Safety Glasses, Gloves, Dust Respirator.
F Safety Glasses, Gloves, Synthetic Apron, Dust Respirator.
G Safety Glasses, Gloves, Vapor Respirator.
H Splash Goggles, Gloves, Synthetic Apron, Vapor Respirator.
I Safety Glasses, Gloves, Combination Dust and Vapor Respirator.
J Splash Goggles, Gloves, Synthetic Apron, Combination Dust and Vapor
Respirator.

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K   Airline Hood or Mask, Gloves, Full Protective Suite, Boots.
X   Ask your supervisor.
O   None required.




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                                CHRONIC EFFECTS

Y   Yes, chronic effects possible.
N   No chronic effects OR not determined.
U   Unknown.

NOTICE: This information is supplied to provide a definition of the number and
letter codes used in the HMIS ratings found on many MSDS's and product
containers. Rating the hazard level of a particular product using this system, is to
be done by qualified personnel only. A supervisor or employee may decide to take
extra precautions while using a particular product.




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                         DEPARTMENT OF FISH & WILDLIFE

             HAZARDOUS MATERIAL INVENTORY UPDATE SHEET

Instructions:      Complete one form for each hazardous substance used. More complete
             instructions are provided on the back of this form.

Forward all sheets to:        Brent Dearing, Safety Office
                              Department of Fish & Wildlife
                              600 Capitol Way N.
                              Olympia, WA 98501-1091


 Program/Division:

 Location:                                            Location number:

 Supervisor's name:

 Phone:

 Date:



Action Requested:          Add product to Inventory

                           Remove product from Inventory

Request MSDS from Safety Office:            Yes          No

                                   Product Information


 Product Name(common):

 Product Description:

 Manufacturer name:

 Manufacturer address:




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                                    Site Information


 Product is used for:

 Amount of Product on hand:

 Average amount used annually:
Form #823




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                       STATION HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

In compliance with state law all locations using and/or storing hazardous substances are required to
keep an inventory list of these items. Supervisors are also required to provide information to his
or her employees of the health hazards of a product.

To aid location managers in fulfilling their responsibility in Hazard Communication the Department
of Fish & Wildlife has set up a computer data base. On a Quarterly basis the database operator will
send a computer generated list of hazardous substances to the location manager. Items on this list
are ones that the location manager has reported as being used and/or stored at his/her facility.
The manager will be required to conduct an inventory of hazardous substances stored at his or her
facility when the list is received. To do this the following steps are recommended:

1.   Use the "Station Hazardous Material Inventory" as a check list. If you no longer have an
     item on the list remove it from the inventory using the "Hazardous Material Inventory
     Update Sheet". Attach the yellow copy of the update sheet to the inventory list (The
     "Station Hazardous Material Inventory" print out), send the white copy to the Safety
     Office.

2.   After completing the first step if you have a hazardous substance that was not listed on
     the inventory, add it to the inventory at this time using the "Hazardous Material Inventory
     Update Sheet". Attach the yellow copy to the station inventory list and send the white
     copy to the Safety Office.

3.   The "Station Hazardous Material Inventory" print out and attached update sheets will
     serve as the stations hazardous material inventory list. This list should be stored in the
     MSDS binder. The next "Station Hazardous Material Inventory" provided by the data base
     operator will replace the combined inventory print out and update sheets.

Note: Although inventories will be updated quarterly, new products must be added to station
inventories upon receipt. MSDS requests can be made at any time.

           FILLING OUT THE HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL INVENTORY UPDATE SHEET

1.   The first section of the update sheet asks for the Program/Division and location of the
     station. It is important to provide the location number, which can be found at the top of
     the "Station Hazardous Material Inventory" print out. If you need assistance in
     determining the number contact the Safety Office.

2.   The second section asks for the action requested. Check the appropriate box to add or
     remove products from the inventory. Also check the appropriate box to request an MSDS
     from the Safety Office.

3.   The product information section is an important part of the form. Information provided

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     should be complete and accurate. Provide the exact product name and a good description of
     it, using the manufacturer product number if provided. If available, provide the complete
     manufacturer's name and address. Attach a copy of the product label if available.

4.   The site information section informs the Safety Office about the product's use. One
     product can sometimes be used in many different ways. The amount of product on hand and
     average amount used annually can be estimated.




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                  WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH & WILDLIFE
                 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION PROGRAM
                     CERTIFICATION OF GENERAL TRAINING




This will certify that I,                                                            ,
                                      (Print Name)
have received instructions on the Hazardous Communication Program, and safe use of
chemicals

used within the Department of Fish & Wildlife. I am aware that emergency information is
written

in Material Safety Data Sheets along with emergency phone numbers in case an over
exposure to

hazardous substances used within the Department of Fish & Wildlife occurs.




   Social Security Number




             Signature                                          Date




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Form No 824




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                        WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF FISH & WILDLIFE
                       HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION PROGRAM
                           CERTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC TRAINING

This will certify that I,                                                             , have been
                                                                             (Print Name)
instructed of the hazards and safe use for dangerous substances listed below that I will be working with
at .

                                                     .
                            Location



                    Signature                                                      Date


 PRODUCT                                    PRODUC        MANUFACTURE   DATE    EMPLOYE    SUPERVISO
                                            T            R                      E          R
                                            NUMBER                              INITIAL     INITIALS
                                                                                S

   1

   2

   3

   4

   5

   6

   7

   8

   9

  10

  11

  12

  13

  14

  15


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  16

  17

  18

  19

  20




           Instructors Signature                 Date



Form No. 825




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                                INSTRUCTIONS




   After the supervisor has conducted specific training for a product it must be
   documented. This form must stay with the employee. If an employee is
   transferred he/she must take the documentation of training with him/her to
   the new place of employment.




                            FILLING OUT THE FORM




   Enter the product name, product number and the manufacturer's name for
   each product for which the employee received training. The product number
   must be entered. If the product number is not filled in the employee will not
   receive credit for the training. The number can be found on the top of the
   MSDS for each product. If you are unsure about the product number call the
   Safety Office for assistance.

   Both the supervisor and the employee must the sign form. The employee
   should keep this form. Documentation for all training an employee receives
   must be kept in the office where he/she is employed. If the employee
   transfers to another work station all training documentation must be
   forwarded to the new place of employment.




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                                 REFERENCES




Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission. Chemical Hazard Communication
Trainer's Handbook. 1988; 106p. 7150 Cleanwater Lane,KY-11, Olympia, Washington
98504-57711.

National Paint & Coatings Association (NPCA). Implementation Manual. 1981; 139p.
(Available from American Labelmark Co. Inc. Labelmaster Division, 5724 N. Pulaski
Rd., Chicago, Illinois 60646).

The Hazard Communication Standard (Guide Book). 1985; 42p. National Safety
Council, 444 North Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60611.




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                             Department of Fish and Wildlife

                                  SAFETY MANUAL



VIII.      SAFETY AND HEALTH COMMITTEE

        A safety committee is a tool for bringing management and labor together on
        common ground to discuss methods and means to reduce or eliminate unsafe
        conditions and practices in the workplace. The committee is not intended to
        replace management's responsibility for safety, but merely to aid it with the
        valuable job experience of committee members in determining unsafe conditions
        and methods of work, suggesting corrective measures, and obtaining the
        participation of all employees.

        A. Committee or Crew Meetings

           WAC 296-24-045 requires that the agency have a designated safety
           committee for the purpose of addressing safety and health issues.
           However, provision is made that if employees are segregated or in widely
           dispersed locations, the agency may elect to have foreman/crew meetings in
           lieu of a safety and health committee. Crew meetings must be held at
           least monthly. Therefore, crew meetings will be used to address safety
           and health issues with the following exceptions.

           1.   In Olympia, there shall be a safety committee comprised of an equal
                number of management appointed and employee elected members.

                a. The safety committee will elect a chairperson.

                b. The committee shall be responsible for determining:

                   (1)   Frequency of meetings
                   (2)   Date of meetings
                   (3)   Time of meetings
                   (4)   Place of meetings

           2. Regional offices may elect representatives to the Olympia safety


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            committee. Such representatives will serve as full members. If regions
            do not elect representatives to the Olympia safety committee, then
            regional offices will have foreman/crew meetings at least monthly.

       3. Installations will have foreman/crew meetings at least monthly.

    B. Meeting Activities

       Safety committee and crew meeting activities (whether in Olympia, the
       regional offices, or at installations) will include:

       1.   A review of the safety and health inspection reports to assist in
            correction of identified unsafe conditions or practices.

       2. An evaluation of the accident investigations conducted since the last
          meeting to determine if the causes of unsafe acts or unsafe conditions
          involved were properly identified and corrected.

       3. An evaluation of the accident and illness prevention program with a
          discussion of recommendations for improvement where indicated.

       4. Self Inspections. There are a number of sources which will be helpful
          to identify hazards as self-inspections are conducted.

            a.   Specific Safety Standards.
            b.   General Safety Standards
            c.   Employee suggestions
            d.   Accident and injury records

       5. Accident Investigations. An accident is an unplanned event. Sometimes
          it injures people or damages things, sometimes not. Even an unplanned
          interruption of the work flow is an accident. By recognizing and
          eliminating the cause, it is possible to avoid a repeat performance of an
          accident.

            a. Post-accident investigation helps identify cause factors. The safety
               committee should evaluate the Supervisor's Report of an Accident
               forms to determine if all contributing factors have been identified
               and corrected. Be aware this is fact finding, not fault finding.


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           b. All cause factors must be identified and corrected.

        6. Evaluation of the safety program. Recommendations for improvements
           or issues that develop that have application beyond the installation or
           office where the safety/crew meeting is held, shall be forwarded to the
           safety office.

        7. Document meetings by keeping minutes. Minutes will include attendance
           and the safety topic discussed, and must be kept on file for a period of
           one year. The minutes will be accessible to Labor and Industries
           inspectors.




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IX.   GLOSSARY

      Bloodborne Pathogens: Pathogenic microorganizms that are present in Human
      Blood and can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not
      limited to, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

      Capillary tubes: A tube with a small internal diameter.

      Contaminated: The presence or the reasonably anticipated presence of human
      blood or other potentially infectious materials on an item or surface.

      Contaminated Laundry: Laundry (including uniforms) which has been soiled with
      human blood or other potentially infectious materials or may contain sharps.

      Contaminated Sharps: Any contaminated object that can penetrate the skin
      including, but not limited to, needles, scalpels, broken glass, borken capillary
      tubes, and exposed ends of dental wires.

      Decontamination: The use of physical or chemical means to remove, inactivate,
      or destroy bloodborne pathogens on a surface or item to the point where they
      are no longer capable of transitting infectious particles and the surface or item
      is rendered safe for handling, use, or disposal.

      Engineering Controls: Controls (e.g. shaps disposal containers, tongs, etc.) that
      isolate or remove the bloodborne pathogens hazard from the workplace.

      Exposure Incident: A specific eye, mouth, other mucous membrane, non-intact
      skin, or parenteral contact with human blood or other potentially infectious
      materials that results from the performance of an employee's duties.

      Facility Manager: The person who is responsible for any worksite. This
      includes: Assistant Director, Regional Manager, Hatchery Manager, Wildlife
      Area Manager, Game Farm Superintendent, Warehouse Supervisor, etc.


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    Handwashing Facilities: A facility providing an adequate supply of running
    potable water, soap and single use towels or hot air drying machines.

    HBV: Hepatitis B virus.

    HIV: Human immunodeficiency virus.




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Glossary                                                                        Chapter IX


     Installation Manager: The person who is responsible for any worksite away
     from Olympia. This includes: Regional Manager, Hatchery Manager, Wildlife
     Area Manager, Game Farm Superintendent, etc.

     Investigation Team: The Director will convene a team to investigate serious
     accidents resulting in major injuries, and near misses. The team will consist of
     the Director's designee, a representative of the safety office, and the
     supervisor of the employee involved.

     Licensed Healthcare Professional: A person whose legally permitted scope of
     practice allows him or her to independently perform the activities required for
     hepatitis B vaccination and post-exposure evaluation and follow-up.

     Medical Claim: An employee accident or illness which results in medical
     treatment only, and results in no employee time loss.

     Near Miss Accident: A near miss accident is defined as an unplanned event
     where damages result t equipment or property, but with no personal injury; or
     where damage did not occur, but the likelihood of personal injury to the
     employee was great.

     Occupational Exposure: Reasonably anticipated skin, eye, mucous membrane, or
     parenteral contact with human blood or other potentially infectious materials
     that may result from the performance of an employee's duties.

     OSHA: Occupational Safety and Health Act administered by the U.S.
     Department of Labor.

     Other Potentially Infectious Materials:

     1.    The following human body fluids: Semen, vaginal secretions, cerebrospinal
           fluid, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, pericardial fluid, peritoneal fluid, amniotic
           fluid, saliva in dental procedures, any body fluid that is visibly contaminated
           with blood, and all body fluids in situations where is is difficult or impossible
           to differentiate between body fluids.

     2. Any unfixed tissue or organ (other than intact skin) from a human (living or
        dead).

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     3. HIV-containing cell or tissue cultures, organ cultures, and HIV- or HBV-
        containing culture medium or other solutions; and blood, organs, or other
        tissues from experimental animals infected with HIV or HBV.

     Parenteral: Piercing mucous membranes or the skin barrier through such
     events as needlesticks, human bites, cuts, and abrasions.

     Precutaneous Injury: An injury through the skin.

     Personal Protective Equipment: Specialized clothing or equipment worn by an
     employee for protection against a hazard. General work clothes (e.g. uniforms,
     pants, shirts or blouses) not intended to function as protection against a hazard
     are not considered to be personal protective equipment.

     Regulated Waste: Liquid or semi-liquid human blood or other potentially
     infectious materials; contaminated items that woudl release human blood or
     other potentially infectious materials in a liquid or semi-liquid state if
     compressed; items that are caked with dried human blood or other potentially
     infectious materials and are capable of releasing these materials during
     handling; contaminated sharps; and pathological and microbioligical wastes
     containing human blood or other potentially infectious materials.

     Return to Work Coordinator: The Return to Work Coordinator is the Manager
     of the Office of Logistics and Safety.

     Safety Office: The Office of Logistics and Safety in Olympia.

     Serological Status: The status of serum in the blood.

     Sharps: Any object that can penetrate the skin including, but not limited to,
     needles, scalpels, broken glass, broken capillary tubes, and exposed ends of
     dental wires.

     Site Manager: The person who is responsible for any worksite. This includes:
     Assistant Director, Regional Manager, Hatchery Manager, Wildlife Area
     Manager, Game Farm Superintendent, Warehouse Supervisor, etc.


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Glossary                                                                Chapter IX


     Source Individual: Any individual, living or dead, whose blood or other
     potentially infectious materials may be a source of occupational exposure to the
     employee.

     Time Loss Claim: A work-related accident or illness which is expected to
     result in time loss, disability, or death, and awards financial compensation for
     these.

     Universal Precautions: An approach to infection control. According to the
     concept of Universal Precautions, all human blood and certain human body fluids
     are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne
     pathogens.

     WISHA: Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act, administered by the
     Department of Labor and Industries.

     Work Practice Controls: Controls that reduce the likelihood of exposure to
     bloodborne pathogens by altering the manner in which a task is performed (e.g.,
     requiring tongs to pick up sharps).




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                       SAFETY MANUAL



X.   APPENDICES




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