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West Midlands trails

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					                                    Travel & Tourism Diploma


                   Tourist trails around the
                       West Midlands


  Guided Trails – Linked to the West Midlands

  Created by Peter Robinson, University of Wolverhampton
1.BRICKS AND SLAUGHTER            A HISTORICAL JOURNEY THROUGH THE WEST MIDLANDS




  West Midlands Trails – May 2010
This trail considers the social history of the West Midlands through art and architecture and built heritage drawing together comparisons
  between major heritage organisations, attractions in private ownership and exploring how diversification in the tourism industry has
  ensure the survival or otherwise of many of the great estates of the West Midlands. The tour is approached through a chronological
  perspective, with the supporting resources on the subsequent pages offering more details on each attraction, although in the case of
    English Heritage and The National Trust the attractions are featured together and identified in the trail as EH and NT respectively.

 Early History can be seen in the collections at many museums in the region (PS) as well as some of the often remotely located ancient
  monuments protected by English Heritage which include Mitchell’s Fold Stone Circle, Arthurs Stone and Oswestry Hill Fort.
 The Roman History of the West Midlands can be seen at the Wroxeter Roman City (EH) and Wall Roman Site (EH & NT), explored through
  the recreated Lunt Roman Fort and traced through the routes of Roman Roads such as The Fosse Way.
 There is little remaining evidence of Saxon times in the West Midlands, although collections in museums (PS) such as the recently
  discovered Staffordshire Hoard demonstrate the wealth of archaeology that exists, whilst other remains may be noted as Saxon Crosses
  and monuments in Churchyards, which link into themes around Church Tourism.
 The West Midlands exemplifies the development of the Castle through medieval times from early Keeps such as Longtown Castle (EH), to
  sophisticated fortresses Warwick Castle, Kenilworth Castle (EH), Tamworth Castle, Ludlow Castle, Clun Castle (EH) and to quieter late-
  medieval times where architecture was castle like, but times were safer so houses were not designed for serious fortification, which can be
  seen at Stokesay Castle (EH), Baddesley Clinton (NT), Lower Brockhampton (NT). Other themes linked to this include the conflicts the
  Welsh Borders and the role of volunteers and the public sector in the management and protection of our shared heritage.
 Other themes from this period include the development of monasteries (White Ladies Priory (EH), Buildwas Abbey (EH0, Lilleshall Abbey
  (EH) and Haughmond Abbey (EH) and an increased number of stone built churches which can be seen throughout the County.
 After the middle-ages came a series of comparatively ‘short’ periods of history, such as Tudor, Elizabethan, and Jacobean and so on. Much
  of our built heritage from this period comprises a mixture of styles and periods of development which can be seen at Attingham Park (NT),
  Weston Park, Ragley Hall, Hanbury Hall (NT), Moseley Old Hall (NT), Packwood House (NT), Boscobel House (EH), Ford Green Hall and
  Bantock House. The owners of these properties frequently designed the houses to showcase their souvenirs from their own travels, and at
  Biddulph Grange Garden (NT) the entire garden was designed around different places in the World.
 During Georgian and Victorian Times, as wealthy entrepreneurs made money from the Industrial Revolution, new houses were built and
  old ones updated. This is exemplified through Eastnor Castle and Wightwick Manor (NT), whilst the poverty that thousands lived in at the




   West Midlands Trails – May 2010
  same time is demonstrated through the Back to Backs (NT) in Birmingham.
 The late 1900s were also a time of greater enlightenment and many museums were created to display items brought back from overseas
  explorations and archaeological digs. An increased interest in our past led to the opening of many museums and in 1895 the creation of
  The National Trust was lead to a situation where today’s tourist can visit historic houses and castles that would not have been otherwise
  accessible.
 The economic changes during the early 20th Century would see more houses given to the National Trust, and many more destroyed or
  ruined beyond use, such as Witley Court (EH). Others were opened to the public by their owners, such as Weston Park and Ragley Hall.
  Others were to be changed to an entirely new type of tourism, firstly as gardens and pleasure parks and then through a process of
  evolution into major Theme Parks, which in the West Midlands explains the development of The Alton Towers Resort and Drayton Manor
  Theme Park.
OPPORTUNITIES FOR APPLIED LEARNING
 Developing Visitor Trails for your Local Area
 Planning an itinerary for a specific visitor market
 Investigating quality and strands of customer service
 Accessibility Studies for museums, galleries and other attractions
 Investigating job roles and opportunities for work experience
 Sustainability audits for Travel and Tourism businesses
 Plan for utilising social media to attract new customers for a venue or attraction
 Predicting trends and changes that can affect a business and developing a business plan for the future
 The use of technology for interpretation, audio tours and virtual tourism


LINKS TO THE DIPLOMA CURRICULUM
Foundation Level
 1.1 Planning Journeys
 1.2 Destinations
 1.3 Looking after customers




   West Midlands Trails – May 2010
   1.5 Creating and delivering travel and tourism products and services

Higher Level
 2.1 Destinations
 2.2 The UK Travel and Tourism Sector
 2.3 The customer experience
 2.4 Working in Travel and Tourism
 2.6 Promotion and Sales
 2.7 Creating and delivering travel and tourism products and services

Advanced Level
 3.2 Destinations and Cultures
 3.3 Environmental Influences
 3.4 Image and perception
 3.6 Technology in Travel and Tourism
 3.8 Creating and delivering travel and tourism products and services

Potential Themes
 Industrial Heritage as a Tourism Resource
 Transport within Tourism
 Domestic and Overseas Markets
 Urban and Rural Tourism
 Travel Management




    West Midlands Trails – May 2010
BRICKS AND SLAUGHTER                        RESOURCES



 Museums
 Introduction

 Most local authorities manage at least one museum. They all have an agenda for education. The following list is a useful guide, but for current
 contacts it is suggested that you visit the website.

 Useful Websites

        Birmingham Museums and Art Galleries – www.bmag.org.uk
        Walsall Museums – www.walsall.gov.uk/museums
        Wolverhampton Museums – www.wolverhampton.gov.uk/leisure_culture/museums/default.htm
        Dudley Museums - www.dudley.gov.uk/leisure-and-culture/museums--galleries/dudley-museum--art-gallery
        Staffordshire Museums – www.staffordshire.gov.uk/leisure/museumandgalleries
        Stoke on Trent Museums – www.stoke.gov.uk/ccm/navigation/leisure/museums
        Shropshire Museums – www.shropshire.gov.uk/museums.nsf
        Herefordshire Museums – www.herefordshire.gov.uk/museums
        Worcestershire Museums – www.worcestershire.gov.uk/cms/leisure-and-culture/museum.aspx
        Coventry Museums – www.coventry.gov.uk/ccm/navigation/leisure-and-culture/museums-and-galleries/



 West Midlands Trails – May 2010
       Warwickshire Museums –www.warwickshire.gov.uk/museum
       Rugby Museums – www.rugby.gov.uk/site/scripts/documents.php?categoryID=200070




Lunt Roman Fort
Introduction

It's A.D. 60; the Iceni of East Anglia led by the legendary Boudica have rebelled against Roman rule, and have just been defeated in a terrible battle fought
somewhere in the Midlands.

As a result the Romans are building a series of fortifications across the Midlands including the Lunt.

Come and explore this partially-reconstructed timber fort. Stand on the ramparts, explore the exhibition in the granary and imagine yourself training horses in the
gyrus - a feature not found anywhere else in the Roman Empire.

                                                                                                                                      (Source: www.luntromanfort.org)
Resources

For further information contact: luntromanfort@coventry.gov.uk

Useful Websites

       Lunt Roman Fort - www.luntromanfort.org




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Church Tourism
Introduction

Divine Inspiration is one example of Church Tourism:

Helen McGowan, the Divine Inspiration project officer shares details of what this project has achieved to date:

"Divine Inspiration is funded by English Heritage and the Diocese of Coventry. It aims to help parish churches in the Diocese of Coventry make lasting
connections with visitors to their church buildings. While the definition of a 'tourist' is quite straightforward, the 'visitor' comes in many different guises looking
for varied things. A visitor can be a long distance traveller or may have lived in the community for years and never made a visit to the church building on their
doorstep. The challenge for any church is to work out how to welcome these people most effectively by sharing their space creatively and telling their story in
an interesting and engaging way”

"We are in the middle of a culture change where church buildings have to stop being exhausting places and start being interesting, relevant and
useful spaces for their communities and to those who make visits”
                                                                                                                                 (Source: www.churchestourism.info)


Resources

Education Resources vary depending on the Church. As a starting point visit The Churches Tourism Association at www.churchestourism.info/regional-
projects-mainmenu-93/east-a-west-midlands-mainmenu-97?layout=default

Useful Websites

       The Church Tourism Association – www.churchestourism.info




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Warwick Castle
Introduction

Warwick Castle TV Advert - http://www.warwick-castle.co.uk/misc/tv-advert.aspx?css=1

Resources

It's amazing what you can achieve in just one day away from the classroom. A school trip to Warwick Castle will challenge your pupils, fill them with
enthusiasm and let them experience Britain’s Ultimate Castle.

For 2010 we plan to introduce a programme of events and activities for pupils of Key Stages 1 to 4. From new Resource Packs to new tours Warwick Castle
provides an outstanding environment to stimulate your pupils’ imaginations.

These are set to be launched throughout the year along with a range of school specific events See our Talks, Tours and Events page for more information.
Your pupils can take part in various structured activities that are linked to the National Curriculum and specific programmes of study.

For further information contact: customer.information@warwick-castle.com

Useful Websites

       Ironbridge Gorge Museums - www.warwick-castle.com




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
English Heritage
Featured in this Trail: English Heritage Kenilworth Castle, Clun Castle, Stokesay Castle, Wall Roman Site, Wroxeter Roman City, Mitchell’s Fold Stone Circle,
Arthurs Stone, Oswestry Hill Fort, White Ladies Priory, Buildwas Abbey, Lilleshall Abbey, Haughmond Abbey, Boscobel House, Witley Court

Introduction

English Heritage is the Government's statutory adviser on the historic environment. Officially known as the Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for
England, English Heritage is an Executive Non-departmental Public Body sponsored by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). Our powers
and responsibilities are set out in the National Heritage Act (1983) and today we report to Parliament through the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and
Sport.

Although sponsored by DCMS, English Heritage works with a range of Government Departments, notably CLG and DEFRA, to help realise the potential of
the historic environment. English Heritage is funded in part by the Government and in part from revenue earned from our historic properties and other
services. In 2008/09 our public funding was worth £132.7 million, and our income from other sources was £48.1 million.

The work of English Heritage is overseen by a Chair and a board of up to 16 Commissioners selected by the Government for the breadth of their national and
regional expertise. The Commission is, in turn, advised by 12 expert advisory committees and panels.

English Heritage works in partnership with the central government departments, local authorities, voluntary bodies and the private sector to:
    Conserve and enhance the historic environment
    Broaden public access to the heritage
    Increase people's understanding of the past

We meet those responsibilities by:
    acting as a national and international champion for the heritage
    giving grants for the conservation of historic buildings, monuments and landscapes
    maintaining registers of England's most significant historic buildings, monuments and landscapes
    advising on the preservation of the historic environment
    encouraging broader public involvement with the heritage
    promoting education and research
    caring for Stonehenge and over 400 other historic properties on behalf of the nation
    maintaining the National Monuments Record as the public archive of the heritage
    generating income for the benefit of the historic environment




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
English Heritage is probably best known for the historic sites in our care which are open to the public. Less well known is our role in looking after the historic
environment as a whole, including historic buildings, monuments and areas, and archaeological remains. We aim not only to ensure the preservation of our
historic surroundings for the future, but also to encourage people to appreciate and enjoy this heritage today.

                                                                                                                            (Source: www.english-heritage.org.uk)
Resources

English Heritage is proud of its commitment to heritage education. We aim to help teachers and those involved in education – at all levels – to use the historic
environment as a resource, right across the curriculum.

These pages (see link below) will help you to:
• plan a visit to one of our sites
• make online bookings for site visits
• download useful information and our latest publications
• access free resources
• use our teaching ideas before and after visits
• find out more about the sites themselves

For further information: www.english-heritage.org.uk/server/show/nav.1571

Useful Websites

       English Heritage: www.english-heritage.org.uk




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Tamworth Castle
Introduction

Tamworth Castle is the number one heritage attraction located in the town centre of Tamworth. Six wealthy and influential families have owned the castle
over the centuries. On a visit witness the magnificent late medieval Great Hall, grand Tudor Chambers and Victorian suit of receptions rooms.
                                                                                                                         (Source: www.tamworthcastle.co.uk)

Resources

Hello and welcome to the Educational programme at Tamworth Castle. We have a wide range of workshops for different age range children. Please click on
the links on the right of the page to find out more about these workshops. Tamworth Castle's education programme has just won the highly commended 2006
Sandford Award for Heritage Education.

For further information contact: castleeducation@tamworth.gov.uk

Useful Websites

       Tamworth Castle - www.tamworthcastle.co.uk




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Ludlow Castle
Introduction

Ludlow Castle, the finest of medieval ruined castles, set in glorious Shropshire countryside, at the heart of this superb, bustling black & white market town.
Walk through the Castle grounds and see the ancient houses of kings, queens, princes, judges and the nobility - a glimpse into the lifestyle of medieval
society.

The Castle, firstly a Norman Fortress and extended over the centuries to become a fortified Royal Palace, has ensured Ludlow's place in English history -
originally built to hold back unconquered Welsh, passing through generations of the de Lacy and Mortimer families to Richard Plantagenet, Duke of York. It
became Crown property in 1461 and remained a royal castle for the next 350 years, during which time the Council of the Marches was formed with
responsibility for the Government of Wales and the border counties. Abandoned in 1689 the castle quickly fell into ruin, described as 'the very perfection of
decay' by Daniel Defoe.

Since 1811 the castle has been owned by the Earls of Powis, who have arrested further decline, and allowed this magnificent historical monument to be open
to the public. Today the Castle is the home to Ludlow's major festivals throughout the year and open for all to enjoy
                                                                                                                           (Source: www.ludlowcastle.com)
Resources

Ludlow and the Castle provide children with a full and interesting day. The town has over 500 listed buildings and at the heart is Ludlow Castle.
The Castle was built as a Norman Fortress, grew into a Royal residence and then a seat of parliament, is was lived in for 600 years and during that time there
were many alterations – better ways were found to defend the castle, to improve the living conditions and the castle grew to accommodate all these changes.
Special admission rates for educational groups.
Guided tours can be tailored to suit your school’s requirements and arranged with our costumed interpreter.

For further information contact: info@ludlowcastle.com

Useful Websites

       Ludlow Castle - www.ludlowcastle.com




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
National Trust (West Midlands)
Featured in the trail: Baddesley Clinton, Lower Brockhampton, Attingham Park, Hanbury Hall, Moseley Old Hall, Packwood House, Wightwick Manor, Back to
Backs, Biddulph Grange

Introduction

Based in the heart of England, we protect over 8,000ha of land in Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Shropshire, Staffordshire, Herefordshire and the West
Midlands. We have many outstanding properties, as diverse in character as the fascinating history of the region. There are beautiful mansions and parks such
as Attingham Park. Baddesley Clinton is a moated manor house little changed since the 17th century. Hanbury Hall, a William & Mary style house, has a
stunning Thornhill mural and a formal 18th-century garden. We also care for urban and industrial heritage such as Birmingham Back to Backs. More unusual
properties include the rock houses at Kinver Edge. You will also see some spectacular countryside. The Brockhampton Estate, the Long Mynd, part of
Carding Mill Valley, and the Clent Hills, only 8ml from Birmingham, all offer breathtaking views of the region.
                                                                    (Source: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/main/w-global/w-localtoyou/w-west_midlands.htm)
Resources

The National Trust West Midlands region offers a range of subject specific and cross curricular school programmes at many of its sites. While many sessions are aimed
at Key Stages 1 & 2, several sites can deliver tailored programmes for Key Stages 3 & 4. We are also pioneering days related to BTECs and the new
apprenticeship GCSEs. Teachers are also welcome to lead their own visits.

Our aim is to provide a year round service. Several sites are open all year round while others offer outreach programmes in the winter. Our Learning Officers
also work closely with the Association of Colleges and universities as well as schools to provide opportunities for placements and projects covering a variety
of heritage and environment courses.

For further information contact: 0121 7537755

Useful Websites

       The National Trust - www.nationaltrust.org.uk




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Weston Park
Introduction

Weston Park is one of the most welcoming stately homes with as much character as any English castle and with as many stories as any royal home.
Open to the public for a day out or perfect for private celebrations, Weston offers more than just beautiful gardens, architecture and history; the House and
Stables are available for business meetings, team building events, corporate hospitality, weddings, product launches, private parties, conferences, family fun
days and activity days; offering an unforgettable venue, appealing to young and old.

The Granary Farm Shop & Art Gallery are open daily; the farm shop stocks the very best in locally produced food and drink and changing exhibitions can be
viewed in the Gallery.

Whether welcoming royalty for a wedding, G8 Summit Leaders for a conference, clients for a business event, schools for an educational visit or visiting for an
event, Weston has a unique appeal whatever the occasion.

Now held in trust by The Weston Park Foundation, you will find Weston Park as welcoming and engaging as ever.
                                                                                                                                 (Source: www.weston-park.com)
Resources

As a Charitable Educational Trust, the aim of the Foundation is to use the rich heritage and extensive facilities at Weston for the benefit of future generations.
Weston provides a focal point for the diverse needs of schools, colleges and universities by allowing teachers and lecturers to combine work in the classroom
with an inspiring outdoor environment and currently welcomes over 7,000 school children per year.

The Learning Department is dedicated to working with a range of educational establishments and strives to offer more informative and enjoyable visits that
address the National Curriculum requirements in addition to identified QCA schemes of work.

For further information contact: learning@weston-park.com

Useful Websites

       Weston Park - www.weston-park.com




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Ragley Hall
Introduction

Whether it’s an action-packed day out for the whole family, a stunning venue at which to hold your corporate event or wedding, or somewhere tranquil to get
lost in your own thoughts, Ragley has it all...

With so much to see and do, visitors often begin with a tour of the delightful Palladian House designed by Robert Hooke in 1680. Ragley has been, and
remains, the family home of the Marquess and Marchioness of Hertford and manages to retain its family charm despite the thousands of people who visit
each year.

The House itself stands majestically in well-maintained formal gardens within beautiful ‘Capability’ Brown parkland. As well as being architecturally stunning,
the Stables house an impressive collection of carriages really bringing to mind the extravagance of times past.
                                                                                                                                  (Source: www.ragleyhall.com)
Resources

Our aim is to enable you and your pupils to experience a truly memorable day by providing an alternative learning space and environment – minimum stress,
maximum enjoyment! Everything you require to make your own unique day out is provided. Exciting Forest School sessions now available for all age groups.

For further information contact: judithizzo@ragleyhall.com

Useful Websites

       Ragley Hall - www.ragleyhall.com




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Ford Green Hall
Introduction

Home to the Ford family for nearly 200 years, Ford Green Hall is a 17th century timber-framed farmhouse complete with period garden.
An award-winning museum, the hall offers visitors a fascinating insight into the life of the 17th century. The rooms are furnished with an outstanding collection
of textiles, ceramics and furniture. The museum offers family-friendly activities, events and displays, can cater for children's parties, and is licensed for
weddings and baby naming ceremonies.
                                                                                   (Source: http://www.stoke.gov.uk/ccm/navigation/leisure/museums/ford-green-hall)
Resources

For further information: http://www.stoke.gov.uk/ccm/navigation/leisure/museums/ford-green-hall/education/

Useful Websites

       Ford Green Hall Website - http://www.stoke.gov.uk/ccm/navigation/leisure/museums/ford-green-hall/




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Bantock House
Introduction

Welcome to Bantock House Museum, an urban oasis that offers a chance to explore life in an Edwardian home and discover the secrets of Wolverhampton’s rich
history.
                                                                                                                             (Source: www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/bantock)
Resources

Bantock House Museum offers a wide range of learning opportunities for all ages and at all levels. Groups can take a tour of the house, become a history detective, take part in a
workshop or a handling session. The Learning section of this website provides teacher with access to a growing selection of downloadable images for use in the classroom as well as
some in depth examinations of interesting collection objects.
For further information: http://www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/bantock/learning/book_visit

Useful Websites

        Ironbridge Gorge Museums - www.wolverhamptonart.org.uk/bantock




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Eastnor Castle
Introduction

Soon after Eastnor was built, it was opened to visitors. Now, after an extensive refurbishment programme, we also offer our state rooms and bedrooms to
private and corporate groups on an exclusive basis and have a licence to hold weddings, for which, as a very romantic castle, we are much in demand. We
have a committed and friendly team who will look after you to the highest standards.

There is much to interest visitors - both adults and children alike - in the grounds.

        Estate Life Photographic Exhibition
        Valley Lawn Picnic Area
        Knight's Maze and Children's Assault Course
        Adventure Playground
        Castle Terraces Overlooking Lake
        Lakeside and Woodland Walks
        Children's Fun Worksheets

                                                                                                                         (Source: www.eastnorcastle.com)
Resources

For further information: http://www.eastnorcastle.com/group_visits_booking_form.htm

Useful Websites

        Eastnor Castle - www.eastnorcastle.com




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Alton Towers Resort
Introduction

Alton Towers Resort includes a Theme Park, built around the gardens and the ruins of the original house, two Hotels and a Waterpark.

Resources

       The Business of Leisure event includes a series of engaging 45 minute talks in our unique venue, Cloud Cuckoo Land Theatre, in the heart of the
        Alton Towers Resort.
       In consultation with practicing teachers, we have developed a range of imaginative and stimulating classroom resources to support the National
        Curriculum for Key Stages 1 to 4.
       Our range of school talks supports our paper-based and online resources and is designed to help you get the most from your visit to the Park.
       The quality and safety of all our rides and attractions are of the utmost importance and therefore a considerable amount of time and effort is spent on
        making all visits a safe and fun experience.

For further information: www.altontowers.com/groups/prices-packages/

Useful Websites

Alton Towers - www.altontowers.com
Towers Times (detailed fan site) - www.towerstimes.co.uk




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Drayton Manor Theme Park
Introduction

Everyone’s favourite theme park, packed with a host of great rides and attractions set in 280 acres of lakes and parkland. Drayton Manor features some of
the biggest, wettest and scariest rides around! Apocalypse is the world’s first stand up tower drop. Shockwave is Europe’s only stand up rollercoaster.
Stormforce 10 is ‘the best water rides in the country’ (Daily Express). Maelstrom is the only gyro swing to make you face outwards! Pandemonium turns your
world upside down!

And the incredible G-Force is a rollercoaster ride like you’ve never had before! This £3 million ride takes terrified thrillseekers through a series of high banked
twists and turns at speeds of up to 70kph at 4.3 Gs, whilst hanging by the hip!

There’s also a host of fantastic family entertainment with Excalibur – a Dragon’s Tale, the Pirate Adventure, Drayton Manor’s live theatres - and the Drunken
Barrels is fantastic new fun for all the family! Thomas Land is packed with rides just for younger children.

Drayton Manor Zoo is home to over a hundred species from throughout the world – plus Dinosaurland, museums, shops, cafes, bars and restaurants – and
much more! It’s a fantastic fun-filled day for everyone!

Thomas Land – For the first time in Europe, Thomas and Friends will have their very own home at Drayton Manor Park!

                                                                                                                               (Source: www.draytonmanor.co.uk)
Resources


For further information contact: info@draytonmanor.co.uk

Useful Websites

       Official Website: www.draytonmanor.co.uk




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
4. HIGH and MIGHTY TRAIL                      INDUSTRIAL HERITAGE and HISTORIC TRANSPORT
   Ironbridge Gorge is recognised as a World Heritage Site because it is widely accepted as ‘The Birthplace of Industry’ from where the
  Industrial Revolution spread throughout Europe. This was not just a result of the pioneering technologies that evolved here, but also
because of the transport infrastructure that developed at that time. This ‘tour’ builds on these themes of industrial heritage and historic
transport to identify and understand the products and services that characterise much of the tourism industry in the West Midlands, and
  to explore how the West Midlands played a pivotal role in the car industry, opening up opportunities for travel to millions of people.

 Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site: provides an opportunity to consider the significance and challenges of managing World Heritage
  Sites and the role of the 10 Ironbridge Gorge Museums within the Ironbridge Destination.

 West Midlands Canal Network: provides an opportunity to look at the links between industrial heritage and historic transport, and their
  role today in rural and urban environments as visitor attractions and the narrowboat hire industry.

 The Black Country Museum: provides living history experiences around the heritage of the area, including a focus on the social and
  industrial heritage of the region

 Burton upon Trent Brewing Heritage: Burton is famous for its brewing heritage and there are increasing opportunities to experience this
  aspect of the Town’s industrial heritage.

 Birmingham Museums & Art Galleries: Industrial Heritage is exemplified through Sarehole Mill and The Museum of the Jewellery Quarter,
  together with the collections on display in other museums linked to the industrial heritage of the area




   West Midlands Trails – May 2010
 Coventry Motor Museum: The museum explores links to Coventry’s manufacturing heritage and historic transport and explains these in
  the context of Coventry’s social history.

 Heritage Motor Centre, Gaydon: celebrating the manufacturing heritage of the West Midlands synonymous with companies that include
  Austin, British Leyland and Land Rover.

 Severn Valley Railway: This 16 mile heritage railway, with its new visitor centre and museum, is a major transport attraction in the West
  Midlands and can be used to travel between West Midlands destinations.

 Tyseley Locomotive Works and Shakespeare Express: The former Birmingham Railway Museum now specialises in mainline tours hauled
  by steam locomotives – this is an important, growing and high-end niche market.

 Walsall Leather Museum: demonstrates the role that Walsall played in international trade as the centre of the leather industry, supplying
  many other companies involved in the industrial past of the region and beyond.

 The Potteries: Stoke on Trent is comprised of 6 towns, each with a history borne from the pottery industry, with many shops, museums
  and activities linked to this particular industrial heritage

Useful Websites

      The Potteries Website - http://www.thepotteries.org/
      Exploring the Potteries: http://www.exploringthepotteries.org.uk/
      The Wedgewood Museum: http://www.wedgwoodmuseum.org.uk/home
      World Heritage Site Entry - http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/371/gallery/
      Ceramica: http://www.ceramicauk.com/
      The Potteries Museum: http://www.stokemuseums.org.uk/pmag




   West Midlands Trails – May 2010
      Gladstone Pottery Museum: http://www.stokemuseums.org.uk/gpm
      News and Information: www.creativestoke.org.uk

OPPORTUNITIES FOR APPLIED LEARNING
 Developing Visitor Trails for your local area and your region
 Identifying ways in which destinations are created by bringing together a range of attractions
 Exploring the role of themed products within destinations
 Planning itineraries for specific visitor markets, possibly to include the use of heritage transport
 Accessibility studies for museums, galleries and other attractions
 Investigating job roles and opportunities for work experience within destination management
 Exploring the use of technology for interpretation, audio tours and virtual tourism.

LINKS TO THE DIPLOMA CURRICULUM
Foundation Level
    1.1 Planning Journeys
    1.2 Destinations
    1.3 Looking after customers
    1.5 Creating and delivering travel and tourism products and services

Higher Level
    2.1 Destinations
    2.2 The UK Travel and Tourism Sector
    2.3 The customer experience
    2.4 Working in Travel and Tourism
    2.6 Promotion and Sales
    2.7 Creating and delivering travel and tourism products and services




   West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Advanced Level
    3.2 Destinations and Cultures
    3.3 Environmental Influences
    3.4 Image and perception
    3.6 Technology in Travel and Tourism
    3.8 Creating and delivering travel and tourism products and services

Potential Themes
    Industrial Heritage as a Tourism Resource
    Transport within Tourism
    Heritage Transport
    Domestic and Overseas Markets
    Urban and Rural Tourism




   West Midlands Trails – May 2010
4. HIGH and MIGHTY TRAIL                             RESOURCES



  Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site
  Introduction

  Here, in Ironbridge, along the most spectacular stretch of the River Severn, are six square miles that changed the world. Although nature has now softened
  the landscape and reclaimed her riverbanks, it still seems faintly shocking that so beautiful - so quiet - a county should have given birth to all things industrial
  in the world.

  But it was here, within the dramatic gorge of the River Severn, that the great Ironmaster Abraham Darby perfected the secret of smelting iron with cheap and
  plentiful coke, instead of expensive and less efficient charcoal. Britain, and the world, would never be the same again.

  The world’s first iron bridge was built in Shropshire, in 1779 and still stands testament to his industry. And throughout the town which now proudly bears the
  name Ironbridge, ten astonishing 'hands-on', world class museums celebrate those early pioneers.
                                                                                                                                      (Source: www.ironbridge.info)
  Resources

  The Ironbridge Gorge is regarded as the ‘birthplace of industry’. The combination of raw materials and the skill and imagination of entrepreneurs like Darby and Wilkinson
  saw this small area of rural Shropshire leading the world in iron manufacture in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Discover and enjoy the history, technology and
  geography that took us from simple iron cooking pots to the first iron bridge, steam engines and Aga cookers.




  West Midlands Trails – May 2010
The Museum offers self guided visits at all ten sites with a wide range of Sandford Award winning facilitated learning experiences at four of them. Find out
about the sessions, tours, activities and resources that we offer education groups which enhance and enrich the curriculum for history, art and design,
science, technology, engineering and maths.

For further information contact: education@ironbridge.org.uk

Useful Websites

       Ironbridge Gorge Museums - http://www.ironbridge.org.uk/
       World Heritage Site Entry - http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/371/gallery/




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
West Midlands Canal Network
Introduction

The exact numbers depend on where you draw the city boundaries, but the whole Birmingham Canal Navigations system extends for 100 miles in total. It is
one of the most intricate canal networks in the world.

These waterways converge at the city centre bustle of Gas Street Basin, where historic boats and canal architecture mingle with modern-day restaurants,
cafes and pubs. But elsewhere on the 'BCN', you can really get away from it all on winding suburban canals and a series of surprisingly rural branches.

The canals were the life-blood of Victorian Birmingham and the Black Country. At their height, they were so busy that gas lighting was installed beside the
locks to permit round-the-clock operation. Boats were built without cabins for maximum carrying capacity, and a near-tidal effect was produced as swarms of
narrowboats converged on the Black Country collieries at the same time every day.

The BCN has survived remarkably intact, with 100 miles still navigable from a peak of 160. The main lines and city centre canals are well patronised, but the
waterways of the Northern BCN remain truly off the beaten track. But should you decide to tackle some of these rarely cruised waters, beware - boating the
BCN can become addictive.
                                                                                                                              (Source: www.waterscape.com)
Resources

For information on educational opportunities: http://www.britishwaterways.co.uk/our-work/delivering-public-benefit/community-engagement

Useful Websites

       West Midlands Canals - http://www.waterscape.com/canals-and-rivers/bcn




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Black Country Living Museum Trust
Introduction

Discover a fascinating world when you visit this urban heritage park in the shadow of Dudley Castle at the heart of the Black Country.Historic buildings from all around the
Black Country have been moved and authentically rebuilt at the Museum, to create a tribute to the traditional skills and enterprise of the people that once lived in the heart
of industrial Britain.Visitors are transported back in time from the modern exhibition halls to the canal-side village, where costumed demonstrators and working craftsmen
bring the buildings to life with their local knowledge, practical skills and unique Black Country humour

                                                                                                                                                         (Source: www.bclm.co.uk)
Resources

The Museum has a high reputation for its educational service, and offers specific themes which are closely related to the National Curriculum and higher educational courses.


More than 1000 school and college groups visit the Museum each year. While visiting the Museum students can interact with the characters in the original shops and houses, ride
on a tramcar or fairground swing boat, join in a lesson at the old-fashioned school and discover what it was like to be a miner in the underground coal mine. Your guide will bring
history to life and let you experience how people lived and worked in the Black Country. You can see traditional skills from sweet-making and glass-cutting to metal-working.
From the introduction in the modern exhibition halls to the reconstructed village, the Museum offers groups of all ages, abilities and interests a full day out with a difference.


The Museum is excellent for cross curricular work including materials in Science, Leisure and Tourism, Technology and Art.


For further information: http://www.bclm.co.uk/education.htm


Useful Websites

        West Midlands Canals - www.bclm.co.uk




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Burton upon Trent: Brewing Heritage
Introduction

While the growth of the town was originally associated with the establishment of the Abbey, it was the discovery by the monks, of the special qualities of the
local well water for brewing that really ensured the future prosperity of the town. A number of inns were built close to the Abbey to accommodate travellers
and most of the innkeepers brewed their own ale. When, in the early 18th century, the Trent was made navigable as far as Burton, other markets became
open to the local brewers and some combined to export their products to the Baltic ports. With the Napoleonic Wars this trade ceased and alternative markets
opened up. With all this trade and expansion the town flourished and by 1880 it was estimated that upwards of 40 breweries were in business in the town.

There are three walking trails through Burton upon Trent's central area: The Abbey Trail, The Brewing Trail and the Borough Trail, which between them give
an introduction and overview of the town's heritage and historical development.

                                                                                                                                   (Source: www.enjoystaffs.co.uk)
Resources

Marston’s Brewery: http://www.enjoyengland.com/ideas/food-and-drink/drink/brewery-tours/marstons-brewery.aspx
Tours are available Monday to Friday and can accommodate 50 persons maximum. School parties are welcome by appointment only. Each visit lasts approximately 3 hours,
costs £6.00 per person plus food and includes:

       A short film about the unique Burton Union System
       Guided tour
       Sampling session
       Hot and cold food (if requested, menus available)
       A visit to Marston’s gift shop

Burton Bridge Brewery: http://www.burtonbridgebrewery.co.uk/Index.shtml

The National Brewery Centre: http://www.nationalbrewerycentre.co.uk/

Burton upon Trent: http://www.enjoyeaststaffs.co.uk/towns/burton.php




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Birmingham Museums & Art Galleries: Sarehole Mill & The Museum of The Jewellery Quarter
Introduction

The 200-year-old mill at Sarehole is one of only two surviving watermills in Birmingham. The cobbled courtyard and mill pool are a tranquil haven from 21st
century life outside, while the buildings and their impressive machinery give a unique insight into the lives of the millers who once inhabited this rural retreat.
More than seventy watermills once occupied the riverbanks around Birmingham and there has been one at Sarehole for at least 460 years. Sarehole was
first built as a corn-grinding mill but has also been used for rolling sheet metal, grinding blades and wire rolling. The Mill was once rented to Matthew Boulton
before he moved to Handsworth to build his famous Soho Manufactory. The local landscape also provided inspiration for the stories of JRR Tolkien who spent
his childhood here.
                                                                                                                                        (Source: www.bmag.org.uk)

Resources

Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery uses its collections, buildings and services to encourage learning, inspiration and enjoyment for all. Regular family activities take place at
all the museums, especially during the school holidays and at weekends. Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery has a team of teachers and Learning Officers who work with
pupils when they visit Museum sites. They teach across the age range, from 4 years - 18 years.

For further information: www.bmag.org.uk/learning-&-schools

Useful Websites

Birmingham Museums & Art Galleries: www.bmag.org.uk
Sarehole Mill: www.bmag.org.uk/sarehole-mill
The Museum of The Jewellery Quarter: www.bmag.org.uk/museum-of-the-jewellery-quarter and www.jewelleryquarter.net/about/sub-page/museum-of-the-
jewellery-quarter/




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Coventry Transport Museum
Introduction

Coventry is the birthplace of the British cycle and motor industry. Discover the fascinating story behind the development of road transport from the earliest
cycles to land speed record breakers. With thrills, nostalgia , inspiration and a little bit of education, join us on a surprising and emotional journey through 150
years of innovation and find out about the people who made it happen.

The Museum’s unique collection has been ‘designated’ as a collection of national importance. So with over 240 cars, commercial vehicles and buses, 94
motorcycles, 200 cycles, 25,000 models and around 1 million archive and ephemera items, you are sure to have a Great Day Out at one of the Midlands’ best
attractions.
                                                                                                                      (Source: www.transport-museum.com)
Resources

If you're looking for a memorable visit we have it all and can facilitate many curriculum areas.
See the worlds largest display of British road transport in the birthplace of the British motor industry and experience a fascinating journey from bone rattling
cycles to mind-blowing land speed records. The Museum is a 'must see' for anyone studying the evolution and social history of road transport and also has a
dedicated WW2 Blitz display.

Free admission for general visits. Find out about lifelong learning and pre-booked education sessions. Find out how our Swift Centre can successfully support
your formal and informal learning and business events.
Support your planning with our dedicated Wiki.

For further information: enquiries@transportmuseum.com

Useful Websites

The Transport Museum Website: www.transport-museum.com




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Heritage Motor Centre, Gaydon
Introduction

Video available here: http://archive.heritage-motor-centre.co.uk/index.html

Resources

Come and spend a day at the Heritage Motor Centre with education officer led cross curricular activities, focusing on travelling and transport

For further information: education@heritage-motor-centre.co.uk

Useful Websites

Heritage Motor Centre: www.heritage-motor-centre.co.uk




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
The Severn Valley Railway
Introduction

For four decades, the Severn Valley Railway has graduated from relative obscurity to a prominent position in British railway preservation. Nowadays, the
initials SVR are not solely part of the specialist jargon of keen railway enthusiasts, although the line is still happily invaded during the popular Enthusiast
Weekends.

Increasingly, the general public has visited the line, thanks partly to extensive TV coverage, which has ensured that very few weeks pass without Severn
Valley steam trains appearing on TV screens across the nation.

                                                                                                                                           (Source: www.svr.co.uk)
Resources

Our Education Service provides advice and practical support for teachers and group leaders from a wide variety of educational and community organisations.

Our Education Services Manager and Education Officer have backgrounds in primary and secondary education and a number of the staff who work with the
service also come from the education sector.

In addition to the practical help we are able to give to school groups arranging a visit to the unspoiled Severn Valley we also organise a number of curriculum
based experiences, for a range of age groups, which further enhance a journey by heritage steam train.

For further information contact: education@svr.co.uk

Useful Websites

       The Severn Valley Railway - www.svr.org.uk
       Related Resources: http://www.svr.co.uk/links.php




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Tyseley Locomotive Works & Shakespeare Express
Introduction

Following the success and popularity of the two Tyseley Open Days held in 2008, which have seen thousands of visitors attending the events, we have decided to hold further
open days. Our open days give visitors a much better opportunity to see the Tyseley collection in action around the site rather than static and lifeless, and they also provide an
opportunity for some of our friends and associates to participate.

Open days provide an excellent opportunity to:

        show visitors the Tyseley Collection,
        see the work done at Tyseley,
        provide opportunities to see items that would otherwise not be seen,
        steam several locomotives provide rides for visitors
        arrange special appearance of invited guest locomotives
        give turntable demonstrations and locomotives operating on the running line.

Vintage Trains operates trains on the main line using locomotives based at Tyseley Locomotive Works. Day excursions are run to places of interest with wide appeal, and
these feature steam hauled and sometimes classic diesel or electric hauled trains. The Excursion Programme offers an attractive and varied choice of destinations. These
tours make an excellent day out for both families and railway enthusiasts.

The Vintage Trains Mainline Programme features a regular summer steam service between Birmingham & Stratford-upon-Avon called The Shakespeare Express). This is a
somewhat different experience to travelling on a preserved railway line capturing the feelings of the 1950s holiday trains on the journey to Stratford, and then the romance of
the steam express train on the trip to Birmingham. It has great appeal to families and is an affordable way of enjoying mainline steam.

                                                                                                                       (Source: www.tyseleylocoworks.co.uk/tlw/index.html)
Resources

We recognise that the dates of these open days may not suit everyone, or that some may be more interested in finding out more about the nuts and bolts of
the exhibits. Accordingly we are happy to receive written applications for pre-booked groups to visit Tyseley by prior arrangement as we do not currently plan
to open the visitor centre at weekends at times other than for the open days.

If you would like to discuss, or indeed book, a party visit to Tyseley Loco Works, please write to us for an application form enclosing an SAE. Write to: Tyseley
Locomotive Works, 670 Warwick Rd, Tyseley, Bham B11 2HL




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Please also allow at least two month’s notice, because Tyseley is a working locomotive works and depot and we do need to ensure that your proposed visit
can fit in with the many activities on and off our depot.

If there is sufficient interest and subject to our resources, it is possible that we may group such requests together and nominate certain days for parties or
groups to visit.

Useful Websites

       General information: www.tyseleylocoworks.co.uk
       Excursion Programme: http://www.vintagetrains.co.uk/vt_trains.htm




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
Walsall Leather Museum
Introduction

Discover why Walsall became the British leathergoods capital in this fascinating working museum, housed in a restored leather factory.

For two hundred years Walsall people have been making some of the world's finest saddles and leather goods. Walsall Leather Museum seeks to celebrate this great tradition
and reflect the achievements of the leather craftsmen and women of Walsall.

In our atmospheric workshops you can watch skilled leather workers in the process of hand-crafting leathergoods such as wallets and purses and perhaps have-a-go yourself.
The displays around the museum tell the stories of the Walsall leather trade and feature splendid examples of local craftsmanship past and present, including saddles made for
the Royal Family and exciting contemporary designs.

Walsall is still home to over ninety leather companies between them making an astonishing variety of items which are exported to most parts of the world.

                                                                                                                             (Source: www.walsall.gov.uk/leathermuseum)
Resources

Our topics and activities have been specially tailored to complement the needs of the National Curriculum. A visit to the museum can complement work on local history, the
Victorians, materials and many other subjects. The museum can also act as an excellent case study for students studying GNVQ Leisure and Tourism.

We can offer guided tours and demonstrations, plus an opportunity for groups to join in genuine leatherworking activities in our period workshops. The museum is also very
happy to offer support to teachers wishing to pursue independent themes of study.

Please note that all services are free to schools within Walsall Borough and only a minimal charge is made to those operating outside the Walsall area, for hands-on activities.
For further information contact: leathermuseum@walsall.gov.uk

Useful Websites

        Walsall Leather Museum - http://www.walsall.gov.uk/leathermuseum/
        The Museum of Leathercraft - http://www.museumofleathercraft.org/




West Midlands Trails – May 2010
The Potteries
Introduction

The Potteries describes the six towns that make up Stoke on Trent whose heritage and culture is defined by the pottery industry, home to famous
names such as Wedgewood and Gladstone Pottery.
                                                                                                                  (Source: www.thepotteries.org)
Resources

The Wedgewood Museum: The Wedgwood Museum has been advised during its development by a learning panel including education advisors
from both Stoke and Staffordshire LAs, and by colleagues from several higher and further education institutions. The museum operates a full
learning programme for schools and other educational groups.

For further information contact: education@wedgwoodmuseum.org.uk

The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery: Our marvelous and diverse collections include natural history, local history, archaeology, ceramics,
costumes and fine art. Support and inspire your children’s learning with the resonance of real objects, be it a mediaeval skeleton, an enormous
ammonite or our own Spitfire aircraft.

We offer a wide range of activities led by our experienced staff (see list below). You are also welcome to bring your pupils on a free, self-led visit,
but please let us know in advance to avoid bottle-necks or to arrange a lunch space. Self-led visits should have a clear focus and pupils should be
supervised at all times.

For further information contact: museumeducation@stoke.gov.uk

Gladstone Pottery Museum: The last complete Victorian pottery factory in Stoke-on-Trent and also a working museum, this unique site will
provide your children with a fantastic hands-on learning experience. Learn about Victorian working conditions for adults and children and watch
our demonstrators as they practise traditional skills in clay. There is also a fully furnished Victorian Doctor’s surgery on site and fascinating
exhibitions on ceramic tiles and the history of the toilet. Come here for art, history, citizenship and science activities.

For further information contact: gladstone@stoke.gov.uk

Ceramica: Ceramica revitalises the Old Town Hall of Burslem into unique visitor attraction exploring the past and future of the pottery industry in
Stoke-on-Trent. For further infomation: http://www.ceramicauk.com/page7.html




West Midlands Trails May 2010
West Midlands Trails May 2010

				
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