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					                                              August 27, 2008


TO:            Mark Schneiderhan, Chair
               Senate Committee on Educational Policy


FROM:          Midge Grosch
               Director of Programs and Academic Assessment

I am submitting for review and action by the Senate Committee on Educational Policy the attached Request to
Establish a Public Health Practice Campus Certificate at Rockford.

The post-baccalaureate certificate was approved by the Executive Committee in the School of Public
Health on June 2, 2008. Also appended to this proposal is a letter from support from Dean Lipsky in the
College of Medicine at Rockford. The certificate was approved by the Graduate College staff on August, 27,
2008.

Attachment

Cc:    B. Neuberger
       L. Bruso
       E. Henley




Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                     1
REQUEST FOR A NEW UNIT OF INSTRUCTION: Certificate
BACKGROUND

1. Name of Institution: University of Illinois at Chicago

   Department and/or College Sponsor: Community Health Sciences/School of Public Health
   List unit approvals with dates

       Community Health Sciences Curriculum Committee
       Community Health Sciences Faculty
       SPH Committee on Educational Programs May 19, 2008
       SPH Executive Committee: June 2, 2008

2. Title of Proposed Certificate: Public Health Practice Campus Certificate at Rockford

3. Contact Person: Eric Henley, MD, MPH

   3.1. Telephone: (815) 395-5804
   3.2. E-mail: ehenley@uic.edu
   3.3. Fax: (815) 395-5801
   3.4 Contact Person and Unit to Receive Student Applications: Vicki Weidenbacher-Hoper

4. Level of Proposed Certificate

  __ Undergraduate Certificate (1-2 years)             X_Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
  __ Undergraduate Certificate (2-4 years)             __ Post-Master’s Certificate
  __ First Professional Certificate

  X     Campus Certificate                                     IBHE Certificate

5. Requested CIP Code (6-digits) _________ (to be supplied by the Office of Academic Programs)

6. Proposed Date for Implementation: __Spring 2009__________________________________

7. Location Offered1: On-Campus _

       Off-Campus _X_: Region Number(s)__2 – Fox Valley (Rockford)____ or Statewide___

8. MISSION, OBJECTIVES AND PRIORITIES

8.1 – Program Purpose
The proposed Public Health Practice Campus Certificate at Rockford, sponsored by the Community Health
Science Division (CHS) in the School of Public Health (SPH), targets individuals with a bachelor’s degree who
are currently working in community, health, public health or other related fields, and medical, nursing and
pharmacy students enrolled at the College of Medicine Rockford site. This certificate program is open to non-
degree students and students in degree programs in UIC colleges other than SPH. The curriculum consists of 16




Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                  2
semester hours which includes five graduate-level courses. Courses completed as part of the certificate program
may be applied toward the Master of Public Health (MPH) if the student is later admitted into the MPH
program. Most courses will be taught in-person on the Rockford campus; some will be available to students
through online modalities.

The Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) 2003 report “Who Will Keep the Public Healthy” advocates for improved
public health training for public health professionals and medical students in order to meet the public health
challenges of the 21st century. The report identifies that nationally 80 percent of public health professionals lack
specific public health training (CDC, 2001c) and only 22 percent of chief executives of local health departments
have graduate degrees in public health (Turnock, 2001). A survey conducted by the IOM committee identified a
need for opportunities for training in non-degree programs for part-time and mid-career students and for
increased distance learning programs. In addition, the IOM strongly recommends that: all medical students
receive basic public health training in population-based prevention approaches to health; serious efforts be
undertaken by academic health centers to provide joint classes and clinical training in public health and
medicine; and a significant proportion of medical school graduates be fully trained in the ecological approach to
public health. Clearly, these two groups are prime targets for opportunities to increase their public health
knowledge.

Beginning Fall 2007 the Council on Education in Public Health (CEPH), the body that accredits schools of
public health and graduate programs in public health, requires that all master of public health (MPH) degree
programs be a minimum of 42 semester hours. This new requirement presents special problems for students in
medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing and other health professions as well as for currently employed public
health workers pursing an MPH. For medical students to complete the MPH degree, an extra year in addition to
the three years they spend at the Rockford site in medical school would be required. Some medical students
have expressed difficulty funding an additional year of tuition. Others do not want to spend an additional year in
school prior to starting residency. Working professionals typically register for one course a semester. By
enrolling in one course a semester, it takes many of the program’s working professionals five to six years to
complete the degree. With yearly tuition increases and limited employer reimbursement, enrolling as a part-time
student becomes quite expensive for working professionals. The time and financial commitment required of
working professionals becomes a deterrent for enrolling in the degree program. For both groups, a certificate
program offers a credible knowledge base in public health from an accredited School of Public Health in a more
convenient and lower cost option than completing a full degree program. Courses in the proposed certificate
program are required courses in the CHS MPH degree program. Consequently, students wishing to pursue a
MPH will be able to readily transfer credits acquired from the campus certificate into the CHS MPH degree
upon admission into the program. Although CHS currently offers two certificate campus programs, these are
entirely on-line programs. The Rockford community and students seek a program located in the community
with substantial face-to-face interaction between instructors and fellow students.

The Public Health Practice Campus Certificate Program at Rockford is expected to increase interest in acquiring
knowledge about public health concepts helpful to protecting and improving community health in the Rockford
region and beyond. Certificate availability would also increase the number of health professionals in Northwest
Illinois who gain and benefit from academic public health education. An increase in public health knowledge
and skills would be an asset to physicians and non-physicians working in a variety of clinical and administrative
positions.

8.2 – Regional and State Needs
Rockford has been one of two regional programs (Peoria is the other site) offering access to the MPH degree
through the UIC School of Public Health (SPH). In addition, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and
University of Illinois at Springfield operate limited MPH degree programs and there are a few other graduate
public health degree programs scattered across northern and northeastern Illinois. While the UIC School of
Public Health offers several campus certificate programs, most are on-line only programs focused on more
specialized public health content. Rockford students participating in MPH courses have consistently voiced a


Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                         3
preference for in-person courses in lieu of on-line. Students and faculty alike indicate that in-class discussions
with peers and faculty have greatly enhanced their educational experience.

Coordinating the MPH program at the College of Medicine site in Rockford has built bridges between public
health academia and public health practice in Northwest Illinois. The program has allowed faculty at the College
to develop relationships with public health professionals in the community and to further build on those
relationships outside of the classroom to serve the larger community. For example, students and alumni of the
program have gone on to serve as Medical Director of the local federally qualified health center, to help
establish a county health department in a rural Illinois community and to lead a local domestic violence
consortium. In addition, in-person classes have allowed medical students and public health workers to directly
interact so as to foster greater appreciation for each other’s work and interest. The proposed campus certificate
program will allow these local relationships to continue to grow which in turn benefits the Rockford and UIC
communities. The UIC site in Rockford is a regional academic health science center consisting of programs
offered by the College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the School of Public Health and the College of
Pharmacy. The proposed campus certificate program allows the School of Public Health to remain directly
engaged in the Rockford campus and community. It is anticipated that the offering of a Rockford-based campus
certificate program may also serve as a feeder program for the CHS MPH degree program, as the Rockford
campus certificate will lead to some students pursuing an MPH through CHS – students who would not
otherwise pursue this direction.

Most public health workers in state and local health departments have had little formal training in public health.
Today, public health systems have wide ranging responsibilities in areas of health promotion, environmental
protection, policy development, and assuring access to care for the underserved segments of the population. The
capacity of public health agencies to address these diverse and sometimes complex responsibilities requires
improved education and training of the public health professional. Although public health professionals are
educated and trained in a wide range of disciplines, they need a common framework for action and an
understanding of the forces that impact on health and a model of health that emphasizes the linkages and
relationships among multiple determinants affecting health. This ecological framework should be grounded in a
thorough understanding and application of the core principles of public health as defined by the Institute of
Medicine in 1988: assessment, assurance and policy development. The Rockford campus certificate program
will emphasize basic public health science skills, analytic skills, cultural awareness, and skills in synthesis and
integration which is fully consistent with the university’s mission and the state’s need for a strong public health
infrastructure.

While the 2003 IOM report emphasizes all medical students receive basic public health training in the
population-based prevention approaches to health, if students do not pursue an MPH, a formalized option does
not currently exist. This formal campus certificate program will make a significant contribution toward
expanding public health training for health professions students in Rockford. The campus certificate is expected
to revive interest among medical students in completion of public health coursework partly because it is
something formal that can be indicated on residency applications. At a recent meeting with second-year medical
students at Rockford, twenty of these students expressed interest in a generalist certificate program if offered on
campus - five have since enrolled in a Public Health Concepts and Practice course on-line this fall. A campus
certificate program will expand the options available to health professions students to receive public health
training by providing an alternative to the time and financial resources it takes to get an MPH. Likewise, UIC
Family Practice residents in Rockford would also have the opportunity to pursue a formalized public health
education during their residency training. Without a locally-driven certificate program, it is highly unlikely that
there will be a medical student base for public health at the Rockford site.

Beginning Fall 2009, the UIC College of Pharmacy will begin offering the PharmD program on the College of
Medicine at Rockford. This will eventually result in an additional 200 students at the Rockford site. A Rockford
MPH graduate and current UIC faculty member developed and taught an introductory public health course for
second and third year students in the College of Pharmacy entitled “Introduction to Public Health - What It Is
and How Does It Apply in Pharmacy?” At the first offering of the course, twenty-one students enrolled in the

Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                        4
two semester-hour elective course. Gauging from these results, it is expected that there will be PharmD students
interested in pursuing a public health campus certificate program while at Rockford for their four years or taking
public health courses as electives for their PharmD degree.

The College of Nursing also has a presence at Rockford, offering a variety of graduate level nursing programs.
Nursing students have enrolled in graduate level public health courses in the past. The opportunity would exist
for some nursing students to complete the campus certificate program in addition to their nursing degree. This
would offer a less intensive option as compared to the requirements of a joint MSN/MPH degree.

Because of the relatively modest size of the site in Rockford, the College of Medicine, the College of Pharmacy,
the College of Nursing and the School of Public Health are able to offer educational collaborations between
academic departments, consistent with a strong recommendation of the 2003 IOM report to foster community-
based research, learning and service.

8.3 – Employment Opportunities
The health sector continues to grow faster than the overall economy, while the segment of the health sector
focusing on public and population health needs is growing at an even more rapid rate. As a result, the need for
public health professionals is growing steadily, especially for occupational titles such as public health nurses,
environmental health practitioners, health educators, health managers, and program specialists. While formal
public health training is lacking for most workers in these areas, the Association of State and Territorial Health
Officials (ASTHO) Workforce Development Policy stresses that public health professionals of the future need
appropriate skills and knowledge to optimally carry out the core functions of public health. The broad-based
knowledge and skills provided through this generalist public health campus certificate program are knowledge
and skills needed by these and other public health occupations and professions, including physicians.

Only limited data are available on the public health workforce and future employment opportunities in Illinois
and nationally. Government employment census data and data from periodic surveys conducted by the Illinois
Department of Public Health indicate that the total number of workers in state and local governmental health
agencies is increasing and that the proportion of professionals in this workforce is also growing. Recent surveys
of state and local public health agencies by the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials and National
Association of County and City Health Officials indicate that approximately 25 percent of the professionals in
state and local health departments will be eligible for retirement in the next 10 years. A study conducted by the
Health Resources and Services Administration reported difficulty with recruiting more educated, skilled public
health providers in traditionally medically underserved areas, such as rural localities. Opportunities for
advancement and hiring should be generous.

As retirements occur in the next 5 to 10 years among public health workers, there will be a need to provide at
least basic fundamental public health concepts to those who are hired to replace those retiring in the Northern
Illinois region. The proposed certificate would help the Rockford community educate its own public health
workers instead of hiring qualified individuals from outside the community for those positions. In addition,
some students may choose to continue on with their public health education and pursue an MPH degree through
the CHS division.

9. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

9.1 – Program Overview
The proposed campus certificate program provides a public health knowledge base targeting local community,
health and public health professionals and medical students enrolled at the College of Medicine in Rockford.
The Public Health Practice Campus Certificate consists of five courses totaling 16 semester hours. The campus
certificate will provide students with a basic public health knowledge that will benefit their work as public
health professionals or physicians. These classes provide fundamental concepts essential to public health
practice and are often recommended as initial classes for community non-degree students. The credits associated
with this certificate can be used toward the MPH degree after admission into that degree program. Successful

Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                        5
completion of the campus certificate program does not, however, guarantee admission into the MPH degree
program. Central academic objectives, course structure, and course descriptions for the campus certificate are
provided below.

Central Academic Objectives: Public Health Practice Campus Certificate at Rockford
The Public Health Practice Campus Certificate at Rockford targets public health and health care professionals
and health science students located at the Rockford site of the College of Medicine. Through this campus
certificate program, learners will acquire the knowledge, skills and practical tools to establish a solid foundation
that will enable them to more effectively address public health issues in their current and/or future jobs. These
knowledge, skills and tools include an overview of the core concepts of public health practice which: 1) develop
a familiarity with the science and art of public health practice; 2) develop a foundation of how to study diseases
and conditions within groups of people; 3) develop a foundation in how to interpret data; 4) provide an overview
of basic theories of health and illness behavior and health education; and 5) explain the organization, roles and
responsibilities of the U.S. health system and public health system.

                                                Table Ia
                                         Course Requirements
                             Public Health Practice Certificate at Rockford
                                     5 courses (16 semester hours)
                           Courses                               Course Titles
                          CHSC 400             Public Health Concepts and Practice (3 sh)
                          EPID 400             Principles of Epidemiology (3 sh)
                          BSTT 400             Biostatistics 1 (4 sh)
                          CHSC 401             Behavioral Sciences in Public Health (3 sh)
                          CHSC 480             Health Education and Health Promotion (3 sh)

Public Health Concepts and Practice, Behavioral Sciences in Public Health, Principles of Epidemiology and
Biostatistics I are four of the six core courses in the current public health curriculum. Public Health Concepts
and Practice provides an overview of the core concepts of public health practice and develops a familiarity with
the science and art of public health practice: epidemiology, biostatistics, community involvement, health
promotion, health agency organization and management, environmental health, public health law and ethics,
behavior science, and the utilization of media to promote health. Behavioral Sciences in Public Health provides
grounding in the social and behavioral sciences to analyze public health issues and includes analysis of
individual, community, institutional, and societal factors influencing health and illness. The Principles of
Epidemiology course provides the foundation of how to study diseases and conditions within groups of people
and the Biostatistics course provides a foundation in how to interpret data. These four courses provide the
foundation for basic public health knowledge. Without an understanding of how to study disease and interpret
data, it is difficult to develop and evaluate programs effectively.

The Health Education and Health Promotion course provides an overview of basic theories of health and illness
behavior and health education, and familiarizes students with the classic and newer trends in the field. Segments
of the course will cover social determinants of health, classic intervention studies and theories, intervention
strategies, ethics, and issues in the planning and evaluation of interventions and programs. These are important
skills for physicians and public health workers when developing programs to change or improve the behavior of
individual patients or groups of people.

The Division of Community Health Sciences in the School of Public Health will offer this campus certificate
program to qualified students and professionals. The courses required can be applied towards an MPH degree in
the School of Public Health upon acceptance. This campus certificate program aims to enhance the abilities of
individuals already working in public health or health-related fields and to broaden the perspectives of medical
students and other interested health science students enrolled at the Rockford site. This encompasses a thorough



Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                         6
understanding and application of the core functions of public health: assessment assurance and policy
development.

Campus certificate students must maintain a 3.00 (out of 4.00) grade point average for all certificate program
courses. Students completing campus certificate program coursework receive academic credit which may be
applied toward an MPH, if the student later pursues a degree. Successful completion of this campus certificate
program does not however guarantee admission into a degree program. No more than 3 transfer credits for
comparable coursework will be considered for courses completed at other CEPH accredited schools or graduate
programs in public health.

Students who are continuously enrolled in the program may earn the Certificate in two years.

Admissions
Admission requirements include a previous bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution. While current or
previous work experience in public health/health care is desirable, it is not required. Applications will be
processed through the UIC online application system, similar to the process for other CHS and SPH campus
certificate programs.

Applicants must submit an official copy of the baccalaureate transcript indicating the earned degree(s).
International academic documents that are evaluated by a professional credential evaluation service that holds
membership in the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES) are also acceptable. While
a grade point average (GPA) of 2.75 is required, a GPA close to 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale) is recommended.
International applicants must submit a copy of TOEFL scores taken within the last 2 years (applies to
international students only who have not attended a US institution of higher learning for at least 2 years).
Minimum scores required: paper-based TOEFL = 550, computer-based TOEFL = 213 [or new TOEFL
minimum total score of 80, with subscores of 21 (Writing), 20 (Speaking), 17 (Listening), 19 (Reading)].

Changing from Non-degree to Degree Program
Admission as a certificate student does not guarantee admission to any of the School of Public Health programs.
Students may transfer all credits earned in the certificate program towards the fulfillment of the MPH (Master of
Public Health) degree requirements in the event they apply and are admitted as degree candidates (see SPH
admission requirements at: www.uic.edu/sph/eohs_admissions.htm. To transfer credits, the student must earn a
minimum letter grade of “B” or above in all certificate courses. Students must attain a 3.00 grade point average
(on a 4.00 point scale) to receive the Public Health Practice Certificate at Rockford.

9.2 – Student Learning Strategies
The courses in the campus certificate program will be offered in-person at the Rockford site as well as be
available on-line. Required readings, class discussions, case studies and group projects occur throughout each
course. The Biostatistics course offers a hands-on experience of entering and analyzing data using statistical
software. Some courses in the campus certificate program make use of local expertise by bringing in speakers
with experience in topics of interest. Students are expected to participate in courses on a regular and consistent
basis and to be responsive and respectful.

Courses in this campus certificate program are appropriate for adult learners and include a variety of interactive,
skill building exercises. The method of instruction emphasizes understanding of the concepts through reading of
the literature, sharing of experiences and synthesizing.

9.3 - Objectives and Outcomes

                                                Table Ib
                      Certificate Program Learning Objectives and Learner Outcomes

                                  Public Health Practice Campus Certificate

Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                        7
                                              Table Ib
                    Certificate Program Learning Objectives and Learner Outcomes

Through this campus certificate program learners will acquire basic knowledge, attitudes and skills that are
important for public health practice and will be able to:

   1. Describe public health as a system, including its unique and important features and their role within it,
       to general audiences
   2. Apply measures of population health and illness, including risk factors, to community health
       improvement initiatives
   3. Identify and distinguish public health and prevention strategies from curative strategies for prevalent
       health problems
   4. Describe the role of law and government in promoting and protecting the health of the public and
       identifying specific functions and roles of governmental public health agencies in assuring population
       health
   5. Identify and explain how various organizations, positions and roles contribute to carrying out public
       health’s core functions and essential services and assessing the components of the public health
       infrastructure
   6. Apply principles derived from the basic public health sciences to planning, implementing and evaluating
       public health interventions
   7. Describe public health roles in emergency and disaster preparedness and response activities
   8. Describe the major contributions of the social sciences (e.g. anthropology, sociology, psychology,
       demography, economics) to the field of public health
   9. Explain major theoretical models derived from the social sciences and used to understand health
       problems and develop interventions
   10. Demonstrate applications of knowledge from the social sciences to address public health problems
   11. Compare and contrast the diverse methodological approaches derived from different social sciences to
       address public health problems
   12. Describe how social science-based knowledge and tools combine with biological and physical science
       to understand and address public health problems
   13. Explain strategies to effectively work in a cross-cultural context and with different ethnic groups
   14. Describe ethical aspects of public health research and practice as informed by the social sciences
   15. Become familiar with the role of statistics in carrying out the core functions of public health
   16. Understand elementary concepts of sampling and probability theory
   17. Understand and be able to identify different types of datasets and variables; be able to work with
       datasets and variables using data analysis software
   18. Become familiar with descriptive statistics and ways they are used to summarize data; be able to
       generate descriptive statistics using data analysis software
   19. Become familiar with and implement basic methods of statistical estimation
   20. Become familiar with and implement basic methods of statistical hypothesis testing
   21. Understand concepts of sample size and power; carry out basic calculations using data analysis software
   22. Be able to choose appropriate presentation formats for descriptive data
   23. Expose students to the historical development of epidemiology as a field of study
   24. Compute measures of disease occurrence and association in populations
   25. Identify and assess criteria for causal inference
   26. Recognize components of study designs, and the impact of bias on study findings
   27. Describe major events in the recent history of the health education and health promotion field
   28. Describe the relationship between theory, research and practice in health promotion
   29. Describe and critically examine major models and theories in health education and health promotion and
       apply them to actual problems in public health
   30. Critically analyze how major models and theories of health education and health promotion apply to
       existing programs and interventions in the community
   31. Identify important steps in planning and evaluating health promotion and education programs

Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                    8
                                                Table Ib
                      Certificate Program Learning Objectives and Learner Outcomes

    32. Design a health promotion program for a selected target group including theory, objectives, activities,
        management and evaluation

9.4 – Learner Assessment
Instructors monitor student progress throughout each course and provide support, guidance and assistance as
needed. Grading criteria for each course is provided on the course syllabus. Successful completion of the
campus certificate program requires maintaining a 3.00 for all certificate courses. If a student receives a C or
lower grade for any course, he/she may be advised to repeat that course.

10. RESOURCES

10.1 – Resource Requirements
Table II identifies all state, non-state, and reallocation funding that will support the certificate program.

                                      TABLE II
                           TOTAL RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS
                  FOR ROCKFORD PUBLIC HEALTH CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

                                                                08/09        09/10        10/11     11/12       12/13
                                                                Year 1       Year 2       Year 3    Year 4      Year 5

1    Total Resource Requirements                                12,503       33,348       33,700    34,063      34,437



2    Resources Available from Federal Sources                      0            0            0         0          0


3    Resources Available from Other Non-State Sources
     (Program Revenue to Rockford Program and                   15,946       28,146       32,463    32,845      33,238
     Student Fee Money)


4    Existing State Resources                                      0            0            0         0          0


5    Resources Available through Internal Reallocation             0         10,000       10,000    10,000      10,000
     (In-kind COM support)


6    New State Resources Required                                  0            0            0         0          0


7    Net Program Revenue                                         3,443        4,798       8,763      8,782      8,801




Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                             9
10.3 – Budget Narrative
The proposed campus certificate program should be financially self-sufficient in its first full year of operation.
A year by year budget narrative follows.
Curriculum Assumptions: CHSC 400 will be offered on campus every fall by Rockford faculty. BSTT 400 will
be offered on-campus by Rockford faculty every other year in the spring semester and CHSC 480 will be
offered on-campus by Rockford faculty every other year in the fall semester. CHSC 401 and EPID 400 will be
offered every year in an on-line format by instructors on the Chicago campus.
Monetary Assumptions: COM-R will commit $12,000 a year in student fee money to support the Rockford
Public Health Practice Campus Certificate.
        Year 1 (2008-2009) is a developmental year in which college and campus approvals will be secured in
         Fall 2008 and marketing begun. One campus certificate program course (CHSC 401) will be offered in
         an on-line format by instructors on the Chicago campus in Spring 2009. It is anticipated that no more
         than 8 students will load into this online course during Year One of the program.
             o   Year One Costs:[#1] Costs for this developmental year include the Program Director at 2.5%
                 (estimated cost $2,803 for half a year) who will coordinate the course approval process; the
                 academic program coordinator at 12.5% (estimated cost $2,900 for half a year); and funding to
                 advertise and promote the new program (estimated at $2,000). Additional costs include
                 loading eight (8) students into online course(s) during Year One. Under existing SPH
                 certificate payment policies ($600 per head for a student load less than 15 students per course).
                 (Online cost instruction = $600 x 8 = $4,800). Total Costs = 2,803 + 2,900 + 2,000 + 4,800 =
                 $12,503.
             o   Year One Revenue:[#3] is expected at 3 in-state students paying Range III (0-3 hours) tuition +
                 differential for one term during Year 1 with 75% of the total tuition returned to the program (3
                 x 1,754 x .75 = $3,946) and $12,000 in student fee money. Total Revenue = $15,946.
             o   In-kind offsets: (Internal Reallocation) [#5] In Year One, courses will not be taught on-site so
                 there is no internal reallocation of dollars.
             o   Net Revenue: [#7] Revenue ($15,946) minus Costs ($12,503) results in net revenue of $3,443
                 for Year One.
        Year 2 (2009-2010) will be the first year of the program’s full operation. In addition to the on- campus
         teaching, on-line courses taught by instructors on the Chicago campus will include EPID 400 in the fall
         2009 semester and CHSC 401 in the summer 2010 semester. It is anticipated that no more than 16
         students (8 students per on-line course) will load into online courses during Year Two of the program.
             o   Year Two Costs:[#1] Costs for this year include the Program Director at 2.5% (estimated cost
                 $5,774) who will oversee the campus certificate program; the academic program coordinator at
                 12.5% (estimated at $5,974); two on-campus courses taught by Rockford faculty (estimated at
                 $10,000) and funding to advertise and promote the program (estimated at $2,000). Additional
                 costs include loading eight (8) students into each of the 2 online course(s) during Year Two.
                 Under existing SPH certificate payment policies ($600 per head for a student load less than 15
                 students per course). (Online cost instruction = $600 x 16 = $9,600). Total costs = 5,774 +
                 5,974 + 10,000 + 2,000 + 9,600 = $33,348.

Revised on August 8, 2008                                                                                        10
            o   Year Two Revenue:[#3] is expected at 6 in-state students paying Range III (0-3 hours) tuition
                + differential per term during Year 2 with 75% of the total tuition returned to the program (12 x
                1,754 x .75 = $15,786) and $12,360 in student fee money. Total Revenue = $28,146.
            o   In-kind offsets: (Internal Reallocation) [#5] On-site instruction costs are off-set through an
                internal reallocation of dollars by College of Medicine Rockford. Course instruction =
                $10,000.
            o   Net Revenue: [#7] Revenue ($28146) plus in-kind COM support ($10,000) minus costs
                ($33,348) results in net revenue of $4,798 for Year Two.

       Year 3 (2010-2011) will offer two courses (CHSC 400 and CHSC 480) on-campus by Rockford
        faculty in fall 2010. In spring 2011, two courses (CHSC 401 and EPID 400) will be offered on-line by
        instructors on the Chicago campus. It is anticipated that no more than 16 students (8 students per on-
        line course) will load into online courses during Year Three of the program. There will be 24 students
        in the program this year. Eight students will take one on-campus course and complete the program.
        Sixteen students will take one on-campus course and two on-line courses.
            o   Year Three Costs:[#1] Costs for this year include the Program Director at 2.5% (estimated cost
                $5,947) who will oversee the campus certificate program; the academic program coordinator at
                12.5% (estimated at $6,153); two on-campus courses taught by Rockford faculty (estimated at
                $10,000) and funding to advertise and promote the program (estimated at $2,000). Additional
                costs include loading sixteen students into online course(s) during Year Three. Under existing
                SPH certificate payment policies ($600 per head for a student load less than 15 students per
                course). (Online cost instruction = $600 x 16 = $9,600. Total Costs = 5,947 + 6,153 + 10,000
                + 2,000 + 9,600 = $33,700.
            o   Year Three Revenue:[#3] is expected at 6 in-state students paying Range III (0-3 hours) tuition
                + differential per term during Year 3 and 3 in-state students paying Range III (0-3 hours)
                tuition + differential for one term during Year 3 with 75% of the total tuition returned to the
                program (12 x 1,754 x .75 = $15,786) + (3 x 1,754 x .75 = $3,946) = $19,732 + $12,731 in
                student fee money = $32,463.
            o   In-kind offsets: (Internal Reallocation) [#5] On-site instruction costs are off-set through an
                internal reallocation of dollars by College of Medicine Rockford. Course instruction =
                $10,000.
            o   Net Revenue: [#7] Revenue ($32,463) plus in-kind COM support ($10,000) minus costs
                ($33,700) results in net revenue of $8,763 for Year Three.

       Year 4 (2011-2012) will offer one course (CHSC 400) on-campus by Rockford faculty and one course
        (EPID 400) will be offered in an on-line format by instructors on the Chicago campus. In spring 2012
        one course (BSTT 400) will be offered on-campus by Rockford faculty and in summer 2012 one course
        (CHSC 401) will be offered in an on-line format by instructors on the Chicago campus. It is

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        anticipated that no more than 16 students (8 students per on-line course) will load into online courses
        during Year Four of the program.
            o   Year Four Costs:[#1] Costs for this year include the Program Director at 2.5% (estimated cost
                $6,125) who will oversee the program; the academic program coordinator at 12.5% (estimated
                at $6,338); two on-campus courses taught by Rockford faculty (estimated at $10,000) and
                funding to advertise and promote the program (estimated at $2,000). Additional costs include
                loading sixteen students into online course(s) during Year Four. Under existing SPH certificate
                payment policies ($600 per head for a student load less than 15 students per course). (Online
                cost instruction = $600 x 16 = $9,600). Total Costs = 6,125 + 6,338 + 10,000 + 2,000 + 9,600
                = $34,063.
            o   Year Four Revenue:[#3] is expected at 6 in-state students paying Range III (0-3 hours) tuition
                + differential per term during Year 4 and 3 in-state students paying Range III (0-3 hours)
                tuition + differential for one term during Year 4 with 75% of the total tuition returned to the
                program (12 x 1,754 x .75 = 15,786) + (3 x 1,754 x .75 = 3,946) = $ 19,732 + $13,113 in
                student fee money = $32,845.
            o   In-kind offsets: (Internal Reallocation) [#5] On-site instruction costs are off-set through an
                internal reallocation of dollars by College of Medicine Rockford. Course instruction =
                $10,000.
            o   Net Revenue: [#7] Revenue ($32,845) plus in-kind COM support ($10,000) minus costs
                ($34,063) results in net revenue of $8,782 for Year Four.

       Year 5 (2012-2013) will offer two courses (CHSC 400 and CHSC 480) on-campus by Rockford
        faculty in fall 2012. In spring 2013, two courses (CHSC 401 and EPID 400) will be offered in an on-
        line format by instructors on the Chicago campus. It is anticipated that no more than 16 students (8
        students per on-line course) will load into online courses during Year Five of the program.
            o   Year Five Costs:[#1] Costs for this year include the Program Director at 2.5% (estimated cost
                $6,309) who will coordinate the course approval process; academic program coordinator at
                12.5% (estimated at $6,528); two on-campus courses taught by Rockford faculty (estimated at
                $10,000) and funding to advertise and promote the new program (estimated at $2,000).
                Additional costs include loading sixteen students into online course(s) during Year Three.
                Under existing SPH certificate payment policies ($600 per head for a student load less than 15
                students per course). (Online cost instruction = $600 x 16 = $9,600). Total Costs = 6,309 +
                6,528 + 10,000 + 2,000 + 9,600 = $34,437.
            o   Year Five Revenue:[#3] is expected at 6 in-state students paying Range III (0-3 hours) tuition
                + differential per term during Year 5 and 3 in-state students paying Range III (0-3 hours)
                tuition + differential for one term during Year 5 with 75% of the total tuition returned to the
                program (12 x 1,754 x .75 = 15,786) + (3 x 1,754 x .75 = 3,946) = 19,732 + $13,506 in student


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                 fee money = $33,238.
             o   In-kind offsets: (Internal Reallocation) [#5] On-site instruction costs are off-set through an
                 internal reallocation of dollars by College of Medicine Rockford. Course instruction =
                 $10,000.
             o   Net Revenue: [#7] Revenue ($33,238) plus in-kind COM support ($10,000) minus costs
                 ($34,437) results in net revenue of $8,801 for Year Five.

10.4 - Tuition
Tuition and fees for this campus certificate program will be charged at the UIC graduate school rate plus the
SPH tuition differential assessed by ranges based on the number of enrolled semester hours

10.5 – Contract Program
This is not a contract program.

11. EFFECT ON UIC UNITS

11.1 – Involvement of Other Units
The Public Health Practice Campus Certificate at Rockford primarily involves courses and faculty located at the
College of Medicine at Rockford. COM-R will commit $12,000 a year in student fee money from the University
to support the campus certificate on an ongoing basis. The proposed campus certificate program would be
utilizing on-line courses offered by the School of Public Health. The estimated number of additional students
registering for on-line courses taught by SPH faculty is expected to be about 16 students in a given year.
Overall, it is expected that the offering of a Rockford-based campus certificate program will serve as a feeder
program for the MPH in the CHS division.

11.2 – Effect on Other Units
The Rockford MPH program has experienced a decline in the number of students taking courses and pursuing
an MPH degree in Rockford. By offering an in-person campus certificate program in Rockford, it is expected
that access and interest in public health courses by campus students and community health professionals will
actually increase. A formal campus certificate is expected to revive interest among medical students in
completion of public health coursework because it is something formal that can be indicated on residency
applications. It will also provide educational opportunities for employed professionals practicing in the field of
medicine and public health without the long-term time commitment and financial costs of obtaining an MPH on
a part-time basis. Although CHS offers two campus certificate programs, Rockford’s campus certificate differs
in the in-person nature of several of the required courses, and its inclusion of biostatistics and health promotion
courses. The Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics offers the EPID 400 course online twice a year. It is
anticipated that after year 3 of the Rockford certificate program, an additional eight students a year will enroll in
EPID 400. In addition, the Rockford-based campus certificate program may lead some students to pursue an
MPH degree through the Community Health Science Division - students who would not have done so without
the exposure to academic public health through the Rockford campus certificate program.

12. OFF-CAMPUS/ONLINE CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ONLY
This certificate is offered through the UIC School of Public Health at the College of Medicine site located in
Rockford, Illinois.

12.1 – Delivery Mode

12.2 – Quality Assurance
Major quality assurance activities for the proposed certificate program include:



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    (a) Faculty qualifications and evaluation: initially, all course instructors will be current SPH faculty
        members who have taught their assigned courses on at least two previous occasions. If an instructor has
        not previously taught a course, the course will be overseen and monitored by a senior faculty member
        with more experience. Course evaluation questionnaires will be used to evaluate course and instructor
        performance. Results of these evaluations are reviewed by the CHS Division Director (for CHS courses)
        and Epi-Bio Director (for EPID and BSTT courses) each semester and discussed with each instructor.
    (b) Courses taught on-site in Rockford will be offered consistent with the UIC Course Request System
        (CRS) information and course syllabi approved by the appropriate division and SPH curriculum
        committees.


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

CHSC 400 Public Health Concepts and Practice - 3 hours.
Concepts, principles, discussions, exercises, and case studies that provide an overview of the philosophy,
purpose, history, organization, functions, tools, activities, and results of public health practice. Prerequisite(s):
Enrollment restricted to public health students; other graduate, professional and advanced undergraduate
students admitted by consent as space permits. To obtain consent, see the SPH registrar.

CHSC 401 Behavioral Sciences in Public Health -3 hours.
Provides grounding in the social and behavioral sciences to analyze public health issues. Includes analysis of
individual, community, institutional, and societal factors influencing health and illness. Prerequisite(s):
Enrollment restricted to public health students; other graduate, professional and advanced undergraduate
students admitted by consent as space permits. To obtain consent, see the SPH registrar.

CHSC 480 Health Education and Health Promotion - 3 hours.

Theories of health education and health promotion for public health professionals; approaches for individual,
group, and community-level behavior change. Prerequisite(s): Graduate or professional standing. Priority
enrollment is given to students in the division of Community Health Sciences within the School of Public
Health. Recommended background: For CHSC students, CHSC 401 is recommended as a prerequisite.

EPID 400 Principles of Epidemiology - 3 hours.
Introduction to descriptive and analytic epidemiology, determinants of health and disease in populations, and
application of epidemiologic methods to disease control; includes use of basic epidemiologic software.
Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in BSTT 400 or consent of the instructor. Enrollment restricted
to public health students; other graduate, professional, and advanced undergraduate students admitted by
consent as space permits. To obtain consent, see the SPH registrar.

BSTT 400 Biostatistics I - 4 hours.
Descriptive statistics, basic probability concepts, one- and two-sample statistical inference, analysis of variance,
and simple linear regression. Introduction to statistical data analysis software. Enrollment restricted to public
health students and healthcare administration students; other graduate, professional and advanced undergraduate
students admitted by consent as space permits. To obtain consent, see the SPH registrar.




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