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									            Introducing MPA’s 2003-2004
               Post-Doctoral Institute
                 on Couples Therapy
                      Course Descriptions and PDI Details

The Maryland Psychological Association/Foundation Post-Doctoral Institute (PDI)
was created to provide focused training in specific clinical skills for psychologists and other post-graduate
mental health professionals. This Post-Doctoral Institute on Couples Therapy provides an opportunity for
clinicians to obtain in-depth continuing education targeting issues relevant to assessment and
psychotherapy with couples. PDI fellows also benefit from the opportunity to participate in small group
discussions and case presentations highlighting relevant topics with the training coordinators (Drs. Brown
and Epstein). This PDI spans two academic years (April 2003 through October 2004) and therefore allows
the clinician to acquire knowledge and applicable strategies in a long-term framework. A special Post-
Doctoral certificate of completion will be awarded to those licensed psychologists who are enrolled and
complete the total PDI. CE certificates will be awarded following each workshop for the number of credit
hours earned in that workshop (total of 33 hours). Those enrolled in the complete post-doctoral institute
will also receive CE certificates for the small groups discussion seminars (totaling 18 hours). The Ethics
workshop by Dr. Brown will qualify for the Maryland Board of Examiners Ethics requirement of 3 hours.

Couples Therapy
The most common complaint for individuals who seek out mental health professionals involves difficulties
in relationships, particularly intimate relationships. Increasing numbers of couples are presenting to
ministers, psychologists, social workers, counselors, and other helpers to repair damaged relationships or
deepen their level of intimacy and satisfaction. Moreover, recent literature has clearly documented the
importance of satisfying intimate relationships, showing that, for example, more successful long-term
relationships are associated with better emotional, financial, and physical health.

Mental health professionals’ training in couple’s treatment has not caught up with demand; most
psychologists have had only sporadic coursework and supervision dealing with dyads. This is in spite of
the fact that individual models of pathology and treatment, in which most of us were thoroughly schooled,
do not always apply to assessment of and intervention into relationship distress. This PDI is aimed at
presenting the major empirically supported techniques of assessment and intervention with troubled
couples along with approaches to specific problems encountered by all couples’ therapists, so it should be
valuable for experienced and relatively inexperienced therapists in laying a solid foundation for couples
treatment.

One way responsible practitioners have attempted to expand their scope of competence is through
continuing education. Surprisingly, however, there is very little evidence as to what constitutes effective
continuing education in mental health. What little evidence we have suggests that traditional CE
workshops have little impact on either practitioner behavior or patient outcomes. Studies designed to tease
out what factors constitute effective CE suggest that programs that involve active vs. passive learning,
practitioners’ knowledge of the gap between their performance and best practices, reinforcement of correct
responses, post-CE feedback, reminders or other enabling tools, and multiple educational interventions all
increase the likelihood of enhancing the quality of professional practice.

This post-doctoral institute on couples therapy is constructed to attempt to employ as many of the
components of effective CE as possible within the limitations of practitioners time and expense. It will
involve some active learning (discussion of a variety of interventions and attempts to implement them into
practice), practitioners self- assessment of their knowledge and skills regarding couple’s distress and its
remediation, small group discussion and possibly role playing of effective intervention techniques,
feedback on the quality of interventions, and multiple educational experiences (workshops, small group
discussions, website discussion).

The PDI will comprise three six-hour workshops on empirically supported couple’s treatment (cognitive-
behavioral, emotionally focused, psychodynamic) and five three-hour workshops on critical treatment
issues (infidelity, sexuality, violence) or issues related to best-practice (assessment, ethical and legal
concerns). It will also include nine, two-hour small group seminars and discussions focused on theory,
research, or techniques presented in the workshops. Additionally, there will be an unmoderated website
where participants will be encourage to query and comment. Finally, for those who have not participated in
workshops by John Gottman, there will be an opportunity to share and discuss the videotapes of his two-
day workshop.

Specific Objectives
1. To enhance the participants’ ability to assess their knowledge and skills in couple’s treatment and to
develop an educational plan to remediate deficiencies and develop new and improve existing skills.

2. To understand the major objectives and techniques of the three major empirically supported approaches
to the treatment of distressed couples.

3. To understand the issues and learn the treatment techniques involved in several major types of dilemmas
in couple’s treatment (dealing with sexuality, violence, infidelity).

4. To enhance practitioners’ awareness of the legal and ethical concerns arising in the treatment of couples
distress.

5. To apply the principles of effective continuing education to the learning experience in order to enhance
the quality of the participants’ practice of couples therapy.

PDI Details
All accepted PDI fellows will complete a self-assessment, prior to the start of the PDI, and set a yearlong
goal on how to maximize their current strengths and remedy deficiencies.

There will also be nine small group seminars lasting two hours each. The first seminar will be held prior to
the first workshop and will be aimed at structuring the experience, sharing expectations and concerns, and
reviewing the results of the self-assessments. An additional eight seminars will be held two-four weeks
following each workshop. These would briefly review the “take-home” points from the preceding
workshop, and each participant would indicate which of the theoretical/practice issues that have
implemented into their practice. This discussion will include why that particular point was chosen, the
specific nature of the activity (including what was done and the timing of the intervention), and the results
of the application. They will receive feedback on the nature and quality of the intervention, possibly
including role-playing of more effective ways of presentation. The focus of the discussions will be on
“declarative” and procedural” knowledge, i.e., a focus not only on knowledge and understanding of the
intervention but also on the ability to implement it.

The schedule for these small group meetings will be: March 2003, May 9 or 16, 2003, Aug. 29 or Sept. 12,
2003 (before the September workshop), October 24 or 31, 2003, December 5 or 12, 2003, February 20 or
27, 2004, April 16 or 23, 2004, June 11 or 18, 2004, and October 1 or 15, 2004.

Finally, PDI fellows will have access to an unmoderated interactive website. This will provide a forum for
questions, reactions, discussion, and suggestions among all the fellows and the training coordinators.
PDI Coordinators/ Director of Training
Robert Brown, Ph.D., ABPP
Dr. Brown received his doctorate from the University of Iowa and has held full-time faculty positions at the
University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas and in the Clinical Psychology program at the
University of Maryland, College Park. He is currently on leave from UMCP and is in independent practice
in Columbia, MD. He is a Fellow of the Divisions of Clinical Psychology, State and Provincial
Association Affairs, and Independent Practice of APA; holds the Diplomate in Clinical Psychology; was
named a Distinguished Practitioner of Psychology of the National Academies of Practice; has served as
President of MPA; has been elected to the APA Council of Representatives and to its Board of Directors,
and as chair of its Policy and Planning Board and the Board of Professional Affairs. His interests,
publications, and invited talks have focused on the prevention and remediation of relationship distress,
sexual dysfunction and treatment, ethical and professional issues, and continuing education. He has
received awards from MPA for Outstanding Professional Contributions and for Outstanding Educational
Contributions. He has taught graduate courses on couples therapy and has co-directed two previous MPA
post-doctoral couples therapy institutes.

Norman Epstein, Ph.D.
Dr. Epstein is Professor of Family Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park and teaches in the
department’s accredited marital and family therapy program. He is a Fellow of the American
Psychological Association (Divisions of Family Psychology and Psychotherapy), a diplomate of the
American Board of Assessment Psychology, a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and
a Clinical Member and Approved Supervisor of the American Association for Marriage and Family
Therapy. He has published extensively on his research and on clinical assessment and therapy with couple
and family relationships. He is author/editor of four books on assessment and treatment of marital and
family problems, author of 38 book chapters on marital and family relationships and therapy, and author of
39 articles in professional journals. His most recent book, Enhanced Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for
Couples: A Contextual Approach (APA Books, 2002), is co-authored with Donald H. Baucom, his long-
time collaborator in developing cognitive-behavioral couple therapy. Dr. Epstein has been licensed and in
private practice for 26 years and has extensive experience in the assessment and treatment of individuals,
couples and families. He also has been very actively involved in training of marital and family therapists,
as a university faculty member and supervisor, and through presentation of numerous workshops for
professionals nationally and internationally.

PDI Cost
The cost of the total PDI is $995.00 for MPA members and $1200.00 for non-members. This fee covers
attendance at all workshops plus; 18 hours (9 sessions) of small group discussion/case presentation, and
access to an interactive website. Workshops are also offered on an individual basis. The 6-hour workshops
are $110 for MPA members and $130 for non-members (lunch is included), and the 3-hour workshops are
$59 for MPA members and $79 for non-members.
Certificates for CE credit will be awarded at the end of each individual workshop for the appropriate
number of hours, for all participants. Also, all licensed psychologists enrolled in the entire PDI will receive
a special Post-Doctoral certificate of completion (for display purposes) indicating their participation in an
in-depth continuing education program on Couples Therapy. This certificate will indicate that they
completed a total of 51 hours of continuing education in the area of assessment and treatment of couples.
PLEASE NOTE: APA Standards for awarding credit prohibit offering variable credit for partial
attendance, i.e., those arriving late and/or leaving a workshop early will not receive CE credit. The
Maryland Psychological Association is approved by the American Psychological Association to offer
continuing education for psychologists. The Maryland Psychological Association is approved by the
Maryland Board of Examiners of Psychologists as a sponsor of Continuing Education. The Maryland
Psychological Association maintains responsibility for the program.
The Workshops
April 25, 2003
1. The Distressed Couple: Assessment and Treatment Planning
Robert Brown, Ph.D. and Norman Epstein, Ph.D.
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Loyola College Graduate Center, Columbia, Md.

For successful intervention with distressed couples, a sound case formulation and treatment plan are
critically dependent on accurate, clinically useful assessment. The overall goals of the assessment are to
identify the couple’s problems and strengths, and influential contextual factors, in order to determine
whether couples therapy is indicated, and if so, what therapeutic goals are feasible and what therapeutic
strategies could be employed. The workshop leaders will discuss critical information to be gathered,
various sources of valuable information, specific measures, and strategies to arrive at a useful case
formulation. The presentation also will describe how the therapist uses the assessment process to begin to
develop a balanced collaborative relationship with the partners, establish the nature and structure of the
therapy, and meet guidelines for record keeping and informed consent to treatment. The leaders will also
discuss important considerations in identifying the core components of the relationship distress, obtaining
histories of the relationship and the individual partners, evaluating current relationship functioning, and
identifying origins of current relationship problems. They will stress the importance of assessing those
factors expected to be directly useful in developing a collaborative treatment plan and will present
guidelines for organizing the data and presenting the findings to the couple.

Learning Objectives
1. To learn methods to identify couples’ problems, strengths, and influential contextual factors affecting
relationship functioning.
2. To learn what data to collect in initial sessions with couples, and how to collect it.
3. To understand how to use information gained through assessment to develop a treatment plan.
4. To learn several ways of organizing initial assessment information and strategies for presenting an
understandable plan based on therapist/couple collaboration.




June 13, 2003
2. Cognitive-Behavioral Couple Therapy: A Contextual Approach
Norman Epstein, Ph.D.
9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Columbia Hilton, Columbia, Md.

This workshop expands the boundaries of traditional cognitive behavioral therapy with a framework that
takes into account the personal characteristics of the two individuals, their dyadic interactions, and
influences of the couple’s interpersonal and physical environment. The presenter emphasizes what each
partner brings to the relationship, including past relationship experiences, current needs, personality style,
and psychopathology. Assessment and intervention also address environmental influences such as the
couple’s broader family system, community and cultural factors, and other life events such as job loss or a
death in the family. This contextual approach helps couples understand their healthy individual
differences, any unresolved personal issues and psychopathology, and individual and familial needs. The
couple’s behavioral, cognitive, and affective responses are viewed within the context of broader
relationship patterns and themes such as boundaries, distribution of power, and investment in the
relationship. The workshop describes interventions for modifying behavior, cognitions, and deficits or
excesses in emotional responses, addressing individual psychopathology, assisting couples in coping with
environmental demands, and enhancing relationship strengths. The presenter’s approach is firmly
grounded in empirical findings concerning relationship functioning and treatment efficacy.
Learning Objectives
1. To become familiar with an enhanced contextual cognitive-behavioral model for couple therapy.
2. To become familiar with questionnaire, interview, and behavior observation methods for cognitive-
behavioral assessment.
3. To learn a variety of interventions for modifying behavior, cognitions, and deficits or excesses in
emotional responses.
4. To learn how to assess and intervene with broad relationship patterns such as boundaries, distribution of
power, and investment in the relationship.
5. To learn options and strategies for intervening with partners’ unresolved personal issues and
psychopathology in the context of couple therapy.


September 19, 2003
3. Creating Connection: Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy (EFT)
Susan M. Johnson, Ed.D
9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Columbia Hilton, Columbia, Md.

EFT is a short-term (8-20 sessions), structured approach to couples therapy. It is based on an explicit
conceptualization of couples’ distress and adult attachment. It maps the change process into discrete steps
and specifies change events, strategies, and interventions. Over 15 years of empirical research has shown
its ability to create significant and lasting change with many different problems and populations. Its goals
are to expand and re-organize key emotional responses, create shifts in partners’ interactional positions,
initiate new cycles of interaction, and foster the creation of a secure bond between partners.

Learning Objectives
1. To understand the phenomena of marital distress in an attachment context.
2. To be able to describe the basic tenants of Emotionally Focused Therapy.
3. To identify specific interventions to help couples reprocess negative affect and restructure negative
interactions.
4. To learn to create powerful change events in therapy that foster a more secure bond between partners.
5. To learn to deal with common impasses and difficult issues in couple’s therapy.


November 14, 2003
4. Integrating Insight-Oriented Techniques Into Couple Therapy
Douglas Snyder, Ph.D.
9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
Columbia Hilton, Columbia, Md.

An important source of couples’ current difficulties involves partners’ previous relationship injuries
resulting in sustained interpersonal vulnerabilities and related defensive strategies interfering with
emotional intimacy. This workshop will describe the integration of insight-oriented techniques within a
hierarchical, pluralistic approach to couple therapy to address partners’ persistent maladaptive relationship
patterns. Initial assessment methods and case formulation, structural considerations, and assumptions
underlying the therapist’s role as well as the selection and timing of interventions are considered from both
the precepts of affective construction and this broader pluralistic model. Videotaped examples from two
cases will highlight intervention techniques and issues in selective implementation.

Learning Objectives
1. To become familiar with questionnaire, interview, and behavior observation methods for assessing the
individuals, the dyad, and the couple’s environment;
2. To learn a variety of interventions for modifying behavior, cognitions, and deficits or excesses in
emotional responses;
3. To learn how to assess and intervene with broad relationship patterns such as boundaries, distribution of
power, and investment in the relationship;
4. To learn options and strategies for intervening with partners’ unresolved personal issues and
psychopathology in the context of couple therapy;
5. To learn how to enhance a couple’s functioning through improved adaptation to healthy individual
differences and more effective use of their resources.


January 16, 2004 (3 hour)
5. Not Just Friends: Treating the Trauma of Infidelity
Shirley P. Glass, Ph.D., ABPP
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Columbia Hilton, Columbia, Md.

Today’s workplace and the Internet have triggered a new crisis of infidelity among good people in good
marriages. This workshop will explore how therapists can approach the serious threat of friendships that
insidiously evolve into intense love affairs. It will offer a trauma recovery model to cope with the
obsessing, flashbacks, and hyper-vigilance following the disclosure of infidelity that integrates the trauma
literature with the most recent infidelity research. Participants will learn how to open a window between
spouses, erect a wall between the unfaithful spouse and the extramarital partner, and move couples from
inquisition to an empathic search for meaning.

Learning Objectives
1. To learn to differentiate between platonic friendships and extramarital emotional involvement.
2. To validate and manage post-traumatic reactions in betrayed partners.
3. To help couples reverse walls and windows in extramarital triangles to create safety and establish
appropriate boundaries.
4. To use the content of disclosure to change the process from a truth-seeking inquisition to an empathic
search for meaning.
5. To develop clinical approaches to infidelity that are consistent with research findings.


March 26, 2004
6. Strategies and Techniques to Resolve Sexual Dysfunction and Dissatisfaction,
Including Relapse Prevention
Barry McCarthy, Ph.D.
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Loyola College Graduate Center, Columbia, Md.

This workshop will cover the major sexual dysfunctions, comprehensive treatment strategies, the
relationship between couple and sex therapy, and relapse prevention strategies.

Learning Objectives
1. To understand the importance of taking a sexual history
2. To understand the personal responsibility/intimate team model of resolving sexual problems
3. To learn to integrate medical interventions into the couple's intimacy, pleasuring, eroticism sexual style.
4. To learn the crucial importance of an individualized relapse prevention program


May 21, 2004 (3 hour)
7. The Assessment and Treatment of Couple’s Violence
Christopher Murphy, Ph.D.
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Loyola College Graduate Center, Columbia, Md.
The workshop is designed to increase participants’ understanding of physical and psychological forms of
domestic abuse and their assessment and treatment within the context of marriage and family practice.
Basic information will be provided on the prevalence, forms, and dynamics of partner abuse in marriage
clinic settings, along with strategies for assessing abuse and its functional dimensions. Intervention
methods will be presented to address key aspects of abusive behavior perpetration. These will include
individualized assessment and case conceptualization of abusive behavior; methods to enhance motivation
to change abusive behavior patterns; common beliefs and attributional styles associated with abusive
behavior, and common behavioral deficits that impede non-abusive conflict resolution. The workshop will
address guidelines for providing individual versus conjoint intervention in cases of partner violence,
strategies for enhancing safety in work with these couples, and when to introduce conjoint work in the
process of individual treatment of abusive spouses.

Learning Objectives
1. To enhance participants’ understanding of domestic abuse as it influences the practice of marriage and
family therapy.
2. To impart strategies and tools for the detection and assessment of abusive behavior.
3. To provide case management and intervention strategies for abusive behavior in marriage and family
therapy.


September 10, 2004 (3 hour)
8. Ethical and Professional Issues in Working with Couples
Robert Brown, Ph.D.
9:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon
Loyola College Graduate Center, Columbia, Md.

This workshop will focus on the unique ethical and professional issues posed by working with couples
rather than individuals. It will briefly cover several ethical frameworks and levels of ethical analysis, will
present a limited number of ethical principles that should be helpful in helping recognize and make sound
judgments about ethical dilemmas, and will examine professional responsibilities as outlined under the
Maryland and new APA ethics codes. It will identify and suggest best practices for dealing with general
and practical issues as confidentiality, informed consent, multiple relationships, extra-therapy contacts, fees
and billing, systemic effects of interventions, identification of the primary patient and the therapist’s
obligations to all parties, telephone calls between sessions, family secrets, and individual in addition to
conjoint sessions. In addition, there will be information on how to monitor oneself with regard to “slippery
slopes” towards unethical or unprofessional practice.

Learning Objectives
1. To be able to cite three general ethical principles that can guide ethical decision making in couples
therapy.
2. To be able to recognize the major ethical concerns in dealing with couples as dealt with in the APA and
Maryland codes of ethics.
3. To identify several major ethical concerns in assessing and treating couples and to offer potential
solutions.
4. To be able to name a minimum of two cues that one can use to alert oneself to the possibility that a
given course of action may be risky for oneself, one of the patients, or the couple’s relationship.
FACULTY
Robert Brown, Ph.D., PDI Director of Training, received his doctorate from the University of Iowa and
has held full-time faculty positions at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School at Dallas and
in the Clinical Psychology program at the University of Maryland, College Park. He is currently on leave
from UMCP and is in independent practice in Columbia, MD. He is a Fellow of the Divisions of Clinical
Psychology, State and Provincial Association Affairs, and Independent Practice of APA; holds the
Diplomate in Clinical Psychology; was named a Distinguished Practitioner of Psychology of the National
Academies of Practice; has served as President of MPA; has been elected to the APA Council of
Representatives and to its Board of Directors, and as chair of its Policy and Planning Board and the Board
of Professional Affairs. His interests, publications, and invited talks have focused on the prevention and
remediation of relationship distress, sexual dysfunction and treatment, ethical and professional issues, and
continuing education. He has received awards from MPA for Outstanding Professional Contributions and
for Outstanding Educational Contributions. He has taught graduate courses on couples therapy and has co-
directed two previous MPA post-doctoral couples therapy institutes.

Norman Epstein, Ph.D., PDI Director of Training, is Professor of Family Studies at the University of
Maryland, College Park and teaches in the department’s accredited marital and family therapy program.
He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Divisions of Family Psychology and
Psychotherapy), a diplomate of the American Board of Assessment Psychology, a Founding Fellow of the
Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and a Clinical Member and Approved Supervisor of the American
Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. He has published extensively on his research and on
clinical assessment and therapy with couple and family relationships. He is author/editor of four books on
assessment and treatment of marital and family problems, author of 38 book chapters on marital and family
relationships and therapy, and author of 39 articles in professional journals. His most recent book,
Enhanced Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Couples: A Contextual Approach (APA Books, 2002), is co-
authored with Donald H. Baucom, his long-time collaborator in developing cognitive-behavioral couple
therapy. Dr. Epstein has been licensed and in private practice for 26 years and has extensive experience in
the assessment and treatment of individuals, couples and families. He also has been very actively involved
in training of marital and family therapists, as a university faculty member and supervisor, and through
presentation of numerous workshops for professionals nationally and internationally.

Shirley P. Glass, Ph.D, ABPP, is author of the book titled: NOT “Just Friends”: Protect Your
Relationship from Infidelity and Heal the Trauma of Betrayal, which replaces popular myths about
extramarital relationships with documented findings. The New York Times referred to her as "the
godmother of infidelity research" because she has been studying extramarital involvement since 1975. Dr.
Glass is a Diplomate in Family Psychology and a Fellow of the American Psychological Association. She
is a highly sought after presenter at professional meetings, such as AAMFT, and is regularly cited in USA
Today, LA Times, and Psychology Today for her relationship expertise. She has appeared on Good
Morning America, Oprah, and The Today Show and has also been featured as a guest on “This American
Life” which is hosted and produced by her son, Ira. Dr. Glass maintains a private practice in the Baltimore
area.

Susan Johnson, Ed.D., is Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry at Ottawa University and Director of the
Ottawa Couple and Family Institute. She is a registered psychologist in the province of Ontario, Canada,
and is a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Marital and Family Therapy and the Journal of
Couple and Relationship Therapy. She is one of the originators of EFT, now one of the best-validated
couple’s interventions in North America. She has authored several books on EFT, including Emotionally
Focused Therapy for Couples with Leslie Greenberg (1988) and The Practice of Emotionally Focused
Marital Therapy: Creating Connection (1996), and was Senior Editor of The Heart of the Matter:
Perspectives on Emotion in Marital Therapy (1994). Her most recent book is Emotionally Focused Couple
Therapy with Trauma Survivors: Strengthening Attachment Bonds. She has also authored number articles
and research studies on couples therapy. She has received numerous awards, including the Year 2000
award from the American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy for Outstanding Contribution to the
Field of Marriage and Family Therapy.

Barry McCarthy, Ph.D., practices couple and sex therapy at the Washington Psychological Center and is a
professor of psychology at American University. With his wife, Emily, he is author of seven books, the
latest being Sexual Awareness: Couple Sexuality for the Twenty-First Century (2002) and Rekindling
Desire: A Step By Step Program to Help Low-Sex and No-Sex Marriages (2003). He is currently working
on a book with Michael Metz on a new treatment program for premature ejaculation. His current interests
are primary and secondary prevention of sexual problems and relapse prevention strategies for marital and
sexual problems.

Christopher Murphy, Ph.D., received his degree in Clinical Psychology from the State University of New
York at Stony Brook in 1991. He is an Associate Professor of Psychology and director of the doctoral
program in clinical psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Dr. Murphy coordinates
the New Behaviors Program at the Domestic Violence Center of Howard County, Maryland, a
comprehensive clinical training, service, and research program focused on perpetrators of intimate partner
violence. His research focuses on cognitive-behavioral and motivational treatments for abusive behavior
in intimate adult relationships.

Douglas Snyder, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training at Texas A&M
University in College Station. He has been recognized nationally for his programmatic research on actuarial
approaches to marital assessment and for his outcome research on marital therapy. He is the author of the
widely used Marital Satisfaction Inventory. In 1992, the American Association for Marriage and Family
Therapy honored Dr. Snyder with its Outstanding Marriage and Family Therapy Research Publication
Award for his four-year follow-up study comparing behavioral and insight-oriented approaches to couples
therapy, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health. Dr. Snyder is a Fellow of the American
Psychological Association in Divisions of Family Psychology, Clinical Psychology, Psychotherapy, and
Evaluation and Measurement. He is also a Fellow of the Society for Personality Assessment. He has
served as Editor of the Clinician's Research Digest and as Associate Editor for the Journal of Consulting
and Clinical Psychology, and currently serves as Associate Editor for the Journal of Family Psychology.

								
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