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					   BENJAMIN T. ROME SCHOOL OF MUSIC

                Graduate Studies

Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes
                          Table of Contents

                          Master’s Programs

Piano Performance-MM………………………………………………………………………...3

Vocal Accompanying-MM………………………………………………………………………8

Chamber Music (Piano)-MM………………………………………………………………….12

Musicology-MA………………………………………………………………………………....16

Vocal Pedagogy-MM…………………………………………………………………………...19

Vocal Performance-MM………………………………………………………………………..23

Composition (Concert Music Emphasis)-MM………………………………………………..27

Composition (Stage Music Emphasis)-MM…………………………………………………..37

Orchestral Conducting-MM…………………………………………………………………...50

Piano Pedagogy-MM…………………………………………………………………………...53

Orchestral Instruments-MM……………………………………………………………………56

Sacred Music-MMSM…………………………………………………………………………..59


                          Doctoral Programs

Vocal Pedagogy-DMA………………………………………………………………………….63

Vocal Performance-DMA………………………………………………………………………67

Chamber Music (Piano)-DMA…………………………………………………………………70

Musicology-PhD………………………………………………………………………………...74

Orchestral Instruments-DMA…………………………………………………………………77

Piano Performance-DMA………………………………………………………………………83

Vocal Accompanying-DMA……………………………………………………………………89

Composition-DMA……………………………………………………………………………...94

Piano Pedagogy-DMA………………………………………………………………………....106

Sacred Music-DMA…………………………………………………………………………....110

Orchestral Conducting-DMA…………………………………………………………………116


                                 2
                            Master of Music in Piano Performance

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


                                     I. Program Description

The Catholic University of America’s Master of Music degree in Piano Performance is a
comprehensive, highly selective program that prepares graduate piano majors for careers in
performance (solo and collaborative), studio teaching, and/or advanced degree work (D.M.A.).
The main focus of the program is on building and developing in every one of its majors the
abilities, skills, knowledge and artistry necessary for a successful performing solo career. The
program seeks to develop professional performing musicians who are also educated musicians.
Thus, the M.M. program combines a careful complement of performance-related studies with
historical and theoretical studies.

The Master of Music in Piano Performance degree program requires completion of 30 semester
credit hours. Also required for graduation are a chamber music performance, a concerto
performance and a final solo recital with hearing. Acceptance into the program is dependent on
passing an entrance audition, followed after admission by an entrance recital with recital hearing,
usually during a student’s first semester in the program. The curriculum’s design balances well
the solo performance aspect of the program with studies and training in other important areas of
the profession. Throughout the course of studies, piano performance graduate students receive
weekly private piano lessons, and the faculty carefully monitors their performance and academic
work via required recitals, performances, juries, repertoire classes, hearings, tests, final exams
and research papers. All students must maintain a ―B‖ average to graduate.

The curriculum for this degree program includes the following required courses: MUPI 791/792,
Private Instruction in Piano (6 credits); 2 Piano Pedagogy courses (3 credits); 2 Piano Literature
courses (6 credits); MUS 605/606, Chamber Music (2 credits); MUS 731, Research
Methodology (3 credits); MUS 712, Analytical Techniques II (3 credits); MUS 902 Final Recital
(3 credits). Students also take 4 credits of Music electives. The Piano Division has designed and
offers more than 15 graduate piano-related courses from which students may choose their
pedagogy, literature and elective courses. Piano Pedagogy courses, internships, and observations
(MUS 500, Piano Pedagogy I; MUS 502, Piano Pedagogy II; MUS 504, Piano Pedagogy III;
MUS 506, The Musician in Modern Society; MUS 529, Internship in Teaching Piano; MUS 525,
Group Issues in Piano Teaching) promote understanding and competence in teaching piano to all
types and levels of students. The focus of collaborative piano courses, such as MUS 605/606,
Chamber Music or Accompanying, and MUS 524, Chamber Music Techniques, is on developing
skills necessary for any type of collaborative playing. The sequence of five piano literature
courses (MUS 522, Piano Literature I; MUS 523, Piano Literature II; MUS 527, Piano Literature
III; MUS 528, Piano Literature IV; MUS 530, Piano Literature V) promotes understanding and
thorough knowledge of the piano repertoire, styles and instruments from the pre-Baroque period
up to the 21st century. The piano division also regularly offers piano seminars on various topics
(MUS 727, Seminar in Piano Pedagogy; MUS 718, Seminar in Pianism).

Students in the piano division study with an impressive faculty of artists and scholars and
participate in master classes which some of the world’s most respected performers offer,
including Boris Berman, Leslie Howard, Leif Ove Andsnes, Horacio Gutierrez, Andre Watts,
and Misha Dichter.
                                                 3
All piano majors participate regularly in on- and off-campus performances, concerts, recitals and
special events. Off campus, these take place in settings like museums, galleries, churches,
embassies, conservatories, schools, colleges, the Kennedy Center or Constitution Hall. Every
year many of our piano majors apply and receive invitations to participate in international,
national and local summer music festivals. Some of our best students earn invitations to compete
in national and international piano competitions as well.

After graduation, piano majors enjoy a large scope of career choices, including performing artist;
recording artist; independent piano teacher; piano faculty in college, conservatory, academy or
community music school; music faculty in private or public school; church music director; choir
conductor; vocal coach; choir, opera, dance, or church accompanist. More than 50% of our
graduates continue their education on the doctoral level at CUA or other universities, among
them the Juilliard School of Music (New York City) and the University of Maryland-College
Park. The high quality of final performances, professional employment and/or acceptance to
doctoral programs at CUA and other prestigious institutions are all indicators of the success of
this program.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Music in Piano Performance degree will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of all aspects of piano performance, including technique, sound
   production, style, performance practice, memorization, sight-reading, accompaniment,
   ensemble playing, recital preparation, artistic imagination, and others.
2. Have attained a high professional level in preparation and presentation of public
   performances, as a soloist or collaborative musician.
3. Demonstrate competence in teaching piano and piano-related subject matters to all types and
   levels of students.
4. Understand and provide evidence of a thorough knowledge of the piano repertoire, styles and
   instruments from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century.

                           Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Audition: Applicants to the major must successfully pass a 15-minute-long entrance audition
   (either in person or by an audio or video recording), performing from memory solo piano
   works representing three contrasting styles. A committee of at least three piano faculty
   members judges the auditions and makes admissions decisions. A successful audition
   generally consists of the student performing his/her repertoire at performance level, from
   memory, up to tempo, technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of the music.
   Students’ acceptance is provisional until the successful passing of the M.M. entrance recital
   hearing (refer to #9 below).
2. Weekly private piano lessons: Each semester every piano major must register for and receive
   piano lessons with his/her private piano instructor. The private piano instructor assigns the
   required recital/jury repertoire and oversees its preparation. Private piano lessons stress
   music of all styles, development of technical and interpretive skills, and ability to read at
   sight. At the end of every semester, the private piano instructor submits a grade based on
   attendance, preparation and performance of the assigned repertoire. Fifty percent of the final
   grade for piano instruction (MUPI 791/792, Private Instruction in Piano) comes from the
   private piano teacher and 50% from the average grade of the end-of-semester jury committee
   members.
                                                4
3. Advising: An academic adviser monitors graduate student progress. There is only one adviser
   for graduate students in the Master of Music in Piano Performance program, who meets with
   each student every semester to help plan course loads, repertoires, and schedules of required
   up-coming performances.
4. Course work: Individual instructors measure students’ progress in academic courses by
   means of quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their
   discretion.
5. GPA: All students must maintain a minimum B average across performance and academic
   courses for graduation. A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate
   course may repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average includes
   only the grade earned in the repeated course.
6. Course evaluations: At the end of each semester, students complete course and faculty
   evaluations for the courses they are taking.
7. Weekly Repertoire Classes: Every piano faculty member offers a weekly repertoire class
   during which his/her piano students have the opportunity to practice performing in front of an
   audience. Although these classes are neither required nor part of the curriculum, most
   students attend them regularly and appreciate the chance to try out their memorized and
   prepared pieces before playing in required juries, hearings and recitals. In these no-credit
   classes, piano majors perform prepared works, as well as works-in-progress that are close to
   being performance-ready. After each in-class performance, the piano professor evaluates
   students’ levels of preparation and gives important suggestions for further improvement of
   the performed repertoire. Performance in repertoire classes does not affect final grades
   directly.
8. Semester Juries: At the end of each semester, a piano faculty committee evaluates student
   performance during the piano juries. M.M. piano performance graduate students must pass at
   least four 20-minute-long juries during the course of studies. A semester jury is a type of
   performance examination in which each student performs the repertoire s/he has learned
   during the semester in front of a committee of at least three piano faculty members. A
   successful jury consists of the student performing the assigned repertoire at performance
   level, from memory, up to tempo, technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of
   the music. The committee judges the juries and grades the performances. Students’ final
   grades for the semester consist of the average grade among the jury committee members,
   averaged with the grade from the private piano instructor for that semester’s lessons. Each
   student taking a piano jury receives detailed written comments and suggestions from every
   member of the committee. Students who have successfully passed a degree recital hearing are
   exempt from that semester’s jury.
9. M.M. Entrance Recital Hearing: To be officially admitted into the M.M. Piano Performance
   program, graduate students must pass a 20-minute, Pass-Fail M.M. Entrance Recital Hearing
   before a piano faculty committee at least 2 weeks before performing their M.M. Entrance
   Recital in public. Students’ acceptance is provisional until the successful passing of this
   hearing. A hearing is a Pass-Fail jury that students must pass before presenting a public
   recital. Students usually schedule their M.M. Entrance Recital Hearings during the first
   semester of studies. A committee of at least three piano faculty members judges the hearing.
   To pass the M.M. Entrance Recital Hearing, a student must successfully play 20 minutes of
   the required 60-min-long recital repertoire at performance level, from memory, up to tempo,
   technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of the music. The repertoire should
   include selections illustrating the student’s ability to perform in various styles. Graduate
   credits in private music instruction apply toward degree requirements beginning with the
   semester during which students pass their entrance recital and hearing. Students who have
   successfully passed this recital hearing are exempt from that semester’s jury. A passing
                                               5
    recital hearing replaces an end-of-semester jury. A student is allowed to repeat a failed recital
    hearing once.
10. M.M. Entrance Solo Recital: After passing the Entrance Recital Hearing before a committee,
    students must present a public performance of 60-minutes-long program of memorized, solo
    piano works. The repertoire should include selections illustrating a student’s ability to
    perform in various styles. Students may perform their entrance recitals on or off campus.
    Students give a printed copy of the program to their advisers for placement in their files.
    Students typically complete their entrance recitals during the first semester of studies.
    Graduate credits in private music instruction apply toward degree requirements beginning
    with the semester during which students pass their entrance hearings and recitals.
11. Chamber Music Performance: Every student in the program must present a public
    performance of a complete major chamber music work for piano and strings or winds.
    Neither hearing nor registration is required for this performance. Memorization is also not
    required. Students may present this performance on or off campus; they must submit a
    printed program to their advisers as proof of completion of this requirement. The chamber
    music coach and the private piano instructor supervise and approve the assignment,
    preparation and presentation of the chamber music performance. The chamber music coach
    submits a Pass-Fail grade at the end of the semester.
12. Concerto Performance: Every student in the program must present a public performance of a
    memorized piano concerto. Neither a hearing nor registration in advance is required. Students
    may present this performance on or off campus. Every student submits a printed program to
    his/her adviser as proof of completion of this requirement. The private piano instructor
    supervises and approves the assignment, preparation and presentation of the concerto
    performance. The private piano instructor submits a Pass-Fail grade at the end of the
    semester.
13. M.M. Final Solo Recital Hearing: To graduate, piano performance graduate students must
    pass a 20-minute-long Pass-Fail M.M. Solo Recital Hearing before a committee of at least
    three piano faculty members at least two weeks before performing the final M.M. public
    recital. A hearing is a Pass-Fail jury that students must pass before presenting a public recital.
    To pass a M.M. Final Solo Recital Hearing, a student must successfully play 20 minutes of
    the required 70-min-long recital repertoire at performance level, from memory, up to tempo,
    technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of the music. The repertoire should
    include selections illustrating the student’s ability to perform in various styles. Students
    typically play the M.M. Final Solo Recital Hearing during their last semester of studies.
    Passing this recital hearing replaces an end-of-semester jury. Students may repeat a failed
    recital hearing once time.
14. M.M. Final 70-minutes Solo Recital: Piano majors must present a public performance of a
    70-minutes-long program of memorized solo piano works. Students may perform their final
    recitals on or off campus after successfully passing the recital hearing. Students must submit
    a printed copy of the program to their advisers as proof of completing the requirement.
    Students typically complete the M.M. Final Solo Recital during the last semester of study.
15. Teaching: Pedagogy classes are included in the curriculum of all M.M. in Piano Performance
    degree students. Through supervised teaching by the instructor and required observations of
    other piano faculty members’ teaching, these courses prepare the degree candidates for
    teaching of all types and levels of students.

                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. The piano faculty intends to collect more data on piano graduates’ career choices and to
   adjust the curriculum accordingly.
                                                  6
2. Close association between faculty and graduates provides feedback on our programs and,
   where warranted, allows consideration for program adjustments. Course evaluations are
   administered at the end of each semester. These are reviewed by the Dean of the School of
   Music, the Chair of the Piano Division, and the instructors of the reviewed courses.




                                              7
                           Master of Music in Vocal Accompanying

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description

The Catholic University of America’s Master of Music degree in Vocal Accompanying is a
comprehensive, highly selective program that prepares graduate piano students for careers in
collaborative performance (vocal accompanying and chamber music), vocal coaching, studio
teaching, and/or advanced degree work (D.M.A.). The program’s main focus is on building and
developing in every one of its majors the abilities, skills, knowledge and artistry necessary for a
successful career as a collaborative artist and a vocal coach. The program seeks to develop
professional performing musicians who are also educated musicians. Thus, the M.M. program
combines a careful complement of performance related studies with historical and theoretical
studies.

The Master of Music in Vocal Accompanying degree program requires completion of 30
semester credit hours and passing three piano-vocal recitals and one chamber music recital.
Passing a language examination in two languages (French, German, or Italian; no substitutions)
also is required. Acceptance into the major is dependent on passing a 15-min.-long entrance
audition before the piano faculty. The audition repertoire includes solo literature, vocal repertoire
and sight-reading. The curriculum’s design balances well the performing aspects of the program
with studies and training in other important areas of the profession. Throughout the course of
studies, students receive weekly private piano lessons, and they participate actively in concerts,
lessons, rehearsals, coaching and productions that both the vocal and piano divisions offer. The
faculty carefully monitors their performance and academic work via required recitals,
performances, juries, repertoire classes, hearings, tests, final exams and research papers. Students
must maintain a ―B‖ average to graduate.

The curriculum for this degree program includes the following required courses: MUPI 791/792,
Private Instruction in Piano (6 credits); MUS 731, Research Methodology (3 credits); MUS 712,
Analytical Techniques II (3 credits); MUS 546, Music in the Classical Period (3 credits); MUS
551, Music in the Romantic Period (3 credits) and 12 credits of Core Electives, e.g. various vocal
repertoire, diction, opera and/or language courses. The vocal division of the School of Music
offers and supervises a significant portion of the curriculum for this degree program. The list of
Core Electives courses in the vocal division in which vocal accompanying degree graduate
students may enroll includes the following: MUS 511/512, Survey of Solo Vocal Literature;
MUS 572, Italian Lyric Diction and Repertoire; MUS 574, French Lyric Diction and Repertoire;
MUS 578, Spanish Lyric Diction and Repertoire; MUS 588, German Lyric Diction and
Repertoire; MUS 518/538, Opera Practicum; MUS 535, Anatomy and Vocal Physiology; MUS
702, Survey of German Lied; MUS 704, French Melodie and others. All graduate students in the
M.M. in Vocal Accompanying program have opportunities to participate and receive first-hand
experience in opera, musical, choral, oratorio and vocal recital productions that the vocal
division and the School of Music organize.

Students in the piano division study with an impressive faculty of artists and scholars and
participate in master classes, which some of the world’s most respected performers offer,
including Boris Berman, Leslie Howard, Leif Ove Andsnes, Horacio Gutierrez, Andre Watts,
and Misha Dichter.

                                                 8
All vocal accompaniment majors participate regularly in on- and off-campus performances,
operas, musicals, concerts, recitals, productions, and other special events. Off campus, these take
place in settings like museums, galleries, churches, embassies, conservatories, schools, colleges,
the Kennedy Center or Constitution Hall. Every year many of our vocal accompanying graduate
students apply and receive invitations to participate in international, national and local summer
music festivals.

After graduation, vocal accompanying majors enjoy a large scope of career choices, including
collaborative artist; vocal coach; recording artist; independent piano teacher; piano faculty in
college, conservatory, academy or community music school; music faculty in private or public
school; church music director; choir conductor; choir, opera, dance, or church accompanist.
More than 50% of our piano M.M. Accompanying graduates continue their education on the
doctoral level at CUA or other universities, among them the Juilliard School of Music (New
York City) and the University of Maryland-College Park. The high quality of final performances,
professional employment and/or acceptance to doctoral programs at CUA and other prestigious
institutions are all indicators of the success of this program.

                                  Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Music in Vocal Accompanying degree will:

5. Demonstrate mastery of all aspects of collaborative playing, including technique, sound
   production and balance, style, performance practice, vocal coaching, breathing, vocal diction,
   sight-reading, accompaniment, ensemble playing considerations, recital preparation, artistic
   imagination, and others.
6. Have attained a high professional level in preparation and presentation of public
   performances, as a collaborative musician.
7. Demonstrate competence in teaching piano, chamber music, accompanying, sight-reading,
   vocal diction and other piano-related subject matters to all types and levels of students.
8. Understand and provide evidence of a thorough knowledge of the vocal repertoire, including
   opera, from the Baroque period up to the 21st century.
9. Exhibit basic/working knowledge of two of three foreign languages, either French, German
   or Italian.

                            Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Audition: Applicants to the major must successfully pass a 15-minute-long entrance audition
   performing solo repertoire, vocal repertoire (with a singer) and sight-reading. A committee of
   at least three piano faculty members judges the auditions and makes admissions decisions. A
   successful audition generally consists of the student performing his/her repertoire at
   performance level, up to tempo with technical polish and with a stylistic understanding of the
   music. The committee expects students to have good sight-reading skills.
2. Weekly private piano lessons: Each semester every student must register for and receive
   piano lessons with his/her private piano instructor. The private piano instructor assigns the
   required recital/jury repertoire and oversees its preparation. Private piano lessons stress
   music of all styles; development of technical, collaborative and interpretive skills, and further
   improvement of the ability to read at sight. At the end of every semester, the private piano
   instructor submits a grade based on attendance, preparation and performance of the assigned
   music. Fifty per cent of the final grade for piano instruction (MUPI 791/792, Private
   Instruction in Piano) comes from the private piano teacher and 50% from the average grade
                                                 9
    from end-of-semester jury committee members.
3. Advising: An academic adviser monitors student progress in the major. There is only one
    adviser for Master of Music in Vocal Accompanying degree graduate students, who meets
    with each of them every semester to help plan course loads, repertoires, and schedules of
    required up-coming performances and juries.
4. Course work: Individual instructors measure students’ progress in academic courses by
    means of quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their
    discretion.
5. GPA: All students in this program must maintain a minimum B average across performance
    and non-performance-based courses for graduation. A graduate student who has received a
    grade of C or F in a graduate course may repeat the course one time. The calculation of the
    grade point average includes only the grade earned in the repeated course.
6. Course evaluations: At the end of each semester, students complete course and faculty
    evaluations for the courses they are taking.
7. Weekly Repertoire Classes: Every piano faculty member offers a weekly repertoire class
    during which his/her piano major students have the opportunity to practice performing in
    front of an audience. Although these classes are neither required nor part of the curriculum,
    most students attend them regularly and appreciate the chance to try out their prepared pieces
    before playing in required juries, hearings and recitals. In these no-credit classes, piano
    majors perform prepared works, as well as works-in-progress that are close to being
    performance-ready. After each in-class performance, the piano professor evaluates students’
    levels of preparation and gives important suggestions for further improvement of the
    performed repertoire. Performance in repertoire classes does not affect final grades directly.
8. Semester Juries: A committee of at least three piano faculty members evaluates student
    performance during piano juries at the end of each semester. Students in this program must
    pass at least four 20-minutes-long juries during the course of their studies. A semester jury is
    a type of performance examination during which each student performs the repertoire s/he
    has learned during that semester in front of a committee of at least three piano faculty
    members. A successful jury consists of a student performing his/her assigned repertoire at
    performance level, up to tempo with technical polish and a stylistic understanding of the
    music. The committee judges the juries and grades the performances. Students’ final piano
    grades for a semester consist of the average grade among the jury committee members,
    averaged with the grade from the student’s private instructor for that semester’s lessons. Each
    student taking a piano jury receives detailed written comments and suggestions from every
    member of the committee. An end-of-semester jury is not required for students who have
    successfully passed a degree recital hearing during the same semester.
9. Four Recital Hearings (three piano-vocal and one chamber): At least 2 weeks before
    performing a public M.M. Degree recital, students must successfully pass a 20-minute-long
    recital hearing. They may do this at any time during the semester in which they present each
    of the required four recitals (one chamber music and three piano-vocal recitals). A hearing is
    a requisite Pass-Fail jury that precedes presentation of a public recital. A committee of at
    least three piano faculty members judges the hearing. To pass a M.M. Recital Hearing, a
    student must successfully play 20 minutes of the required 70-min-long recital repertoire at
    performance level, up to tempo with technical polish and a stylistic understanding of the
    music. The repertoire sampled should include selections illustrating the student’s ability to
    perform in various styles. An end-of-semester jury is not required for students who have
    successfully passed a degree recital hearing during the same semester. A student is allowed
    to repeat a failed recital hearing once.
10. Chamber Music Recital: A public performance of a 70-min.-long chamber music recital is
    required for graduation. The repertoire should include works for piano and strings or winds.
                                                10
    Memorization is not required. Students may present this performance on or off campus after
    successfully passing the related M.M. Recital Hearing. The private piano instructor
    supervises and approves the assignment, preparation and presentation of the chamber music
    performance. Students must submit a printed program as proof of completion of this
    requirement to their advisers.
11. Three Piano-Vocal Recitals: All students must present three 60-minutes-long public piano-
    vocal recitals. Neither advance registration nor memorization is required. The private piano
    instructor supervises and approves the assignment, preparation and presentation of the piano-
    vocal concerts. Students may perform their recitals on or off campus after successfully
    passing a M.M. Recital Hearing before a committee. Students must submit a printed copy of
    the program for each recital they complete to their advisers for placement in their files.
12. Language Requirement: Students must pass a language examination in two of three
    languages (French, German, or Italian; no substitutions) for graduation. Working/basic
    written and spoken knowledge is required. Either the Voice Division of the School of Music
    or the appropriate section of the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures in the
    School of Arts and Sciences administers these examinations.
13. Teaching: The opera practicum and vocal diction courses prepare the candidates for both
    teaching and coaching of all types and levels of students at universities, colleges, opera
    companies and other vocal performing institutions.


                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. The piano faculty intends to collect more data on piano graduates’ career choices and to
   adjust the curriculum accordingly.
2. Close association between faculty and graduates provides feedback on our programs and,
   where warranted, allows consideration for program adjustments. Course evaluations are
   administered at the end of each semester. These are reviewed by the Dean of the School of
   Music, the Chair of the Piano Division, and the instructors of the reviewed courses.




                                               11
                          Master of Music in Chamber Music (Piano)

                     Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


                                      Program Description

The Catholic University of America’s Master of Music degree in Chamber Music (Piano) is a
comprehensive, highly selective program that prepares graduate piano majors for careers in
collaborative performance (chamber music and vocal accompanying), studio teaching, and/or
advanced degree work (D.M.A.). The main focus of the program is on building and developing
in every one of its majors the abilities, skills, knowledge and artistry necessary for a successful
chamber music performing career. The program seeks to develop professional performing
musicians who are also educated musicians. Thus, the M.M. program combines a careful
complement of performance related studies with historical and theoretical studies.

The Master of Music in Chamber Music (Piano) degree program requires completion of 30
semester credit hours and three public recitals: two in Chamber Music and one Piano-Vocal.
Acceptance into the major is dependent on passing an entrance audition before the piano faculty.
The curriculum’s design balances well the performance aspects of the program with studies and
training in other important areas of the profession. Throughout the course of studies, chamber
music (piano) majors receive weekly private piano lessons, and the faculty carefully monitors
their performance and academic work via required recitals, performances, juries, repertoire
classes, hearings, tests, final exams and research papers. All students must maintain a ―B‖
average to graduate.

The curriculum for this degree program includes the following required courses: MUPI 791/792,
Private Instruction in Piano (6 credits); MUS 731, Research Methodology (3 credits); MUS 712,
Analytical Techniques II (3 credits); MUS 546, Music in the Classical Period (3 credits); MUS
551, Music in the Romantic Period (3 credits), and 12 credits of Chamber Music Core Electives
which include MUS 605/606, Chamber Music (3 credits); Vocal Literature courses (4 credits);
Piano Literature courses (6 credits) and MUS 524, Chamber Music Techniques (3 credits). The
Piano and Voice Divisions have designed and offer more than 20 graduate courses that students
in this program can choose to take. The focus of collaborative piano courses, such as MUS
605/606, Chamber Music or Accompanying, and MUS 524, Chamber Music Techniques, is on
developing performing as well as teaching skills necessary for any type of collaborative playing.
The sequence of five piano literature courses (MUS 522, Piano Literature I; MUS 523, Piano
Literature II; MUS 527, Piano Literature III; MUS 528, Piano Literature IV and MUS 530, Piano
Literature V) promotes understanding and thorough knowledge of the piano repertoire, styles and
instruments from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century. The vocal literature courses,
which the Voice Division offers (MUS 511/512, Survey of Solo Vocal Literature; MUS 572,
Italian Lyric Diction and Repertoire; MUS 574, French Lyric Diction and Repertoire; MUS 578,
Spanish Lyric Diction and Repertoire and MUS 588, German Lyric Diction and Repertoire),
promote understanding and thorough knowledge of the existing vocal repertoire and styles.

Students in the piano division study with an impressive faculty of artists and scholars and
participate in master classes, which some of the world’s most respected performers offer,
including Boris Berman, Leslie Howard, Leif Ove Andsnes, Horacio Gutierrez, Andre Watts,
and Misha Dichter.

                                                 12
All chamber music (piano) majors participate regularly in on- and off-campus performances,
concerts, recitals and special events. Off campus, these take place in settings like museums,
galleries, churches, embassies, conservatories, schools, colleges, the Kennedy Center or
Constitution Hall. Every year many of our chamber music (piano) majors apply and receive
invitations to participate in international, national and local summer music festivals. Some of our
best students earn invitations to compete in national and international piano or chamber music
competitions as well.

After graduation, chamber music (piano) majors enjoy a large scope of career choices, including
performing artist; recording artist; independent piano teacher; piano faculty in college,
conservatory, academy or community music school; music faculty in private or public school;
church music director; choir conductor; vocal coach; choir, opera, dance, or church accompanist.
More than 50% of our chamber music (piano) graduates continue their education on the doctoral
level at CUA or other universities, among them the Juilliard School of Music (New York City)
and the University of Maryland-College Park. The high quality of final performances,
professional employment and/or acceptance to doctoral programs at CUA and other prestigious
institutions are all indicators of the success of this program.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Music in Chamber Music (Piano) degree will:

10. Demonstrate mastery of all aspects of piano performance, including technique, sound
    production, style, performance practice, sight-reading, accompaniment, ensemble playing,
    recital preparation, artistic imagination, and others.
11. Have attained a high professional level in preparation and presentation of public
    performances, as a collaborative musician.
12. Demonstrate competence in teaching piano, chamber music, accompanying, sight-reading,
    and piano-related subject matters to all types and levels of students.
13. Understand and provide evidence of a thorough knowledge of the solo piano, chamber music
    and vocal repertoires, as well as styles from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Audition: Applicants to the major must successfully pass a 15-minute-long entrance audition
   (either in person or by an audio or video recording), consisting of solo literature, chamber
   music (with string or wind players) and sight-reading. A committee of at least three piano
   faculty members judges the auditions and makes admissions decisions. A successful audition
   generally consists of the applicant performing his/her repertoire at performance level, up to
   tempo, technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of the music. The committee
   also expects to see evidence of good sight-reading skills.
2. Weekly private piano lessons: Each semester every M.M. student in chamber music (piano)
   must register for and receive piano lessons with his/her private piano instructor. The private
   piano instructor assigns the required recital/jury repertoire and oversees its preparation.
   Private piano lessons stress music of all styles; development of technical, collaborative and
   interpretive skills, and further improvement of the ability to read at sight. At the end of every
   semester, the private piano instructor submits a grade based on attendance, preparation and
   performance of the assigned repertoire. Fifty per cent of the final grade for piano instruction
   (MUPI 791/792, Private Instruction in Piano) comes from the private piano teacher and 50%
   from the average grade of the end-of-semester jury committee members.
                                                 13
3. Advising: An academic adviser monitors graduate student progress. There is only one adviser
    for graduate students in the Master of Music degree in Chamber Music (Piano), who meets
    with each student every semester to help plan course loads, repertoires, and schedules of
    required up-coming performances.
4. Course work: Individual instructors measure students’ progress in academic courses by
    means of quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their
    discretion.
5. GPA: All students must maintain a minimum B average across performance and academic
    courses for graduation. A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate
    course may repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average includes
    only the grade earned in the repeated course.
6. Course evaluations: At the end of each semester, students complete course and faculty
    evaluations for the courses they are taking.
7. Weekly Repertoire Classes: Every piano faculty member offers a weekly repertoire class
    during which his/her piano students have the opportunity to practice performing in front of an
    audience. Although these classes are neither required nor part of the curriculum, most
    students attend them regularly and appreciate the chance to try out their prepared pieces
    before playing the required recitals, hearings and juries. In these no-credit classes, piano
    students perform prepared works, as well as works-in-progress that are close to being
    performance-ready. After each in-class performance, the piano professor evaluates students’
    levels of preparation and gives important suggestions for further improvement of the
    performed repertoire. Performance in repertoire classes does not affect final grades directly.
8. Semester Juries: A piano faculty committee evaluates student performance during piano
    juries at the end of each semester. Students in this M.M. program must pass at least four 20-
    minutes-long juries during the course of their studies. A semester jury is a type of
    performance examination, during which each student performs in front of a committee of at
    least three piano faculty members the repertoire they have learned during the semester. A
    successful jury consists of the student performing the assigned repertoire at performance
    level, up to tempo, technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of the music. The
    committee judges the juries and grades the performances. Students’ final grades in piano
    private instruction for the semester consist of the average grade among the jury committee
    members, averaged with the student’s private instructor’s grade for the semester of lessons.
    Each student taking a piano jury receives detailed written comments and suggestions from
    every member of the committee. Students who have successfully passed a degree recital
    hearing during the semester are exempt from that semester’s jury.
9. Three M.M. Recital Hearings (two chamber music and one piano-vocal): Students must pass
    a Pass-Fail 20-minute-long recital hearing before a piano faculty panel of at least three
    members at least two weeks before presenting each of their three required public M.M.
    degree recitals (two chamber music and one piano-vocal). Students can schedule recital
    hearings at any time during the semester and any time during the course of studies. A hearing
    is a Pass-Fail jury that students must pass before a recital. To pass a M.M. Recital Hearing, a
    student must successfully play 20 minutes of the required 70-min-long recital repertoire at
    performance level, up to tempo, technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of
    the music. The repertoire should include selections illustrating the student’s ability to
    perform in various styles. A passing recital hearing replaces an end-of-semester jury. A
    student may repeat a failed recital hearing only once.
10. Three M.M. Recitals (two chamber music and one piano-vocal): To graduate, Chamber
    Music (piano) majors must present three public recitals: two chamber music and one piano-
    vocal. Each recital must be 70 minutes long. Students may perform their recitals on or off
    campus after successfully passing the requisite recital hearings. Students must give a printed
                                                14
    copy of the program to their adviser for placement in their files. Students can present these
    recitals at any time during the course of studies.
11. Teaching: The required Chamber Music Techniques and Chamber Music courses prepare the
    candidates for both teaching and coaching of all types and levels of students.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1. The piano faculty intends to collect more data on piano graduates’ career choices and to
   adjust the curriculum accordingly.
2. Close association between faculty and graduates provides feedback on our programs and,
   where warranted, allows consideration for program adjustments. Course evaluations are
   administered at the end of each semester. These are reviewed by the Dean of the School of
   Music, the Chair of the Piano Division, and the instructors of the reviewed courses.




                                               15
                          MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSICOLOGY
                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                    I. Program Description

The Benjamin T. Rome School of Music at The Catholic University of America offers a Master
of Arts in Musicology that in 30 credit hours combines a core study of period courses in music
history with advanced, research-based seminars. M.A. students are also required to fulfill a
foreign language requirement in either French or German, pass comprehensive examinations
built around courses in their program of study and complete a thesis demonstrating independent
research as well as excellent writing and organizational skills. This program offers students the
opportunity to gain an in-depth understanding of all periods of music history and develop the
skills to conduct scholarly research and present it in well-organized written and oral
presentations. A number of M.A. students also elect to continue intensive performance studies in
voice or an instrument of their choosing and participate in various musical ensembles

There are six required classes in the MA program. Each student must complete Research
Methodology MUS 731, which includes an overview of various kinds of scholarship in
musicology, ethnomusicology, music theory, and some related disciplines. Students examine the
basic tools of research, both print and online sources, and each completes an extensive
independent project, analyzing the secondary literature in a topic of his/her choosing. The course
also emphasizes organization and writing. Students must complete two "period courses", 500-
level classes (e.g., MUS 558, Twentieth-Century Music) that each focuses on a different epoch in
music history. These courses emphasize knowledge of important composers and works and also
require that students undertake their own research projects. Also requisite are two Seminars
(MUS 720) in which topics rotate based on the research interests of the faculty. The classes are
built around research; they require students to engage with original source materials (manuscripts
or documents) or perform intensive analytical research in the music featured in class. Each
student must complete one of the two Analytical Techniques classes offered by the Theory area.
In all their advanced classes, M.A. students gain appropriate research and presentation skills
through assignments that examine music in a historical or analytical context or as part of a
repertory associated with a specific performance medium.

The research orientation of course work prepares M.A. students for the thesis, a significant
scholarly project completed under the direction of one of the members of the Music History
faculty. Thesis topics typically develop from the student's course work; indeed, they might grow
out of a particular assignment or paper. Students give oral presentations of their theses. They
must also pass M.A. comprehensive examinations.

The School of Music offers internship opportunities with a number of area arts organizations and
libraries, such as the Library of Congress, Music Division; The Folger Library; and Washington
National Opera. The faculty encourages involvement in such projects in each student’s program
of study.

The skills that majors develop in this program prepare them for a wide array of post-graduation
options, including Ph.D. study in musicology, music theory, or other disciplines of music, or
advanced study in a number of other fields in the humanities or professions, such as library and
information science or law. In recent years, all of the graduates from this program have gone on
to Ph.D. studies in musicology either at CUA or other top-ranked universities. Earlier students

                                               16
from this program have also gone on to diverse careers in the arts, as well as in Church service
and business.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Arts in Musicology will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of the fundamental body of knowledge of music history and important
   composers, trends or "schools", and musical works; students must demonstrate knowledge of
   the important musical works in a variety of style periods.
2. Conduct independent research on music with broad knowledge of the standard academic and
   musicological/musical theoretical tools;
3. Communicate effectively in written and oral forms and demonstrate the ability to discuss
   music in a professional manner;
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the expectations of musicology as a research discipline, and
5. Demonstrate a reading knowledge of French or German.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcomes Measures

1. For Admission, students must completed an undergraduate degree in music with a significant
   study of music history and theory or have completed courses to demonstrate this level of
   study. Students must demonstrate competence in writing as evidenced by writing samples.
2. Course work: Individual professors of all of the classes described above evaluate each M.A.
   student. These evaluations focus on a student’s synthesis of the appropriate required
   knowledge in music history and effective written and verbal communication. Faculty
   members inform each student of his/her progress in the program, primarily through written
   comments and grades on exams and assignments but also frequently in individual face-to-
   face consultations.
3. Advising: Professors of individual courses also communicate any concerns they might have
   about a student’s performance to his/her academic adviser, who meets frequently with the
   student and closely monitors his/her progress in the program.
4. [Course evaluations: Each student completes course evaluations for every class.
5. Language requirement: To fulfill the foreign language requirement, each student either
   successfully completes an advanced reading course in French or German or passes a
   language examination given by the appropriate department at CUA.
6. Comprehensive Examinations: Each student must pass M.A. comprehensive examinations,
   which are built around his/her choice of four classes undertaken in the program with advice
   from faculty. Three faculty members develop broad essay questions related to these four
   courses. The MA exams cover one four-hour test period.
7. The same faculty members grade the responses following the standard expectations in
   musicology in terms of breadth of knowledge and accurate, up-to-date information. Each
   faculty member grades each answer for accuracy, depth of knowledge and conceptual ability.
   The faculty members vote on the outcome, either Pass or Fail.
8. M.A. Thesis: The crowning achievement of the program, the student’s thesis, demonstrates
   mastery of the important skills. Each student plans and structures this significant scholarly
   project under the direction of one of the members of the Music History faculty. Thesis topics
   typically develop from the student's coursework; indeed, they might grow out of a particular
   assignment or paper. Two faculty members evaluate the finished product, basing their
   judgments on the international standards for research in musicology and the clarity of the
   writing and organization.
                                                17
9. Oral Presentation: Every student gives an oral presentation based on the thesis, on which
   members of the faculty and other students offer critiques. These presentations follow the
   international expectations of musicology for conference papers in terms of accuracy,
   organization and clarity of thought; the presentation is also judged on the logic of the
   presentation, as well as the quality of the research.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning


1. The Musicology area and the School of Music use results of students’ examinations, both
   those given in courses and comprehensive exams, to determine which topics or courses they
   should change or emphases they should increase, so that each student will complete the M.A.
   with an advanced overview of music history.
2. The quality of students’ research and writing, as evident in their papers for individual classes
   and also in their theses, helps faculty members determine to which skills and techniques they
   should be given more emphasis in Research Methodology.
3. Faculty members meet regularly to discuss issues of student success and the needs of the
   program. Classes and requirements are frequently revised based on students’ work and
   feedback.




                                                18
                            Master of Music in Vocal Pedagogy
                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description



The Master of Music degree in Vocal Pedagogy at The Catholic University of America is
designed for the prospective vocal instructor who evidences performance ability and technical
proficiency along with fine musicianship and musical style. While studying instructional
methodology, the student continues to improve upon her/his own performance capabilities. The
faculty of this division – a highly qualified team comprised of vocal technicians, lyric diction
experts, coaches/accompanists and scientific physiologists, all of whom offer valuable training –
works together to provide every student the opportunity to succeed in her/his aspirations. The
student who completes the degree will be qualified to teach applied vocal instruction and/or
perhaps continue toward enhanced avenues of performing opportunities.

Applicants should hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and exhibit a
formidable ability to perform and strong desire to become an instructor in vocal technique and
style. An applicant’s pre-admission audition for a voice committee, including the chair of the
division and two voice faculty members, must demonstrate enough vocal technical ability,
musical style and viable foreign language diction (Italian, German and French at a minimum) to
warrant study beyond the bachelor’s level of achievement. An applicant’s pre-admission audition
should be in person, but a CD or DVD will be accepted if the candidate will be more than 200
miles from campus and/or finds it impossible to attend. Students must pass entrance placement
examinations in music history and theory prior to beginning graduate courses. They may take
pre-requisite Italian, German and French classes (the school of music requires four semesters of
Italian and two semesters each of German and French), which they might have missed in
undergraduate study, along with regular graduate level courses.

To earn the M.M. Vocal Pedagogy degree, students successfully complete at least 30 credit hours
of instruction (beyond additional possible pre-requisite courses), a pedagogy practicum, a final
recital with required preliminary hearing before the voice committee and a directed research
paper. The research paper, directed by the Chair of the Vocal Division will cover subject matter
related to his/her major curriculum which is approved by the Chair of the Division. The paper
will be approximately thirty pages in length. The curriculum carefully balances performance
classes and pedagogy classes with music history and theory courses. Required courses include
the following: MUPI 791/792 Voice (6 credits); MUS 712 Analytical Techniques II (3 credits);
MUS 535 Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and Physiology (2 credits); MUS 535A Vocal
Pedagogy Practicum (2 credits); MUS 511 Survey of Solo Vocal Literature I (2 credits); 3 credits
of Lyric Diction (e.g., MUS 572, Italian Lyric Diction); 3 credits of Music History (e.g., MUS
553, History of Opera); an additional 7 credits of electives appropriate to the student’s
curriculum, plus 2 credits for the final recital and 1 credit for the directed research paper. Among
the electives from which M.M. students can choose are the following: MUS 518 Opera
Practicum (1 credit); MUS 526A Opera Practicum (2 credits); MUS 510/511 Opera Workshop (2
credits); MUS 661 Seminar in Vocal Performance (3 credits; may be taken each spring
semester); MUS 536/537 Stage Movement (1 credit); or any graduate level courses in Drama or
Speech (with permission from the division chair).



                                                19
The Division of Vocal Performance supports an ―Open Studio‖ policy, which encourages the
vocal faculty to work as a team toward the progress of every student; it places student needs first.
Although each candidate has an applied teacher of record, with notification to the Chair of the
Vocal Division, students may engage in two lessons each semester with another voice faculty
member. The teacher of record may attend the sessions, if the student so chooses; s/he may not
discourage the opportunity. A faculty member may also encourage a student to seek instruction
from one of his/her colleagues for a specific technical or stylistic expertise. The student returns
to his/her teacher of record with information from which both the candidate and the teacher
benefit. Open Studio promotes the best possible instruction and distribution of information. It
recognizes that no one faculty member has all the answers regarding individual technical facility
and no two students process information in the same manner.

Master classes with professionals in the fields of performance, teaching, voice therapy and artist
management round out the curriculum. This variety helps guide students’ career choices and
offers them opportunities to develop networking connections for the future. The program also
encourages its students to perform in operas (an average of two opportunities a year in the
School of Music) and with university choruses and attend conferences (such as The Annual
Voice Symposium with Dr. Robert Sataloff) appropriate to her/his field of study.
Graduates with this degree are equipped to teach applied vocal instruction privately or as part of
an institution of higher education, such as community colleges and universities. Many graduates
find themselves continuing their vocal studies as they begin to profit from better technical and
musical performance in the vocal major.



                                 II. Goals for Student Learning


Students who graduate with a Master of Music degree in Vocal Pedagogy will:

1. Demonstrate a growing/continuously improving mastery of technical facility in vocal
   performance.
2. Demonstrate the knowledge and skill to instruct both female and male students in applied
   vocal technique and musicianship with a viable understanding of physiology, stage
   deportment and a well-studied musicianship. This includes the ability to discuss and instruct
   in concrete terms voice technique and teaching methodology
3. Perform art song and other vocal literature from the Baroque through Contemporary eras in
   Italian, German, French and English with improved quality of language diction and vocal
   technical production demonstrated in the highest quality examples available, such as those
   heard on classical recordings by noted artists in the field
4. Demonstrate an understanding of musical style, the era from which that style originates and
   knowledge of a composer and librettist/poet, the theoretical textures of the pieces s/he
   performs, including intricate harmonic construction and how to express the emotion behind
   the composition - which completes a performance.
5. Display poise and security on the performance stage to serve as an example to her/his
   students.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures



                                                20
1. Admission: Applicants have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and exhibit
    formidable ability (a strong basic training on which to build) to perform and a strong desire
    to become instructors in vocal technique and style. In a pre-admission audition for a voice
    committee, the prospective student must demonstrate enough vocal technical ability, musical
    style and viable foreign language diction (Italian, German and French at minimum) to
    warrant study beyond the bachelor’s level of achievement. Specific audition dates are
    established by the school of music and advertised in university admission literature and on-
    line website format.
2. M.M. Entrance Examinations: Students must pass examinations in Music History and Theory
    to proceed with courses in the respective areas on the graduate level. Pre-requisite review
    courses are available to aid students who do not pass.
3. Course work/GPA: Individual instructors measure progress in academic courses by means of
    quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their discretion.
    Students must complete all graduate and ―pre-requisite‖ courses (which the faculty may have
    assigned as necessary to completing entrance requirements) with a grade average of ―B‖ or
    better. A grade less than a ―C‖ in a graduate course in unacceptable for utilization toward
    graduation. Courses may be repeated if a student does not pass.
4. Course Tracking: Students’ course tracking by the Advisor/Chair of the Division is
    maintained on an ―audit‖ form in his/her file.
5. Semester Jury Examinations: At the end of each semester of study, students perform a jury
    examination of six memorized pieces in at least four languages for a voice committee. Said
    jury may choose to hear as few as two random selections or as many as all six pieces. From
    one jury to the next, students should exhibit increasing technical facility, lyric diction
    accomplishment and correct and acceptable (as established by performance tradition and
    recorded expertise – standard to the professionally marketed material) adherence to viable
    musical style and dramatic expression.
6. Vocal Pedagogy Practicum Student Performance: M.M. students must show evidence of their
    knowledge and skill at teaching both male and female vocal practicum (practice) students
    (volunteer practice singers procured by the students) under the guidance of the instructor in
    the Vocal Pedagogy Practicum course. A public performance by the graduate student’s
    practicum students constitutes the final exam for the Vocal Pedagogy Practicum Class (MUS
    535A). The final grade for the course is based upon improvement of the practicum singers
    along with improved communication skills of the student with said practicum singers.
7. Final Recital: After the student has completed 6 credits of vocal instruction, s/he should
    present a 60-minute, public graduation recital - a program which the student has selected
    with encouragement from the applied teacher of record. It includes songs in at least four
    different languages, chosen from Italian, German, French, English, Latin, Spanish, Russian
    or Scandinavian languages, and a variety of musical styles from the Baroque through the
    contemporary era. Evaluation criteria includes vocal classification, technical facility and
    performing viability. For approval to perform the recital, the student must pass a recital
    hearing exam before the voice committee, during which s/he performs random selections
    from the recital program – chosen by the voice committee. The student performs the recital
    from memory with the exception of chamber works with special instrumental
    accompaniment. The student may not perform the recital until the Voice Committee is
    satisfied with the performance.
12. Directed Research Paper: The research paper, directed by the Chair of the Vocal Division
    will cover subject matter related to the student’s major curriculum which is approved by the
    Chair of the Division. The paper will be approximately thirty pages in length.
13. Course Evaluations: Each year the student is encouraged to participate in written course
    evaluations for the School of Music.
                                               21
                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

Regular meetings/discussions with Voice Committee members (consisting of the Chair of the
Division and two other voice faculty), following graduate recitals and with close attention to
various alumni successes in the areas of performance and teaching, help in assessing course
strengths and what specialized programs of newly offered courses may be included in future
semesters.
Also included are discussions of student feedback from classroom evaluations and applied
instructor evaluations by students. The implementation of ―Open Studio‖ policy is a direct result
of student evaluation of applied faculty instruction.




                                               22
                            Master of Music in Vocal Performance
                     Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                      I. Program Description


The Master of Music degree in Vocal Performance at The Catholic University of America is a
highly selective program that offers the prospective professional singing artist the technical and
musical training to prepare her/himself at the highest level. The faculty of this division – a highly
qualified team comprised of vocal technicians, lyric diction experts, coaches/accompanists and
scientific physiologists, all of whom offer valuable training – works together to provide every
student the opportunity to succeed in her/his professional aspiration.

Applicants should hold a bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution and exhibit strong
potential for a career in professional singing. An applicant’s pre-admission audition for a voice
committee (preferably in person, but a CD or DVD will be accepted if the candidate will be more
than 200 miles from campus and/or finds it impossible to attend), including the chair of the
division and two voice faculty members, must demonstrate enough vocal technical finesse,
musical style and viable foreign language diction (Italian, German and French at minimum) to
warrant study beyond the bachelor’s level of achievement. During the first semester of study, the
student should also perform an entrance recital, 60 minutes in length, which the Chair of the
Vocal Division chooses from the student’s past repertoire. Once the student passes the entrance
recital (hearing of random selections chosen by the voice committee), her/his vocal study credits
are included toward the degree requirements. The entrance recital marks official acceptance into
the degree program and candidacy. Students must also pass entrance placement examinations in
music history and theory prior to beginning graduate course work in these areas. Students may
take pre-requisite Italian, German and French classes (the School of Music requires four
semesters of Italian and two semesters each of German and French), which they might have
missed in undergraduate study, along with regular graduate level courses.

To earn the M.M. Vocal Performance degree, students successfully complete at least 30 credit
hours of instruction (beyond additional, possible pre-requisite courses) and a final recital with
required preliminary hearing before the voice committee. The curriculum carefully balances
performance classes with music history and theory courses. Required courses include the
following: MUPI 791/792 Voice (6 credits); MUS 712 Analytical Techniques II (3 credits);
Music History Elective (3 credits, e.g., MUS 553 History of Opera); MUS 535 Introduction to
Vocal Pedagogy and Physiology (2 credits); MUS 511 Survey of Solo Vocal Literature I (2
credits); 7 credits of electives appropriate to the student’s curriculum, plus 3 credits for the final
recital. The following are samples of the electives from which students can choose: Lyric Diction
and Repertoire (e.g., MUS 588, 577; 3 credits); MUS 538 Opera Practicum (3 credits; may be
taken each semester); MUS 510/511 Opera Workshop (2 credits each semester); MUS 661
Seminar in Vocal Performance (3 credits; may be taken each spring semester); MUS 536 Stage
Movement (1 credit); MUS 535A Vocal Pedagogy Practicum (2 credits); any graduate level
courses in German, French or Italian (with permission from the chair of the division) or any
graduate level courses in Drama or Speech (with permission from the Chair of the Division).

The Division of Vocal Performance supports an ―Open Studio‖ policy, which encourages the
vocal faculty to work as a team toward the progress of every candidate; it places student needs
first. Although each graduate student has an applied teacher of record, all students may engage in
two lessons each semester with other voice faculty members with notification to the chair of the
                                                 23
vocal division. The teacher of record may attend these sessions, if the student so chooses; s/he
may not discourage the opportunity. A faculty member may also encourage a student to seek
instruction from one of her/his colleagues for a specific technical or stylistic expertise. The
student returns to the teacher of record with information from which both the candidate and the
teacher benefit. Open Studio promotes the best possible instruction and distribution of
information. It recognizes that no one faculty has all the answers regarding individual technical
facility and no two students process information in the same manner.

Master classes with professionals in the fields of performance, teaching, voice therapy and artist
management round out the curriculum. This variety helps guide students’ career choices and
offers them opportunities to develop networking connections for the future. The program also
encourages students to perform in operas (an average of two opportunities a year in the School of
Music), audition for performances with professional companies and organizations outside the
university and enter vocal competitions, both local and international. The division also
encourages students to participate in various apprentice programs and professional performance
opportunities during interim periods, such as summers. Particularly noteworthy among these
prospects are the Summer Opera Theater Company (in residence on the CUA campus) and the
Bel Cantanti Opera Company, whose artistic director is a member of the voice faculty. Other
companies with which our students have affiliated for these sorts of experiences include Santa Fe
Opera, Glimmerglass Opera and Aspen Music Festival, which the Dean of the School of Music
has been affiliated for 30 years. The faculty also encourages students to participate in summer
programs abroad, such as Music Festival Perugia in Italy (for which the Chair of the Division is a
faculty member), because they offer opportunities to study and perform with noted faculty and
artists from around the world from companies such as Covent Garden and Rome Opera.

Many of our vocal performance students and alumni sing with professional opera companies,
such as the Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera, Los Angeles Opera, New York City Opera
and a score of others. This is a testament to our ever-fruitful efforts to prepare our students for
the most rewarding careers and experiences in the vocal performance field.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Music degree in Vocal Performance will:

1. Demonstrate a growing/continuously improving mastery of technical facility for his/her
   particular voice classification and the knowledge and skill to discuss technical vocal facility
   in concrete terms. Perform art song and opera from the Baroque through the contemporary
   eras in Italian, German, French and English with established levels of quality, as
   demonstrated by the highest quality examples available, such as Metropolitan Opera
   principal artists and classical recordings by noted artists in the field.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of musical style, the era from which that style originates and
   an understanding of composers and librettists/poets from that era, including the ability to
   express the emotion behind the composition - which completes the performance.
3. Exhibit poise and security in a myriad of performance venues – opera, recital, oratorio, etc.
4. Demonstrate understanding of the theoretical textures of the pieces s/he performs, including
   intricate musical construction.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures



                                                24
 1. Admission: Applicants have their bachelor’s degrees from accredited institutions and
    exhibit strong potential for careers in professional singing. An applicant’s pre-admission
    audition before a voice committee must demonstrate enough vocal technical finesse,
    musical style and viable foreign language diction (Italian, German and French at minimum)
    to warrant study beyond the bachelor’s level of achievement. Beginning in December,
    regular audition dates are advertised by the school of music for participation.
 2. MM Entrance Recital: Students must successfully pass a recital hearing before the voice
    committee, during the first semester of study. It consists of random selections from a 60-
    minute recital, which the Chair of the Vocal Division compiles from the candidate’s
    performance repertoire list. Successful performance of this hearing permits the candidate to
    enter the degree program. Students may repeat the hearing once, if s/he does not pass on
    the first attempt.
 3. MM Entrance Examinations: Students must pass examinations in Music History and
    Theory to proceed with graduate-level courses in the respective areas. Pre-requisite review
    courses are available to aid students who do not pass
 4. Course work/GPA: Individual instructors measure progress in academic courses by means
    of quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their
    discretion. Students must complete all graduate and ―pre-requisite‖ courses (which the
    faculty may have assigned as necessary to completing entrance requirements) with a grade
    average of ―B‖ or better. A grade less than a ―C’ in a graduate course is unacceptable for
    utilization toward graduation.
 5. Course Tracking: Students’ course tracking by the advisor/ chair of the division is
    maintained on an ―audit‖ form in his/her file.
 6. Semester Jury Examinations: At the end of each semester of study, students perform of six
    memorized pieces in at least four languages for a voice committee. This jury may choose to
    hear as few as two random selections or as many as all six pieces. From one jury to the
    next, students should exhibit increasing technical facility, lyric diction accomplishment and
    correct adherence to viable musical style and dramatic expression.
 7. Final recital: After the student has completed 6 credits of vocal instruction, s/he should
    present a 60-minute, public graduation recital, a program selected by the student and his
    teacher with encouragement from the Chair of the Division. It should include songs in at
    least four different languages, chosen from Italian, German, French, English, Latin,
    Spanish, Russian or Scandinavian languages, and a variety of musical styles from the
    Baroque through the Contemporary era. Evaluation criteria include vocal classification,
    technical facility and performing viability. For approval to perform the recital, the student
    must pass a recital hearing exam before the voice committee, during which s/he performs
    random selections from the memorized recital program. Students must exhibit correct
    language pronunciation and understanding of the text and musical style. A viable
    performance is one that is acceptable by all members of the voice committee. The student
    may be asked to repeat the hearing until the performance is acceptable. Although no exact
    number of hearings is established, as long as the student exhibits improvement, he may
    continue to endeavor to pass.
 8. Course Evaluations: Every year, students are encouraged to participate in written
    evaluations of courses by the School of Music.

                         IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

Regular meetings/discussions with Voice committee members (consisting of the Chair of the
division and two other voice faculty), following graduate recitals and with close attention to
various alumni successes in the areas of performance and teaching, help in assessing course
                                                25
strengths and what specialized programs of newly offered courses may be included in future
semesters.
Also included are discussions of student feedback from classroom evaluations and applied
instructor evaluations by students. The implementation of ―Open Studio‖ policy is a direct result
of student evaluation of applied faculty instruction.




                                               26
                               Master of Music in Composition
                                 (Concert Music Emphasis)

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


I. Program Description
The Master of Music (MM) in Composition, Concert Music Emphasis, seeks to provide graduate
composers having prior compositional experience with specialized, intensive training in applied
composition as well as academic grounding in music theory, history, and research methodology.
The degree program culminates in the creation of a thesis project and public performance of that
thesis or other works created in the course of the degree program.

The MM in Composition is intended to be a four-semester (for full-time students) degree
program, requiring a minimum of 35 credit hours. Applied private instruction in composition is
required of all majors. 12 credit hours of music theory provide students with advanced skills in
analysis and theoretical evaluation of music. 6 credits of music history courses provide students
with additional specialization and background in the cultural context of music. 6 credits of
electives typically consist of additional theory and/or history courses: MUS 713, Pedagogy of
Theory, for example, is commonly taken by composition students who wish to gain teaching
experience for careers in academia or music education.

Curriculum
Coursework in the MM Composition, Concert Music Emphasis program consists of the
following courses:

Credits     Course Number          Description
6           MUPI 791                 Composition (private study)
2           MUS 629                  Composition Seminar (2 @ 1 cr. each)
6           MUS 711, 712             Analytical Techniques I/II
3           MUS 714                  Advanced Counterpoint
3           MUS 5XX                  Advanced Orchestration
3           MUS 731                  Music Research Methodology
3           MUS 558                  Twentieth-century Music
3           MUS XXX                  Music History elective
6           MUS XXX                  Music electives
0           N/A                      MM Recital (chamber music)
35

Language requirement
No language requirement currently exists in the MM Composition program.

Music Research Methodology (3 credits) and Composition Seminar (2 credits: 2 semesters @ 1
credit each) are recently-added requirements (effective for students entering in fall 2008). The
former course trains students in advanced research methods and acquaints them with the
secondary literature and the procedures and technologies for conducting research. The latter, the
composition ―major class,‖ is a weekly meeting of composition majors and minors. Students
give presentations on their own music or that of other composers, hear lectures or participate in
master classes with visiting composers, and remain connected with their colleagues in the
                                               27
program. Thus, students balance coursework with practical training in private lessons.

The MM Composition, Concert Music Emphasis degree program culminates in a recital of
chamber music and the master’s thesis, a work of substantial proportions for large ensemble such
as orchestra or wind ensemble. The recital (0 credit hours) consists of chamber music composed
during the student’s time in the MM program: the student organizes and presents the recital.
Unlike the BM Composition program, no requirement exists for the student to participate in the
recital as performer: no performance component is included in the more specialized MM
program (as opposed to the BM program, which requires one year of applied study on an
instrument or voice).

The master’s thesis, typically written during the second year of the MM program, represents the
culmination of the student’s applied work. Although public performances of the thesis cannot be
guaranteed, every effort is made to provide a reading of the complete thesis (or a substantial
portion thereof) in collaboration with a School of Music ensemble.

Concentration in Latin American Music
Students in the MM Composition, Concert Music Emphasis program are also eligible to pursue a
concentration in Latin American music in collaboration with the School of Music’s Latin
American Music Center. In order to pursue the concentration, 6 credit hours of Latin American
courses replace the 3-credit music history elective, and 3 credits of the 6-credit music elective.
In addition, the master’s thesis composition, created in consultation with the student’s academic
advisor, must be related to Latin American music.

Performance Opportunities
An essential component of compositional training is the frequent hearing of one’s own work,
whether in a reading or performance context. Correspondingly, the structure of the MM
curriculum is designed to build in maximum opportunity for aural realization of compositions.

Division Recitals
The composition division sponsors one recital per semester of student compositions, open to all
students enrolled in applied composition study. Additionally, student composers founded, during
the 2008-09 academic year, a student chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc. (SCI), a national
composer organization which has both professional and student divisions. The SCI chapter
sponsors a recital of student work each semester, as well (open to all members of the CUA
community who write music). Thus, at least two performances per year are offered to students.

Readings
Each semester, the CUA Symphony Orchestra reads student composers’ works in a dedicated
rehearsal; these readings are recorded and made available to students for personal and
professional growth. The Great Noise Ensemble, since fall 2009 the ensemble in residence at the
School of Music, conducts a reading of student chamber music compositions each semester, as
well. On occasion, the CUA chorus has also read student compositions.

School of Music Individual and Group Commissions
Commissions and collaborative projects have also increased opportunities for student
compositional performance. Each year, the School of Music commissions one graduate student
to compose a choral-orchestral fanfare to open the annual Christmas concert, held in the Basilica
of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.

                                                28
For the past five years, group commission projects have involved CUA student composers in
creating new music for performance during the School of Music’s annual President’s Festival of
the Arts. These collaborative projects, each of which include CUA composition students, in
chronological order, are:

2005 Songs of the Forgotten War (19 composers): 1-minute chamber works based on the 19
soldier statues at the Korean War Memorial in downtown Washington, DC

2006 New Old American Songs (10 composers): 3-minute choral and instrumental works
based on American folk songs, in homage to Aaron Copland’s ―Old American Songs‖

2008 Singing, Playing, Talking Wilder (6 composers): Miniature operas or incidental music
to short, 3-minute plays by Thornton Wilder

2009 Silent Explosions, Invisible Jumps: Music, Dance and Film Create a Ruckus (7
composers): New scores to silent films by French film pioneer Georges Méliès, performed by the
Snark Ensemble both with the film and with new choreography created by CUA and DC-based
choreographers and dancers

Cross-Disciplinary Projects
A new initiative has been launched to pair composers with students in other disciplines to create
new work which stems from a joint source of inspiration: music and the partner discipline. In
fall 2008, several graduate composition students were invited to serve as consultants during a
course in CUA’s School of Architecture and Planning. Student architects were assigned a
project to design elements of a house based on a particular composition (the client is devoted to
that particular piece). A number of pieces were selected, including works by Monteverdi, J. S.
Bach, Beethoven, Debussy, and John Cage. The composers spent a class period answering
questions about their composers and consulting on the projects. Several weeks later, the
architects presented their house elements inspired by their composers.

In return, I organized a session whereby the process would work in reverse: in this case, student
composers would be given a structure upon which to compose a one-minute piece. These one-
minute chamber pieces were read by the Great Noise Ensemble, the School of Music’s ensemble
in residence, late in the semester. This architecture project was also an assignment for
Composition Seminar, so it had a curricular tie, as well. Student architects came to a session of
Composition Seminar to consult with the composers about the structures and their architects, and
the composers then created their new instrumental pieces. The resulting exchange proved
illuminating and fruitful, and has encouraged new cross-disciplinary projects, such as ―Silent
Explosions, Invisible Jumps,‖ the 2009 President’s Festival project involving new works for
silent film and dance.


Performance in Coursework
Coursework also provides opportunities for students to hear their work performed. Advanced
Orchestration, a practical, project-based course in which students arrange and orchestrate for
different instrumental combinations, regularly includes readings of projects by instrumentalists
through the semester, culminating in a reading of the final course project by the CUA Symphony
Orchestra.

Graduation Recital
                                               29
The chamber recital also presents a required opportunity for students to present at least 30
minutes of original music in performance: as a result, no student in the MM Composition
program graduates without at least some experience in bringing original work to performance,
and most students have numerous opportunities during their time in the program.

Admission Requirements
Applicants to the MM Composition, Concert Music Emphasis program must submit a portfolio
of original compositions for review by the composition faculty. Generally, 2-3 scores in
contrasting media are expected, and recordings of live performances are strongly recommended
(recordings will be required of applicants for the 2010-11 academic year). Applicants to the MM
in Composition should have experience in bringing completed compositions to performance; the
process of organizing performances is different from that of writing, and applicants need to
demonstrate past ability to have works performed in order to show promise as composers. For
admissions purposes, therefore, MIDI realizations of acoustic compositions are discouraged
because they do not reveal evidence of prior performances.

Students who possess an undergraduate degree in composition are preferred; however, students
who have an undergraduate music degree with substantial compositional experience (either as an
undergraduate minor, non-major applied study in composition, or practical writing experience)
are considered suitable candidates, as well.

Upon acceptance to the School of Music and the university, MM students must take the Theory
Placement and History Placement Exams at the beginning of their first semester of matriculation
in the master’s program. These examinations determine whether a student needs a review course
in music history (3 credits), harmony (2 credits), and/or aural skills (2 credits). A potential 7
credits of remedial coursework, not applicable to the degree, may be required of entering MM
students who demonstrate deficiency in undergraduate theory or history training.

Specific MM Composition entrance exams will be removed from the curriculum, as their
proposed content is largely duplicated by the Theory and History Placement Examinations.

Post-Graduation and Employment
The principal destination of graduates from the MM Composition, Concert Music Emphasis
program is doctoral study in composition. The coursework and practical performing experience
gained during the master’s program is designed to provide students with the requisite
background to enter doctoral study either at CUA or another recognized institution. Several
CUA students continue into the doctoral program upon completion of the masters.

A second destination is teaching music in secondary school contexts: some graduates have taken
positions as music instructors, either while preparing for doctoral study, or as a career
destination. Our most recent graduate from the MM Composition, Concert Music Emphasis
program is currently employed as a secondary school choral director.

Some graduates are employed as church music directors, and the practical training provided by
the MM program gives them additional experience to pursue the practical considerations in
mounting weekly services and larger, seasonal concerts and performances.

Teaching Experience in the School of Music
Whenever possible, graduate composition students are employed as teaching assistants (TA’s)
for the School of Music’s undergraduate core music theory curriculum. This represents
                                               30
extremely valuable experience and career preparation for student composers, most of whom will
teach music theory courses as part of an academic career.

TA’s are selected through a rigorous audition process (which I designed), typically in the spring
semester. The selection process consists of four steps:

a.) Written examinations in harmony and aural skills;
b.) Practical jury testing the candidate’s skill at sight singing, performing of rhythm, and
keyboard proficiency;
c.) Teaching demonstration before an actual undergraduate class;
d.) Interview with theory-composition faculty

TA’s are employed as need and budget permit. Typically, 5-6 TA’s are employed each semester.
In some cases, TA’s have had full teaching and grading responsibility for a course (these are
typically DMA students, although MM students have sometimes been employed as full
instructors), working in collaboration with a faculty member who teaches a corresponding
section of the same course. In some cases, TA’s serve as teaching assistants for a faculty
member who teaches the lecture portions of the course: the TA’s thus teach the ―lab‖ or ―drill‖
sections under the supervision and direction of the faculty member.

Bi-weekly meetings are held with the TA’s by the chair of theory-composition, and faculty
members are encouraged to observe TA’s, as well, as their schedule permits.

GAPS (Graduate Academic Position Symposium)
During my time at CUA, I began to notice a substantial gap in the knowledge which graduate
students displayed about the nature of academic institutions, and the academic job market in
general. Although this problem was more immediately connected with doctoral students, there
was a clear relevance to masters students, as well. To assist in addressing this problem, I have,
from time to time, offered informal seminars on the academic job market, called ―GAPS:‖ the
Graduate Academic Position Symposium.

In a series of meetings, I informed the students about the types of post-secondary institutions and
music institutions in the United States (four-year colleges, junior colleges, research universities,
liberal arts colleges, departments of music, schools of music, conservatories of music), the types
of positions available (part-time, full-time, tenure-track, non-tenure-track, one-year sabbatical
replacement) and ranks (Instructor, Assistant/Associate/Full Professor, etc.), how to prepare a
CV and draft an effective cover letter, how to interpret the language of posted job descriptions,
how to prepare for interviews, and other practical topics. Students who have participated in
these voluntary seminars have reported increased effectiveness in obtaining interviews and
employment offers.

Website
I have also created a website page which details possible career paths for students obtaining
degrees in Music Composition. http://composition.cua.edu/Careers//index.cfm

II. Goals for Student Learning
Students graduating with a Master of Music in Composition, Concert Music Emphasis, will:

1.     Gain advanced training in compositional technique and practice through intensive private
                                                 31
       study;
2.     Develop advanced skills in orchestration and counterpoint;
3.     Produce a work of major proportions for large ensemble such as orchestra, wind
       ensemble, or chorus and orchestra as the thesis;
4.     Gain training in research methodology critical to a career in academia and useful to all
       professional music career paths;
5.     Gain crucial analytical skills in post-1900 literature;
6.     Obtain practical training in professional development, grant writing, competitions, and
       career guidance, through the Composition Seminar;
7.     Have experience in preparing and performing a complete recital program: composing the
       music, editing and preparing scores and parts, obtaining performers, organizing and
       attending rehearsals, and overseeing the logistical aspects of the event

III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures
Direct Measures

1. Graduate seminars and courses
        Graduate students are required to take a minimum of 18 credit hours of music theory and
history courses, most of which include a seminar paper or final examination and paper. Some
examples of capstone course projects include:

MUS 573 (Introduction to Music Notation Software)
Final project generated through use of notation software, as the culmination of a project-based
course

MUS 581 (Advanced Orchestration)
Final orchestration project for full orchestra, with score and parts (for reading by CUA
Symphony Orchestra)

MUS 629 (Composition Seminar)
Seminar presentation each semester on a topic of general importance (e.g., an analysis of a
significant contemporary work), or an organized, analytical presentation on the student’s own
work

MUS 633 (Introduction to the Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music)
Final analytical examination which requires students to apply analytical techniques to a variety
of post-1900 musical examples.

MUS 720 (Seminar in Music History and/or Theory Topics)
A rotating seminar, offered each semester, to provide specialized training in selected topics,
either from a theoretical/analytical perspective, or a historical/critical perspective. Past topics
have included ―Music of Stravinsky‖ and ―The Operas of Alban Berg,‖ each of which included a
seminar presentation, final analytical seminar paper, and final examination.

2. End-of-semester juries
       The entire composition faculty monitors and evaluates masters students’ progress in
composition. At the conclusion of each semester, majors taking private lessons submit portfolios
of compositional work completed in private instruction during that semester for evaluation by the

                                                32
composition faculty, who review and assesses the samples and assign them a grade. An ―A‖
would be awarded to a student whose work showed a high level of artistic merit on both
technical and esthetic grounds. Technically, a student must submit complete, legible, correctly-
notated and spelled scores; esthetically, an ―A‖ jury would show originality and interest of
musical ideas and development, logical yet arresting development of ideas, effective scoring with
respect to color, balance, and variety of timbre, sufficient economy of ideas and lack of a
superfluity of ideas which are not developed or musically related to one another, and other items
which the composition faculty as practitioners judge in their estimation to be of highest merit.

        This jury grade is then paired with the students’ private composition teachers’ grades. At
the beginning of the following semester, majors receive their jury comments, either through the
private instructor or from comment sheets that the jury has completed

3. Thesis Document
        All students in the MM Composition, Concert Music Emphasis program create a large
composition (normally with a minimum of 10 minutes in duration) for large ensemble such as
orchestra, wind ensemble, or chorus with orchestra. The work is supervised by the student’s
director , and the committee consists of a director and one reader. Both director and reader
oversee and edit the thesis and approve the thesis by consultation. No public or oral defense of
the thesis exists at present, although the thesis is read by the relevant performing ensemble
whenever possible.

       Throughout the final semester of the student’s matriculation in the program, the thesis
committee reviews and makes amendments and corrections to the student’s thesis; the student is
required to accept all amendments and corrections approved by the thesis director. The thesis
committee, upon consultation about the final document, approves and signs the thesis document,
which is then submitted for deposit.

4. Graduation Recital
        Each student must compose at least 30 minutes of original chamber music, to be
performed during a chamber music graduation recital, typically held during the final semester of
the student’s matriculation in the program. All of the music on the recital program is to have
been composed during the student’s matriculation in the graduate program, and the bulk of the
repertoire will have been produced under direct supervision of the private composition instructor.

        Scores for the recital must be submitted to the two faculty members of the student’s
thesis committee at least 30 days in advance of the recital date, and the program is subject to
approval by the committee.

        Faculty attend the recital in performance (in contradistinction to other graduate recitals,
there is no pre-performance recital hearing), and consult to pass or not pass the recital. Faculty
indicate approval by their signatures on an official copy of the recital program, which program is
then deposited in the student’s academic file in the Music office.

5. Comprehensive Examinations
       At present, the MM Composition program does not have a system of comprehensive
examinations. The composition faculty is developing a proposal (to be presented in spring 2009)
both an oral and written comprehensive examination, effective for students entering fall 2010.

The oral component of the examination will consist of student discourse upon a work drawn
                                                33
from a pre-determined repertoire list of approximately 6 works (3 from before 1900, 3 from 1900
or later), and be able to answer questions about the structure, organization, and content of the
selected pieces. Keyboard proficiency will also be demonstrated during the oral exam, as will
demonstration of familiarity with important composers, trends and schools of composition, and
the contemporary musical repertoire.

The full-time members of the composition faculty (always at least three) will constitute the
student’s oral comprehensive panel.

The written portion of the examination will consist of two three-hour examinations: a.) music
theory and analysis; b.) music history. Both examinations, to be given on the same day or on
consecutive days, will focus primarily on repertoire, techniques, and topics since 1900, although
familiarity with pre-1900 methodologies, skills, and topics such as species counterpoint, Roman
numeral analysis, isorhythm and the Church modes, is expected. The examination will be
evaluated by members of the Theory-Composition faculty. Members of the Music History
faculty may be consulted on questions pertaining to the history examination; however, the
principal responsibility for evaluation lies with composition faculty members.

Indirect Measures

1. Student evaluations
       Course evaluations are useful in assessing the quality and utility of courses (although not
required of graduate courses, the chair of the division typically requests evaluations for 500-level
and higher courses).

2. Master classes with visiting composers
        One important measure of evaluating student work and situating it within a larger context
is through master classes with distinguished visiting composers. The School of Music has
hosted, since 2005, such noted composers as John Corigliano, Joseph Schwantner, Christopher
Rouse, Martin Bresnick, Libby Larsen, William Bolcom, CUA alumnus Mark Adamo, Roberto
Sierra, and others. Four of the composers listed above are Pulitzer Prize winners. In the public
forum of the master class, students present their work to these established professionals, who
comment upon their work and suggest a variety of approaches and strategies. In fall 2008, three
CUA graduate students participated in a very successful master class with composer (and
Pulitzer Prize winner) John Adams, sponsored by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at
Strathmore Performing arts Center in Rockville, MD.

3. External program reviews
         The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) conducts an assessment of the
School of Music every 10 years; 2008-09 was the year for review in the School of Music.
Evaluators examine the curricula and offerings of the program, initially through self-study
documents generated by the School of Music and each constituent program, and finally through a
3-day campus visit in which as many aspects of the School are evaluated as possible: instruction,
facilities, and ensembles. The findings and recommendations by the NASM team have been
incorporated and absorbed by the composition division.
         .
IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
Performance-based observation
An important aspect of curricular and program assessment is made through student evaluation
                                                34
and faculty observation.

Because creative achievement is problematic to assess with purely objective standards,
composition faculty employ rather an experiential review process to assess student progress.

The quality of student compositions as evidenced by performances on recitals reveals certain
aspects of a student’s progress: a.) quality of compositional material; b.) ability to assemble
musicians who have adequate rehearsal time; c.) work by the composer to ensure that the
performance of his/her work is both accurate and of high technical and musical quality (through
coachings with performers and attendance at rehearsals).

Based on attendance at a series of recitals, the latter element – the coaching of student
compositions – emerged as a considerable problem. It was clear that student composers were not
engaging with the rehearsal process to ensure that their pieces were receiving effective
performances. This issue has been partially addressed by our collaboration with the Great Noise
Ensemble, a DC-based new music ensemble which is an ensemble in residence at the School of
Music, which pairs member artists with student composers and performers to coach the pieces in
preparation for the division recital.

The Composition Seminar holds at least career-development session per semester to assist
composition students in preparing for careers both within and beyond their time in the program.
Session topics have included grant writing, seeking and applying to competitions and
residencies, finding and securing performers, score and parts preparation, rehearsal and reading
etiquette, and other topics. The GAPS seminar (see above) has also proven beneficial in
preparing students for post-graduate employment and careers in academia.

In response to a perceived lack of familiarity with important composers and repertoire, and
insufficient attendance at performances, the Composition Seminar, beginning in spring 2008,
adopted new components: formal seminar presentations on important composers and pieces (to
develop repertoire) and concert attendance requirements (with one-page reports), to encourage a
regular habit of concert attendance and support of colleagues.

Course evaluations are useful in tracking the effectiveness of specific courses, and revising their
content for a repeat offering based on commentary and rankings given.

Exit interviews will be conducted for the first time at the conclusion of the spring 2009 semester.
The chair of the division will conduct private interviews with graduating students, seeking to
learn of the overall effectiveness of the program, suggestions for items to add or delete, and other
items of relevance. A written evaluation form will be accompanied by an oral interview.




                                                35
                                Master of Music in Composition
                                  (Stage Music Emphasis)

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


I. Program Description
The Master of Music (MM) in Composition, Stage Music Emphasis, seeks to provide graduate
composers having prior compositional experience with specialized, intensive training in writing
for theatrical contexts and collaborating with artists in other disciplines to create and produce
new work. In addition, the program provides academic grounding in music theory, history, and
research methodology, to enable pursuit of a career in professional theater or continuation to
doctoral study. The program culminates in the creation and production of the thesis: a theatrical
work of at least 30 minutes’ duration, to be publicly performed in its theatrical context (i.e.,
staged, not performed as a concert work).

The MM Composition, Stage Music Emphasis, is a new addition to the graduate composition
program, instituted in fall 2005 as a specialized extension of the MM Composition programs’
offerings. To accommodate the addition of this specialized emphasis, the existing MM
Composition degree curriculum was subsequently termed ―Concert Music Emphasis‖ to
distinguish it from its newer companion. Both emphases share a common core of coursework,
applied lessons, and graduation recital/thesis requirement. The differences between the program
lie principally in the content of coursework and emphasis within applied lessons.

The Stage Music Emphasis program was developed in response to a perceived need for
instruction and practical training in composing for theatrical and collaborative contexts,
opportunities for which are plentiful in the compositional field. The comparative lack of such
training in traditional graduate composition programs, coupled with CUA’s particular strengths
in opera, musical theater, drama, and the accessible resources of the strong, vibrant DC dance
community, made the creation and sustaining of such a program feasible.

The MM in Composition, Stage Music Emphasis, is intended to be a four-semester (for full-time
students) degree program, requiring a minimum of 34 credit hours. The program focuses on four
principal theatrical genres, each of which students in the program experience:

      Opera
      Musical Theater
      Dance
      Drama

9 credit hours of applied private instruction in composition is required of all majors.




MM in Composition, Stage Music Emphasis Curriculum

                                                 36
Major Area of Study: Required
Courses
9 credit hours                     MUPI 791   Composition (private study)
4                                  MUS 629    Composition Seminar (4 semesters @ 1 cr. each)
3                                  MUS 617    Stage Music Practicum
3                                  MUS 731    Music Research Methodology
3                                  MUS 581    Advanced Orchestration
3                                  MUS 555    Topics in Stage Music (5-week courses, total of 3
                                              credits required)

Other Studies in Music
(Music Theory/History, by
advisement):
6 credit hours from:
3                                  MUS 553    History of Opera
3                                  MUS 558    Twentieth-Century Music
3                                  MUS 714    Advanced Counterpoint
3                                  MUS 573    Music Desktop Publishing
3                                  MUS 711    Analytical Techniques I
3                                  MUS 712    Analytical Techniques II
3                                  MUS 633    Introduction to 20th-Century Analysis
3                                  MUS 665    History of Jazz Through Analysis
3                                  MUS 707    History of American Song
                                   MUS
3                                             Others by advisement
                                   XXX

                                   MUPI
0                                             Piano (if necessary)*
                                   XXX

Studies Outside of Music
3 credit hours from:
3                                  DR 565     Playwriting I
3                                  DR 603     Western Theatre/Culture I
3                                  DR 605     Modern European Drama
3                                  DR 610     20th-Century Theatres
3                                  DR 762     Adaptation
3                                  XXX        Other by advisement

Language requirement
No language requirement currently exists in the DMA Composition program.

Two new courses specifically address the needs of the Stage Music Emphasis program. Stage
Music Practicum (formerly called ―Interdisciplinary Music Practicum,‖ MUS 617, 3 credit
hours), is the cornerstone course of the curriculum. This course combines lecture with practicum
performances of new work. Structured in four units, the course pairs student composers with
artists to create and perform new work in each of the four principal genres of the curriculum:
                                               37
opera, musical theater, dance, and drama.

The other course is innovative both in content and in form. In response to a perceived need for
practical instruction in important topics which nonetheless receive rare, if any, formal attention
in curricula, I created an umbrella course entitled Topics in Stage Music (MUS 555, 5-week
courses at 1 credit hour each), which addresses such topics on a rotational basis in specialized,
small five-week segments, consisting of 15 sessions. Topics have included ―Text-setting for
Composers,‖ ―Scoring for Theatrical Pit Band,‖ ―Operatic Production for Composers,‖ ―Writing
for Voice,‖ and ―Operatic Repertoire: Composition and Performance, 1950-present,‖ ―Scoring
for Silent Film,‖ and ―Theatrical Production for Composers.‖ Some of these courses have been
repeated, others have been offered once; it is hoped that colleagues with particular expertise will
teach a section as well, thus adding to the range of faculty involvement. Students must take 3
credits of MUS 555, which would be offered every year. The creation of three temporal (rather
than spatial) sections represents an innovation for CUA, as well: thus, section 01 meets in weeks
1-5, section 02 in weeks 6-10, and section 03 in weeks 11-15.

To emphasize the cross-disciplinary nature of the MM Composition, Stage Music Emphasis
program, students must also take one graduate course outside music: to date, most students have
chosen courses offered by the CUA Department of Drama. ―Playwriting‖ and ―Adaptation‖ have
proven particularly successful, as at least two previous students’ thesis projects grew directly
from work done in these courses. An additional benefit is that student composers take courses
side by side with MFA directing, acting, and playwriting students in the Department of Drama,
with whom they often collaborate during their time in the program at CUA.

Private instruction in composition takes place during the first year, 3 credits per semester.
Experience has shown that, during the final year, students benefit from instruction during an
additional two semesters (particularly while they are in the process of mounting their thesis
productions); thus, they are typically advised to break up the final 3 credits by registering for 2
(fall) and 1 (spring) credit of lessons.

Instruction and advisement on the thesis composition begins during the first semester of study,
and much time in private lessons is taken by formulating the structure, content, and pacing of the
proposed theatrical work. Most of the composers in the program have also provided the text for
their operas or musicals, an important skill for them to possess. Specialized instruction on
working with text is gained through Stage Music Practicum and Topics in Stage Music.

Composition Seminar, the composition ―major class,‖ is a weekly meeting of composition
majors and minors. Students give presentations on their own music or that of other composers,
hear lectures or participate in master classes with visiting composers, and remain connected with
their colleagues in the program. Thus, students balance coursework with practical training in
private lessons.

The MM Composition, Stage Music Emphasis degree program culminates in the production of
the thesis, a theatrical work of consisting of at least 30 minutes of music (either an opera,
musical, incidental music for drama, a ballet or music for dance, or a combination of these), in
theatrical context. Student composers collaborate with a variety of other artists, including
directors, actors, dancers, singers, instrumentalists, and technical production personnel, in the
mounting of their production. No production budget is provided for the composers, although a
wealth of in-kind services, ranging from performance and rehearsal space to publicity to pianos
and crew, assists them. Composers are encouraged to seek independent, external funding for
                                                 38
their productions, and gain instruction in this through various venues: presentations in
Composition Seminar, Topics in Stage Music, or private lessons. Thus, the apparent liability of
no production budget proves to be a wonderful catalyst for initiative and creativity, and provides
the students with valuable practical experience in raising funds and presenting a production
within an educational, non-commercial context.

The production of the thesis work, which must be performed, thus represents both thesis and
graduation recital. There is no separate chamber music recital in the MM Composition, Stage
Music Emphasis program, as the amount of effort in mounting a theatrical production is easily
commensurate with that involved in a chamber music recital, and the score of the thesis work is
subjected to the same review and deposit requirements as is the thesis composition for the
Concert Music Emphasis.

Concentration in Latin American Music
Students in the MM Composition, Stage Music Emphasis program are also eligible to pursue a
concentration in Latin American music in collaboration with the School of Music’s Latin
American Music Center. In order to pursue the concentration, 6 credit hours of Latin American
courses replace the 6-credit music electives listed under ―Other Studies in Music,‖ and the
master’s thesis composition, created in consultation with the student’s academic advisor, must be
related to Latin American music.

Performance Opportunities
An essential component of compositional training is the frequent hearing of one’s own work,
whether in a reading or performance context. Correspondingly, the structure of the MM
curriculum is designed to build in maximum opportunity for aural realization of compositions.

Division Recitals
The composition division sponsors one recital per semester of student compositions, open to all
students enrolled in applied composition study. Additionally, student composers founded, during
the 2008-09 academic year, a student chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc. (SCI), a national
composer organization which has both professional and student divisions. The SCI chapter
sponsors a recital of student work each semester, as well (open to all members of the CUA
community who write music). Thus, at least two performances per year are offered to students.
Stage Music Emphasis students are welcome to submit pieces for these recitals of concert music,
and many regularly participate.

New in the 2008-09 academic year are ―Stage Music Scenes,‖ a recital forum for scenes or
pieces in progress. This represents a further opportunity for student composers to mount
portions of their works prior to their full realization as thesis productions, or to create and
perform stand-alone scenes.

Kennedy Center Page to Stage Festival
For the past two Labor Day weekends (2007 and 2008), the Stage Music Emphasis program has
participated in the Kennedy Center’s annual Page to Stage Festival, which is a public forum for
new works and works in progress. Two alumni pieces have been presented on the Kennedy
Center’s Millennium Stage (Kyle Gullings’ musical, ―The Eden Diaries,‖ in 2007, and Gregg
Martin’s opera ―Life in Death,‖ in 2008), and a first-year Stage Music student had a reading of
the first act of his thesis musical (John Maggi, ―This is Not my Life‖, in 2008). This represents
an additional platform for public performance of original work and work-in-progress, and
provides an unparalleled opportunity for student composers.
                                                 39
Readings
Each semester, the CUA Symphony Orchestra reads student composers’ works in a dedicated
rehearsal; these readings are recorded and made available to students for personal and
professional growth. The Great Noise Ensemble, since fall 2009 the ensemble in residence at the
School of Music, conducts a reading of student chamber music compositions each semester, as
well. On occasion, the CUA chorus has also read student compositions.

School of Music Individual and Group Commissions
Commissions and collaborative projects have also increased opportunities for student
compositional performance. Each year, the School of Music commissions one graduate student
to compose a choral-orchestral fanfare to open the annual Christmas concert, held in the Basilica
of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.

For the past five years, group commission projects have involved CUA student composers in
creating new music for performance during the School of Music’s annual President’s Festival of
the Arts. These collaborative projects, each of which include CUA composition students, in
chronological order, are:

2005 Songs of the Forgotten War (19 composers): 1-minute chamber works based on the 19
soldier statues at the Korean War Memorial in downtown Washington, DC

2006 New Old American Songs (10 composers): 3-minute choral and instrumental works
based on American folk songs, in homage to Aaron Copland’s ―Old American Songs‖

2008 Singing, Playing, Talking Wilder (6 composers): Miniature operas or incidental music
to short, 3-minute plays by Thornton Wilder

2009 Silent Explosions, Invisible Jumps: Music, Dance and Film Create a Ruckus (7
composers): New scores to silent films by French film pioneer Georges Méliès, performed by the
Snark Ensemble both with the film and with new choreography created by CUA and DC-based
choreographers and dancers

Cross-Disciplinary Projects
A new initiative has been launched to pair composers with students in other disciplines to create
new work which stems from a joint source of inspiration: music and the partner discipline. In
fall 2008, several graduate composition students were invited to serve as consultants during a
course in CUA’s School of Architecture and Planning. Student architects were assigned a
project to design elements of a house based on a particular composition (the client is devoted to
that particular piece). A number of pieces were selected, including works by Monteverdi, J. S.
Bach, Beethoven, Debussy, and John Cage. The composers spent a class period answering
questions about their composers and consulting on the projects. Several weeks later, the
architects presented their house elements inspired by their composers.

In return, I organized a session whereby the process would work in reverse: in this case, student
composers would be given a structure upon which to compose a one-minute piece. These one-
minute chamber pieces were read by the Great Noise Ensemble, the School of Music’s ensemble
in residence, late in the semester. This architecture project was also an assignment for
Composition Seminar, so it had a curricular tie, as well. Student architects came to a session of
Composition Seminar to consult with the composers about the structures and their architects, and
                                               40
the composers then created their new instrumental pieces. The resulting exchange proved
illuminating and fruitful, and has encouraged new cross-disciplinary projects, such as ―Silent
Explosions, Invisible Jumps,‖ the 2009 President’s Festival project involving new works for
silent film and dance.

Performance in Coursework
Coursework also provides opportunities for students to hear their work performed. Advanced
Orchestration, a practical, project-based course in which students arrange and orchestrate for
different instrumental combinations, regularly includes readings of projects by instrumentalists
through the semester, culminating in a reading of the final course project by the CUA Symphony
Orchestra.

Stage Music Practicum – the cornerstone course of the curriculum, as noted before – is the
course which provides the most extensive opportunities for collaboration and performance of
new work. The course consists of four units: Opera, Musical Theater, Dance and Drama. For
each unit, student composers are paired with artists from each of those disciplines, either on or
off campus. The partners have two weeks to create, rehearsal, and perform their new works in a
class session, moderated by a panel of faculty including the course instructor.

As an example of the class’ operation, Drama was the first unit in the course’s first offering in
fall 2006. Student composers were paired with MFA Directing students: they were to choose a
play from Shakespeare’s time to the present day, and choose a scene from that play. The
directors and composers were to discuss the play, and music’s role in that play. The directors
then cast their scene, and blocked and rehearsed it with MFA Acting students; the composers
were each assigned an ―orchestra‖ of violin and cello (both composers as well). The composers
were responsible for writing the music, organizing rehearsals with the musicians, and attending
staging rehearsals.

During the performance session, each scene was presented – off book, with blocking, costuming,
and simple props – accompanied by the live incidental music. I was joined by the head of the
CUA Directing program in commenting on each scene and inviting feedback from the assembled
students. The event was also recorded and placed online as streaming audio and video to
document the session: http://composition.cua.edu/Degrees/mmstage.cfm

The second unit, Dance, paired students with choreographers and dancers in the Youth Dance
Program at Joy of Motion Dance Center in DC. The performance session, held in Bethesda, MD,
was opened to the public; the program was later repeated, with dancers and composers, at the
Arts Club of Washington.

Several benefits accrue from the experience of this course: first, the composers developed a
facility in writing quickly, which was necessary in order to meet the four projects’ tight
deadlines. Secondly, the composers gained direct experience in writing for each of the four
component genres (from which they would choose a genre for their thesis). Additionally, the
composers made important contacts and friendships during these collaborative sessions, and
many enduring artistic partnerships have already come from this course. This combination of
practical musical and professional training represents a key accomplishment of the program since
its 2005 inception.

Topics in Stage Music has also presented opportunities for composers to hear their works
presented. In spring 2009, the first unit of the course, ―Scoring for Silent Film,‖ resulted in the
                                                 41
public performance of the final projects as part of the CUA President’s Festival of the Arts.
―Writing for Voice,‖ offered in the spring 2009 semester, will also provide students with an
opportunity to hear their work performed by bringing in singers to work with the composers on a
new piece to be performed in class.

Graduation Recital
As noted previously, the graduation recital is the production of the student’s theatrical thesis
composition, performed in its theatrical context (i.e., staged).

Admission Requirements
Applicants to the MM Composition, Stage Music Emphasis program must submit a portfolio of
original compositions for review by the composition faculty. Generally, 2-3 scores in
contrasting media are expected, and recordings of live performances are strongly recommended
(recordings will be required of applicants for the 2010-11 academic year). Applicants to the MM
in Composition should have experience in bringing completed compositions to performance; the
process of organizing performances is different from that of writing, and applicants need to
demonstrate past ability to have works performed in order to show promise as composers. For
admissions purposes, therefore, MIDI realizations of acoustic compositions are discouraged
because they do not reveal evidence of prior performances.

Students who possess an undergraduate degree in composition are preferred; however, students
who have an undergraduate music degree with substantial compositional experience (either as an
undergraduate minor, non-major applied study in composition, or practical writing experience)
are considered suitable candidates, as well.

It is not necessary to have prior experience in theater, although this has proven to be a benefit for
those students who have had such background. Keyboard skills are also important, and all
students are encouraged to pursue additional private instruction in keyboard.

Upon acceptance to the School of Music and the university, MM students must take the Theory
Placement and History Placement Exams at the beginning of their first semester of matriculation
in the master’s program. These examinations determine whether a student needs a review course
in music history (3 credits), harmony (2 credits), and/or aural skills (2 credits). A potential 7
credits of remedial coursework, not applicable to the degree, may be required of entering MM
students who demonstrate deficiency in undergraduate theory or history training.

Specific MM Composition entrance exams will be removed from the curriculum, as their
proposed content is largely duplicated by the Theory and History Placement Examinations.

Post-Graduation and Employment
The principal destination of graduates from the MM Composition, Stage Music Emphasis
program is doctoral study in composition. The coursework and practical performing experience
gained during the master’s program is designed to provide students with the requisite
background to enter doctoral study either at CUA or another recognized institution. Several
CUA students continue into the doctoral program upon completion of the masters.

A second envisioned path for graduates from the program is a professional career in musical
theater. Many opportunities exist for composers to work professionally by creating incidental
music or arrangements for theatrical productions. The training in our program prepares students
for this professional path, as well: contacts made during the program’s coursework and (if
                                                 42
elected) externship may prove to be of assistance in this.

A third destination is teaching music in secondary school contexts: some graduates have taken
positions as music instructors, either while preparing for doctoral study, or as a career
destination. Our most recent graduate from the MM Composition, Stage Music Emphasis
program is currently employed as a secondary school choral director.

Some graduates are employed as church music directors, and the practical training provided by
the MM program gives them additional experience to pursue the practical considerations in
mounting weekly services and larger, seasonal concerts and performances.

Teaching Experience in the School of Music
Whenever possible, graduate composition students are employed as teaching assistants (TA’s)
for the School of Music’s undergraduate core music theory curriculum. This represents
extremely valuable experience and career preparation for student composers, most of whom will
teach music theory courses as part of an academic career.

TA’s are selected through a rigorous audition process (which I designed), typically in the spring
semester. The selection process consists of four steps:

a.) Written examinations in harmony and aural skills;
b.) Practical jury testing the candidate’s skill at sight singing, performing of rhythm, and
keyboard proficiency;
c.) Teaching demonstration before an actual undergraduate class;
d.) Interview with theory-composition faculty

TA’s are employed as need and budget permit. Typically, 5-6 TA’s are employed each semester.
In some cases, TA’s have had full teaching and grading responsibility for a course (these are
typically DMA students, although MM students have sometimes been employed as full
instructors), working in collaboration with a faculty member who teaches a corresponding
section of the same course. In some cases, TA’s serve as teaching assistants for a faculty
member who teaches the lecture portions of the course: the TA’s thus teach the ―lab‖ or ―drill‖
sections under the supervision and direction of the faculty member.

Bi-weekly meetings are held with the TA’s by the chair of theory-composition, and faculty
members are encouraged to observe TA’s, as well, as their schedule permits.

Externship Program
An optional externship program has been initiated which pairs student composers with partner
arts organizations in Washington, DC. The pilot externship was with Joy of Motion Dance
Center: the composer extern served an agreed-upon number of hours assisting with productions
and creating music for the dance classes of a faculty choreographer. These externships are not
intended to provide office assistance for the host organization, but rather to give composers
insights into the workings of commercial or non-profit arts organizations, and to interact with
them as a composer. It is also hoped that students will develop important professional
connections through their externships which will prove of service to them in their post-CUA
careers.

An extension of the externship program currently envisioned is to offer a section of Topics in
Stage Music as a 5-week, 1-credit, unpaid externship with an arts organization. This would
                                                 43
count as one of the required three credit hours of MUS 555.

GAPS (Graduate Academic Position Symposium)
During my time at CUA, I began to notice a substantial gap in the knowledge which graduate
students displayed about the nature of academic institutions, and the academic job market in
general. Although this problem was more immediately connected with doctoral students, there
was a clear relevance to masters students, as well. To assist in addressing this problem, I have,
from time to time, offered informal seminars on the academic job market, called ―GAPS:‖ the
Graduate Academic Position Symposium.

In a series of meetings, I informed the students about the types of post-secondary institutions and
music institutions in the United States (four-year colleges, junior colleges, research universities,
liberal arts colleges, departments of music, schools of music, conservatories of music), the types
of positions available (part-time, full-time, tenure-track, non-tenure-track, one-year sabbatical
replacement) and ranks (Instructor, Assistant/Associate/Full Professor, etc.), how to prepare a
CV and draft an effective cover letter, how to interpret the language of posted job descriptions,
how to prepare for interviews, and other practical topics. Students who have participated in
these voluntary seminars have reported increased effectiveness in obtaining interviews and
employment offers.

Website
I have also created a website page which details possible career paths for students obtaining
degrees in Music Composition. http://composition.cua.edu/Careers//index.cfm

II. Goals for Student Learning
Students graduating with a Master of Music in Composition, Stage Music Emphasis, will:

8.     Gain advanced training in compositional technique and practice through intensive private
       study;
9.     Develop advanced skills in orchestration and counterpoint;
10.    Gain a strong, first-hand experience of the elements of theatrical production;
11.    Collaborate with a lyricist and librettist and/or gain first-hand experience in creating
       lyrics for musical theater and libretti for opera;
12.    Produce a theatrical thesis work, serving as de facto producer in overseeing all aspects of
       the project;
13.    Gain training in research methodology critical to a career in academia and useful to all
       professional music career paths;
14.    Gain background and experience in a non-music discipline through coursework;
15.    Collaborate with artists in at least four disciplines: opera, musical theater, dance, and
       drama;
16.    Obtain practical training in professional development, grant writing, competitions, and
       career guidance, through the Composition Seminar;
17.    Gain background in the history and literature of the four component disciplines, and have
       an understanding of the current landscape of each (artists, movements, works, etc.)

III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures
Direct Measures


                                                44
1. Graduate seminars and courses
        Graduate students are required to take a minimum of 12 credit hours of music theory and
history courses, most of which include a seminar paper, final examination and paper, or final
project. Some examples of capstone course projects include:

MUS 573 (Introduction to Music Notation Software)
Final project generated through use of notation software, as the culmination of a project-based
course

MUS 581 (Advanced Orchestration)
Final orchestration project for full orchestra, with score and parts (for reading by CUA
Symphony Orchestra)

MUS 617 (Stage Music Practicum)
Four theatrical scenes presented throughout the semester, extensive final quiz on literature and
history of opera, musical theater, dance, and drama

MUS 629 (Composition Seminar)
Seminar presentation each semester on a topic of general importance (e.g., an analysis of a
significant contemporary work), or an organized, analytical presentation on the student’s own
work

MUS 633 (Introduction to the Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music)
Final analytical examination which requires students to apply analytical techniques to a variety
of post-1900 musical examples.

MUS 720 (Seminar in Music History and/or Theory Topics)
A rotating seminar, offered each semester, to provide specialized training in selected topics,
either from a theoretical/analytical perspective, or a historical/critical perspective. Past topics
have included ―Music of Stravinsky‖ and ―The Operas of Alban Berg,‖ each of which included a
seminar presentation, final analytical seminar paper, and final examination.

2. End-of-semester juries
        The entire composition faculty monitors and evaluates masters students’ progress in
composition. At the conclusion of each semester, majors taking private lessons submit portfolios
of compositional work completed in private instruction during that semester for evaluation by the
composition faculty, who review and assesses the samples and assign them a grade. An ―A‖
would be awarded to a student whose work showed a high level of artistic merit on both
technical and esthetic grounds. Technically, a student must submit complete, legible, correctly-
notated and spelled scores; esthetically, an ―A‖ jury would show originality and interest of
musical ideas and development, logical yet arresting development of ideas, effective scoring with
respect to color, balance, and variety of timbre, sufficient economy of ideas and lack of a
superfluity of ideas which are not developed or musically related to one another, and other items
which the composition faculty as practitioners judge in their estimation to be of highest merit.

        This jury grade is then paired with the students’ private composition teachers’ grades. At
the beginning of the following semester, majors receive their jury comments, either through the
private instructor or from comment sheets that the jury has completed

3. Thesis Document
                                                45
        The score of the theatrical work to be presented is the student’s thesis composition. The
work is supervised by the student’s director , and the committee consists of a director and one
reader. Both director and reader oversee and edit the thesis and approve the thesis by
consultation. No public or oral defense of the thesis exists at present, although the thesis is read
by the relevant performing ensemble whenever possible.

       Throughout the final semester of the student’s matriculation in the program, the thesis
committee reviews and makes amendments and corrections to the student’s thesis; the student is
required to accept all amendments and corrections approved by the thesis director. The thesis
committee, upon consultation about the final document, approves and signs the thesis document,
which is then submitted for deposit.

4. Graduation Recital
         As noted previously, the graduation recital is the production of the student’s theatrical
thesis composition, performed in its theatrical context (i.e., staged).

        Faculty attend the recital in performance (in contradistinction to other graduate recitals,
there is no pre-performance recital hearing), and consult to pass or not pass the recital. Faculty
indicate approval by their signatures on an official copy of the production program, which
program is then deposited in the student’s academic file in the Music office.

5. Comprehensive Examinations
      At present, the MM Composition program does not have a system of comprehensive
examinations. The composition faculty is developing both an oral and written comprehensive
examination, effective for students entering fall 2010.

The oral component of the examination will consist of student discourse upon a work drawn
from a pre-determined repertoire list of approximately 6 works (3 from before 1900, 3 from 1900
or later), and be able to answer questions about the structure, organization, and content of the
selected pieces. Keyboard proficiency will also be demonstrated during the oral exam, as will
demonstration of familiarity with important composers, trends and schools of composition, and
the contemporary musical repertoire.

The full-time members of the composition faculty (always at least three) will constitute the
student’s oral comprehensive panel.

The written portion of the examination will consist of two three-hour examinations: a.) music
theory and analysis; b.) music history, with a particular emphasis on the history of stage music.
Both examinations, to be given on the same day or on consecutive days, will focus primarily on
repertoire, techniques, and topics since 1900, although familiarity with pre-1900 methodologies,
skills, and topics such as species counterpoint, Roman numeral analysis, operatic styles and
ballet terminology, is expected. The examination will be evaluated by members of the Theory-
Composition faculty. Members of the Music History faculty may be consulted on questions
pertaining to the history examination; however, the principal responsibility for evaluation lies
with composition faculty members.

Indirect Measures
1. Student evaluations
        Course evaluations are useful in assessing the quality and utility of courses (although not
required of graduate courses, the chair of the division typically requests evaluations for 500-level
                                                 46
and higher courses).

2. Master classes with visiting composers
        One important measure of evaluating student work and situating it within a larger context
is through master classes with distinguished visiting composers. The School of Music has
hosted, since 2005, such noted composers as John Corigliano, Joseph Schwantner, Christopher
Rouse, Martin Bresnick, Libby Larsen, William Bolcom, CUA alumnus Mark Adamo, Roberto
Sierra, and others. Four of the composers listed above are Pulitzer Prize winners. In the public
forum of the master class, students present their work to these established professionals, who
comment upon their work and suggest a variety of approaches and strategies. In fall 2008, three
CUA graduate students participated in a very successful master class with composer (and
Pulitzer Prize winner) John Adams, sponsored by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at
Strathmore Performing arts Center in Rockville, MD. Stage Music students have participated
with Concert Music students in these master classes.

3. External program reviews
         The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) conducts an assessment of the
School of Music every 10 years; 2008-09 was the year for review in the School of Music.
Evaluators examine the curricula and offerings of the program, initially through self-study
documents generated by the School of Music and each constituent program, and finally through a
3-day campus visit in which as many aspects of the School are evaluated as possible: instruction,
facilities, and ensembles. The findings and recommendations by the NASM team have been
incorporated and absorbed by the composition division.
         .
IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
Performance-based observation
An important aspect of curricular and program assessment is made through student evaluation
and faculty observation.

Because creative achievement is problematic to assess with purely objective standards,
composition faculty employ rather an experiential review process to assess student progress.

The quality of student compositions as evidenced by performances on recitals reveals certain
aspects of a student’s progress: a.) quality of compositional material; b.) ability to assemble
musicians who have adequate rehearsal time; c.) work by the composer to ensure that the
performance of his/her work is both accurate and of high technical and musical quality (through
coachings with performers and attendance at rehearsals).

Based on attendance at a series of recitals, the latter element – the coaching of student
compositions – emerged as a considerable problem. It was clear that student composers were not
engaging with the rehearsal process to ensure that their pieces were receiving effective
performances. This issue has been partially addressed by our collaboration with the Great Noise
Ensemble, a DC-based new music ensemble which is an ensemble in residence at the School of
Music, which pairs member artists with student composers and performers to coach the pieces in
preparation for the division recital.

The Composition Seminar holds at least career-development session per semester to assist
composition students in preparing for careers both within and beyond their time in the program.
Session topics have included grant writing, seeking and applying to competitions and
                                               47
residencies, finding and securing performers, score and parts preparation, rehearsal and reading
etiquette, and other topics. The GAPS seminar (see above) has also proven beneficial in
preparing students for post-graduate employment and careers in academia.

In response to a perceived lack of familiarity with important composers and repertoire, and
insufficient attendance at performances, the Composition Seminar, beginning in spring 2008,
adopted new components: formal seminar presentations on important composers and pieces (to
develop repertoire) and concert attendance requirements (with one-page reports), to encourage a
regular habit of concert attendance and support of colleagues.

Course evaluations are useful in tracking the effectiveness of specific courses, and revising their
content for a repeat offering based on commentary and rankings given.

Exit interviews will be conducted for the first time at the conclusion of the spring 2009 semester.
The chair of the division will conduct private interviews with graduating students, seeking to
learn of the overall effectiveness of the program, suggestions for items to add or delete, and other
items of relevance. A written evaluation form will be accompanied by an oral interview.




                                                48
                          Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                    I. Program Description

The Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting at The Catholic University of America is an
intensive, selective program designed to prepare the student for a career as a conductor of
professional, community or university/conservatory orchestras and/or for doctoral or other post-
graduate study. Because most young conductors begin their training at the master's level without
having had much actual time on the podium, the program seeks to give them as much practical
experience as possible. The number of students the program accepts, therefore, is limited to
ensure that students receive ample opportunities to conduct regularly within the school.

Applicants to the program must meet the general requirements for admission to the School of
Music, complete a successful live audition with the CUA Symphony Orchestra, pass a theory and
music history placement test and complete a successful examination/interview with the major
professor and audition committee.

The curriculum for the Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting requires 35 semester hours of
intensive academic and theoretical course work. To gain practical experience, during their course
of study, students must work as assistant conductors on at least one opera production and one
musical theatre production to learn about the intricacies of conducting staged productions and the
very different challenges it presents in comparison to concert work. Students also complete two
semesters of non-credit, required assistant/apprentice work with an outside ensemble to gain
broader experience with the artistic and administrative responsibilities of a conductor. For the
capstone evaluation, each student successfully conducts a 70-minute final recital consisting of a
program of music of varying styles and periods, which the major professor approves and a jury
consisting of the major professor and other faculty evaluates on a pass/fail basis.

The program’s curriculum includes the following required courses: MUPI 791: Private Applied
Conducting Instruction (6 credits); MUS 643 & 644: Graduate Seminar in Conducting I and II (6
credits); 2 credits in a performing ensemble; MUS 711 & 712 Analytical Techniques I and II (6
credits); Research Methodology (3 credits); an elective in Music History (3 credits); the Master's
Recital (MUS 902, 3 credits) and 3 credits from a list of Core Electives. Acceptable Core
Electives include the following: MUS 506, The Musician in Modern Society (3 credits); MUS
542, Music in the Baroque (3 credits); MUS 546, Music in the Classical Period (3 credits); MUS
551, Music in the Romantic Period (3 credits); MUS 553, History of Opera (3 credits); MUS
558, Twentieth Century Music (3 credits); MUS 632, History of Orchestration (3 credits); MUS
665, History of Jazz through Analysis (3 credits); MUS 715/716: Schenkerian Analysis I, II (3, 3
credits); MUS 724, Music of Messiaen (3 credits), and MUS 726, Tone Poems of Richard
Strauss (3 credits).


                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with the degree of Master of Music in Orchestral Conducting will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of skills in baton and rehearsal technique, concerto and opera

                                                49
   accompanying and score analysis.
2. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to discuss and write intelligently about a wide range of
   composers and musical styles for both scholarly and lay audiences.
3. Exhibit the knowledge and skills to collaborate effectively with opera and stage directors,
   producers and artistic administrators.
4. Display artistic and interpretive insight in a wide range of musical styles through public
   performances with ensembles within and outside CUA.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Audition: Applicants must pass a successful conducting entrance audition with the CUA
   Symphony Orchestra and an interview/examination with the conducting professor and
   audition jury. The candidate conducts and rehearses repertoire specified by the major
   professor, which is given to him/her prior to the audition. The conducting portion of the
   audition lasts about 20 minutes. For successful auditions and interviews, candidates should
   demonstrate basic fluency and clarity of baton technique, efficiency in rehearsal, satisfactory
   knowledge of the score and an ability to convey musical ideas effectively through gesture or
   verbal instruction. In the interview portion, students are tested by the major professor on
   repertoire knowledge, score analysis skills, aural skills and, if they are pianists, ability to play
   at sight from a full orchestral score.
2. Course work/GPA: Class instructors assess students' progress through class presentations,
   quizzes, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their discretion.
   Students must achieve a minimum 3.0 grade point average for graduation.
3. Academic advising: Students meet with an academic adviser at least once each semester for
   assistance with course selection and recital planning and to ensure that the student is properly
   progressing in the degree program.
4. Weekly private lessons: The major professor assigns students repertoire to prepare for each
   lesson and for conducting in MUS 643 & 644: Graduate Seminar in Conducting. Score study
   and analysis with the guidance of the major professor is also a core component of private
   instruction at CUA. Private lesson grades are based on attendance, preparation and
   performance. Students receive letter grades.
5. Graduate Seminar in Conducting: Students participate weekly in a 2-hour seminar class,
   which includes their conducting of the Repertory Orchestra. (Repertory Orchestra is a
   separate course for undergraduate and graduate instrumentalists, which the conducting
   professor and the co-instructor, a violist from the National Symphony Orchestra, teach and
   evaluate together.) They rehearse the orchestra in major symphonic and concerto repertoire
   under the supervision of the conducting professor and the co-instructor, who give students
   feedback about their conducting. Additional analysis and critique of student performance
   take place in a video review session, which follows the 2-hour orchestra session. This time is
   also used to discuss other areas of conducting, such as job applications, auditions and ideas
   for concert programming. The seminar can also include guest artists and speakers. Students
   earn grades based on attendance, preparation and performance.

6. Field experience: Each student works for at least 2 semesters (non-credit but required) as an
   apprentice/assistant conductor with a local professional or youth orchestra, opera company,
   or other approved ensemble. The host conductor reports regularly to the major professor on
   the student's progress. S/he also gives the student regular feedback and completes a written
   evaluation form at the end of the assigned semester. Students bring in video recordings of
   their rehearsals and performances with the outside ensembles for critique and analysis. The
   evaluation form completed by the host conductor asks him/her to rate the student on a level
                                                  50
   of 1-5 (5 being the best) in several areas. The form also provides for the host conductor to
   write his or her own comments.

7. Opera and musical theatre conducting: Students must work as assistant conductors on at least
   one CUA opera production and at least one musical theatre production during the course of
   study. They receive regular, ongoing feedback on these experiences from the production's
   music director or producer. The producer or musical director submits a summative written
   evaluation of the student's work to the major professor at the end of the project, which is then
   placed in the student’s academic file. The form follows a similar format to that of the Field
   Experience evaluation form.


 M.M. Recital: Each student prepares and rehearses a full orchestra concert program under the
 supervision of the major professor. The student selects the repertoire in consultation with the
major professor; it should include a contemporary work, a concerto or vocal accompaniment and
a symphony or tone poem. The program must consist of at least 70 minutes of music. A faculty
                              jury evaluates it on a pass/fail system

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

Students complete confidential course evaluations at the end of each semester. The data is sent
to the Dean for initial review and then to the appropriate instructors. Instructors have the
opportunity to discuss the results with the Dean to analyze and assess areas for improvement and
development.




                                                51
                              Master of Music in Piano Pedagogy

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


                                    I. Program Description

This degree program combines advanced training in theory and performance with the laboratory
experience of teaching piano. The candidate’s knowledge of the literature, techniques, and theory
of piano music is organized by musical style periods as well as learning styles and applied to the
practical problems of both class and private teaching at all levels.
                The candidate will gain practical teaching experience in 2 semesters of required
                 internship courses. In these courses the students are assigned a student to teach
                 for the entire semester. They are supervised on a weekly basis, must prepare
                 weekly lesson plans and meet with the instructor for feedback about each lesson
                 that is taught. Additionally, students are required to observe 15 lessons during
                 the semester.
                Students become well acquainted with the teaching literature through the
                 required pedagogy courses, specifically the elementary, intermediate and
                 advanced pedagogy courses. In these courses, the students are required to
                 study, perform and analyze on a weekly basis much of the standard teaching
                 repertoire of all style periods and levels.
                Students improve their own performance abilities through daily practice of 3-5
                 hours. Their progress is measured by the faculty through a performance
                 examination at the end of each semester of study, culminating at the end of the
                 degree in a performance examination of the required 60 minute degree recital,
                 representing works from all style periods.
                The nature of the pedagogy courses is a hands-on approach, where the
                 information that is learned is regularly applied to the actual teaching of lessons
                 in the courses. At all levels—elementary, intermediate and advance—students
                 prepare resource compendiums of repertoire, method books, learning styles, etc,
                 that are appropriate for the material covered in the course. These are valuable
                 resources for the student after they are finished with the degree and working in
                 the field of piano pedagogy.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Music in Piano Pedagogy will:
   1. Demonstrate significant knowledge of, and ability to teach piano repertoire at all levels;
   2. Exhibit advanced knowledge of the teaching literature from all musical style periods.
       Additionally, they exhibit a thorough understanding of standard method books that are
       commonly used by piano teachers for beginning and intermediate piano students, as well
       as significant competency in understanding the full variety of student learning styles.
       This understanding is what enables them to choose the appropriate method books for
       their students;
   3. Display an advanced level of performance ability on the piano, which greatly enhances
       their ability to be a fine teacher; and
   4. Demonstrate the depth and breadth of knowledge and skill with instructional resources to
       confidently choose appropriate teaching materials and repertoire for students of all ages

                                                52
       and levels.


                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

   1. Admission: Students are required to have a BM in Piano Performance, or the equivalent;
       this ensures that an acceptable level of performance has been achieved. Additionally, the
       student must successfully pass a performance audition in order to be admitted to the
       program.
   2. Advising: The advisor meets regularly with the student to discuss performance in the
       required course work as well as the performance in end-of-semester juries.
   3. Course Work: While students are required to pass the course, students who receive a
       grade of ―C‖ in a pedagogy course are advised to repeat the course.
   4. Internships: There are 2 required internship courses. The students are evaluated by their
       ability to recognize and diagnose problems that their student is having. Additionally,
       they are evaluated by their ability to offer suggestions to the student regarding practice
       strategies for overcoming these problems.
   5. Language: There is no foreign language requirement.
   6. Weekly private piano lessons: Students take weekly private piano lessons; their progress
       is measured in 2 ways: a) by their private teacher on a weekly basis, and b) by the full
       piano faculty at the end of each semester. (see #7 below)
   7. End of Semester Juries: All piano majors at the BM and MM level are required to take a
       performance examination at the end of each semester. In this exam, students are required
       to play at least 30 minutes of repertoire that is representative of several musical style
       periods. Qualities that are indicative of a high level of performance are solid
       memorization, no technical issues and ability to properly express the emotional content of
       the music being performed.
   8. M.M. Degree Recital Hearing: This hearing is a performance examination in front of the
       full piano faculty on the repertoire to be performed on the M.M. degree recital. The
       committee hears 20-30 minutes of the recital repertoire and evaluates it in terms of
       memorization, technical issues, and ability to express the emotional content of the music
       being performed. A high-quality jury performance would demonstrate a high degree of
       proficiency in all of these areas.
   9. M.M. Solo Recital. Since good piano teachers must also be good pianists, the M.M.
       degree recital includes a repertoire that is representative of all style periods, which
       demonstrates that the student has the foundation to confidently teach proper performance
       practices for music of all style periods. The recital is a minimum of 60 minutes of
       repertoire that is heard by the full piano faculty in the degree recital hearing. No student
       can perform the solo recital without first passing the degree recital hearing. The student’s
       ability to perform at a high level is one way to measure their ability to teach at a high
       level.
   10. The pedagogy paper. Students write a paper on a topic of significant relevance to piano
       pedagogy. The topic is approved by a faculty committee and the writing of the paper is
       supervised by the adviser. The paper is normally 25-35 pages in length and is a research
       paper. Typical topics include analysis of important teaching repertoire from a harmonic,
       structural, and pedagogical standpoint. An important component of the evaluation is the
       efficacy of the paper to other piano teachers.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
The evaluation of student performance in areas such as performance, course work and the
                                               53
pedagogy paper have influence on what material is emphasized in the course work. While it
does not change the content of material covered, it does afford the faculty a method of assessing
what material needs to be emphasized in order to more effectively prepare the student for a
career as a piano teacher.




                                               54
                          Master of Music in Orchestral Instruments

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description

The Catholic University of America’s Master of Music degree in Orchestral Instruments
Performance is a comprehensive and balanced program that prepares graduate instrumental
majors for careers in solo, chamber music, and orchestral performing, as well as the skills
required for studio teaching, and/or advanced degree work (D.M.A.). The core of the program is
based on training graduate students for skills in mastery of technique, artistry, knowledge, and
originality, as tools for developing compelling artistic performance. As a well balanced
program, the degree combines the intensive performing requirements with a careful compliment
of historical and theoretical studies.

The Master of Music in Orchestral Instruments Performance degree program requires completion
of 30 semester credit hours as well as a chamber music performance, a concerto performance and
a final solo recital with hearing. Students holding a bachelor’s degree may gain acceptance into
the program by passing an entrance audition, followed after admission by an entrance recital
with recital hearing. It is recommended that the recital hearing is performed during a student’s
first semester in the program. The curriculum’s design includes weekly private lessons, required
recitals, performances, juries, repertoire classes, hearings, tests, final exams and research papers,
all of which are closely monitored by the faculty. All students must maintain a ―B‖ average to
graduate. All orchestral instruments majors participate regularly in performances, concerts,
recitals and special events, both on campus and off campus. Off campus, these performances
have taken place in settings like museums, galleries, churches, embassies, conservatories,
schools, colleges, the Kennedy Center or Library of Congress, for example.

The curriculum for this degree program includes the following required courses: MUPI 791/792,
Private Instruction (M.M) (6 credits); MUS 731, Research Methodology (3 credits); MUS 711,
Analytical Techniques I (3 credits); MUS 712, Analytical Techniques II (3 credits); MUS
605/606, Chamber Music (3 credits) for violin, viola, cello, or 3 credits of Music Electives for all
other orchestral instruments; Performing Ensemble, CUA Symphony Orchestra (3 credits) MUS
508; Music History Electives (6 credits); MUS 902 Final Recital (3 credits).

Other performance ensembles include: MUS 508A Repertory Orchestra; MUS 508B
Instrumental Ensembles; MUS 508C Jazz Ensemble; MUS 508D Percussion Ensemble; MUS
508E Contemporary Music Ensemble; MUS 508F Flute Ensemble.

A diverse and extensive course of study is provided to the graduate student through a broad
scope of music electives and history electives. The Catholic University of America’s Rome
School of Music is one of the few institutions that offer a minor degree in Latin American Music.

After graduation, orchestral instruments majors have been successful in many career endeavors
ranging from, orchestral, chamber music, solo artist, recording artist, and studio teaching both
private and in schools. Graduates of this program have become members of such orchestras as
the Los Angeles Philharmonic, San Francisco Symphony, Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra,
Minnesota Orchestra, Cleveland Orchestra, Pittsburgh Symphony, Baltimore Symphony,
National Symphony, and the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra.

                                                 55
                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Music in Orchestral Instruments Performance degree
will:

14. Demonstrate mastery of all aspects of performance on their instrument, including technique,
    sound production, style, performance practice, memorization, sight-reading, ensemble
    playing, recital preparation, and artistic imagination.
15. Have attained a high professional level in preparation and presentation of public
    performances in solo and chamber repertoire.
16. Demonstrate proficiency in orchestral excerpt playing through classes, readings, excerpt
    study with guidance from National Symphony Orchestra musicians, and mock auditions as
    well as regular seating auditions within the CUA Orchestra.
17. Provide evidence of a thorough understanding of their instrumental repertoire and styles and
    from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century, through class work and performance.

                            Student Assessment Outcome Measures

16. Audition: Applicants to the major must successfully pass a 15-minute-long entrance audition
    (either in person or by an audio or video recording), representing contrasting styles. A
    committee of at least three faculty members judges the auditions and makes admissions
    decisions. A successful audition generally consists of the student performing his/her
    repertoire at performance level, demonstrating good tempo, technical polish, and stylistic
    understanding of the music. A students’ acceptance remains provisional until the successful
    passing of the M.M. entrance recital hearing (refer to #9 below).
17. Weekly private lessons: Each semester every major must register for and receive lessons with
    his/her private instructor. The private instructor assigns the required recital/jury repertoire
    and oversees its preparation. Private lessons stress music of all styles, development of
    technical and interpretive skills, and ability to read at sight. At the end of every semester, the
    private instructor submits a grade based on attendance, preparation and performance of the
    assigned repertoire. Fifty percent of the final grade for instruction (MUPI 791/792, Private
    Instruction in Strings) comes from the private teacher and 50% from the average grade of the
    end-of-semester jury committee members.
18. Advising: An academic adviser monitors graduate student progress. There is only one adviser
    for graduate students in the Master of Music in Orchestral Instruments program, who meets
    with each student every semester to help plan course loads, repertoires, and schedules of
    required up-coming performances.
19. Course work: Individual instructors measure students’ progress in academic courses by
    means of quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their
    discretion.
20. GPA: All students must maintain a minimum B average across performance and academic
    courses for graduation. A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate
    course may repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average includes
    only the grade earned in the repeated course.
21. Course evaluations: At the end of each semester, students complete course and faculty
    evaluations for the courses they are taking.
22. Repertoire Classes: Orchestral Instruments faculty members offer repertoire classes as
    needed to give the students performance practice in front of an audience. Although these
    classes are neither required nor part of the curriculum, most students attend them regularly
                                                 56
    and appreciate the chance to try out their memorized and prepared pieces before playing in
    required juries, hearings and recitals. The music school and its faculty often bring in guest
    artists to teach a repertoire class. Performance in repertoire classes does not affect final
    grades directly.
23. Semester Juries: At the end of each semester, an orchestral instruments faculty committee
    evaluates student performance during their juries. M.M. orchestral instruments performance
    graduate students must pass a 20-minute-long jury for each semester that lesson credits are
    required. This jury is a type of performance examination in which each student performs the
    repertoire he or she has learned during the semester in front of a committee of at least two
    faculty members. A successful jury consists of the student performing the assigned repertoire
    at performance level, demonstrating good tempo, technical polish, and stylistic understanding
    of the music. The committee judges the juries and grades the performances. Students’ final
    grades for the semester consist of the average grade among the jury committee members,
    averaged with the grade from the private instructor for that semester’s lessons. Each student
    taking a jury receives detailed written comments and suggestions from every member of the
    committee. Students who have successfully passed a degree recital hearing are exempt from
    that semester’s jury.
24. M.M. Entrance Recital Hearing: To be officially admitted into the M.M. Orchestral
    Instruments Performance program, graduate students must pass a 20-minute, Pass-Fail M.M.
    Entrance Recital Hearing before a faculty committee. A students’ acceptance is provisional
    until the successful passing of this hearing. Students usually schedule their M.M. Entrance
    Recital Hearings during the first semester of studies. A committee of at least two faculty
    members judges the hearing. To pass the M.M. Entrance Recital Hearing, a student must
    successfully play 20 minutes of the required 60-min-long recital repertoire at performance
    level with the technique and artistry and pacing commensurate with the graduation recital of
    a B.M. degree. The repertoire should include selections illustrating the student’s ability to
    perform in various styles. Graduate credits in private music instruction apply toward degree
    requirements beginning with the semester during which students pass their entrance recital
    and hearing. Students who have successfully passed this recital hearing are exempt from that
    semester’s jury. A passing recital hearing replaces an end-of-semester jury. A student is
    allowed to repeat a failed recital hearing once.
25. Chamber Music Performance: Every student in the program must present a public
    performance of a complete major chamber music work. Neither hearing nor registration is
    required for this performance. Memorization is also not required. Students may present this
    performance on or off campus; they must submit a printed program to their advisers as proof
    of completion of this requirement. The chamber music coach and the private instructor
    supervise and approve the assignment, preparation and presentation of the chamber music
    performance. The chamber music coach submits a Pass-Fail grade at the end of the semester.
26. Concerto Performance: Every student in the program must present a public performance of a
    concerto. Neither a hearing nor registration in advance is required. Students may present this
    performance on or off campus. Every student submits a printed program to his/her adviser as
    proof of completion of this requirement. The private piano instructor supervises and approves
    the assignment, preparation and presentation of the concerto performance. The private
    instructor submits a Pass-Fail grade at the end of the semester.
27. M.M. Final Solo Recital Hearing: To graduate, orchestral instruments performance graduate
    students must pass a 20-minute-long Pass-Fail M.M. Solo Recital Hearing before a
    committee of at least two faculty members at least two weeks before performing the final
    M.M. public recital. A hearing is a Pass-Fail jury that students must pass before presenting a
    public recital. To pass a M.M. Final Solo Recital Hearing, a student must successfully play
    20 minutes of the required 70-min-long recital repertoire at performance level, demonstrating
                                               57
    good tempo, technical polish, and stylistic understanding of the music. The repertoire should
    include selections illustrating the student’s ability to perform in various styles. Students
    typically play the M.M. Final Solo Recital Hearing during their last semester of studies.
    Passing this recital hearing replaces an end-of-semester jury. Students may repeat a failed
    recital hearing one time.
28. M.M. Final 70-minutes Solo Recital: Orchestral instruments majors must present a public
    performance of a 70-minutes-long program of varied repertoire. Students may perform their
    final recitals on or off campus after successfully passing the recital hearing. Students must
    submit a printed copy of the program to their advisers as proof of completing the
    requirement. Students typically complete the M.M. Final Solo Recital during the last
    semester of study.


                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

3. The orchestral instruments faculty believe that aligning the career choices and desires of the
   students with the curriculum is essential for the best service to the graduate student. Research
   and surveys of the graduate students’ career choices and success as well as a survey of the
   current musical trends of modern culture will better serve the faculty and staff to guide new
   students toward their careers.
4. Close association between faculty and graduates provides feedback on our programs and,
   where warranted, allows consideration for program adjustments. Course evaluations are
   administered at the end of each semester and are reviewed by the Dean of the School of
   Music and the instructors of the reviewed courses.




                                                58
                             Master of Music in Sacred Music
                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description

The Master of Music in Sacred Music (M.M.S.M.) is an interdisciplinary course of study
combining scholarship, performance and ministry. The program offers concentrations in choral
music, organ performance and composition. Students undertake musical studies in the School of
Music and liturgical studies in CUA’s School of Theology and Religious Studies (STRS).
Established in 2001, the degree program is a new curriculum replacing the former Master of
Liturgical Music degree program. Directors of the School of Music’s divisions of musicology
and scared music and the School of Theology and Religious studies effected the program’s
restructuring through collaborative planning.

Planning is in process for the implementation of newly designed rubrics for the comprehensive
examinations and recitals of the incoming students of August 2010. Dialog among the STRS, the
musicology division of the School of Music, and the director of graduate studies in sacred music
is ongoing and contingent upon the coursework schedule and the individual student performance
in the respective disciplines.

The M.M.S.M. program requires successful completion of a minimum of 38 semester hours of
graduate study, a written comprehensive examination, and either a one-hour public recital for the
concentration in performance, or the submission and performance of an original work for the
concentration in composition.

Additional Requirements for MMSM and DMA students: (1) include their participation in
Chamber Choir and Practicum/Colloquium in Sacred Music each semester that they are in
residence, and (2) that they perform the required works from the curriculum in their parochial
music position.

Although knowledge of lyric diction (pronunciation for musical performance) and literal as well
as prose translations for works in multiple languages are foundational to the choral art, an
integral component of each of the concentrations in graduate sacred music studies, the present
curriculum of 38 is not of sufficient proportion to warrant inclusion of a foreign language
requirement.

Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the degree program, the curriculum is fixed for each
concentration; there are no electives at the master’s level. Some students undertake more course
work than required to supplement instruction in their individual areas of interest. The curriculum
requires six hours of Liturgical Studies (TRS 741A, Liturgy: Theological and Historical
Perspectives and TRS 744, Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology); nine hours of Sacred and Choral
Music (MUS 584, Liturgical Music; MUS 637, Choral Development and MUS 746, Seminar in
Sacred Music); nine hours of applied skills, which includes six hours of private music instruction
(organ, composition and conducting) and MUS, 638, (Advanced Conducting). Six hours of
Music History (MUS 556, History of Sacred Music and MUS 731, Research Methodology);
three hours of Music Theory (MUS 712, Analytical Techniques II); three hours of Music
Literature (one course chosen from among MUS 516/517, Survey of Organ Literature I/II; MUS
640640A/640B, Choral Literature I/II/III or MUS 642, Forms and Techniques in Sacred Music);
two credits of Music Performance (MUS 607, CUA Chamber Choir; participation in chamber
choir is a requisite every semester in residence, only two of which are for credit). Also required
                                               59
every semester is participation in the non-credit Practicum/Colloquium in Sacred Music. In
applied instruction, an open studio policy provides students opportunities to interface with
multiple instructors.

At the recommendation of last year’s NASM reaccreditation, all students will soon participate in
a weekly conducting class with conductors’ chorus comprised of current graduate students,
supplemented by work-study students to supply the vocal parts required for balance. Eventually,
each student will participate in conductor’s studio during each spring semester, with or without
credit. This addition will parallel a similar requirement in the MM and DMA programs in
orchestral conducting.

Eligible applicants hold a bachelor's degree with a major in music from an accredited institution
and have two to three years experience in the field of sacred music in a position of leadership or
as an assistant. The program will under extraordinary circumstances and chronicled aptitude in
both academic and performance areas accept students with other majors only after they meet the
equivalent requirements for CUA’s Bachelor of Music degree, either by taking advanced
standing examinations or by completing undergraduate courses.

It is the practice of the program and prior to submission of formal application to the university,
prospective students must communicate via e-mail and telephone with the director of program
for mutual exploration of the compatibility of applicant and program. The director also suggests
that applicants contact current graduate students before submitting an application. With their
applications, performance applicants (choral music, organ) submit a 30-minute tape (video
preferred, audio acceptable). Applicants in composition submit representative manuscripts with
recordings, if possible.

Invitations to campus for pre-admission audition, interview, and testing are based on the
evaluation of application materials. All concentrations require visits for testing and
demonstration of conducting skills, typically in January or February preceding anticipated fall
enrollment. Applicants in organ and vocal performance also perform for the respective faculties
at the time of their visit. Testing consists of demonstrating keyboard proficiency, open score
reading, and sight-singing. Results might indicate remedial study in keyboard skills for those
whose concentration is not organ performance and sight reading for those who have not
developed these skills to a graduate level. The conducting audition, which determines placement
in the conducting sequence, is comprised of a performance of two specified works with CUA
Chamber Choir; applicants are informed of the selections in anticipation of the audition. The
director of program ranks students who successfully complete these elements to determine the
order in which they will receive admission offers.

All entering graduate students in the School of Music take entrance examinations in the areas of
musical theory, ear training and musicology. Divisional chairs use these exams to determine
whether remedial course work in the respective field is indicated. Students must also meet a
liturgical pre-requisite, TRS 540 Introduction to Liturgy, or its equivalent, which they can
demonstrate by written examination. This course is available online during the summer term;
students who do not have this basic knowledge are required to take the course before arrival.

The metropolitan Washington area is a center for sacred music and home to the national
churches for several major denominations, as well as symphonic choruses and professional vocal
chamber ensembles. Music directors from these organizations frequently expand and refresh the
Sacred Music program, as they address the students, work with them in practica, and
                                                60
occasionally serve on recital juries. Every year, the program invites alumni/ae to return to
campus for continuing practica and colloquia. Their presence represents continuing education
for them, and it enriches current graduate students with the experiences of their predecessors in
the program.

Students in the MMSM program are expected to maintain a professional position in the musical
ministry (music director, organist, and/or conductor) during the course of the degree program. It
is assumed that graduate students are current practitioners in the field and therefore aware of the
national organizations that maintain listings of available posts. The director may suggest avenues
in the Archdiocese of Washington and Diocese of Arlington. Graduate students also may serve
as teaching assistants in conducting, or as accompanists and/or conductors for one of the many
performing ensembles at the university. Other areas and opportunities in which students have
developed professional skills, aptitudes, experience and service to the community include but are
not limited to the following:

   Serve as Graduate Student Union president and senators;
   Contribute to professional journals;
   Participate, perform and deliver presentations at national and regional professional
    gatherings/conventions;
   Perform in recital at notable tri-state and national (occasionally international) venues.
   Prepare, compose and/or perform musical liturgies for musical associations in the tri-state
    area or for campus liturgies;
   Serve as organists and cantors to the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, whose
    headquarters are next to the campus;
   Participate in the broader Washington community’s activities through musical performance:
    for the Archdiocese of Washington, April 2008 Mass celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI, the
    Pontiff’s visit to the university itself, providing music for national gatherings such as the
    Association of Catholic Colleges and Universities annual conference (2009).

In the fall of 2009, a second-year M.M.S.M. student was named the first campus minister for
music, an appointment that carried with it full tuition remission plus a $12K stipend. His
successful performance in this capacity occasioned the establishment of a second position
commencing in fall 2009. The selection process is competitive with preference given to students
in the graduate programs in Sacred Music or the School of Theology and Religious Studies. This
year the post was awarded to a graduate student in vocal accompanying.

M.M.S.M. graduates most frequently assume positions of leadership in the parish ecclesial
community as music directors, organists, conductors; they are prepared to take up secondary or
assistant positions as directors of music and liturgy at the cathedral and diocesan level.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Master of Music in Sacred Music degree will:

       Demonstrate discipline knowledge through research and bibliographic skills consistent
        and appropriate to both the existing musical literature canon and new repertoire.
       Demonstrate artistry, developed technique, and stylistic nuances consistent with the
        expectations of a graduate student in the areas of primary concentration.
       Demonstrate discipline knowledge and exemplary skills in the foundational areas of
        choral development and conducting technique as designated in the curriculum.
                                                61
   Integrate knowledge across disciplines including the repertoire in area of concentration in
    addition to the attendant areas of service/ritual music.
   Demonstrate a well-developed sense of ecclesiology (sensus ecclesiæ) consonant with the
    current practices of the Roman Catholic Church, and successfully implement said
    knowledge and skills in the musico-liturgical forum.
   Exhibit the professional dispositions of a candidate committed to achieving the skills that
    are foundational to the art, craft, and ministry of sacred music.




                                            62
                           Doctor of Musical Arts in Vocal Pedagogy

                     Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Vocal Pedagogy at The Catholic University of America is
a prestigious degree that offers students a finely tuned balance of performance and pedagogical
study to prepare them to teach at the university level. The faculty of this division – a highly
qualified team comprised of vocal technicians, lyric diction experts, coaches/accompanists and
scientific physiologists, all of whom offer valuable training – works together to provide every
candidate the opportunity to succeed in her/his aspirations.

Applicants must have extensive teaching and performing experience (thereby showing evidence
of her/his security in both performance and technical facility), the master’s degree in vocal
performance or pedagogy from an accredited institution and a strong desire to enhance their
pedagogical knowledge and skill, while continuing to improve their own performing abilities.
For acceptance into the program, an audition for a voice committee (―jury‖) that includes the
Chair of the division and two voice faculty members, must demonstrate enough vocal technical
ability, musical style and viable foreign language diction (in Italian, German and French at
minimum) to warrant graduate study beyond the master’s level of achievement. Final acceptance
for candidacy, is dependent upon successful completion of a 70-minute (approximate time)
entrance recital for the voice committee. The Chair of the vocal division constructs the program
for this recital from an applicant’s repertoire list. The entrance recital should occur by the end of
the first semester of study. Students must also successfully pass entrance placement
examinations in music history and theory (offered at the beginning of the first and second
semesters of study) prior to graduate-level study in these respective areas. Graduate review
courses are available for those who do not pass these exams. Students may take pre-requisite
language classes along with regular graduate-level courses by advisement (but will not be
eligible for full candidacy until the pre-requisite requirements are completed), requirements that
the division communicates in writing to the prospective candidate at the time of university and
school acceptance.
A typical program includes from 54 to 72 credit hours beyond the master’s degree to complete
the degree. Students may select a minor (a minimum of 12 semester hours in any one field) in
music theory, Latin American Music or another field for which the candidate has the appropriate
pre-requisite training with the approval of the Chair of the division. The Chair of the vocal
division individualizes each student’s particular course of study depending on her/his unique
needs. D.M.A. Vocal Pedagogy students must complete three juried recitals/opera roles,
including an exit recital for which music is assigned to the candidate 90 days prior to the recital.
Candidates schedule their final comprehensive examinations (set forth by the faculty of the
specific divisions on specific dates outlined by the school of music each year) with the approval
of the advisor, following the completion of course work, recitals and research paper. The
directed research paper approximately 50 pages in length, surveys subject matter associated with
vocal pedagogy and its related fields (approval of said subject matter must be approved by the
Chair of the division).
Required courses include the following: MUPI 885, Private Voice instruction (12 credits); nine
to 12 credits in Music History and Music Theory (i.e. MUS 731, MUS 711); six to 10 credits of
Vocal Literature (i.e. MUS 511, MUS 572); MUS 535, Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and
Physiology (2 credits); MUS 535A, Vocal Pedagogy Practicum (2 credits); five to 11 credits of
electives appropriate to the curriculum; MUS 907/908, Recitals (6 credits); MUS 993/994,
                                                 63
Directed Research (6 credits) and 12 to18 credits for the minor. Among sample electives are the
following possibilities: MUS 577/578, Lyric Diction and Repertoire (2 credits); MUS 518, Opera
Practicum (1 credit); MUS 526A, Opera Practicum (2 credits); MUS 661, Seminar in Vocal
Performance (3 credits) and Music History (i.e. MUS 731, MUS 727; 3 credits).
The Division of Vocal Performance and Pedagogy supports an ―Open Studio‖ policy, which
encourages the vocal faculty to work as a team toward the progress of every student; it places
student needs first. Although each candidate has an applied teacher of record, with notification to
the Chair of the vocal division candidates may engage in two lessons each semester with another
voice faculty member. The teacher of record may attend these sessions, if the student so chooses;
s/he may not discourage the opportunity. A faculty member may also encourage a candidate to
seek instruction from another faculty member for a specific technical or stylistic expertise. Open
Studio promotes the best possible instruction and distribution of information; no one faculty
member has all the answers regarding individual technical facility, and no two singers process
information in the same manner. The student returns to her/his teacher of record with shared
information from which both s/he and the teacher benefit. The vocal pedagogy program
encourages D.M.A. students to study with a different faculty member on the voice staff each of
her/his three years of study to examine more varieties of teaching methodology.

Master classes with professionals in the fields of performance, teaching, voice therapy and artist
management round out the curriculum. This variety helps guide students’ career choices and
offers them opportunities to develop networking connections for the future. The program also
encourages its students to perform in operas (an average of two opportunities a year in the school
of music) and with university choruses and attend conferences (such as The Annual Voice
Symposium with Dr. Robert Sataloff) appropriate to her/his field of study.
Students who graduate with a DMA in Vocal Pedagogy teach in universities and community
colleges as full-time tenure-track positions or as adjunct professors. Many work as part-time
independent applied instructors while continuing to study voice so as to improve their
performing skills. Many of the Vocal Pedagogy candidates have changed their curriculum to
Vocal Performance having auditioned for the Voice Committee with that specific goal.


                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Vocal Pedagogy will:

1. Demonstrate proficiency in vocal technical facility, a well-studied musicianship and
   appropriate style in performance that expresses the musical integrity of both the composer
   and the librettist or poet. Exhibit the knowledge and skill to discuss in concrete terms the
   scientific, physiological vocal anatomy.
2. Perform art song and other vocal literature from the Baroque through Contemporary eras in
   Italian, German, French, English, Spanish and Russian with the quality of diction and vocal
   technical production demonstrated in the highest quality examples available, such as those
   heard on classical recordings by noted artists in the field. Demonstrate an understanding of
   musical style, the era from which that style originates, knowledge of the composer and
   librettist/poet, the theoretical textures of every piece s/he performs, intricate harmonic
   construction and how to express the emotion behind the composition, which completes a
   performance.
3. Display poise and security on the performance stage to serve as an example for her/his
   students.
4. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills to offer vocal instruction in every facet of
                                                64
   performance – vocal technical production, lyric diction, musicianship and stage deportment.
5. Graduates with a DMA in Vocal Pedagogy teach in universities as full-time tenure-track
   instructors and as adjunct professors in community colleges. Many teach part-time applied
   music independently while continuing to study performance skills.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures


1. Admission: Applicants must have extensive teaching and performing experience and a
   master’s degree in vocal performance or pedagogy from an accredited institution. For
   acceptance into the program, an audition for a voice committee (including the Chair of the
   division and two voice faculty members) must demonstrate enough vocal technical ability,
   musical style and viable foreign language diction (Italian, German and French at a minimum)
   to warrant graduate study beyond the master’s degree level of achievement. D.M.A. Entrance
   Solo Recital: Final acceptance for candidacy is dependent on successful completion of a 70-
   minute recital for the voice committee performed from memory in a formal recital setting.
   The Chair of the voice committee selects the recital program from works on the applicant’s
   repertoire list and communicates the selections to the applicant prior to the recital date (the
   recital should occur by the end of the first semester of study). Entrance Examinations:
   Students must pass examinations in Music History and Theory (offered at the beginning of
   the first and second semester of study) to proceed with graduate-level courses in the
   respective areas of study. (Review courses are available to aid students who do not pass.)
2. Applied Lessons and Course Work/GPA: Grading of applied lesson work is based on the
   amount of work put forth by the candidate and the improvement of said candidate.
   Course work/GPA: Individual instructors measure progress in academic courses by means of
   quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their discretion.
   Students must complete all graduate and ―pre-requisite‖ courses (which the faculty may have
   assigned as necessary to completing entrance requirements) with a grade average of ―B‖ or
   better. In order to achieve ―candidacy,‖ all pre-requisite requirements must be completed.
3. D.M.A. Recitals/Opera Roles: The D.M.A. candidate must pass two juried, public recitals or
   opera roles. The Chair of the division must approve recital repertoire and/or opera roles. The
   length of the recital or size of the opera role may vary by determination of the difficulty of
   the music – approximately 60-70 minutes of music for a recital and individual opera roles to
   be determined separately by the Chair of the division regarding the individual voice
   classification.
4. D.M.A. Exit Recital: Ninety days prior to the final recital, the chair presents the candidate
   with the repertoire for her/his recital. During the intervening time period, s/he may not study
   with a vocal instructor but must learn the material on her/his own. The voice committee must
   pass the student on this memorized recital performance for the candidate to have fulfilled all
   the recital requirements for the degree. A directed research paper surveying some aspect of
   Vocal Pedagogy (subject matter approved by the Chair of the division), approximately 50
   pages in length, must be completed in order to graduate.
5. Vocal Pedagogy Practicum Student Performance: D.M.A. students must show viable
   evidence through the performance of their practicum (practice) students (one male and one
   female) that they are able to instruct and guide students toward improvement in vocal
   technical facility, musicianship, lyric diction and stage deportment. This special class, MUS
   535A, (also offered to performance majors as an elective) is a requirement for pedagogy
   students in the degree. The Chair of the vocal division or other vocal faculty member (who
   may be instructing the class) grades the practicum student performance exam. The outcome
   should provide evidence of clear and precise vocal improvement along with an improved
                                               65
   understanding of singing style and diction – these performances comprise two thirds of the
   total grade. Included in the requirements of this class is the classroom presentation of
   research data on a chosen area of interest by the candidate within the scope of information
   surveyed in the lecture information. The project comprises one third of the total grade for the
   class
6. DMA Comprehensive Examinations: During the final semester of study, the candidate takes
   exams in his major and minor fields of study (offered at specific times by the faculty of the
   various divisions in accordance with the administration of the school of music). The
   candidate may have two opportunities only to pass these examinations.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

Regular meetings and discussions with Voice Committee members following graduate recitals,
and with close attention to various alumni successes in the areas of performance and teaching,
help in assessing course strengths and what specialized programs or newly offered courses may
be included in future semesters.

* consisting of the Chair of the division and two other voice faculty




                                                66
                         Doctor of Musical Arts in Vocal Performance

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Vocal Performance at The Catholic University of America
is a prestigious and highly selective program that provides advanced and professional vocal
study at the highest artistic level. It offers students every opportunity to prepare for a
performance career and, possibly, to teach at the university level. The faculty of this division – a
highly qualified team comprised of vocal technicians, lyric diction experts,
coaches/accompanists and scientific physiologists, all of whom offer valuable training – works
together to provide every candidate the opportunity to succeed in her/his professional aspirations.

Applicants to this program must have extensive performing and teaching experience (thereby
showing evidence of her/his security in both performance and technical facility) to teach others
in the applied area and have graduated from an accredited institution with a master of music
degree, preferably in performance. The initial audition (for the voice committee consisting of the
Chair of the vocal division and two other voice faculty) into the school of music should include
at least three arias and/or art songs in three languages which evidence different musical style.
Final acceptance into the program for candidacy, is dependent upon successful completion of a
70-minute entrance recital (approximate time) performed (by the completion of the first semester
of study) from memory for the voice committee (―jury‖), which is comprised of three members
of the voice faculty, including the Chair of the division. The Chair of the vocal division
constructs the content of the entrance recital based on the student’s repertoire list. Students must
also successfully pass placement exams in music history and theory prior to advanced graduate
study. For those who do not pass, review graduate courses are available in place of repeating the
exams.

The curriculum can accommodate the students’ individual needs; it includes music history,
theory, performance, lyric diction, research, opera practicum, vocal pedagogy and physiology
and teaching methodology. A typical degree program includes from 54 to 72 credit hours of
study, including a variety of elective course opportunities that allow each student to address
her/his own unique needs to perfect performing skills. The division communicates a specific,
individualized course curriculum (in writing) to each student, including pre-requisite courses. To
graduate, D.M.A. vocal performance students must also complete five juried solo recitals or
opera, including an exit recital for which the candidate receives the assigned music 90 days prior
to the recital.
Required courses include the following: MUPI 885, Private Voice instruction (12 credits); nine
to 12 credits of Music History and Music Theory (i.e. MUS 731, MUS 711); MUS 511, Vocal
Literature (2 credits); MUS 535, Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and Physiology (2 credits);
MUS 907/908, Recitals/Opera Roles (12 credits), and 21 to 33 credits of electives appropriate to
the curriculum. Among sample electives are the following possibilities: Three credits of Lyric
Diction and Repertoire (i.e. MUS 588, 577); MUS 538, Opera Practicum (MUS 538; 3 credits –
may be added each semester); MUS 510/511, Opera Workshop (2 credits); MUS 661, Seminar in
Vocal Performance (3 credits – may be added each spring semester); Music History (i.e. MUS
537, 551 541 558); MUS 536/537, Stage Movement (1 credit); MUS 535A, Vocal Pedagogy
Practicum (2 credits).
The Division of Vocal Performance supports an ―Open Studio‖ policy, which encourages the
vocal faculty to work as a team toward the progress of every student; it places student needs first.
                                                67
Although each candidate is assigned a teacher of record, the faculty encourages D.M.A. voice
performance students to engage in two lessons each semester with other voice faculty members.
The faculty also encourages students to spend one or two full semesters of study with other voice
faculty members to help promote the best possible instruction.

Master classes with professionals in the fields of performing, teaching, voice therapy and artist
management round out the curriculum. These help guide students with career choices and offer
opportunities to develop networking connections. The division encourages D.M.A. Vocal
Performance students to perform in operas both within the division and outside the university. It
also encourages students to apply to local and international vocal competitions, auditions for solo
and apprentice opportunities. Particularly noteworthy among these prospects are the Summer
Opera Theater Company (in residence on the CUA campus) and the Bel Cantanti Opera
Company, whose artistic director is a member of the voice faculty. Other companies with which
our students have affiliated for these sorts of experiences include Santa Fe Opera, Glimmerglass
Opera and Aspen Music Festival with which the Dean of the school of music has been affiliated
for 30 years. The faculty also encourages students to participate in international summer festivals
abroad, such as Music Festival Perugia in Italy (for which the chair of the division is a faculty
member), because they afford students opportunities to study with international faculty and
audition for international opera houses.

Many of our D.M.A. candidates and alumnae sing with professional opera companies, such as
the Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera, Los Angeles Opera, New York City Opera and a
score of others. This is a testament to our ever-fruitful efforts to prepare our graduates for the
most rewarding careers and experiences in the vocal performance field.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Candidates who graduate with a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Vocal Performance will:

1. Demonstrate proficiency in vocal technical production, a well-studied musicianship and
   appropriate style in performance practice that expresses the musical integrity of both the
   composer and the librettist or poet.
2. Exhibit the knowledge and skill to discuss in concrete terms the scientific physiological vocal
   anatomy.
3. Perform art song and opera from the Baroque through Contemporary eras in Italian, German,
   French, English, Russian and Spanish, matching levels of quality established by the highest
   quality examples available, such as those of the principal artists of the Metropolitan Opera
   and classical recordings by noted artists in the field.
4. Display skill at performing as an expressive actor with developed characterization and word
   nuance, while demonstrating poise and security in stage deportment.
5. Demonstrate understanding of the theoretical textures of the music s/he performs, including
   intricate musical construction.
6. Graduates with a DMA in Vocal Performance work as professional singers in regional opera
   companies and choruses, perform as soloist with choral groups of renown, teach in
   universities and community colleges as full-time tenure-track instructors and as part-time
   adjunct instructors in community colleges while continuing to perfect their performing skills.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures



                                                68
1. Admission: Applicants must have extensive performing and teaching experience in the
   applied area and have graduated from an accredited institution with a master of music degree,
   preferably in performance. D.M.A. Entrance Recital: Applicants to the major must
   successfully pass a 70-minute solo recital performed from memory in a formal recital setting
   for the voice committee, comprised of the chair of the division and two other voice faculty
   members. The chair selects the recital program from the applicant’s repertoire list and
   communicates the selections to the applicant within the first month of the semester prior to
   the recital date.
2. Entrance Examinations: Students must pass examinations (offered at the beginning of the
   first and second semesters of study) in Music History and Theory to proceed with graduate-
   level courses in the respective areas of study. (Review courses are available to aid students
   who do not pass)
3. Applied Lessons and Course work: Grading of applied lesson work is based on the amount
   of work put forth by the candidate and the improvement of said candidate.
   Course work/GPA: Individual instructors measure progress in academic courses by means of
   quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their discretion.
   Students must complete all graduate and ―pre-requisite‖ courses (which the faculty may have
   assigned as necessary to completing entrance requirements) with a grade average of ―B‖ or
   better. In order to achieve ―candidacy,‖ all pre-requisite requirements must be completed.
4. D.M.A. Recitals/Opera Roles: The D.M.A. candidate must pass four juried, public recitals or
   opera roles. The Chair of the division must approve recital repertoires and/or opera roles. The
   length of the recital or size of the opera role may vary determining the difficulty of the music
   – approximately 60-70 minutes of music for a recital and individual opera roles to be
   determined separately by the Chair of the division regarding the individual voice
   classification.
5. D.M.A. Exit Recital: Ninety days prior to the final recital, the Chair of the division presents
   the candidate with the repertoire for her/his recital. During the intervening time period, s/he
   may not study with a vocal instructor, but must learn the material on her/his own. The voice
   committee must pass the student on this memorized public/juried recital performance for the
   candidate to have fulfilled all the recital requirements for the degree.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

Regular meetings and discussions with Voice Committee members following graduate recitals,
and with close attention to various alumni successes in the areas of performance and teaching,
help in assessing course strengths and what specialized programs or newly offered courses may
be included in future semesters.

                consisting of the Chair of the division and two other voice faculty




                                                69
                      Doctor of Musical Arts in Chamber Music (Piano)

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                    I. Program Description

The Catholic University of America’s Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Chamber Music (Piano)
is a comprehensive, highly selective program designed to provide advanced study at the highest
artistic and pedagogical levels to prepare applicants for collaborative performance careers,
college/university/conservatory teaching and leadership in the profession. The main focus of the
program is to build and develop in every D.M.A. candidate the abilities, skills, knowledge and
artistry necessary for successful performing, as well as university-level teaching careers. The
program seeks to continue developing professional performing musicians who are also educated
musicians. Thus, the curriculum combines a careful complement of performance related studies
with historical and theoretical studies.

Applicants must have extensive performance and teaching experience after receiving a master’s
degree from an accredited institution in piano or chamber music performance. Acceptance is
dependent on the successful completion of a public entrance chamber music recital, and
individual student curriculum is then designed based on each entrant’s performance on various
entrance examinations in chamber music literature, piano-vocal literature, music history, music
theory, and sight-reading. Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the Piano Division
D.M.A. committee, consisting of the Chair of the Piano Division and any two other piano faculty
members, in conference with the student arranges a program of study ranging from 54 to 72
credit hours beyond the master’s degree. Throughout the course of studies, D.M.A. candidates in
chamber music (piano) take weekly private piano lessons, and the faculty monitors their
performance and academic work carefully via required recitals, performances, repertoire classes,
tests, final exams and research papers. All candidates must maintain a ―B‖ average to graduate.

The curriculum’s design balances well the performance aspect of the program with studies and
training in other important areas of the profession. The D.M.A. Committee communicates the
individualized list of courses and repertoire each student will complete in partial satisfaction of
degree requirements to the student in writing. Although each degree program is individualized, a
typical program might include the following: MUPI 885, Private Instruction in Piano (9-12
credits); MUS 605/606, Chamber Music (4 credits); Music History courses (6-12 credits); Music
Theory courses (3-9 credits); MUS 524, Chamber Music Techniques (3 credits); Core Courses in
Piano and Chamber Music Literature, Performance Practices, etc., by advisement (13-26 credits);
MUS 931, Repertoire List (0 credits); Five Required Recitals (14 credits); Final Recital (0
credits).

The Piano Division has designed and offers more than 15 graduate piano-related courses. Piano
Pedagogy courses, internships, and observations (MUS 500, Piano Pedagogy I; MUS 502, Piano
Pedagogy II; MUS 504, Piano Pedagogy III; MUS 506, The Musician in Modern Society; MUS
529, Internship in Teaching Piano; MUS 525, Group Issues in Piano Teaching) promote
understanding and competence in teaching piano to all types and levels of students. The focus of
collaborative piano courses, such as MUS 605/606, Chamber Music or Accompanying, and
MUS 524, Chamber Music Techniques, is on developing and teaching skills necessary for any
type of collaborative playing. The sequence of five piano literature courses (MUS 522, Piano
Literature I; MUS 523, Piano Literature II; MUS 527, Piano Literature III; MUS 528, Piano
                                                70
Literature IV; MUS 530, Piano Literature V) promotes understanding and thorough knowledge
of the piano repertoire, styles and instruments from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century.
The piano division also offers on a regular basis piano seminars on different topics (MUS 727,
Seminar in Piano Pedagogy; MUS 718, Seminar in Pianism).

D.M.A. candidates study with an impressive faculty of artists and scholars and participate in
master classes, which some of the world’s most respected performers offer, including Boris
Berman, Leslie Howard, Leif Ove Andsnes, Horacio Gutierrez, Andre Watts, and Misha Dichter.

All D.M.A. candidates participate regularly in on- and off-campus performances, concerts,
recitals and special events. Off campus, these take place in settings like museums, galleries,
churches, embassies, conservatories, schools, colleges, the Kennedy Center or Constitution Hall.
Every year many of our chamber music (piano) D.M.A. candidates apply and receive invitations
to participate in international, national and local summer music festivals. Some of our best
students earn invitations to compete in national and international competitions as well.

After graduation, chamber music (piano) doctoral graduates enjoy a large scope of career
choices, including performing artist; recording artist; independent piano teacher; piano faculty in
college, university, conservatory, music academy or community music school; music faculty in
private or public school; church music director; choir conductor; vocal coach; choir, opera,
dance, or church accompanist. The professional employment of our doctoral graduates,
especially in university schools and departments of music here and abroad, attests to the
excellence of this individually need-based, structured D.M.A. program.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Doctor of Musical Arts in Chamber Music (Piano) Performance
will:

18. Demonstrate extraordinary mastery, breath of knowledge and doctoral level of skills of all
    aspects of piano performance, including technique, sound production, style, performance
    practice, memorization, sight-reading, accompaniment, ensemble playing, recital preparation,
    artistic imagination, and others.
19. Have attained a very high professional level in preparation and presentation of public
    performances, as a collaborative musician.
20. Demonstrate competence in teaching piano and piano-related subject matters to all types and
    levels of students, including teaching on college/university level.
21. Understand and provide evidence of a thorough knowledge of the piano repertoire (solo and
    chamber music), styles and instruments from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century.

                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. DMA Entrance Chamber Music Recital: Applicants to the D.M.A. program must
   successfully pass a 70-minutes-long public chamber music recital presented during the first
   week of the semester for which they have been provisionally admitted to the School of
   Music. The D.M.A. Committee selects the recital program from works on the candidate’s
   repertoire list and communicates it to the candidate 30 days prior to the recital date. The
   applicant is responsible for obtaining his/her own supporting performers. A committee of at
   least three piano faculty members attends the recital and makes the admission decision. A
   successful recital generally consists of the candidate performing his/her repertoire at a
                                                71
     performance level, up to tempo, technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of
     the music. Applicants may repeat a failed recital once.
2.   DMA Entrance Examinations: Applicants must take diagnostic written examinations in
     chamber music literature, piano-vocal literature, music history, and music theory during the
     week before the semester starts. The entrance requirements also include a private sight-
     reading examination for a committee of three piano faculty members. Students are regarded
     as Degree Candidates after having passed their entrance recital as well as taken the DMA
     entrance examinations.
3.   Weekly private piano lessons: Chamber Music candidates must register for and take weekly
     piano lessons with their private piano instructors. The private piano instructor assigns the
     repertoire for required recitals from the Repertoire List and oversees its preparation. Private
     piano lessons stress music of all styles, development of technical and interpretive skills,
     preparation for public recitals, and further improvement of the ability to read at sight. At the
     end of the semester, each private piano instructor submits grades based on attendance,
     preparation and performance of the assigned repertoire.
4.   Advising: An academic adviser monitors candidates’ progress. There is only one adviser for
     the D.M.A. degree in Chamber Music (Piano) program, who meets with each student every
     semester to help plan course loads, repertoires, and schedules of required up-coming
     performances based on the written plan, which the D.M.A. Committee and candidates have
     developed together.
5.   Course work: Individual instructors measure progress in academic courses by means of
     quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their discretion.
6.   GPA: All candidates must maintain a minimum B average across performance and academic
     courses for graduation. A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate
     course may repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average includes
     only the grade earned in the repeated course.
7.   Weekly Repertoire Classes: Every piano faculty member offers weekly repertoire classes in
     which his/her piano candidates have the opportunities to practice performing in front of an
     audience. Although these classes are neither required nor part of the curriculum, most
     students attend them regularly and appreciate the chance they offer to try out their prepared
     pieces before playing the required recitals. In these non-credit classes, chamber music (piano)
     students perform prepared works, as well as works-in-progress when they are close to being
     performance-ready. After each in-class performance, the piano professor evaluates their
     levels of preparation and gives important suggestions for further improvement of the
     performed repertoires. Performance in repertoire classes does not affect final grades directly.
8.   Repertoire List: The D.M.A. Committee assigns a repertoire list of works at the beginning of
     the program, which each chamber music (piano) candidate must learn and give evidence of
     having publicly performed in recital or repertoire class prior to giving the final recital.
     Documentation of successful preparation and performance of the repertoire may include any
     of the following: 1) signed statement from a private piano teacher, representing a
     performance in a repertoire class; 2) performance in a D.M.A. juried recital; 3) copy of the
     printed program from a public on- or off-campus performance; 4) DVD or video recording of
     a performance.
9.   Five DMA Public Juried Recitals (three chamber music, one lecture, and one vocal-
     accompanying): Candidates must pass five public, juried recitals for graduation. The
     candidate selects the contents of the recitals in consultation with the D.M.A. committee. Each
     recital is to be of approximately 70 minutes playing time. Candidates may complete them in
     any order. A committee of at least three piano faculty members attends and grades (Pass or
     Fail) each recital. A successful recital generally consists of the candidate performing his/her
     repertoire on a performance level, up to tempo, technically polished, well rehearsed, and with
                                                 72
    a stylistic understanding of the music. Candidates may repeat a failed recital once.
     The required lecture recital also serves as a comprehensive review of the candidate’s
        ability to research, lecture, and perform music relating to an approved topic. The lecture
        recital paper must reflect a high standard of scholarship and is deposited in dissertation
        form. The paper is supervised by the student’s adviser. A typical lecture recital consists
        of 35 minutes of playing and 35 minutes of speaking.
10. Final DMA Juried Chamber Music Recital: The final non-credit DMA public juried chamber
    music recital (70-minutes long) is the final comprehensive examination; it demonstrates the
    candidate’s ability to solve performance issues related to technique, learning, discipline and
    style independently. The D.M.A. committee communicates the program content of this
    recital to the candidate 60 days in advance of the performance. The candidate then prepares
    the program without the aid of a teacher or coach. S/he is also responsible for the preparation
    of the other musicians, thus, demonstrating the ability to rehearse, coach and prepare a
    collaborative performance. A committee of at least three piano faculty members attends and
    grades (Pass or Fail) the final recital. A successful recital generally consists of the candidate
    performing his/her repertoire on a performance level, up to tempo, technically polished, and
    with a stylistic understanding of the music; it should demonstrate the candidate’s ability as a
    performer of the highest caliber. Candidates may repeat a failed recital once.
11. Course evaluations: At the end of each semester, students complete course and faculty
    evaluations for the courses they are taking.
12. Teaching: The Chamber Music Techniques and Chamber Music courses prepare the
    candidates for teaching and coaching of all types and levels of students, including teaching
    on college/university level.

                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1.     The piano faculty intends to collect more data on piano graduates’ career choices and to
       adjust the curriculum accordingly.
2.     Close association between faculty and graduates provides feedback on our programs and,
       where warranted, allows consideration for program adjustments. Course evaluations are
       administered at the end of each semester. These are reviewed by the Dean of the School
       of Music, the Chair of the Piano Division, and the instructors of the reviewed courses.




                                                 73
                     DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN MUSICOLOGY
                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                    I. Program Description

The Benjamin T. Rome School of Music at The Catholic University of America offers a Doctor
of Philosophy Degree in musicology that in 35 credit hours of study combines a core of period
courses in music history with advanced research-based seminars. Ph.D. students must also fulfill
a foreign language requirement in both French and German, pass doctoral comprehensive
examinations covering the entire breadth of music history and complete a dissertation with oral
defense. The program offers doctoral students the opportunity to gain an in-depth,
comprehensive understanding of all periods of music history and develops their abilities to
conduct scholarly research and present it in well-organized verbal and written presentations. A
number of students choose to continue intensive performance studies in voice or an instrument of
their choosing and participate in various musical ensembles.

There are nine required courses in the Ph.D: each student must complete Research Methodology
MUS 731, which includes an overview of various kinds of scholarship in musicology,
ethnomusicology, music theory, and some related disciplines, and examines the basic tools of
musicology research, both print and online sources. In this course, each student completes an
extensive independent project, analyzing the secondary literature in a topic of his/her choosing.
The class also emphasizes organization and writing. Students must complete three "period
courses", 500-level classes (such as MUS 558, Twentieth-Century Music) that each focus on a
different epoch in music history. These courses emphasize knowledge of important composers
and works and also require that students conduct their own research projects. Another requisite is
completion of four Research Seminars (MUS 720) in which the specific topics rotate based on
the faculty member’s interests. In these courses, students examine original source materials
(manuscripts or documents) or perform intensive analytical research in the music featured in
class. Students must also take Musical Paleography (MUS 729), in which they learn to read and
transcribe early forms of musical notation from the earliest chant to Renaissance polyphony,
using primary sources and facsimiles of important manuscripts. Five electives – additional period
courses, seminars or courses covering specific topics in music history, such as History of Opera
(MUS 553) or History of Sacred Music (MUS 556) – complete each student’s Ph.D. course of
study. An academic adviser works closely with every student to determine the best selection of
courses for his/her individual curriculum. In all the advanced classes, students develop
appropriate research and presentation skills through assignments that examine music in a
historical or analytical context or as part of a repertory associated with a specific performance
medium.

All musicology doctoral students must demonstrate a significant knowledge of Western musical
traditions in the ―art‖ or classical musical realm beginning with the theory and aesthetics of
Ancient Greece and proceeding to the present. Students must successfully complete the Ph.D.
comprehensive exams to demonstrate in-depth knowledge of all eras of music history, recent
research in important areas and general trends in musicological scholarship. The knowledge
required for the Major area includes significant scholarly trends, important individual scholar’s
work and debates in the discipline of musicology. All musicology Ph.D. students must
successfully complete comprehensive examines in both the musicology major and a minor field.
Many musicology doctoral students select Music Theory as their ―minor‖, though other options
                                               74
are available. These include performance disciplines (providing a student passes an audition for
the appropriate faculty members) or academic areas outside of music, such as Medieval History
or Art History, that complement a student’s research interests and qualifications. Each Ph.D.
student takes a minimum of four courses in their minor areas, which they select in consultation
with faculty members who specialize in that area. (If, the advisor deems it necessary to take more
than four courses to gain a solid base of knowledge in the minor, then the student draws the
additional credit hours from the electives in the major area.) Students who have performance
disciplines as their minors must successfully complete final solo recitals, judged according to the
standards expected of master’s level study in performance.

Course work and comprehensive exams prepare Ph.D. students for the dissertation, a significant,
independent scholarly project completed under the direction of one of the members of the music
history faculty. Students are expected to give an oral presentation on which members of the
faculty and other students present critiques, and on completion of the dissertation, each student
also passes an oral defense on the research document.

The School of Music offers internship opportunities with a number of area arts organizations and
libraries such as the Library of Congress, Music Division; The Folger Library; and Washington
National Opera.

The skills that majors develop in this program prepare them for an active career as a publishing
musicologist and also prepare them for a wide array of post-graduation options, including faculty
positions in musicology, music theory, or other disciplines of music, or other music-related
careers such as publishing, music librarianship, or musical journalism. A number of our recent
graduates currently hold faculty positions at colleges and universities, and several also hold jobs
at the Library of Congress. Several other graduates have built multi-faceted careers as
independent scholars with posts in arts administration.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning


Students who graduate with a Doctor of Philosophy in Musicology will:

1. Demonstrate mastery of the advanced body of knowledge of music history and important
   composers, trends or "schools", and musical works; master the important trends in
   scholarship such as ongoing debates and innovative research projects.




                                                75
2. Complete independent, original research on music with advanced knowledge of standard
   academic and musicological/musical theoretical tools;
3. Communicate effectively in written and oral forms and demonstrate the ability to discuss
   music in a professional manner; present innovative thoughts in terms of historical research
   and critical thinking.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of the expectations of musicology as a research discipline, and
5. Demonstrate translation mastery in two foreign languages, French and German.
6. (for performance minors only) Demonstrate mastery of all levels of performance in the
   selected area.

                        III. Student Assessment Outcomes Measures

1. To be admitted students must demonstrate ability for critical thinking and advanced research.
   They must demonstrate success in prior music history and theory classes and the ability to
   write well.
2. (performance majors only) Admission: In addition to meeting Musicology entrance criteria,
   doctoral students electing a performance minor must also pass an audition for the applicable
   faculty members within the School of Music.
3. Course work: The individual professor of every course described above evaluates each Ph.D.
   student. These evaluations focus on the student’s synthesis of the appropriate required
   knowledge and effective written and verbal communication. Faculty members keep each
   student informed of his/her progress in the program, primarily through written comments and
   grades on exams and assignments but also frequently in individual face-to-face consultations.
4. Advising: Professors of individual courses also communicate any concerns they might have
   about a student’s performance to his/her academic adviser, who closely monitors the
   student’s progress in the program and meets frequently with him/her.
5. Course evaluations: each student completes a course evaluation for all courses taken.
6. Foreign language requirement: Each student must also fulfill two foreign language
   requirements (in German and French) by either successfully completing advanced reading
   courses in these languages or passing language examinations given by the appropriate
   department at CUA.Ph.D. Comprehensive Exams: Students must successfully complete
   Ph.D. comprehensive exams to demonstrate (a) in-depth knowledge of all eras of music
   history, including important composers, genres, musical works, and aesthetic movements and
   (b) knowledge of recent research in important areas and of general trends in musicological
   scholarship. For the exam, three faculty members develop broad essay questions and provide
   excerpts of musical scores that students must analyze, identify, and describe. The major
   comps are two four-hour sessions spread over two days.
7. The same faculty members grade the results following the standard expectations in
   musicology in terms of breadth of knowledge and accurate, up-to-date information. The
   grading committee members evaluate each answer in terms of its accuracy and coverage of
   all issues implied or stated in the question. The three-member committee votes on the grade,
   either Pass or Fail
8. On completion of course work in their minor areas, students must also pass a comprehensive
   exam built around those courses, which qualified faculty develop and grade.
9. (performance minors only) Ph.D. Final Recital: Students, who have performance disciplines
   as their minors, must successfully complete a solo recital, judged according to the standards
    expected of a master’s student in performance.
10. Dissertation: The dissertation is a significant scholarly project completed under the direction
    of one of the members of the music history faculty. Two additional faculty members serve as
    readers, forming a committee of three faculty members. Planned and structured under the
    guidance of the faculty adviser, the dissertation is an independent project that leads to a
    substantial (often book-length), original, written paper that follows the research expectations
    of musicology.
11. Each student must file a formal dissertation abstract (following a standard CUA format) that
    includes a brief prospectus, statement of methodology, and bibliography. This is approved
    by the advisor and readers, then submitted to a faculty committee, and then approved by the
    full music faculty before being examined by the Dean of Graduate Studies of the University.
12. Three faculty members evaluate the dissertation, which is the crowning achievement of the
    Musicology doctoral program, to determine each candidate’s mastery of the important
    knowledge and skills. Faculty members base their judgments on the international standards
    for research in musicology, and in academia at large, and the originality as well as the clarity
    of the writing and organization.
13. Oral presentation: Students give an oral presentation on their dissertation topic on which
    members of the faculty and other students present critiques. Likewise, the oral presentation is
    judged based on the clarity and logic of the presentation as well as the quality of the research.
14. Oral defense: On completion of the dissertation, the student must pass an oral examination
    before the three members of her/his committee and two additional faculty members drawn
    from other departments of the university, during which the student describes the significance
    and contribution of the dissertation and answers questions from the examiners; the defense
    typically lasts two hours. The faculty committee votes to pass or fail the defense

                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning


1. The Musicology area and the School of Music use results of students’ examinations, both
   those given in courses and comprehensive exams, to determine which topics or courses they
   should change or emphases they should increase, so that each student will have an advanced
   overview of music history and trends in scholarship.
2. The quality of students’ research and writing, as evidenced in their papers for individual
   classes and also in their dissertations and oral defenses, helps faculty members determine to
   which skills and techniques they should be giving more emphasis in Research Methodology.
3. Faculty members meet regularly to discuss the needs of the program and any changes
   necessary based on students’ progress and feedback.




                                                 77
                      Doctor of Musical Arts in Orchestral Instruments

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


                                     I. Program Description

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Orchestral Instruments is a highly selective program that
offers qualified candidates opportunities for advanced study and continued musical growth
beyond the master’s degree. Within the program, a minor in Latin American Music is available
for interested students.

Admission to this program is a two-step process, which involves separate admission to both the
School of Music and the program. Applicants must have a master’s degree in musical
performance or comparable preparation, an established repertoire of approximately 25-35 major
works, documented performance experience (e.g., programs, critical reviews), and a description
of previous teaching experiences, as well as letters of recommendation, a goal statement,
transcripts, etc. Admission to the degree program itself requires the completion of placement
tests in written and analytical music theory, aural skills, and music history (detailed in the
Measures section) and the passing of an entrance recital.

The program of study, guided by a faculty advisory committee that the dean appoints (the
D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments Committee), consists of 54 to 72 semester hours of credit beyond
the master’s degree. Although each student’s program is organized to meet his/her individual
needs and goals, all students complete at least 12 semester hours of private instruction on the
major instrument, 4 semesters of Orchestra, 26 semester hours of approved academic course
work, 4 juried recitals of varying kinds at 3 semester hours each, including a lecture-recital, and
a final non-credit solo recital. The 26 semester hours of approved course work normally include
18 semester hours of music history, music theory, or other approved courses and 8 semester
hours of music electives. For these 26 semester hours of course work, the curriculum does not
require specific courses; rather, courses are chosen by advisement, to expand the student’s
professional competencies, adding to but not duplicating knowledge and skills students have
acquired in courses that are part of the master’s degree. Students pursuing the minor in Latin
American Music include among their course work at least 12 semester hours of Latin American
music electives, and their lecture-recital must be based on a Latin American music topic. The
juried recitals serve in lieu of a comprehensive examination and dissertation in the program.
There is no foreign language requirement. For students who have begun a doctoral program
elsewhere before coming to CUA, the program may accept a limited number of transfer credits
with approval of the School of Music Curriculum Committee and the full faculty.

As a means of contributing to their professional development, students in the program are chosen
to teach instrumental techniques classes for undergraduate music education majors and to teach
private instruction to non-music majors, when such opportunities are available; some students
have also coached undergraduate performing ensembles. Most students in the program are
already active professionally in the field as public school or college music teachers or as military
or free-lance musicians.



                                                78
Graduates of the program typically pursue professional careers in musical performance (solo
recitals, chamber music, orchestras, military bands, etc.) and/or studio teaching (private or
university/college). Those who pursue university/college teaching also typically coach small
ensembles, teach pedagogy and literature courses in their major performance area, and teach
courses in any other areas of competence (such as undergraduate music theory or music history
courses).


                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Doctor of Musical Arts in Orchestral Instruments will:

1.     Demonstrate advanced mastery of all aspects of performance on the major instrument,
including technique, sound production, style, performance practice, memorization (where
applicable), ensemble playing, artistic imagination, and others.

2.     Exhibit a high professional level in the preparation and presentation of public
performances, both as a soloist and collaborative musician.

3.     Have acquired skills involved in musical research, such as choosing, researching, and
organizing a topic and providing oral and written documentation of the research.

4.     Have broadened and deepened their knowledge of music theory and music history
through course work that builds upon and expands course work in these areas completed during
their undergraduate and master’s degrees.

5.     Have acquired basic pedagogical knowledge and skills in their performance area or in
another area, such as music theory, as School of Music resources permit.


                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1.       Admission: Applicants should have the master’s degree in performance or comparable
         preparation, which provides evidence that they have demonstrated performance ability at
a level that warrants consideration for doctoral study as performance majors. They should also
provide a listing of their repertoire, records of professional experience (e.g., programs and
critical reviews), and a description of teaching experience. The faculty advisor of the program,
who is also a member of the D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments Committee, evaluates admission
credentials.
2.       Audition: As apart of admission to the School of Music, applicants to the program must
pass a 10-minute audition before a faculty committee. Auditions are evaluated for technique,
sound production, intonation, style, and artistic interpretation, and students must play at a level
that predicts success in the required recitals of the doctoral program in order to pass. The
audition         gives faculty members an initial opportunity to assess applicants’ performance
levels, and it also plays a role in maintaining a highly selective admission process.



                                                79
3.       Placement Tests: As a requirement for admission to the degree program, every D.M.A.
student takes placement tests in written and analytical music theory, aural skills, and music
history, to determine whether he/she is qualified to take graduate courses in these areas. Students
normally take these tests immediately prior to their first semester of study. Students must pass all
three placement tests or successfully complete graduate review courses in any areas of deficiency
with at least a grade of C. Credits earned in these courses do not apply toward degree
requirements, and students must pass assigned graduate review courses before taking specified
graduate courses in the applicable areas.
4.       Entrance recital: Admission to the degree program also requires that students pass a 60-
minute private solo recital. The D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments Committee assigns the repertoire
for this recital (based on the repertoire list submitted by the student during the admission
process), which must be communicated to the student at least 30 days before the recital; the
committee also evaluates the performance. The recital normally takes place on the first day of the
student’s first semester of study; less often, it may occur later during the first semester of study
or at the beginning of the second semester of study, if circumstances warrant. The entrance
recital is evaluated for technical accuracy and fluency, sound production, intonation, style,
performance practice, interplay with the accompanist, artistic imagination, and others, the goal
being to determine if the student is playing at a level that predicts success in the remaining five
recitals required by the curriculum. The entrance recital is perhaps the most crucial component of
the admission process, given that this is a musical performance degree. It is possible that a
student who has been admitted initially to the School of Music on the basis of submitted
credentials and a 10-minute audition may fail the entrance recital, because presenting a creditable
full-length recital is much more difficult and involved than presenting a short audition; however,
the faculty attempts to avoid this possibility by being highly selective during the audition
process.
5.       Course Work and GPA: The faculty in graduate music academic courses typically base
students’ grades on assignments, projects, examinations, and/or term papers; grades in Orchestra,
private lessons, and chamber music are typically based on the quality of students’ musical
performance, which reflects on the thoroughness of students’ outside preparation, musical skill,
and conscientiousness in applying the instructors’ teachings and instructions. For all courses
(both academic and performance), with the exception of recitals (which are graded pass/fail),
students receive a letter grade. Students must maintain an average of B or better for graduation;
the GPA is based upon a combination of all graduate-level academic and performance courses.
Graduate students who earn a C or F in a course may repeat the course one time, in which case
the calculation of the GPA includes only the grade earned in the repeated course. A student who
fails two courses (performance or academic) is subject to dismissal.
6.       Advising: The D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments Committee, one of whose members serves
also as the advisor for the program, guides students in their work. The advisor evaluates
admission credentials, works with students in selecting their courses, monitors overall progress
toward the completion of degree requirements, coordinates recital scheduling, oversees and
approves the lecture-recital research paper, and certifies to the dean that students have completed
degree requirements. The committee as a whole approves the repertoire for student recitals and
the lecture-recital proposal, and its members attend all student recitals and evaluate the
performances. Committee members also teach private lessons, coach chamber music courses
and/or teach academic courses, which students in the program take. This puts them in a position
to aid directly in the ongoing assessment of student progress in course work and performance.



                                                80
7.       Language: There is no foreign language requirement in this program.
8.       Pedagogy: Students for whom teaching is a career goal typically take courses in string
pedagogy (MUS 569) and orchestral literature (MUS 568) for string majors; private-instruction
study in pedagogy and literature for brass and woodwind players; and Pedagogy of Music
Theory (MUS 713). Student work in these courses is guided and evaluated by the course
instructors.
9.       Performance on the Major Instrument: Because this is a degree program in musical
performance, assessment of the student’s performance level on the major instrument is frequent
and ongoing until the completion of the degree. The principal means for assessing progress are
through private lessons, collaborative music-making experiences, required recitals, and a lecture-
recital (see below).
10.      Private Lessons: Students must complete at least 12 semester hours of private (one-on-
one) lessons on their major instrument, the equivalent of a one-hour lesson each week for four
semesters. The emphasis in private lessons is on technical considerations and on coaching the
performance of solo repertoire and orchestral excerpts at a high professional level. Letter grades
are assigned for lessons, based on the quality of the student’s musical growth and on
performance in the lessons (which reflects on the thoroughness of outside preparation, musical
skill, and conscientiousness in applying the instructor’s teachings). Violinists and cellists study
with full-time faculty members, who are also members of the D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments
Committee, which provides weekly opportunities for assessing their progress. Other instrument
majors study with School of Music-approved part-time faculty, who most often are members of
the National or the Baltimore Symphony Orchestras, but sometimes are noted performers from
New York, Philadelphia, or other east-coast cities. These instructors evaluate students according
to accepted criteria of what is required for players to function successfully as professional
musicians in orchestras or solo careers. Part-time faculty members are consulted on student
progress as needed.
11.      Repertoire List: Unlike some of CUA’s other D.M.A. programs (e.g., piano
performance), this program does not have a repertoire list requirement or repertoire classes
separate from private lessons.
12.      Orchestra: Students must perform in the University Symphony Orchestra for four
semesters. This provides the D.M.A. Orchestra Committee opportunities to assess their
performance through input from the Orchestra’s conductor as needed and observations of their
performance in concerts several times a semester. Students in Orchestra are given letter grades,
based on the quality of their musical performance, which reflects on the thoroughness of their
outside preparation, musical skill, and conscientiousness in applying the conductor’s
instructions.
13.      Chamber Music: Most string majors enroll in several semesters of elective chamber
music. Because the chamber music coach is one of the members of the D.M.A. Orchestral
Instruments Committee, this provides weekly opportunities to assess student progress in
collaborative music-making. As in Orchestra, students receive letter grades, based on the quality
of their musical performance, which reflects on the thoroughness of their outside preparation,
musical skill, and conscientiousness in applying the conductor’s instructions. These opportunities
for assessment are not normally available for woodwind and brass majors, who do not normally
enroll in chamber music courses.
14.      Juried Recitals: Following the completion of 28 semester hours of course work, students
in the program begin performing a required series of public recitals as culminating experiences:



                                                81
4 recitals at 3 semester hours each (solo recital, concerto recital, chamber music recital, and
lecture-recital) and a final non-credit solo recital. For the solo, concerto, and chamber music
recitals, the D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments Committee approves repertoire proposed by the
student.. The committee assigns the repertoire for the final recital, which the student must
prepare without the aid of the teacher or coach and present in 90 days as a demonstration of
his/her ability to prepare unfamiliar repertoire independently. Procedures for the lecture-recital
are described below. The D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments Committee attends and evaluates all
recitals. Recitals are evaluated for preparation, technical accuracy and fluency, intonation, sound
production, style, performance practice, memorization (when applicable), interaction with
collaborating musicians, artistic imagination, stage presence, and others. All recitals are graded
as pass or fail. Students who receive failing grades in two courses (academic or performance) are
subject to dismissal. Unlike recitals in the B.M. and M.M. programs, students do not present a
preliminary committee hearing for these recitals; as doctoral students and professional musicians,
they are evaluated on their ability to prepare and present recitals for critical review without a
prior hearing to determine how well they have prepared.
15.      Lecture-Recital: For the lecture-recital, students choose a topic that involves research
into some aspect of the literature, performance practice, pedagogy, or history of their major
instrument. The D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments Committee must approve a proposal that
summarizes the intended research and lists the musical works the student will perform (and their
timings). The student then presents the results of his/her research in both a lecture-recital and a
research paper. The lecture-recital typically consists of approximately 30 minutes of lecture and
30 minutes of performance, which the committee considers of equal importance in evaluation.
The faculty adviser guides, evaluates, and approves the research paper. The lecture component is
evaluated for organization, substance, and smoothness of presentation; the performance
component is evaluated using the same criteria as other recitals (see above); the research paper is
evaluated according to criteria for term papers in academic courses. The paper, though of modest
proportions, often goes into more depth than is possible within the time constraints of the lecture-
recital presentation itself. The lecture-recital presentation is evaluated as pass or fail by the
committee; however, a grade for the course is not submitted until the research paper has been
completed and has received final approval from the faculty advisor.
16.      Indirect Assessment Measures: The School of Music does not presently administer
alumni surveys, student evaluations of its graduate programs, focus group studies, or other
formal indirect assessment measures. Such measures would constitute valuable additions to the
school’s doctoral programs.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

1.      Student performance in private lessons, chamber music, and Orchestra provide instructors
in      those courses with weekly opportunities to assess their teaching methods (what works
well, what does not) and make improvements. Faculty members in the area of music history and
in music theory meet frequently to discuss issues in their areas. Any resulting proposals for
curricular change are then submitted to the School of Music’s Curriculum Committee and full
faculty for approval.
2.      Private lessons, chamber music classes, Orchestra, and recitals are also a mutually
supportive means of monitoring and students’ progress on their instruments and improving
student learning. The Orchestra conductor, chamber music coach, or recital committee, for



                                                82
example, can ask the private instructor to address certain technical problems a given student is
having. This is done on an as-needed basis.
3.      Following each recital (about 15-20 each semester), the D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments
Committee meets to discuss what went well and what could have been done better. Based on
these discussions, the committee has been compiling a list of guidelines for improving student
recitals in general, which will be made available to students in a handbook for use as they
prepare their recitals.
4.      The advisor of the program has been compiling a comparable list of guidelines for
improving the general quality of research papers associated with the lecture-recital, which will
also be made available to students.
5.      While the curriculum is organized to meet the needs and goals of the students, and
students take a mixture of music theory, music history, and professional development courses,
several years of experience guiding students through the program and discussions with alumni
and students nearing completion of the degree have suggested to the faculty advisor the
desirability of considering revisions to the curriculum to help it serve students better. To
implement such revisions, the D.M.A. Orchestral Instruments Committee will initially need to
examine doctoral programs in orchestral instruments at other universities and study
university/college job descriptions to determine what types of competencies in addition to
performance on the major instrument are most often desired. The committee will then discuss
with the dean how best to address the results of this research within the budgetary possibilities of
the School of Music. Finally, the revised curriculum will be presented to the school’s Curriculum
Committee and full faculty for approval.




                                                83
                         Doctor of Musical Arts in Piano Performance

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description

The Catholic University of America’s Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Piano Performance is a
comprehensive, highly selective program that provides advanced study at the highest artistic and
pedagogical levels to prepare applicants for performance careers (solo and collaborative),
college/university/conservatory teaching and leadership in the profession. The main focus of the
program is on building and developing in every D.M.A. student the abilities, skills, knowledge
and artistry necessary for successful performing, as well as university-level teaching careers. The
program seeks to continue the development of professional performing musicians, who are also
educated musicians. Thus, the curriculum combines a careful complement of performance-
related studies with historical and theoretical studies.

Applicants for the D.M.A. in Piano Performance must have extensive performance and teaching
experience after receiving their master’s degrees from an accredited institution in piano
performance. Acceptance is dependent on the successful completion of a public entrance solo
recital, and individual student curriculum is then designed based on each entrant’s performance
on various entrance examinations in piano literature, piano pedagogy, music history, music
theory, chamber music and solo performance. Based on the results of the entrance examinations,
the Piano Division D.M.A. committee, consisting of the Chair of the Piano Division and any two
other piano faculty members, in conference with the student arranges a program of study ranging
from 54 to 72 credit hours beyond the master’s degree. Throughout the course of studies, D.M.A.
candidates take weekly private piano lessons, and the faculty carefully monitors their
performance and academic work via required recitals, performances, repertoire classes, tests,
final exams and research papers. All D.M.A. candidates must maintain a ―B‖ average to
graduate. There is no foreign language requirement.

The curriculum’s design balances well the solo performance aspect of the program with studies
and training in other important areas of the profession. The D.M.A. Committee communicates
the individualized list of courses and repertoire each student will complete in partial satisfaction
of degree requirements to the student in writing. Although each degree program is
individualized, a typical program might include the following: MUPI 885, Private Instruction in
Piano (12 credits); MUS 605/606, Chamber Music (3-5 credits); Piano Literature and Pedagogy
courses (6-12 credits); Music History and Music Theory, by advisement (12 credits); MUS 931,
Repertoire List (3 credits); Electives, by advisement (3-7 credits) and Five Required Recitals (15
credits) plus a Final Recital (0 credits).

The Piano Division has designed and offers more than 15 graduate piano-related courses. Piano
Pedagogy courses, internships, and observations (MUS 500, Piano Pedagogy I; MUS 502, Piano
Pedagogy II; MUS 504, Piano Pedagogy III; MUS 506, The Musician in Modern Society; MUS
529, Internship in Teaching Piano; MUS 525, Group Issues in Piano Teaching) promote
understanding and competence in teaching piano to all types and levels of students. The focus of
collaborative piano courses, such as MUS 605/606, Chamber Music or Accompanying, and



                                                 84
MUS 524, Chamber Music Techniques, is on developing and teaching skills necessary for any
type of collaborative playing. The sequence of five piano literature courses (MUS 522, Piano
Literature I; MUS 523, Piano Literature II; MUS 527, Piano Literature III; MUS 528, Piano
Literature IV; MUS 530, Piano Literature V) promotes understanding and thorough knowledge
of the piano repertoire, styles and instruments from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century.
The piano division also offers on a regular basis piano seminars on different topics (MUS 727,
Seminar in Piano Pedagogy; MUS 718, Seminar in Pianism).

D.M.A. candidates study with an impressive faculty of artists and scholars and participate in
master classes, which some of the world’s most respected performers offer, including Boris
Berman, Leslie Howard, Leif Ove Andsnes, Horacio Gutierrez, Andre Watts, and Misha Dichter.

All D.M.A. candidates participate regularly in on- and off-campus performances, concerts,
recitals and special events. Off campus, these take place in settings like museums, galleries,
churches, embassies, conservatories, schools, colleges, the Kennedy Center or Constitution Hall.
Every year, many of our piano graduate students apply and receive invitations to participate in
international, national and local summer music festivals. Some of our best students earn
invitations to compete in national and international piano competitions as well.

After earning their D.M.A. degrees, graduates enjoy a large scope of career choices, including
performing artist; recording artist; independent piano teacher; piano faculty in college,
university, conservatory, music academy or community music school; music faculty in private or
public school; church music director; choir conductor; vocal coach; choir, opera, dance, or
church accompanist. The professional employment records of our doctoral graduates, especially
in university schools and departments of music in the USA and abroad, attest to the excellence of
this individually need-based, structured DMA program.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Doctor of Musical Arts in Piano Performance will:

22. Demonstrate extraordinary mastery, breadth of knowledge and doctoral level of skills of all
    aspects of piano performance, including technique, sound production, style, performance
    practice, memorization, sight-reading, accompaniment, ensemble playing, recital preparation,
    artistic imagination, and others.
23. Have attained a very high professional level in preparation and presentation of public
    performances, as a soloist or collaborative musician.
24. Demonstrate competence in teaching piano and piano-related subject matters to all types and
    levels of students, including teaching at college/university level.
25. Understand and provide evidence of a thorough knowledge of the piano repertoire, styles and
    instruments from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century.

                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. DMA Entrance Solo Recital: Applicants to the D.M.A. program must successfully pass a 70-
   minutes-long public solo recital presented during the first week of the semester for which



                                                85
     they have been provisionally admitted to the School of Music. The DMA committee selects
     the recital program from works on the applicant’s repertoire list, and it communicates its
     selections to the applicant 30 days prior to recital date. A committee of at least three piano
     faculty members attends the recital and must decide if the student has passed the recital,
     which makes the student’s admission into the degree program official. A successful recital
     generally consists of the applicant performing the repertoire from memory, up to tempo,
     technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of the music. An applicant may repeat
     a failed recital once.
2.   DMA Entrance Examinations: Applicants must take diagnostic written examinations in piano
     literature, piano pedagogy, history of music, and music theory during the week before the
     semester starts. The students’ individual course curricula are created after the completion of
     these exams. The entrance requirements also include private performance examinations of a
     chamber music work (chosen by the candidate, who is also responsible for obtaining his/her
     own supporting performers) and a short piece (chosen by the committee and given to the
     candidate with only 24-hours advance notice) for a committee of three piano faculty
     members. Students are regarded as Degree Candidates after they have passed their entrance
     recital as well as taken the entrance examinations.
3.   Weekly private piano lessons: Piano candidates must take weekly piano lessons with their
     private piano instructors. Each private piano instructor assigns the repertoire for each
     required recital from the Repertoire List and oversees its preparation. Private piano lessons
     stress music of all styles, development of technical and interpretive skills, preparation for a
     public recital, and improving the ability to read at sight. At the end of each semester, each
     private piano instructor submits grades for their students based on attendance, preparation
     and performance of the assigned repertoire.
4.   Advising: An academic adviser monitors each candidate’s progress toward the D.M.A. There
     is only one adviser for the D.M.A. in Piano Performance, who meets with each student every
     semester and helps plan course loads, repertoires, and schedules of required up-coming
     performances based on the written plan which the D.M.A. Committee and candidates
     developed together at the beginning of their doctoral studies.
5.   Course work: Individual instructors measure progress in academic courses by means of
     quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their discretion.
6.   GPA: All candidates must maintain a minimum B average across performance and academic
     courses for graduation. A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate
     course may repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average includes
     only the grade earned in the repeated course.
7.   Weekly Repertoire Classes: Every piano faculty member offers weekly repertoire classes
     during which his/her piano students have opportunities to practice performing in front of an
     audience. Although these classes are neither required nor part of the curriculum, most
     students attend them regularly and appreciate the chance they offer to try out their
     memorized and prepared pieces before playing the required recitals. In these non-credit
     classes, piano students perform prepared works, as well as works-in-progress when they are
     close to being performance-ready. After each in-class performance, the piano professor
     evaluates their levels of preparation and gives important suggestions for further improvement
     of the performed repertoires. Performance in repertoire classes does not affect final grades
     directly.
8.   Repertoire List: The D.M.A. Committee assigns each candidate a repertoire list at the



                                                 86
    beginning of the program; candidates must learn the repertoire and give evidence of public
    performance prior to giving the final D.M.A recital. Candidates must memorize all works on
    the list and perform them either in recital or in repertoire class. Documentation of successful
    preparation and performance of the repertoire includes any of the following: (1) signed
    statement from a private piano instructor, representing a performance in a repertoire class; (2)
    performance in a D.M.A. juried recital; (3) copy of the printed program from a public
    performance on- or off-campus; or 4) DVD or video recording of a performance.
9. Five D.M.A. Public Juried Recitals (one solo, two concertos, one chamber music and one
    lecture): Candidates must pass five public, juried recitals for graduation. Candidates select
    the contents of these recitals in consultation with the D.M.A. Committee. Each should
    involve approximately 70 minutes playing time and be performed from memory, except for
    the chamber music recital. Candidates may give their recitals in any order. A committee of at
    least three piano faculty members attends and grades (Pass or Fail) each recital. A successful
    recital generally consists of the candidate performing the repertoire at performance level,
    from memory, up to tempo, technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of the
    music. A candidate may repeat a failed recital once.
     The required lecture recital also serves as a comprehensive review of the candidate’s
        ability to research, lecture, and perform music relating to a topic approved by the D.M.A.
        committee. The lecture recital paper must reflect a high standard of scholarship and is
        deposited in dissertation form. The paper is supervised by the student’s adviser. A typical
        lecture recital consists of 35 minutes of playing and 35 minutes of speaking.
10. Final D.M.A. Juried Solo Recital: The final D.M.A. public juried solo recital (70-minutes
    long) serves as the final comprehensive examination; it demonstrates the candidate’s ability
    independently to solve performance issues related to technique, learning, discipline and style.
    The D.M.A. Committee selects the program content for the recital and communicates it to the
    candidate 90 days in advance of the performance. The candidate must prepare the program
    without the aid of a teacher or coach. A committee of at least three piano faculty members
    attends and grades (Pass or Fail) the final recital. A successful recital generally consists of
    the candidate performing the repertoire at performance level, from memory, up to tempo,
    technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of the music; it should demonstrate
    the candidate’s ability as a performer of the highest caliber. A candidate may repeat a failed
    recital once.
11. Teaching: Pedagogy classes are included in the curriculum of all D.M.A. in Piano
    Performance degree students. Through supervised teaching by the instructor and required
    observations of other piano faculty members’ teaching, these courses prepare the degree
    candidates for teaching of all types and levels of students.
12. Course evaluations: At the end of each semester, students complete course and faculty
    evaluations for the courses they are taking.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

3.     The piano faculty intends to collect more data on piano graduates’ career choices and to
       adjust the curriculum accordingly.
4.     Close association between faculty and graduates provides feedback on our programs and,
       where warranted, allows consideration for program adjustments. Course evaluations are
       administered at the end of each semester. These are reviewed by the Dean of the School



                                                87
of Music, the Chair of the Piano Division, and the instructors of the reviewed courses.




                                        88
                        Doctor of Musical Arts in Vocal Accompanying

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description

The Catholic University of America’s Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Vocal Accompanying is
a comprehensive, highly selective program designed to provide advanced study at the highest
artistic and pedagogical levels to prepare applicants for collaborative performance careers,
college/university/conservatory teaching and leadership in the profession. The main focus of the
program is building and developing in every one of its D.M.A. candidates the abilities, skills,
knowledge and artistry necessary for successful collaborative performing, vocal coaching and
university-level teaching. The program seeks to continue the development of professional
performing musicians who are also educated musicians. Thus, the curriculum combines a careful
complement of performance related studies with historical and theoretical studies.

Applicants for the D.M.A. in Vocal Accompanying must have extensive performance and
teaching experience after receiving a master’s degree from an accredited institution in piano,
vocal accompanying or chamber music performance. Acceptance is dependent on the successful
completion of a public vocal-accompanying entrance recital, and individual student curriculum is
then designed based on each entrant’s performance on various entrance examinations in piano-
chamber music literature, vocal music literature, music history, music theory, and sight-
reading/transposition. Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the Piano Division
D.M.A. Committee, consisting of the Chair of the Piano Division and any two other piano
faculty members, in conference with the student arranges a program of study ranging from 54 to
72 credit hours beyond the master’s degree. Throughout the course of studies, D.M.A. candidates
in vocal accompanying take weekly private piano lessons, and the faculty carefully monitors
their performance and academic work via required recitals, performances, repertoire classes,
tests, final exams and research papers. All candidates must maintain a ―B‖ average to graduate.
They must also pass language examinations in French, German and Italian.

The curriculum’s design balances well the performance aspect of the program with studies and
training in other important areas of the profession. The D.M.A. Committee communicates the
individualized list of courses and repertoire each student will complete in partial satisfaction of
degree requirements to the student in writing. Although each degree program is individualized, a
typical program might include the following: MUPI 885, Private Instruction in Piano (9-12
credits); MUS 605/606, Chamber Music (2 credits); Music History courses (6-12 credits); Music
Theory courses (3-9 credits); Opera Coaching Techniques, musical preparation (6 credits); Core
Courses in Vocal Literature, Performance Practices, etc., by advisement (13-26 credits); MUS
931, Repertoire List (0 credits); Six Required Recitals (13 credits); Final Recital (0 credits).

The Vocal Division of the School of Music offers and supervises a significant portion of the
curriculum for this degree program. All candidates in the D.M.A. in Vocal Accompanying
program have opportunities for first-hand experiences in opera, musical, choral, oratorio and
vocal concert productions that the Vocal Division organizes. The list of Vocal Division courses
in which these candidates might enroll include the following: MUS 511/512, Survey of Solo



                                                89
Vocal Literature; MUS 572, Italian Lyric Diction and Repertoire; MUS 574, French Lyric
Diction and Repertoire; MUS 578, Spanish Lyric Diction and Repertoire; MUS 588, German
Lyric Diction and Repertoire; MUS 518/538, Opera Practicum; MUS 535, Anatomy and Vocal
Physiology; MUS 702, Survey of German Lied; MUS 704, French Melodie and others. In
addition, the Piano Division offers more than 15 graduate piano-related courses in which
candidates in the D.M.A. in Vocal Accompanying might enroll. The focus of collaborative piano
courses, such as MUS, 605/606 Chamber Music or Accompanying, and MUS 524, Chamber
Music Techniques, is on developing and teaching skills necessary for any type of collaborative
playing. The sequence of five piano literature courses (MUS 522, Piano Literature I; MUS 523,
Piano Literature II; MUS 527, Piano Literature III; MUS 528, Piano Literature IV; MUS 530,
Piano Literature V) promotes understanding and thorough knowledge of the piano repertoire,
styles and instruments from the pre-Baroque period up to the 21st century. The piano division
also regularly offers seminars on varied topics (MUS 727, Seminar in Piano Pedagogy; MUS
718, Seminar in Pianism).

D.M.A. candidates study with an impressive faculty of artists and scholars and participate in
master classes, which some of the world’s most respected performers offer, including Boris
Berman, Leslie Howard, Leif Ove Andsnes, Horacio Gutierrez, Andre Watts, and Misha Dichter.

All D.M.A. candidates participate regularly in on- and off-campus performances, concerts,
recitals and special events. Off campus, these take place in settings like museums, galleries,
churches, embassies, conservatories, schools, colleges, the Kennedy Center or Constitution Hall.
Every year, many of our Vocal Accompanying candidates apply and receive invitations to
participate in international, national and local summer music festivals.

After graduation, vocal accompanying doctoral graduates enjoy a large scope of career choices,
including performing artist; recording artist; independent piano teacher; piano faculty in college,
university, conservatory, music academy or community music school; music faculty in private or
public school; church music director; choir conductor; vocal coach; choir, opera, dance, or
church accompanist. The professional employment of our doctoral graduates, especially in
university schools and departments of music here and abroad, attests to the excellence of this
individually need-based, structured D.M.A. program.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with a Doctor of Musical Arts in Vocal Accompanying will:

26. Demonstrate extraordinary mastery and breath of knowledge of all aspects of piano-vocal
    and collaborative performance, including technique, sound production, style, performance
    practice, vocal coaching, breathing, vocal diction, sight-reading, accompaniment, ensemble
    playing, recital preparation, artistic imagination, and others.
27. Have attained a very high professional level in vocal coaching and accompanying,
    preparation and presentation of public performances as a collaborative musician.
28. Demonstrate competence in teaching piano, vocal coaching, chamber music, accompanying,
    sight-reading, vocal diction and other piano-related subject matters to all types and levels of
    students, including teaching on college/university level.



                                                90
29. Understand and provide evidence of a thorough knowledge of the vocal, opera, solo and
    chamber music repertoire and styles from the Baroque period up to the 21st century.
30. Exhibit working/basic knowledge and skills in French, German and Italian.
                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. DMA Entrance Vocal Accompanying Recital: Applicants to the D.M.A. program must
   successfully pass a 70-minute-long public vocal accompanying recital presented during the
   first week of the semester for which they have been provisionally admitted to the School of
   Music. The D.M.A. Committee selects the recital program from works on the applicant’s
   repertoire list and communicates it to the candidate 30 days prior to recital date. The
   applicant is responsible for obtaining his/her own supporting performers. A committee of at
   least three piano faculty members attends the recital and must decide if the student has
   passed the recital, which makes the student’s admission into the degree program official. A
   successful recital generally consists of the applicant performing the repertoire at a
   performance level, up to tempo, technically polished, and with a stylistic understanding of
   the music. Applicants may repeat a failed recital once.
2. DMA Entrance Examinations: Applicants must take diagnostic written examinations in vocal
   music literature, piano-chamber literature, history of music, and music theory during the
   week before the semester starts. The entrance requirements also include a private sight-
   reading and transposition examination with a committee of three piano faculty members. The
   students’ individual course curricula are created after the completion of these exams.
   Students are regarded as Degree Candidates after they have passed their entrance recital and
   taken the entrance examinations.
3. Weekly private piano lessons: Vocal Accompanying candidates must register for and take
   weekly piano lessons with their private piano instructors. The private piano instructor assigns
   the required recital repertoire from the Repertoire List and oversees its preparation. Private
   piano lessons stress music of all styles, development of technical and interpretive skills,
   preparation for public recitals, and improving the ability to read at sight. At the end of the
   semester, private piano instructors submit grades for their private students based on
   attendance, preparation and performance of the assigned repertoire.
4. Advising: An academic adviser monitors each candidate’s progress toward the D.M.A. There
   is only one adviser for the D.M.A. in Vocal Accompanying, who meets with each student
   every semester to help plan course loads, repertoires, and schedules of required up-coming
   performances based on the written plan which the D.M.A. Committee and candidates have
   developed together at the beginning of their doctoral studies.
5. Course work: Individual instructors measure progress in academic courses by means of
   quizzes, tests, final examinations and research papers, which they assign at their discretion.
6. GPA: All candidates must maintain a minimum B average across performance and academic
   courses for graduation. A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate
   course may repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average includes
   only the grade earned in the repeated course.
7. Weekly Repertoire Classes: Every piano faculty member offers weekly repertoires classes in
   which his/her piano students have opportunities to practice performing in front of an
   audience. Although these classes are neither required nor part of the curriculum, most
   students attend them regularly and appreciate the chance they offer to try out their prepared
   pieces before playing the required recitals. In these non-credit classes, vocal accompanying



                                               91
    students perform prepared works, as well as works-in-progress when they are close to being
    performance-ready. After each in-class performance, the piano professor evaluates their
    levels of preparation and gives important suggestions for further improvement of the
    performed repertoires. Performance in repertoire classes does not affect final grades directly.
8. Repertoire List: The D.M.A. Committee assigns a repertoire list of operas and opera arias at
    the beginning of the D.M.A. program. Candidates must learn and give evidence of having
    publicly performed all these works in recital, repertoire class or rehearsal before the final
    D.M.A. recital. Documentation of successful preparation and performance of the repertoire
    may include any of the following: 1) signed statement from a private piano teacher,
    representing a performance in a repertoire class; 2) performance in a D.M.A. juried recital; 3)
    copy of the printed program from a public performance on- or off-campus; 4) DVD or video
    recording of a performance.
9. Six D.M.A. Public Juried Recitals (one chamber music, one vocal-instrumental, and four
    vocal-accompanying recitals): Candidates must pass six public, juried recitals for graduation.
    They select the contents of these recitals in consultation with the D.M.A. committee. Each
    should involve approximately 70 minutes playing time. Candidates may give their recitals in
    any order. A committee of at least three piano faculty members attends and grades (Pass or
    Fail) each recital. A successful recital generally consists of the candidate performing the
    repertoire on a performance level, up to tempo, technically polished, well rehearsed, and with
    a stylistic understanding of the music. A candidate may repeat a failed recital once.
10. Final D.M.A. Juried Vocal Accompanying Recital: The final, non-credit D.M.A. public,
    juried vocal accompanying recital (70-minutes long) is the final comprehensive examination;
    it demonstrates each candidate’s ability to solve performance issues related to technique,
    learning, discipline and style independently. The D.M.A. Committee selects the program
    content of this recital and communicates it to the candidate 60 days in advance of the
    performance. The candidate must prepare the program without the aid of a teacher or coach.
    The candidate is responsible for the preparation of other musicians, thus demonstrating
    his/her ability to rehearse, coach and prepare a collaborative performance. A committee of at
    least three piano faculty members attends and grades (Pass or Fail) the final recital. A
    successful recital generally consists of the candidate performing his/her repertoire on a
    performance level, up to tempo, technically polished, well rehearsed and with a stylistic
    understanding of the music; it should demonstrates the candidate’s ability as a performer and
    a coach of the highest caliber. Candidates may repeat a failed final recital once.
11. Language Examinations: Candidates must pass language examinations in French, German,
    and Italian. Either the Voice Division of the School of Music or the Department of Modern
    Languages and Literatures in the School of Arts and Sciences administers these exams.
12. Teaching: The Opera Coaching Techniques, vocal diction and chamber music courses
    prepare the candidates for both teaching and coaching at universities, colleges, opera
    companies and other vocal performing institutions.
13. Course evaluations: At the end of each semester, students complete course and faculty
    evaluations for the courses they are taking.

                        IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
5.     The piano faculty intends to collect more data on piano graduates’ career choices and to
       adjust the curriculum accordingly.
6.     Close association between faculty and graduates provides feedback on our programs and,



                                                92
where warranted, allows consideration for program adjustments. Course evaluations are
administered at the end of each semester. These are reviewed by the Dean of the School
of Music, the Chair of the Piano Division, and the instructors of the reviewed courses.




                                       93
                            Doctor of Musical Arts in Composition

                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


I. Program Description
The Doctor of Musical Arts (DMA) in Composition seeks to train composers who possess a
significant level of artistic accomplishment, and are able to pursue creative and academic work at
the highest level.

The program consists of a minimum of 58 credit hours beyond the master’s degree. Coursework
is combined with private composition instruction and a four-part dissertation requirement.

Curriculum
The DMA in Composition, as is the case with all DMA programs in the School of Music, is
individually tailored to each student, and the curriculum, arrived at by consultation between
student and advisor, meets the specific needs of students while bolstering areas of deficiency
which may be present.

DMA in Composition
12 credit
          MUPI 885               Composition (private study)
hours
4         MUS 629                Composition Seminar (effective for students entering fall 2007)
3         MUS XXX                Music Theory (by advisement)
3         MUS 714                Advanced Counterpoint
3         MUS 581                Advanced Orchestration
3         MUS 6XX                Conducting
6         MUS                    Music History electives
                                 Required compositions and lecture-recital (see "Dissertation
24
                                 requirement," below)

Total: 58-70 required credit hours (54-70 for students who entered prior to fall 2007)

Language requirement
No language requirement currently exists in the DMA Composition program.

Concentration in Latin American music
The DMA in Composition degree also offers the option, for interested students, of including a
Latin American Music concentration in cooperation with the Latin American Music Center,
housed in the School of Music. In consultation with the student's advisory committee, the DMA
curriculum will include at least 12 credit hours of Latin American music elective courses.

Additionally, the dissertation composition b.) listed above (major work for chorus and orchestra,
short opera, extended operatic scene, or an accompanied Mass) should be based upon a Latin
American text or subject matter.



                                                94
Dissertation requirement
As a creative professional degree rather than a research degree, the Doctor of Musical Arts
curriculum and graduation documents produce a series of new, original musical compositions, of
differing length and dimensions, as part of a final portfolio of compositions. An analytical
document accompanies one of the four components (the lecture-recital).

The term ―dissertation‖ with reference to a capstone composition is commensurate with
numerous peer doctoral composition programs in the United States. Thus, although the term
frequently implies a work of original scholarship, the creative dissertation is interpreted to
reference a substantial original artistic work which represents a significant technical and esthetic
achievement. The originality of the work lies in the composer’s work.

Thus, the dissertation requirement for the DMA in Composition consists of four independent
parts, each of which represents 6 credit hours:

a.) an extended work of major proportions for orchestra or instrumental ensemble;

b.) a major work for chorus and orchestra, a short opera, an extended operatic scene, or an
accompanied Mass;

c.) a chamber music composition;

d.) a public lecture-recital at which the student presents a formal paper discussing and analyzing
his or her own compositions.

The course designator MUS 903 or 904 (―DMA Recital or Composition,‖ 6 credit hours) is
employed to reference each of the four components. Students may not register for more than one
6-credit component in a given semester. If the student elects to register for MUS 903 or 904
during the summer, the work must be spread across the first and second six-week summer
sessions.

Admission to Candidacy
Presently, admission to candidacy is obtained by completion of the 34 hours of coursework.
After completion of coursework, the student may register for any one of the four components of
the 24-credit dissertation requirement. Only one component may be taken during the same term:
the student may begin work on the component prior to the term in which he/she registers for
MUS 903 or 904; however, the student must complete the component composition or recital, and
receive committee approval (with a grade of ―pass‖) by the conclusion of the relevant term in
order to advance to the next component.

Students may normally not begin work on their dissertation requirement until they have
completed the 34 credits of coursework.

Comprehensive Examination
At present, no comprehensive examination is administered, although the composition faculty is
developing a proposal, to be presented in spring 2009, for approval by the School of Music


                                                 95
Curriculum Committee and full faculty for the institution of comprehensive examinations in the
DMA Composition program effective for students entering in fall 2010.

The institution of these examinations will provide a necessary barrier to candidacy, and provide
the occasion to summarize and consolidate the coursework.

More detail as to the content of the proposed comprehensive examinations is given in section III
below.

Doctoral Committee
DMA committees are comprised of the director and two readers, both of whom are preferably
members of the CUA faculty (external readers are allowed, although discouraged).
Students choose their committee members, who agree to serve in this capacity. A committee
signature form has been developed for certifying the membership of the DMA panel.

The structure of the dissertation, which represents 24 credits of the program, provides for a large
body of creative work from the student. It does represent what appears to be a disproportionate
number of credit hours, however, and the composition faculty is currently consulting to develop
a revised DMA curriculum which shifts much of the credit load toward additional coursework.

The candidate composes each component of the dissertation requirement in consultation with the
director: the 6 credits of MUS 903 or 904 entitle the student to advisement access.

A public performance requirement, with the exception of the lecture-recital, is not expected,
although the chamber work (letter c. above) is routinely included in the lecture-recital program,
and a. and b. are at least given a reading by the relevant ensembles whenever possible.

No public oral defense exists for the four-part dissertation requirement. However, the lecture-
recital, as a public event, is evaluated and judged by the faculty, who are present at the recital
and who consult to pass or not pass the recital. In this respect, then, the lecture-recital is an oral
and musical presentation consisting of numerous creative works written during the student’s time
in the program, and would normally contain one other dissertation piece, the required chamber
work, on its program.

For this reason, the lecture-recital is typically the final portion of the four MUS 903/904
components undertaken by students.

Proposal
Because the DMA dissertation requirement consists of three independent compositions and one
recital program, a formal dissertation proposal is not currently required for DMA Composition
candidates. Rather, the order of work on each of the four components of the dissertation
requirement is decided in consultation with the director, and the student registers for one
component per term.

In the case of a student pursuing a concentration in Latin American Music, agreement must be
made prior to beginning work on the dissertation pieces as to the manner in which they concern


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Latin American music.

Thus, no procedure for a dissertation proposal is in place, because a research topic per se is not
being proposed; rather, a program of creative work is undertaken in stages, with a public
component.

Approval of Dissertation
During each of the four phases of the DMA dissertation process, the candidate’s director and
committee advise and consult on each of the four scores (and, in the case of the lecture-recital,
the script). Thus, the committee edits and approves each of the four components in turn, so that
there is a chronological succession of parts. The director, in consultation with the committee,
issues a grade of pass or fail on each of the four components at the conclusion of the term for
which the student has registered. The committee does not sign the committee approval form for
each component document; rather, once all four components have been individually approved,
the director and committee sign the approval form for the completed dissertation requirement in
toto.

Deposit of Dissertation
Upon receiving the signatures of the dissertation committee, and the original final signatures on
the signature page, the student then deposits the completed, edited scores of a., b., and c. as noted
above, the scores included on d. (lecture-recital) and the text of the lecture. All of these
documents are bound together as a single document for deposit. The student also has the option
of depositing an audio recording of the lecture-recital to be included in the bound dissertation
volume.

Performance Opportunities in the DMA program
An essential component of compositional training is the frequent hearing of one’s own work,
whether in a reading or performance context. Correspondingly, the structure of the MM
curriculum is designed to build in maximum opportunity for aural realization of compositions.

Division Recitals
The composition division sponsors one recital per semester of student compositions, open to all
students enrolled in applied composition study. Additionally, student composers founded, during
the 2008-09 academic year, a student chapter of the Society of Composers, Inc. (SCI), a national
composer organization which has both professional and student divisions. The SCI chapter
sponsors a recital of student work each semester, as well (open to all members of the CUA
community who write music). Thus, at least two performances per year are offered to students.

New in the 2008-09 academic year are ―Stage Music Scenes,‖ a recital forum for scenes or
pieces in progress. This represents a further opportunity for student composers to mount
portions of their works prior to their full realization as thesis productions, or to create and
perform stand-alone scenes.

Readings
Each semester, the CUA Symphony Orchestra reads student composers’ works in a dedicated
rehearsal; these readings are recorded and made available to students for personal and



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professional growth. The Great Noise Ensemble, since fall 2009 the ensemble in residence at the
School of Music, conducts a reading of student chamber music compositions each semester, as
well. On occasion, the CUA chorus has also read student compositions.

School of Music Individual and Group Commissions
Commissions and collaborative projects have also increased opportunities for student
compositional performance. Each year, the School of Music commissions one graduate student
(typically, a DMA composition student) to compose a choral-orchestral fanfare to open the
annual Christmas concert, held in the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate
Conception.

For the past five years, group commission projects have involved CUA student composers in
creating new music for performance during the School of Music’s annual President’s Festival of
the Arts. These collaborative projects, each of which include CUA composition students, in
chronological order, are:

2005 Songs of the Forgotten War (19 composers): 1-minute chamber works based on the 19
soldier statues at the Korean War Memorial in downtown Washington, DC

2006 New Old American Songs (10 composers): 3-minute choral and instrumental works
based on American folk songs, in homage to Aaron Copland’s ―Old American Songs‖

2008 Singing, Playing, Talking Wilder (6 composers): Miniature operas or incidental music
to short, 3-minute plays by Thornton Wilder

2009 Silent Explosions, Invisible Jumps: Music, Dance and Film Create a Ruckus (7
composers): New scores to silent films by French film pioneer Georges Méliès, performed by the
Snark Ensemble both with the film and with new choreography created by CUA and DC-based
choreographers and dancers

Cross-Disciplinary Projects
A new initiative has been launched to pair composers with students in other disciplines to create
new work which stems from a joint source of inspiration: music and the partner discipline. In
fall 2008, several graduate composition students were invited to serve as consultants during a
course in CUA’s School of Architecture and Planning. Student architects were assigned a
project to design elements of a house based on a particular composition (the client is devoted to
that particular piece). A number of pieces were selected, including works by Monteverdi, J. S.
Bach, Beethoven, Debussy, and John Cage. The composers spent a class period answering
questions about their composers and consulting on the projects. Several weeks later, the
architects presented their house elements inspired by their composers.

In return, I organized a session whereby the process would work in reverse: in this case, student
composers would be given a structure upon which to compose a one-minute piece. These one-
minute chamber pieces were read by the Great Noise Ensemble, the School of Music’s ensemble
in residence, late in the semester. This architecture project was also an assignment for
Composition Seminar, so it had a curricular tie, as well. Student architects came to a session of



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Composition Seminar to consult with the composers about the structures and their architects, and
the composers then created their new instrumental pieces. The resulting exchange proved
illuminating and fruitful, and has encouraged new cross-disciplinary projects, such as ―Silent
Explosions, Invisible Jumps,‖ the 2009 President’s Festival project involving new works for
silent film and dance.

Performance in Coursework
Coursework also provides opportunities for students to hear their work performed. Advanced
Orchestration, a practical, project-based course in which students arrange and orchestrate for
different instrumental combinations, regularly includes readings of projects by instrumentalists
through the semester, culminating in a reading of the final course project by the CUA Symphony
Orchestra.

Lecture-Recital
The lecture-recital (MUS 903 or 904, 6 credits), as one of the components of the DMA
dissertation requirement, combines the student’s compositional and analytical skills. Students
produce a written document, delivered as a paper during the lecture recital (at least 60 minutes),
which analyzes and discusses the chamber works on the recital to be performed. All of the
works on the lecture-recital must have been written during the student’s matriculation in the
DMA program at CUA. The written text of the lecture-recital, including musical examples, is
included as part of the document deposited with the office of theses and dissertations.

Admission Requirements
Applicants to the DMA program must submit a portfolio of original compositions for review by
the composition faculty. Generally, 3-4 scores in contrasting media and recordings of live
performances are expected. Applicants to the DMA in Composition should have substantial and
broad experience as composers, and be capable of independent work at a high level. Students
must normally possess a master’s degree in composition to be eligible for admission to the DMA
program.

The composition faculty reviews all application materials in committee, and determines the
suitability of each applicant for the DMA program. The prior academic performance of the
candidate, the strength of the four recommendation letters, the applicant’s past compositional
experience, and the quality and originality of the submitted compositions are all important
factors in the decision to recommend admission or rejection. The percentage of students
admitted at the DMA is lower than that at the MM or BM levels, as a higher level of
accomplishment is expected of students beginning doctoral study.

Upon acceptance to the School of Music and the university, DMA students take the Theory
Placement and History Placement Exams at the beginning of their first semester of matriculation
in the master’s program. These examinations determine whether a student needs a review course
in music history (3 credits), harmony (2 credits), and/or aural skills (2 credits). A potential 7
credits of remedial coursework, not applicable to the degree, may be required of entering DMA
students who demonstrate deficiency in undergraduate theory or history training.

Entrance Examinations (in first semester of matriculation)



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The DMA Entrance Examinations in Composition serve as predictors of performance and a
methodology by which to assist in determining a student’s individually-tailored curriculum. This
is commensurate with procedure in other DMA programs in the School of Music.

The Entrance Examination in Composition initially consisted of three parts. Part III, a history
exam, has now been discontinued, and entering students take the History Placement Exam
instead.

I. Harmony, Ear Training and Sight Singing (2 hours): written and practical examination
Skills evaluated:
     Written exam on voice-leading, analysis, harmonization of melodies, realization of
        figured bass
     Sight singing of melodies (with or without solfège)
     Sight singing of rhythms
     Ear training (recognition of intervals, scales, cadences)
     Melodic dictation
     Keyboard (piano) sight reading
     Figured bass realization at the keyboard
     Harmonization of melodies at the keyboard
     Open score reading at the keyboard (chamber and orchestral scores)

II. Composition/Theory (3 hours): written examination
Skills evaluated:
     Orchestration (transcription from a piano work)
     Composition of a four-voice fugue exposition on a given subject
     Analysis of a fugue
     Analysis of a given composition (generally focusing on pitch, form, textural and motivic
        elements)

Deficiencies observed as a result of these examinations are addressed by appropriate coursework
in consultation with the advisor. Typical courses offered on this basis are ―Score Reading at the
Piano,‖ frequently offered on an independent study basis in one of the two summer sessions.

Coursework deemed to be remedial does not count toward the DMA degree; however, such
courses may be taken concurrently with graduate courses, provided that the remedial courses are
not prerequisites to the graduate courses.

Post-Graduation and Employment
The principal destination of graduates from the DMA Composition program is employment in
the academy as music faculty and artist/teachers. Prior to the present year, the most recent
graduate of the DMA program is currently a full-time, tenure-track faculty member at Howard
University.

A second destination is teaching music in secondary school contexts: some graduates have taken
positions as music instructors, either while preparing for doctoral study, or as a career
destination. Our most recent graduate from the MM Composition, Concert Music Emphasis



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program is currently employed as a secondary school choral director.

Other students embark upon a professional career involving creative and performing work in
composition with teaching or service in the profession.

In some cases, members of the clergy or foreign students take degrees and return to their
professions in their native countries. A very fine composer, who received a DMA in
Composition in 2004, is a Roman Catholic priest in South Korea, who returned to the Diocese of
Seoul upon his graduation from CUA. Another Korean DMA recipient returned to Korea to take
up a university position there.

Teaching Experience in the School of Music
Whenever possible, graduate composition students are employed as teaching assistants (TA’s)
for the School of Music’s undergraduate core music theory curriculum. This represents
extremely valuable experience and career preparation for student composers, most of whom will
teach music theory courses as part of an academic career.

TA’s are selected through a rigorous audition process (which I designed), typically in the spring
semester. The selection process consists of four steps:

a.) Written examinations in harmony and aural skills;
b.) Practical jury testing the candidate’s skill at sight singing, performing of rhythm, and
keyboard proficiency;
c.) Teaching demonstration before an actual undergraduate class;
d.) Interview with theory-composition faculty

TA’s are employed as need and budget permit. Typically, 5-6 TA’s are employed each semester.
In some cases, TA’s have had full teaching and grading responsibility for a course (these are
typically DMA students), working in collaboration with a faculty member who teaches a
corresponding section of the same course. In some cases, TA’s serve as teaching assistants for a
faculty member who teaches the lecture portions of the course: the TA’s thus teach the ―lab‖ or
―drill‖ sections under the supervision and direction of the faculty member.

Bi-weekly meetings are held with the TA’s by the chair of theory-composition, and faculty
members are encouraged to observe TA’s, as well, as their schedule permits.

GAPS (Graduate Academic Position Symposium)
During my time at CUA, I began to notice a substantial gap in the knowledge which graduate
students displayed about the nature of academic institutions, and the academic job market in
general. Although this problem was more immediately connected with doctoral students, there
was a clear relevance to masters students, as well. To assist in addressing this problem, I have,
from time to time, offered informal seminars on the academic job market, called ―GAPS:‖ the
Graduate Academic Position Symposium.
In a series of meetings, I informed the students about the types of post-secondary institutions and
music institutions in the United States (four-year colleges, junior colleges, research universities,
liberal arts colleges, departments of music, schools of music, conservatories of music), the types



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of positions available (part-time, full-time, tenure-track, non-tenure-track, one-year sabbatical
replacement) and ranks (Instructor, Assistant/Associate/Full Professor, etc.), how to prepare a
CV and draft an effective cover letter, how to interpret the language of posted job descriptions,
how to prepare for interviews, and other practical topics.

Students who have participated in these voluntary seminars have reported increased effectiveness
in obtaining interviews and employment offers.

Website
I have also created a website page which details possible career paths for students obtaining
degrees in Music Composition. http://composition.cua.edu/Careers//index.cfm

II. Goals for Student Learning
Students graduating with a Doctor of Musical Arts in Composition will:

18.    Gain advanced training in compositional technique and practice through intensive private
       study;
19.    Develop advanced skills in orchestration and counterpoint;
20.    Produce several work of major proportions for large ensembles such as orchestra, wind
       ensemble, or chorus and orchestra as the thesis;
21.    Gain training in research methodology critical to a career in academia and useful to all
       professional music career paths;
22.    Gain crucial analytical skills in pre- and post-1900 literature;
23.    Obtain practical training in professional development, grant writing, competitions, and
       career guidance, through the Composition Seminar;
24.    Have experience in preparing and performing a complete lecture-recital program:
       composing the music, editing and preparing scores and parts, drafting and delivering the
       lecture, obtaining performers, organizing and attending rehearsals, and overseeing the
       logistical aspects of the event

III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures
Direct Measures

1. Graduate seminars and courses
        Graduate students are required to take a minimum of 18 credit hours of music theory and
history courses, most of which include a seminar paper or final examination and paper. Some
examples of capstone course projects include:

MUS 573 (Introduction to Music Notation Software)
Final project generated through use of notation software, as the culmination of a project-based
course

MUS 581 (Advanced Orchestration)
Final orchestration project for full orchestra, with score and parts (for reading by CUA
Symphony Orchestra)


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MUS 629 (Composition Seminar)
Seminar presentation each semester on a topic of general importance (e.g., an analysis of a
significant contemporary work), or an organized, analytical presentation on the student’s own
work

MUS 633 (Introduction to the Analysis of Twentieth-Century Music)
Final analytical examination which requires students to apply analytical techniques to a variety
of post-1900 musical examples.

MUS 720 (Seminar in Music History and/or Theory Topics)
A rotating seminar, offered each semester, to provide specialized training in selected topics,
either from a theoretical/analytical perspective, or a historical/critical perspective. Past topics
have included ―Music of Stravinsky‖ and ―The Operas of Alban Berg,‖ each of which included a
seminar presentation, final analytical seminar paper, and final examination.

Comprehensive Examinations
        At present, the DMA Composition program does not administer comprehensive
examinations. The composition faculty is developing a proposal (to be presented for approval in
spring 2009) for an oral and written comprehensive examination, effective for students entering
fall 2010.

The oral component of the examination would consist of student discourse upon a work drawn
from a pre-determined repertoire list of approximately 10-12 works (5-6 from before 1900, 5-6
from 1900 or later), and be able to answer questions about the structure, organization, and
content of the selected pieces. Keyboard proficiency will also be demonstrated during the oral
exam, as will demonstration of familiarity with important composers, trends and schools of
composition, and the contemporary musical repertoire.

Additionally, the candidate will be responsible for the body of secondary literature and
scholarship related to each piece on the repertoire list, and be able to converse knowledgeably
about the diverse opinions, analyses, and reception which the work generates.

The full-time members of the composition faculty (always at least three) will constitute the
student’s oral comprehensive panel.

The written portion of the examination will consist of three three-hour examinations: a.) music
theory and analysis, written and practical; b.) music history; c.) composition and orchestration.
The complete range of knowledge of music theory, history, and literature, is open for
examination, with some emphasis placed upon topics post-1900. The examination will be
evaluated by members of the Theory-Composition faculty. Members of the Music History
faculty may be consulted on questions pertaining to the history examination; however, the
principal responsibility for evaluation lies with composition faculty members.

This would represent a departure from the procedure followed by many DMA programs in the
School of Music, in which comprehensive examination questions are drawn from coursework



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taken by the student. As the culminating examinations of the coursework portion of the degree,
the composition faculty believes that comprehensive knowledge, of vital importance to
composers, is required for successful completion of comprehensive examinations.

Indirect Measures
1. Student evaluations
        Course evaluations are useful in assessing the quality and utility of courses (although not
required of graduate courses, the chair of the division typically requests evaluations for 500-level
and higher courses).

2. Master classes with visiting composers
        One important measure of evaluating student work and situating it within a larger context
is through master classes with distinguished visiting composers. The School of Music has
hosted, since 2005, such noted composers as John Corigliano, Joseph Schwantner, Christopher
Rouse, Martin Bresnick, Libby Larsen, William Bolcom, CUA alumnus Mark Adamo, Roberto
Sierra, and others. Four of the composers listed above are Pulitzer Prize winners. In the public
forum of the master class, students present their work to these established professionals, who
comment upon their work and suggest a variety of approaches and strategies. In fall 2008, three
CUA graduate students participated in a very successful master class with composer (and
Pulitzer Prize winner) John Adams, sponsored by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra at
Strathmore Performing arts Center in Rockville, MD.

3. External program reviews
         The National Association of Schools of Music (NASM) conducts an assessment of the
School of Music every 10 years; 2008-09 was the year for review in the School of Music.
Evaluators examine the curricula and offerings of the program, initially through self-study
documents generated by the School of Music and each constituent program, and finally through a
3-day campus visit in which as many aspects of the School are evaluated as possible: instruction,
facilities, and ensembles. The findings and recommendations by the NASM team have been
incorporated and absorbed by the composition division.
         .
IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning
Performance-based observation
An important aspect of curricular and program assessment is made through student evaluation
and faculty observation.

Because creative achievement is problematic to assess with purely objective standards,
composition faculty employ rather an experiential review process to assess student progress.

The quality of student compositions as evidenced by performances on recitals reveals certain
aspects of a student’s progress: a.) quality of compositional material; b.) ability to assemble
musicians who have adequate rehearsal time; c.) work by the composer to ensure that the
performance of his/her work is both accurate and of high technical and musical quality (through
coachings with performers and attendance at rehearsals).




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Based on attendance at a series of recitals, the latter element – the coaching of student
compositions – emerged as a considerable problem. It was clear that student composers were not
engaging with the rehearsal process to ensure that their pieces were receiving effective
performances. This issue has been partially addressed by our collaboration with the Great Noise
Ensemble, a DC-based new music ensemble which is an ensemble in residence at the School of
Music, which pairs member artists with student composers and performers to coach the pieces in
preparation for the division recital.

The Composition Seminar holds at least career-development session per semester to assist
composition students in preparing for careers both within and beyond their time in the program.
Session topics have included grant writing, seeking and applying to competitions and
residencies, finding and securing performers, score and parts preparation, rehearsal and reading
etiquette, and other topics. The GAPS seminar (see above) has also proven beneficial in
preparing students for post-graduate employment and careers in academia.

In response to a perceived lack of familiarity with important composers and repertoire, and
insufficient attendance at performances, the Composition Seminar, beginning in spring 2008,
adopted new components: formal seminar presentations on important composers and pieces (to
develop repertoire) and concert attendance requirements (with one-page reports), to encourage a
regular habit of concert attendance and support of colleagues.

Course evaluations are useful in tracking the effectiveness of specific courses, and revising their
content for a repeat offering based on commentary and rankings given.

Exit interviews will be conducted for the first time at the conclusion of the spring 2009 semester.
The chair of the division will conduct private interviews with graduating students, seeking to
learn of the overall effectiveness of the program, suggestions for items to add or delete, and other
items of relevance. A written evaluation form will be accompanied by an oral interview.




                                                105
                      Doctor of Musical Arts in Piano Pedagogy
                    Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes


                                    I. Program Description

This degree program combines advanced training in pedagogy, piano literature, piano
performance, music history and theory with the laboratory experience of teaching piano. The
candidate’s knowledge of the literature, techniques, and theory of piano music is broadened and
applied to the practical problems of both class and private teaching at all levels. For each
candidate, the curriculum is individualized to meet his/her particular needs, based on diagnostic
examinations taken at the beginning of the degree.

      For acceptance to the D.M.A. program, the candidate must normally have a M.M. degree
       in piano pedagogy, as well as significant teaching experience before beginning the
       D.M.A. The assigned curriculum of 54-72 credit hours beyond the M.M. is based upon
       the candidate’s performance on diagnostic entrance examinations that are given in four
       key areas—piano pedagogy, piano literature, music history and music theory. This
       affords the faculty committee an opportunity to accurately assess the areas in which the
       D.M.A. candidate may be deficient and assign curriculum accordingly. This is a unique
       feature of the D.M.A. program and allows each candidate to have an individualized
       curriculum.
      Through continued observation of experienced teachers, D.M.A. students gain even
       deeper insight into methods and approaches in teaching advanced repertoire.
      Coursework at the D.M.A. level is similar in content to the M.M. level coursework, but is
       much more in depth in terms of analysis of the technical and musical issues involved in
       teaching repertoire at all levels and musical style periods. Through significant prior
       teaching experience, D.M.A. students are better equipped to analyze the problems they
       encounter with their students.
      D.M.A. candidates will reach even higher levels of performance through daily practice of
       4-6 hours and presentation of the required doctoral recitals. The candidate has the choice
       of Recital Option 1, consisting of 3 D.M.A. recitals—lecture-recital, solo recital, and
       chamber music recital, or Recital Option 2, consisting of 4 D.M.A. recitals—lecture-
       recital, 2 chamber music recitals, and 1 accompanying recital.
      Upon completion of the D.M.A. degree, the candidate goes on to a career in teaching,
       normally at the university level or as an independent music teacher.
      A unique feature of the D.M.A. program is the emphasis on high performance standards;
       this separates our program from many other D.M.A. programs.

                                II. Goals for Student Learning
Students who graduate with a Doctor of Musical Arts in Piano Pedagogy will:
    Demonstrate extensive knowledge of, and ability to teach piano repertoire at all levels;
    Exhibit extensive knowledge of the teaching literature from all musical style periods.
       Additionally, they exhibit a thorough understanding of standard method books that are
       commonly used by piano teachers for beginning and intermediate piano students, as well


                                               106
       as significant competency in understanding the full variety of student learning styles.
       This understanding is what enables them to choose the appropriate method books for
       their students;
      Display an extremely high level of performance ability on the piano, as evidenced in the
       required degree recitals, which greatly enhances their ability to be a fine teacher; and
      Demonstrate the depth and breadth of knowledge and skill with instructional resources to
       confidently choose appropriate teaching materials and repertoire for students of all ages
       and levels.
      Demonstrate great ability to teach students at all levels. This is achieved through
       continued participation in Internship experiences, well beyond what is required for the
       M.M. degree.


                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

1. Admissions: The D.M.A. candidate will normally have a M.M. degree in piano pedagogy,
   will demonstrate high performance ability—assessed by the faculty committee at the
   entrance recital, and have several years of teaching experience after completion of the M.M
   degree.
2. Entrance examinations: The D.M.A. candidate takes four written entrance examinations in
   the areas of 1) piano pedagogy, 2) piano literature, 3) music history and 4) music theory.
   These exams are diagnostic in nature, allowing the committee an additional measure by
   which to assess the candidate’s readiness for doctoral study, and they assist the faculty in
   devising a curriculum appropriate to the strengths and weaknesses of the candidate.
3. Weekly private piano lessons: D.M.A. candidates have weekly private instruction in piano
   throughout the course of the degree; significant portions of the repertoire studied in these
   weekly lessons is presented on the various required degree recitals. Emphasis is on further
   development of technical and musical ability as well as the candidate’s ability to assess his
   own strengths and weaknesses in this regard.
4. Advising: The advisor functions as a mentor for the candidate and is responsible for
   monitoring the candidate’s progress throughout the course of the degree. This is done by a)
   assessing and discussing the candidate’s performance in the required coursework, b)
   assessing the progress on the research project, and c) evaluating the performance capabilities
   as demonstrated in the required degree recitals.
5. Course work: The D.M.A. candidate is required to give lectures in all courses, as well as
   public teaching demonstrations on assigned repertoire. The instructor assesses the
   candidate’s ability to prepare and present lectures and presentations on the assigned material.
6. GPA: There is no minimum GPA requirement, but candidate’s who receive a grade of C or
   lower in any course must repeat the course.
7. Weekly repertoire classes: These weekly repertoire classes are mandatory for pedagogy
   majors and are an essential component of their degree. It affords them important
   performance opportunities in front of their peers and allows them to receive feedback from a
   critical audience.
8. Internships: The D.M.A. candidate participates in internship courses offered within the
   university as well as teaching in local music schools. This practical training experience
   outside of the university community affords them the opportunity of being evaluated by other


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    professionals in the field.
9. Degree Recitals: Since good teachers must also be good pianists, the faculty committee
    measures the pianistic development of candidates, most significantly, through three or four
    degree recitals—depending upon option chosen as stated above—in which candidates must
    demonstrate professional levels of artistry at the piano. Each recital consists of a minimum
    of 70 minutes of music, approved by the candidate’s instructor and is then performed for a
    faculty committee of 3 members who evaluate the candidate’s technical proficiency, ability
    to express and emotional content of the music and the ability to communicate with an
    audience. Areas such are rhythmic stability, note accuracy, tempo stability are assessed at
    thee levels—exceeds expectations, meets expectations, or below expectations.
10. Lecture recital: Regardless of option chosen, all candidates present a lecture-recital on an
    approved topic of significant relevance to piano pedagogy. The topic is approved by a faculty
    committee and the candidate’s instructor assists the candidate in preparing the lecture. The
    lecture recital is evaluated by a faculty committee of three members on areas listed under
    Degree recitals above.
11. Research paper: Candidates write a research paper of 50-70 pages in length on an approved
    topic of significant relevance to piano pedagogy; the topic must be approved by a faculty
    committee of three members before work can begin. The candidate is required to take 6
    credits of Directed Research in which the adviser guides the candidate. The research paper is
    a separate entity from the lecture recital, although the work in the lecture recital is often the
    genesis of the topic for the research project. Once the paper is completed, it is submitted to
    the same faculty committee for comments and recommendations; these recommendations are
    then addressed and the paper is re-submitted to the committee for final approval.
12. Comprehensive Exams: At the conclusion of all degree requirements, the candidate must
    take comprehensive exams. These exams are three-part: 1)written examinations in piano
    pedagogy and piano literature, and 2) teaching demonstrations in front of the faculty
    committee on assigned repertoire, and 3) an oral examination on any questions the committee
    wishes to ask related to the candidate’s study. These comprehensive exams are different
    from comprehensive exams in the Ph.D. degree, for example, in that they cover material the
    faculty committee feels a D.M.A candidate in piano pedagogy should know, regardless of
    whether this material was specifically covered in the D.M.A. coursework or not. It is an
    extremely useful tool for the committee to assess the candidate’s ability to succeed in the
    field, as well as affording the candidate an opportunity to organize and systematize all
    information that has been learned and studied up to this point.

                          IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

The evaluation of the candidate’s performance in areas such as performance, course work and
the pedagogy paper have influence on what material is emphasized in the course work. While it
does not change the content of material covered, it does afford the faculty a method of assessing
what material needs to be emphasized in order to more effectively prepare the student for a
career as a piano teacher. Additionally, the candidate’s performance during the comprehensive
exam process is a tool by which the faculty can assess the efficacy of the material covered
throughout the course of the degree and make changes where needed. As an example, recently, a
course on the business of running an independent music studio was added to the curriculum, as
the faculty became aware that candidate’s were inadequately prepared to run an independent



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music studio, as evidenced by the quality of answers given during the comprehensive exam.
Furthermore, as university positions become harder to obtain, more and more of our graduates
are developing successful careers as independent music teachers.




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                         Doctor of Musical Arts in Sacred Music
                     Goals and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes

                                     I. Program Description

The Doctor of Musical Arts in Sacred Music an interdisciplinary course of study combining
scholarship, performance and ministry. The program offers concentrations in choral music, organ
performance and composition. Students undertake musical studies in the School of Music and
liturgical studies in CUA’s School of Theology and Religious Studies. The degree program,
established in 2001, is the successor to the former degree program(s) in liturgical music

To earn the degree, students must successfully complete 60 to 72 semester hours of graduate
work, a foreign language requirement, a comprehensive examination. Terminal projects consist
of a series of three hour-long public recitals or in the composition concentration, a lecture-recital
consisting of 40 minutes of representative works composed during CUA studies.

Unlike the M.M.S.M. degree for which there are no elective courses, the doctoral program is
characterized by a latitude through which the student in consultation with the director of program
and the two principal professors (or directors of departments) constructs a cogent curricula in the
three fields of sacred music, liturgical studies and musicology. For the D.M.A., students must
complete 12 semester hours of liturgical studies; 12 hours of sacred and choral music; 12 to 15
hours in applied skills, including six to 12 hours of private music instruction and six to 12 hours
of advanced conducting (with or without credit, conducting classes are a requisite for all students
during each semester of residence); 12 hours of Music History and Music Theory; 12 hours of
Music Literature; two hours of Music Performance (MUS 607, CUA Chamber Choir;
participation in chamber choir is also a requisite every semester in residence, only two of which
are for credit) and two hours of Vocal Pedagogy. Also required every semester is participation in
the non-credit Practicum/Colloquium in Sacred Music. The program awards six credits for the
Treatise (MUS 993/994) and three credits for three one-hour public recitals in the candidate’s
performance area (MUS 914), one of which must include instrumental ensemble. In applied
instruction, an open studio policy provides students opportunities to interface with multiple
instructors.

Eligible applicants hold a Master of Music degree in sacred music (or its equivalent with course
work in the areas of sacred music, choral music, musicology and history of sacred music) from
an accredited institution and have extensive experience in the field of sacred music, preferably in
a position of leadership. Prior to submission of formal application to the university, prospective
students communicate via e-mail and telephone with the director of program for mutual
exploration of the compatibility of applicant and program. The program also invites them to
contact current graduate students. With their applications, performance applicants (choral music,
organ) submit a 30-minute with recordings, if possible. Applicants must also meet significant
academic pre-requisites, as follows: In Liturgical Studies: TRS 540 Introduction to Liturgy; TRS
741A Liturgy: Theological and Historical Perspectives and TRS 744 Eucharist: A Liturgical
Theology. [This prerequisite may be satisfied by examination of a summer online course.] In
Sacred and Choral Music: MUS 584 Liturgical Music; MUS 637 Choral Development and MUS
tape (video preferred, audio acceptable). Applicants in composition submit representative


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manuscripts 746 Seminar in Sacred Music. In Music History and Music Theory: MUS 556
History of Sacred Music; MUS 731 Research Methodology and MUS 712 Analytical Techniques
II. In Music Literature, by concentration students should have had at least three hours from
among either MUS 516/517/517A Survey of Organ Literature I, II or III; or MUS
640/640A/640B Choral Literature I, II or III, or MUS 642 Forms and Techniques in Sacred
Music.

School of Music entrance examinations are administered to incoming graduate students in all
disciplines in the areas of music history and music theory.

Specific requirements of CUA’s MMSM as opposed to, for example, an MM in organ
performance or choral music must be met either though diagnostic examination or the
coursework itself.

Invitations to campus for pre-admission audition, interview, and testing are based on the
evaluation of application materials. All concentrations require visits for testing and
demonstration of conducting skills, typically in the January or February preceding anticipated
Fall enrollment. Applicants in organ also perform for the respective faculties at the time of their
visits. Testing consists of demonstration of keyboard proficiency, open score reading, and sight-
singing. Results might indicate a need for remedial study in these areas. The conducting
audition, which determines placement in the conducting sequence, is comprised of a performance
of two specified works with CUA Chamber Choir. The applicants are given these works in
advance. The Director of Program (Leo Nestor) determines in which areas, if any, the applicant
will require remediation; these are listed in the admit letter.

Students who matriculate take entrance placement examinations (two hours each) in music
theory/ear training and in music history to determine that requisite knowledgee, skills and
dispositions have been achieved. Divisional chairs use these exams to determine whether
remedial coursework in the respective field is indicated.

The metropolitan Washington area is a center for sacred music and home to the national
churches for several major denominations, as well as symphonic choruses and professional vocal
chamber ensembles. Music directors from these organizations frequently expand and refresh the
Sacred Music program, as they address students, work with them in practica, and occasionally
serve on recital juries. Every year, the program invites alumni/ae to return to campus for
continuing practica and colloquia. Their presence represents continuing education for them, and
it enriches current graduate students with the experiences of their predecessors in the program.

The D.M.A. program expects every student to be applying what s/he is learning in applied and
academic course work by maintaining a professional position in musical ministry (music
director, organist, conductor) during his/her years of study. Students are assisted by the director,
but the responsibility for securing employment is the that of the student. Our students have
served as directors of Campus Music Ministry, assistants, conductors and accompanists at the
university and they have availed themselves of the following opportunities:

   Serving as Graduate Student Union president and senators;



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   Contributing to professional journals;
   Participating in and delivering presentations at national and regional professional
    gatherings/conventions;
   Performing in recital at national and regional conventions and
   Designing and/or performing musical liturgies for associations in the tri-state area, including
    the April 2008 Mass celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI.

Recipients of the D.M.A. are prepared to assume positions of leadership in the ecclesial
community as music directors, organists and conductors, and as directors of music and liturgy at
the cathedral and diocesan level. They are also prepared for university teaching.

                                 II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with the Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Sacred Music will:

1. Demonstrate the highest level of artistry and possess a comprehensive technique and
   informed style in the area of primary of concentration.
                    a. Choral Music and Conducting: See Appendix A
                    b. Organ Performance: See Appendix B
                    c. Composition: See Appendix C

2. Exhibit advanced competencies in matters of vocal health and voice building, choral
   development skills and a professional level of conducting skills, clearly translatable to
   instrumental and vocal ensembles;
3. Display a comprehensive knowledge of the repertoire in the area of concentration, as well as
   in the attendant areas of service/ritual music.
4. Demonstrate research and bibliographic skills at a level sufficient to (a) produce a
   dissertation (the term treatise is employed for doctoral degrees in sacred music and
   composition); (b) investigate choral, choral/instrumental literature for performance and the
   three-term sequence of courses in choral literature.
5. Demonstrate reading proficiency in one approved foreign language (French, German,
   Spanish, Italian, Latin or a language required for dissertation research, approved by the
   director of program) by the conclusion of the second year of doctoral study;
6. Have a well-developed sense of ecclesiology (sensus ecclesiæ) consonant with contemporary
   practice of the Roman Catholic Church and the advanced knowledge and skills to
   successfully implement such in the musico-liturgical forum.
7. Exhibit the dispositions in interpersonal and managerial which enable in the art, craft and
   ministry of sacred music.
8. Demonstrate the advanced knowledge and skills to produce distinctive research and
   contribute to the future life of the academy.
9. Demonstrate proficiency in pedagogy through coursework in conducting, accompanying,
   undergraduate.


                          III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures




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[Note: Please carefully review the following from the perspective of composition students. It
seemed as if their situation occasionally got lost in the shuffle. I’ve tried to insert or ask about
it but might have missed instances when measures might be different for these students.]

1. Admission: Eligible applicants have the Master of Music degree in sacred music ,
   composition or organ performance (or its equivalent with course work in the areas of sacred
   music, choral music, musicology and history of sacred music) from an accredited institution
   and at least four years experience in the field of sacred music, preferably in a position of
   leadership. With their applications, they submit (a) a repertoire or composition list and (b) an
   experience record, which chronicles in detail all previous experience in sacred music and
   representative liturgical programs. Performance applicants (choral music, organ) submit a 30-
   minute tape (video preferred, audio acceptable). Applicants in composition submit
   representative manuscripts with recordings, if possible.
2. Pre-requisites and Graduate Placement Examinations: Applicants must also meet significant
   academic pre-requisites either through examination or transferred/accepted credits, as
   follows: In Liturgical Studies: TRS 540, Introduction to Liturgy; TRS 741A, Liturgy:
   Theological and Historical Perspectives and TRS 744, Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology. In
   Sacred and Choral Music: MUS 584, Liturgical Music; MUS 637, Choral Development and
   MUS 746, Seminar in Sacred Music. In Music History and Music Theory: MUS 556, History
   of Sacred Music, MUS 731, Research Methodology and MUS 712, Analytical Techniques II.
   In Music Literature, based on concentration, students should have had at least three hours
   from among MUS 516/517/517A, Survey of Organ Literature I, II or III; MUS
   640/640A/640B, Choral Literature I, II or III or MUS 642, Forms and Techniques in Sacred
   Music.
3. Course work/GPA: All students must maintain a B average to graduate. Throughout their
   course of studies, the faculty carefully monitors applied instruction in the principal area
   (conducting, organ, composition) and academic work, examinations and research papers.
   Student difficulties in any of the fields are discussed by the professors of these other
   divisions with the director of program.
4. Student advising: Each semester, the advisement process has proven itself an excellent
   vehicle for substantive one-on-one exchange with graduate students. It provides the
   opportunity for the student to opine on course work, applied instruction, specific concerns,
   external work-related matters and career expectations.
5. Practicum/studio: The most valuable assessment tool in the areas of organ performance,
   service playing, improvisation, selection of repertoire, conducting occur in the biweekly
   Practicum/Colloquium in Sacred Music which alternates with Organ Performance Studio.
   This 1.5 hour class, required each semester in residence, provides the entire graduate
   population the opportunity to perform in the foundational areas of the program of study.
   Three members of the faculty are usually present. The areas of choral music/conducting and
   compostion are regularly evaluated in applied lessons and coursework. Organ performance
   majors are evaluated in juries as well as lessons.
6. Recitals: Students may begin their three doctoral recitals in applied performance, or two in
   composition, during the second semester of the second year of study. Students must be
   enrolled for private instruction and recital during the semester in which they give any recital.
   Recitals must be video and audio recorded. A faculty committee of three members attends
   and adjudicates each recital. Although the decision to pass, pass with conditions, or fail is the



                                                113
    decision of the committee, the student meets privately with each of the committee members
    within two weeks following a recital to receive the specific evaluation of that juror. Refer to
    evaluation rubrics presented in appendices for specific criteria.
7. Hearings: The applied professor attends a minimum one rehearsal before a hearing, which
    must take place two weeks before the date of the recital. Students must pass a hearing to be
    able to mount a recital. Refer to evaluation rubrics presented in appendices for specific
    criteria.
     Performance concentrators: For the first two recitals, students select the repertoire in
         consultation and with the approval of the principal applied professor. The repertoire for
         the third recital is assigned. One of the three recitals in choral music and organ
         performance must include instrumental ensemble.
     Composers: For composers, the principal professor approves the scope and nature of
         recitals. One of the two recitals must include instrumental ensemble.
8. Chamber Choir: During each semester in residence, all D.M.A. students perform with
    Chamber Choir. Since this choir takes a leadership role in planning and celebrating university
    liturgies (e.g., the university masses that begin each term, annual vespers for the School of
    Theology and Religious Studies, Baccalaureate Mass, funerals of faculty, memorial services
    and special celebrations in the life of the university), it offers students opportunities to learn
    first hand the musico-liturgical models, which the School of Music/Institute of Sacred Music
    puts forth as exemplars. Students perform at these liturgies as cantors, organists (service
    playing, organ and choral literature, improvisation), and conductors under the supervision of
    the faculty. Both the School of Music and greater university faculties attend these liturgies,
    providing the graduate students with further specific feedback on their work.
9. D.M.A. comprehensive examinations: At the conclusion of course work, each student
    requests comprehensive examinations. The director of program evaluates the student’s
    transcripts and approves the request. Students take three four-hour examinations in (a) sacred
    music; (b) music history and (c) liturgical studies. The adviser encourages students to meet
    with each of the three directors of programs to better understand the nature of these
    comprehensive examinations in advance. Although they are based primarily on course work,
    students must demonstrate significant breadth in each of the fields is the expectation;
    therefore, exams may ask questions not necessarily derived from course work. The
    examinations are read and graded by the directors of sacred music and musicology; STRS
    examinations are read and graded by the professor assigned by the dean of that school.
10. Admission to candidacy: University policy provides that students advance to candidacy on
    the first day of the term following successful completion of comprehensive examinations
11. Treatise proposal: By the beginning of the third year of doctoral study, the student is
    expected to be honing the area of investigation for the treatise in consultation with the major
    professor and director of program. The major professor submits the student’s treatise
    proposals to the Dissertation Committee; this process usually requires clarifications/revisions
    requested by the committee before approval. Refer to evaluation rubrics presented in
    appendices for specific criteria.
12. Treatise: Candidates have two years to complete the treatise after the proposal has been
    accepted. The scope of the document is 80-100 pages and follows dissertation format. For the
    composer, the parameters and scope of the treatise composition are approved by the major
    professor. Refer to evaluation rubrics presented in appendices for specific criteria. The




                                                 114
    committee consists of the major professor and two readers. There is an oral defense with the
    committee which is open to the public.
13. The university policy is that course/professor evaluation for graduate coursework is optional.
14. Exit feedback: The director the program invites graduates to compose exit letters and freely
    express recommendations for improvement to the program and/or specific aspects of the
    program.

                       IV. Use of Results to Improve Student Learning


1. The faculty reconsiders and restructures individual courses at each offering; this is
   particularly the case in seminars (hymnology, liturgical planning, musical formation of the
   musician in the Church, musico-liturgical aesthetics, the three-semester choral literature
   sequence) but also applicable advanced conducting courses. The process includes
   reexamination of course scope and sequence, reconsideration of composer and repertoire
   selections, evaluation of reading lists, and consideration of student learning activities.
   Student feedback is solicited in the final class meetings each semester. As appropriate, the
   faculty incorporates these changes into future syllabi.
2. Student performance in comprehensive examinations is a strong indicator to the faculty
   regarding student learning.
3. Data collected from the recital hearing rubric and the actual performances guide
   considerations in future course content and presentation.




                                               115
                       Doctor of Musical Arts in Orchestral Conducting

                                         I. Program Description

The Doctor of Musical Arts in Orchestral Conducting at The Catholic University of America is
an intensive, select program that provides advanced training at the highest artistic level to
prepare students for work at the highest artistic and scholarly levels as conductors of professional
orchestras or teaching at the university/conservatory level. It is expected that applicants will
already have worked in some professional capacity as a conductor prior to entering the program.
The number of students accepted is kept low to ensure that students will receive ample
opportunities to conduct regularly within the school. Students are expected to be skilled at
conducting operatic and symphonic repertoire as well as symphonic repertoire. To this end, they
are required to work as assistant conductors on at least one opera production and one musical
theatre production during their course of study to learn about the intricacies of conducting staged
productions and the very different challenges it presents in comparison to concert work.
Additionally, students are required to work as assistant/apprentice conductors with outside
ensembles to gain a broader experience with the artistic and administrative responsibilities of a
conductor. Students are required to present four recitals for credit. The exact nature of the first
three recitals (each MUS 917, each 4 semester hours) is flexible and will be determined by the
adviser and the student. The fourth recital must be a lecture-recital (MUS 903, 6 semester hours).
All recitals must be approved in advance by the adviser. The student is required to conduct at
least one substantial work from memory on one of these recitals, as approved by the adviser.
Printed programs and program notes are required for all recitals. The student must pass a
reading proficiency examination in two languages, normally in German and Italian. With the
adviser’s approval, French may be substituted. These elements of practical experience are
combined with intensive academic and theoretical studies to give the student a broad practical
and scholarly experience.

The curriculum for the D.M.A. in Orchestral Conducting requires 36 credits of coursework in
addition to the 18 credits of recitals. Required coursework includes the following:

Private Instruction 12 credits
Graduate Seminar in Conducting 9 credits
Music History and Literature* 6 credits
Music Theory and Analysis 6 credits
Advanced Orchestration 3 credits
Music Electives** 3-6 credits
Final comprehensive oral examination (non-credit):
Successful completion of a final comprehensive oral examination before a faculty committee
constitutes the final requirement.


* Research Methodology is a pre-requisite and, if assigned, does not count toward the degree.
** Music electives may include piano, advanced solfege, composition, and/or voice lessons. An
apprenticeship with an outside professional ensemble may also count as elective credit (up to 3
credits, depending upon the scope of the assignment).


                                                116
                                    II. Goals for Student Learning

Students who graduate with the degree of Doctor of Musical Arts in Orchestral Conducting will:

   5. Demonstrate a mastery of skills in baton and rehearsal technique, concerto and opera
      accompanying and score analysis.

   6. Demonstrate an ability to intelligently discuss a wide range of composers and musical
      styles in oral presentations suitable for both scholarly and lay audiences.

   7. Demonstrate an ability to effectively collaborate with opera and stage directors,
      producers and artistic administrators.

   8. Demonstrate artistic and interpretive insight in a wide range of musical styles through
      public performances with ensembles within and outside CUA.

   9. Demonstrate the highest level of artistic accomplishment in performance.

   10. Demonstrate a high level of scholarly writing about musical history and theoretical
       analysis.


                         III. Student Assessment Outcome Measures

   8. Audition: Applicants must pass a successful conducting audition with the CUA
      Symphony Orchestra and an interview/examination with the conducting professor and
      audition jury. For a successful audition and interview, candidates should demonstrate a
      basic fluency and clarity of baton technique, efficiency in rehearsal, satisfactory
      knowledge of the score and an ability to effectively convey his/her musical ideas through
      gesture or verbal instruction.

   9. Course work: Students' progress is assessed by the class instructors through class
      presentations, quizzes, final examinations and research papers.

   10. Weekly private lessons: Students are assigned repertoire by the teacher to prepare for the
       lesson and for conducting in Graduate Seminar in Conducting. Students also bring in
       video recordings of their rehearsals and performances with outside ensembles for critique
       and analysis. Score study and analysis with the guidance of the major professor is also a
       core component of private instruction at CUA. Students are graded based on attendance,
       preparation and performance.

   11. Academic advising: Students meet with an academic adviser at least once each semester
       to assist the student in course selection and recital planning to ensure that the student is



                                               117
   properly progressing in the degree program.

12. Graduate Seminar in Conducting: Students participate weekly in a 2-hour seminar class,
    which includes their conducting of the Repertory Orchestra. Repertory Orchestra is a
    separate course for undergraduate and graduate instrumentalists which is taught by the
    conducting professor and the co-instructor, a violist from the National Symphony
    Orchestra. Student conductors rehearse the orchestra in major symphonic and concerto
    repertoire under the supervision of the conducting professor and the co-instructor, who
    give the students feedback about their conducting. Additional analysis and critique of
    student performance by the conducting professor and the co-instructor takes place in a
    video review session which follows the 2-hour orchestra session. This time is also used
    to discuss other areas of conducting, such as job applications, auditions and ideas for
    concert programming. The seminar can also include guests artists and speakers.
    Students are graded on attendance, preparation and performance.

13. Field experience: The student works for at least 2 semesters as an apprentice/assistant
    conductor with a local professional or youth orchestra, opera company, or other approved
    ensemble. The host conductor reports regularly to the major professor on the student's
    progress. The host conductor also gives the student regular feedback and completes a
    written evaluation form at the end of the student's assigned semester.

14. Opera and musical theatre conducting: Students are required to work as assistant
    conductors on at least one opera production and at least one musical theatre production
    during their course of study. The student receives regular feedback from the production's
    music director or producer and a written evaluation of the student's work is submitted by
    the producer or music director at the end of the project.

15. D.M.A. Recitals: Students are required to present four recitals for credit. The exact
    nature of the first three recitals (each MUS 917, each 4 semester hours) is flexible and
    will be determined by the adviser and the student. The fourth recital must be a lecture-
    recital (MUS 903, 6 semester hours). All recitals must be approved in advance by the
    adviser. The student is required to conduct at least one substantial work from memory on
    one of these recitals, as approved by the adviser. Printed programs and program notes are
    required for all recitals.

16. Graduate oral comprehensive examination: The student must pass a comprehensive oral
    examination (non-credit) before a faculty jury to complete the requirements for
    graduation.



                      IV: Use of Results to Improve Student Learning

       1. Faculty will collect data on the career paths of graduates and make adjustments to
          the curriculum accordingly.
       2. Regular contact with graduates provides opportunity for feedback and the use of



                                          118
that feedback to adjust the programs when needed. Course evaluations are
distributed at the end of each semester and are reviewed by the Dean of the
School of Music, the Division Chair and the instructors of the courses.




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